History Videogame / SidMeiersAlphaCentauri

21st Jun '17 4:32:13 PM Matt620
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* ExpositionOfImmortality: One of the text interludes that crop up during gameplay at various intervals mentions you and your Planetfall colleagues still being alive after several centuries. It makes mention of you spending time in a rejuvenation tank in order to maintain your longevity and that at least one of your staff still looks to be in the prime of her youth, even after two hundred years.

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* ExpositionOfImmortality: One of the text interludes that crop up during gameplay at various intervals mentions you and your Planetfall colleagues still being alive after several centuries. It makes mention of you spending time in a rejuvenation tank in order to maintain your longevity and that at least one of your staff still looks to be in the prime of her his youth, even after two hundred years.
24th May '17 1:27:15 PM Xtifr
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Added DiffLines:

* EcoTerrorist: The Cult of Planet in ''Alien Crossfire'' is kind of like this, except they are defending an environment that is ''more'' than capable of defending itself, and believe in their cause so strongly they would gladly let humanity go extinct to preserve Planet. (They can convince Planet not to kill ''them'' by doing this, and in fact lend them aid in the form of slightly more docile--to them--wildlife.)
16th Apr '17 9:29:12 AM nombretomado
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* HumanResources: Implied in the quote for Recycling Tanks. Might overlap right into SoylentGreen.

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* HumanResources: Implied in the quote for Recycling Tanks. Might overlap right into SoylentGreen.
25th Mar '17 6:06:39 PM WillKeaton
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Created by the masterminds Brian Reynolds and SidMeier under the auspices of Firaxis, and released in 1999, ''Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri'' (abbreviated as ''SMAC'', the expansion is ''SMAX'') is a turn-based strategy game that, while rather popular, didn't manage to reach the soaring popularity of the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series. However, that doesn't mean the game is worse. Far from that. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sid_Meier%27s_Alpha_Centauri According to the Wikipedia entry about the game]], even though development was rather hindered by Reynolds and Meier's departure from Microprose to found Firaxis, ''Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri'' was awarded by the US edition of PC Gamer a score of 98% (the first and one of only three games to have ever done so), and was also granted a long list of Game of the Year prizes. A trilogy of novels based on the game was even written! Admittedly, this doesn't sound too impressive by modern standards, but in 1998 it was basically unheard of.

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Created by the masterminds Brian Reynolds and SidMeier under the auspices of Firaxis, and released in 1999, ''Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri'' (abbreviated as ''SMAC'', the expansion is ''SMAX'') is a turn-based strategy game that, while rather popular, didn't manage to reach the soaring popularity of the ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series. However, that doesn't mean the game is worse. Far from that. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sid_Meier%27s_Alpha_Centauri According to the Wikipedia entry about the game]], game,]] even though development was rather hindered by Reynolds and Meier's departure from Microprose to found Firaxis, ''Sid Meier's Alpha Centauri'' was awarded by the US edition of PC Gamer a score of 98% (the first and one of only three games to have ever done so), and was also granted a long list of Game of the Year prizes. A trilogy of novels based on the game was even written! Admittedly, this doesn't sound too impressive by modern standards, but in 1998 it was basically unheard of.
16th Mar '17 5:22:32 PM LentilSandEater
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** FridgeLogic applies in that if you capture a sea colony of another species, not only does the population drop, but colony pods flee, which can be captured by your ships with marine detachments. Yes, you can found colonies not only with another faction's citizens, but with another species.
12th Mar '17 2:05:58 PM nombretomado
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** CEO Nwabudike Morgan and his faction are likely a reference to the 20th century financier J. P. Morgan. And looks just like MorganFreeman.

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** CEO Nwabudike Morgan and his faction are likely a reference to the 20th century financier J. P. Morgan. And looks just like MorganFreeman.Creator/MorganFreeman.
4th Mar '17 7:55:52 PM Kuruni
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* BerserkButton: All of the factions have a Berserk Button which increases their hostility and can provoke them to declaring Vendetta—namely, picking a government, economic model, value, or future society that isn't their own agenda (or the no-modifiers starting model):

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* BerserkButton: All of the factions have a Berserk Button which increases their hostility and can provoke them to declaring Vendetta—namely, picking a government, economic model, value, or future society that isn't their own agenda (or the no-modifiers starting model):model). While human leaders might overlook any of these for pragmatic reasons like global politics, [[EnemyMine a faction you both hate more than you hate each other]], good trade relations, one faction's insignificance to the other (either by being far away or by being very small and weak), technology-sharing, and so on. The Progenitor factions will never let it up.



** Both Progenitor factions: Using any economic system except Planned. Justification: "You should follow our economic model."
*** In addition, Progenitor factions hate each other very much, so a peace treaty with one will be a BerserkButton for the other.
*** Even then, leaders might overlook any of these for pragmatic reasons like global politics, [[EnemyMine a faction you both hate more than you hate each other]], good trade relations, one faction's insignificance to the other (either by being far away or by being very small and weak), technology-sharing, and so on. Thus you can have a game where, for instance, the Peacekeepers and the Hive have a long-lasting Treaty of Friendship and never fight even though they share a border, or where the Morganites and Gaians have a Pact. The only real exception is the hard-coded fight between the two Progenitor factions: They will never let it up.

to:

** Both Progenitor factions: Using any economic system except Planned. Justification: "You should follow our economic model."
*** In addition,
" Progenitor factions hate each other very much, so a peace treaty with one will be a BerserkButton for the other.
*** Even then, leaders might overlook any of these for pragmatic reasons like global politics, [[EnemyMine a faction you both hate more than you hate each other]], good trade relations, one faction's insignificance to the other (either by being far away or by being very small and weak), technology-sharing, and so on. Thus you can have a game where, for instance, the Peacekeepers and the Hive have a long-lasting Treaty of Friendship and never fight even though they share a border, or where the Morganites and Gaians have a Pact. The only real exception is the hard-coded fight between the two Progenitor factions: They will never let it up.
other.



*** Beyond the obvious, Miriam is the name of Moses's sister, the first Jewish prophet.
*** Not to mention that the name Miriam is similar to Maryam; Arabic for (the Virgin) Mary. Plus the Saxon King Harold Godwinson was the one who took over from Edward the Confessor; called so of course because of his piety but there's more; Miriam's voice actress is Gretchen Weigel; a German name which is also fitting given that the Saxons were of German descent and Germany was where the Reformation began. I wonder if the creators of the game thought of all this.

to:

*** Beyond the obvious, ** Miriam is also the name of Moses's sister, the first Jewish prophet.
*** Not to mention that the
prophet. The name Miriam is similar to Maryam; Arabic for (the Virgin) Mary. Plus the Saxon King Harold Godwinson was the one who took over from Edward the Confessor; called so of course because of his piety but there's more; Miriam's voice actress is Gretchen Weigel; a German name which is also fitting given that the Saxons were of German descent and Germany was where the Reformation began. I wonder if the creators of the game thought of all this.



** CEO Nwabudike Morgan and his faction are likely a reference to the 20th century financier J. P. Morgan.
*** And looks just like MorganFreeman.

to:

** CEO Nwabudike Morgan and his faction are likely a reference to the 20th century financier J. P. Morgan.
***
Morgan. And looks just like MorganFreeman.



* ShoutOut: Microsoft (in the late '90s) and Morgan Industries. Just compare Microsoft's slogan "''Where do you want'' to go ''today?''" with Morgan's slogan "''Where do you want'' your node ''today?''". Similarly, the "Network Backbone" Secret Project (think "Wonders" from ''Civilization'') includes a quote from Morgan where he insists he doesn't want a monopoly, despite bundling his company's software with every Network Node—their products are "just so good" that no one feels a need to compete.

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* ShoutOut: ShoutOut:
**
Microsoft (in the late '90s) and Morgan Industries. Just compare Microsoft's slogan "''Where do you want'' to go ''today?''" with Morgan's slogan "''Where do you want'' your node ''today?''". Similarly, the "Network Backbone" Secret Project (think "Wonders" from ''Civilization'') includes a quote from Morgan where he insists he doesn't want a monopoly, despite bundling his company's software with every Network Node—their products are "just so good" that no one feels a need to compete.



** Also, many, many literary references to actual works, each of which may also count as a ShoutOut in its own right.
*** The tech name "The Will to Power" is directly derived from the works of Creator/FriedrichNietzsche, and while "Homo Superior" might seem to be a simple reference to Linnean taxonomy, you realize that it's also a good way to express the term ''{{Ubermensch}}'', which comes from...Friedrich Nietzsche. Nietzsche quotes appear for both technologies (all from the Prologue to ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'').
*** The Nautilus Pirates take their name and some of their themes from ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''.
** Also, the names of some bases (like ''Literature/FarnhamsFreehold'' or ''Googleplex'') may ring some bells.

to:

** Also, many, many literary references to actual works, each of which may also count as a ShoutOut in its own right.
***
The tech name "The Will to Power" is directly derived from the works of Creator/FriedrichNietzsche, and while "Homo Superior" might seem to be a simple reference to Linnean taxonomy, you realize that it's also a good way to express the term ''{{Ubermensch}}'', which comes from...Friedrich Nietzsche. Nietzsche quotes appear for both technologies (all from the Prologue to ''Thus Spoke Zarathustra'').
*** ** The Nautilus Pirates take their name and some of their themes from ''Literature/TwentyThousandLeaguesUnderTheSea''.
** Also, the The names of some bases (like ''Literature/FarnhamsFreehold'' or ''Googleplex'') may ring some bells.
4th Mar '17 4:52:36 PM SANC
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Added DiffLines:

**** Not to mention that the name Miriam is similar to Maryam; Arabic for (the Virgin) Mary. Plus the Saxon King Harold Godwinson was the one who took over from Edward the Confessor; called so of course because of his piety but there's more; Miriam's voice actress is Gretchen Weigel; a German name which is also fitting given that the Saxons were of German descent and Germany was where the Reformation began. I wonder if the creators of the game thought of all this.
10th Feb '17 4:25:56 PM Gosicrystal
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* DeadlyEuphemism: War has become something of a taboo among the ''Unity'' factions. So how do they get past the "never again" clause? [[{{Hypocrite}} By declaring]] [[NoExceptYes "vendettas."]]

to:

* DeadlyEuphemism: War has become something of a taboo among the ''Unity'' factions. So how do they get past the "never again" clause? [[{{Hypocrite}} By declaring]] [[NoExceptYes [[DistinctionWithoutADifference "vendettas."]]



* DistantFinale

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%%* DistantFinale
* DistantFinaleDistinctionWithoutADifference : The factions don't wage war, as that was what led to the doom of [[EarthThatWas Old Earth]]. They will, however, pursue ''vendettas'' with each other.



* NoExceptYes: The factions don't wage war, as that was what led to the doom of [[EarthThatWas Old Earth]]. They will, however, pursue ''vendettas'' with each other.
9th Feb '17 2:04:08 PM morenohijazo
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* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: NotPlayingFairWithResources: On transcend difficulty, the AI can mind control your units and bases or hurry production for less than a quarter of what the same would cost you, and several difficulty-related penalties do not affect the AI, such as eco-damage and base number-caused inefficiency. In every difficulty setting, it's a case of TheAllSeeingAI: even your submarine tech probe cruisers can get blown up, out of nowehere, in the middle of the ocean, by a missile.
** Late in the game, as global warming from increased populations and industrial activity provokes Planet, it is supposed to start sending massive waves of mind worms to attack the faction most responsible. Instead of two or three mind worms randomly appearing, massive armies numbering 30-40 in some instances will start suddenly popping up outside of your major bases—and as soon as you defeat the last of this batch (or nearly so), ''another'' batch just as large will suddenly sprout into being (the Planet just generates them—unlike your faction enemies, it has no infrastructure limitations). Dropping some Planet Buster nukes causes massive ecological damage so this is ''guaranteed'' to make Planet start sending waves of native life after you. The kicker? In single-player, Planet will ''always'' single out the human player...even if you ''were not'' the one who detonated nukes, or if you only have a meager infrastructure relative to the super-power factions who are doing the overwhelming majority of the pollution. Planet won't single out the faction that fired nukes like it's supposed to, ''nor'' will it at least attack every faction equally. Basically as soon as planet-wide eco-damage becomes bad enough, ''regardless'' of who caused it, it will single out you the human player as a target. It also gets fairly determined to wipe you off the map: if you're in the late game and have sufficiently advanced tech and military, such as Tachyon Shields around each base and units armed with maxed out tech tree capabilities (Stasis Generator armor, Singularity Engines, Graviton Guns, etc.) you can actually weather an assault by 30 mind worms for one turn. So it just sends ''more'' of these super-swarms of over 30 mind worms. Within the space of ten turns you can sometimes fight off over 300 of these things, ''and they just keep coming''. Even if you weren't even responsible for the eco-damage. Dropping a Planet Buster on one of these super-swarms doesn't really help either: 1, they usually pop up right next to your own base, so you're nuking your own soil, dropping the soil down to sea level; 2, dropping nukes is one of the things that specifically pisses off Planet ''even more'' (though given that it's already mad at you personally for no good reason...); and 3, for all the damage the Planet Buster does to the landscape, the computer shall just auto-generate ''another'' super-swarm of over 30 mind worms on the next turn. While all of this is going on, ''none'' of the other, even more powerful factions are getting targeted.



* StandardSciFiArmy: The basic units already cover the main areas of the trope (Infantry, Oceanic Navies, Aircraft, Armored Combat Vehicles, Support). The mind worms and the Isle of the Deep could be consider examples of Exotic and [to a certain extent] Indigs.



* TelepathicSpacemen: mind worms
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: NotPlayingFairWithResources: On transcend difficulty, the AI can mind control your units and bases or hurry production for less than a quarter of what the same would cost you, and several difficulty-related penalties do not affect the AI, such as eco-damage and base number-caused inefficiency. In every difficulty setting, it's a case of TheAllSeeingAI: even your submarine tech probe cruisers can get blown up, out of nowehere, in the middle of the ocean, by a missile.
** Late in the game, as global warming from increased populations and industrial activity provokes Planet, it is supposed to start sending massive waves of mind worms to attack the faction most responsible. Instead of two or three mind worms randomly appearing, massive armies numbering 30-40 in some instances will start suddenly popping up outside of your major bases—and as soon as you defeat the last of this batch (or nearly so), ''another'' batch just as large will suddenly sprout into being (the Planet just generates them—unlike your faction enemies, it has no infrastructure limitations). Dropping some Planet Buster nukes causes massive ecological damage so this is ''guaranteed'' to make Planet start sending waves of native life after you. The kicker? In single-player, Planet will ''always'' single out the human player...even if you ''were not'' the one who detonated nukes, or if you only have a meager infrastructure relative to the super-power factions who are doing the overwhelming majority of the pollution. Planet won't single out the faction that fired nukes like it's supposed to, ''nor'' will it at least attack every faction equally. Basically as soon as planet-wide eco-damage becomes bad enough, ''regardless'' of who caused it, it will single out you the human player as a target. It also gets fairly determined to wipe you off the map: if you're in the late game and have sufficiently advanced tech and military, such as Tachyon Shields around each base and units armed with maxed out tech tree capabilities (Stasis Generator armor, Singularity Engines, Graviton Guns, etc.) you can actually weather an assault by 30 mind worms for one turn. So it just sends ''more'' of these super-swarms of over 30 mind worms. Within the space of ten turns you can sometimes fight off over 300 of these things, ''and they just keep coming''. Even if you weren't even responsible for the eco-damage. Dropping a Planet Buster on one of these super-swarms doesn't really help either: 1, they usually pop up right next to your own base, so you're nuking your own soil, dropping the soil down to sea level; 2, dropping nukes is one of the things that specifically pisses off Planet ''even more'' (though given that it's already mad at you personally for no good reason...); and 3, for all the damage the Planet Buster does to the landscape, the computer shall just auto-generate ''another'' super-swarm of over 30 mind worms on the next turn. While all of this is going on, ''none'' of the other, even more powerful factions are getting targeted.
* StandardSciFiArmy: The basic units already cover the main areas of the trope (Infantry, Oceanic Navies, Aircraft, Armored Combat Vehicles, Support). The mind worms and the Isle of the Deep could be consider examples of Exotic and [to a certain extent] Indigs.

to:

* {{Technophobia}}: The Lord's Believers faction are Christian Fundamentalists who are suspicious of secular science and fear the progress of technology drawing people away from faith in God. This manifests in-game as a penalty to their research stat.
* TelepathicSpacemen: mind worms
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: NotPlayingFairWithResources: On transcend difficulty, the AI can mind control your units and bases or hurry production for less than a quarter of what the same would cost you, and several difficulty-related penalties do not affect the AI, such as eco-damage and base number-caused inefficiency. In every difficulty setting, it's a case of TheAllSeeingAI: even your submarine tech probe cruisers can get blown up, out of nowehere, in the middle of the ocean, by a missile.
** Late in the game, as global warming from increased populations and industrial activity provokes Planet, it is supposed to start sending massive waves of mind worms to attack the faction most responsible. Instead of two or three mind worms randomly appearing, massive armies numbering 30-40 in some instances will start suddenly popping up outside of your major bases—and as soon as you defeat the last of this batch (or nearly so), ''another'' batch just as large will suddenly sprout into being (the Planet just generates them—unlike your faction enemies, it has no infrastructure limitations). Dropping some Planet Buster nukes causes massive ecological damage so this is ''guaranteed'' to make Planet start sending waves of native life after you. The kicker? In single-player, Planet will ''always'' single out the human player...even if you ''were not'' the one who detonated nukes, or if you only have a meager infrastructure relative to the super-power factions who are doing the overwhelming majority of the pollution. Planet won't single out the faction that fired nukes like it's supposed to, ''nor'' will it at least attack every faction equally. Basically as soon as planet-wide eco-damage becomes bad enough, ''regardless'' of who caused it, it will single out you the human player as a target. It also gets fairly determined to wipe you off the map: if you're in the late game and have sufficiently advanced tech and military, such as Tachyon Shields around each base and units armed with maxed out tech tree capabilities (Stasis Generator armor, Singularity Engines, Graviton Guns, etc.) you can actually weather an assault by 30 mind worms for one turn. So it just sends ''more'' of these super-swarms of over 30 mind worms. Within the space of ten turns you can sometimes fight off over 300 of these things, ''and they just keep coming''. Even if you weren't even responsible for the eco-damage. Dropping a Planet Buster on one of these super-swarms doesn't really help either: 1, they usually pop up right next to your own base, so you're nuking your own soil, dropping the soil down to sea level; 2, dropping nukes is one of the things that specifically pisses off Planet ''even more'' (though given that it's already mad at you personally for no good reason...); and 3, for all the damage the Planet Buster does to the landscape, the computer shall just auto-generate ''another'' super-swarm of over 30 mind worms on the next turn. While all of this is going on, ''none'' of the other, even more powerful factions are getting targeted.
* StandardSciFiArmy: The basic units already cover the main areas of the trope (Infantry, Oceanic Navies, Aircraft, Armored Combat Vehicles, Support). The mind worms and the Isle of the Deep could be consider examples of Exotic and [to a certain extent] Indigs.
Mind worms.
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