History Videogame / MegaManBattleNetwork

16th Feb '17 1:22:30 AM bt8257
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* ChekhovsGun

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* ChekhovsGunChekhovsGun:
24th Jan '17 11:28:46 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Justified in the fourth game, when Yuichirou returns the Navi Customizer to Lan and Mega. Turns out Haruka confiscated it from them to [[GenreSavvy keep them out of trouble]].

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** Justified in the fourth game, when Yuichirou returns the Navi Customizer to Lan and Mega. Turns out Haruka confiscated it from them to [[GenreSavvy keep them out of trouble]].trouble.
24th Jan '17 8:54:05 AM urutapu
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** Overall, the series changes art style in between 3 and 4. The character's eyes are rounded instead of semicircular (most prominent on [=MegaMan=]) and the shapes of their bodies feel more slender and less blocky, though the recurring characters are prone to some wacky, far-fetched expressions on their mugshots. The games themselves shrink down sprite dimension and gain thick outlines to create a crisp feel of objects. The colors also become brighter and more saturated. Character designs for the generic [=NPCs=] went from semi-realistic (especially the foreigners) to cartoony-looking.

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** Overall, the series changes art style in between 3 and 4. The character's eyes are rounded instead of semicircular (most prominent on [=MegaMan=]) and the shapes of their bodies feel more slender and less blocky, though the recurring characters are prone to some wacky, far-fetched expressions on their mugshots. The games themselves shrink down sprite dimension and gain thick outlines to create a crisp feel of objects. The colors also become brighter and more saturated.saturated, which is probably a measure to combat the GBA's infamously dark screen. Character designs for the generic [=NPCs=] went from semi-realistic (especially the foreigners) to cartoony-looking.
23rd Jan '17 8:00:48 PM AgentSalt
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* MercyKill: The altered Programs in the first game's Power Plant dungeon have been irrevocably ruined by the WWW, some driven crazy, all turned into viruses. There's no way to save them from this, and so on one of the sane programs asks Mega to kill them.

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* MercyKill: The altered Programs in the first game's Power Plant dungeon have been irrevocably ruined by the WWW, some driven crazy, all turned into viruses. There's no way to save them from this, and so on one of the sane programs asks Mega to kill them.
8th Jan '17 9:41:09 AM MayIncon
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* DifficultButAwesome: A handful of battle chips have secret input codes that allow the user to draw out special effects. The most famous examples are the
6th Jan '17 5:21:58 PM MayIncon
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* DifficultButAwesome: A handful of battle chips have secret input codes that allow the user to draw out special effects. The most famous examples are the Variable Sword and Neo Variable Sword (mentioned elsewhere on this page), but Battle Network 3 gave secret attacks to the Guts Punch series and the [=MetalMan=] Navi Chip's code allows you to place Metal Man almost anywhere on the field. The timing to input this code is shortly after using the chip, while holding the A button, and can be interrupted by enemy attacks, so it takes [[SomeDexterityRequired some physical skill to input the more complex commands.]]
* DifficultySpike:
** In each installment, any of three things will represent a difficulty spike: Entering the [=UnderNet=] (where [[GoddamnedBats powerful and tricky viruses]] are suddenly abundant and random battles are now deadly), reaching the FinalBoss (who usually packs upwards of twice the HP of previous bosses, more damage with faster attacks, and regenerating shields or temporary damage immunity), or facing a [[RecurringBoss version 3 boss]] for the first time. Outside of those things, the main games are pretty easy if you're actually exploring, collecting powerups, updating your folder, and so forth - suddenly being at high risk of dying from any of those things even when well prepared is a pretty significant difficulty spike. And just when you get to the point where all those things become easy (And you will), there's always the ultimate [[BonusBoss Bonus Bosses]] to stress you to your limits.
** It increases even more [[SequelDifficultySpike as the series goes on]]. The first game is very forgiving up until the final areas, and with a good folder even the more difficult bosses can be blitzed down before they get too wild -- but the second one stops pulling punches very early on, and the third lays into you right out of the starting gate.
* DifficultButAwesome: There are a variety of chips that have [[GuideDangIt secret input commands]] that allow you to get some special functionality out of them... if you can punch them in fast enough. The most famous of these is the ''Variable Sword''.

to:

* DifficultButAwesome: A handful of battle chips have secret input codes that allow the user to draw out special effects. The most famous examples are the
* DifficultButAwesome: There are a variety of chips that have [[GuideDangIt secret input commands]] that allow you to get some special functionality out of them...if you can punch them in fast enough. The most famous of these is
the Variable Sword and Neo Variable Sword (mentioned elsewhere on this page), but Battle Network 3 gave secret attacks to the Guts Punch series and the [=MetalMan=] Navi Chip's code allows you to place Metal Man almost anywhere on the field.Sword. The timing to input this code is shortly after using the chip, while holding the A button, and can be interrupted by enemy attacks, so it takes [[SomeDexterityRequired some physical skill to input the more complex commands.]]
* DifficultySpike:
** In each installment, any of three things will represent a difficulty spike: Entering the [=UnderNet=] (where [[GoddamnedBats powerful and tricky viruses]] are suddenly abundant and random battles are now deadly), reaching the FinalBoss (who usually packs upwards of twice the HP of previous bosses, more damage with faster attacks, and regenerating shields or temporary damage immunity), or facing a [[RecurringBoss version 3 boss]] for the first time. Outside of those things, the main games are pretty easy if you're actually exploring, collecting powerups, updating your folder, and so forth - suddenly being at high risk of dying from any of those things even when well prepared is a pretty significant difficulty spike. And just when you get to the point where all those things become easy (And you will), there's always the ultimate [[BonusBoss Bonus Bosses]] to stress you to your limits.
** It increases even more [[SequelDifficultySpike as the series goes on]]. The first game is very forgiving up until the final areas, and with a good folder even the more difficult bosses can be blitzed down before they get too wild -- but the second one stops pulling punches very early on, and the third lays into you right out of the starting gate.
* DifficultButAwesome: There are a variety of chips that have [[GuideDangIt secret input commands]] that allow you to get some special functionality out of them... if you can punch them in fast enough. The most famous of these is the ''Variable Sword''.
]]



** Each of the Guts Punch chip series has a special attack; the most famous is the [[RocketPunch Rocket Guts Punch]], which activates when you enter the traditional command for the [[VideoGame/StreetFighter Hadouken]] when using the first chip.
** The [=MetalMan=] Navi Chip has one of the simplest commands of all, which allows you to place [=MetalMan=] and his PowerFist anywhere on the field.

to:

** Each of ''Battle Network 3'' gave secret attacks to the Guts Punch chip series has a special attack; the most famous is the [[RocketPunch Rocket Guts Punch]], which (which activates when you enter the traditional command for the [[VideoGame/StreetFighter Hadouken]] when using the first chip.
** The
chip) and the [=MetalMan=] Navi Chip has one of the simplest commands of all, which Chip's code allows you to place [=MetalMan=] and his [=MetalMan=]'s short-ranged PowerFist almost anywhere on the field.field.



* DifficultySpike:
** In each installment, any of three things will represent a difficulty spike: Entering the [=UnderNet=] (where [[GoddamnedBats powerful and tricky viruses]] are suddenly abundant and random battles are now deadly), reaching the FinalBoss (who usually packs upwards of twice the HP of previous bosses, more damage with faster attacks, and regenerating shields or temporary damage immunity), or facing a [[RecurringBoss version 3 boss]] for the first time. Outside of those things, the main games are pretty easy if you're actually exploring, collecting powerups, updating your folder, and so forth - suddenly being at high risk of dying from any of those things even when well prepared is a pretty significant difficulty spike. And just when you get to the point where all those things become easy (And you will), there's always the ultimate [[BonusBoss Bonus Bosses]] to stress you to your limits.
** It increases even more [[SequelDifficultySpike as the series goes on]]. The first game is very forgiving up until the final areas, and with a good folder even the more difficult bosses can be blitzed down before they get too wild -- but the second one stops pulling punches very early on, and the third lays into you right out of the starting gate.



** Battle Network 3 can't decide whether it wants to play this straight or not. Lan and Mega remain functional nobodies despite their accomplishments, though Sunayama introduces Lan as the hero who stopped the WWW during the N1 Grand Prix opening. That said, Sunayama is really the only one who knows or cares. Incidentally, the entire N1 Grand Prix scenario is actually about [[WellDoneSonGuy Chaud]][[note]]Whom Sunayama is specifically targeting, so forget about him caring about Lan[[/note]]. [[HeroOfAnotherStory Lan's really just there to watch]]. Lan gets an award for his heroics in the latter half of the game... but this only allows a villain to set up one of the nastiest scenarios in all of Battle Network via social engineering. After said event, Lan doesn't really care much about fame and glory anymore. This is carried over to future installments.

to:

** Battle ''Battle Network 3 3'' can't decide whether it wants to play this straight or not. Lan and Mega remain functional nobodies despite their accomplishments, though Sunayama introduces Lan as the hero who stopped the WWW during the N1 Grand Prix opening. That said, Sunayama is really the only one who knows or cares. Incidentally, the entire N1 Grand Prix scenario is actually about [[WellDoneSonGuy Chaud]][[note]]Whom Sunayama is specifically targeting, so forget about him caring about Lan[[/note]]. [[HeroOfAnotherStory Lan's really just there to watch]]. Lan gets an award for his heroics in the latter half of the game... but this only allows a villain to set up one of the nastiest scenarios in all of Battle Network via social engineering. After said event, Lan doesn't really care much about fame and glory anymore. This is carried over to future installments.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: .
** Battle Network 1 is not only an ObviousBeta, but it was still trying to figure out how to hash out the world itself. For example, Lan is much snarkier than his later IdiotHero self[[note]]He's not at all thrilled to have Mayl drag him to school so she can chat about the plot and he mocks Dex's boasts about taking on WWW viruses[[/note]], and Dex refers to [=GutsMan=] as a commercial model.
** The main internet area looks very different in Battle Network 1 than it did in later games -- it's a mostly-incomprehensible maze with a few chip salesmen scattered over it and no real pattern to it, whereas later games tended to make it much more orderly. Indeed, because the first game had the same background for all parts of the Internet, it's impossible at a glance to tell the difference between the "regular" Internet and the Undernet.

to:

* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: .
EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
** Battle ''Battle Network 1 1'' is not only an ObviousBeta, but it was still trying to figure out how to hash out the world itself. For example, Lan is much snarkier than his later IdiotHero self[[note]]He's not at all thrilled to have Mayl drag him to school so she can chat about the plot and he mocks Dex's boasts about taking on WWW viruses[[/note]], and Dex refers to [=GutsMan=] as a commercial model.
** The main internet area looks very different in Battle ''Battle Network 1 1'' than it did in later games -- it's a mostly-incomprehensible maze with a few chip salesmen scattered over it and no real pattern to it, whereas later games tended to make it much more orderly. Indeed, because the first game had the same background for all parts of the Internet, it's impossible at a glance to tell the difference between the "regular" Internet and the Undernet.Undernet.
** Elemental Armors in the first game. While it may serve as the precursor to the Style Change mechanic, it functions differently; you can buy them from Net merchants, it halves all damage that isn't the armor's elemental weakness.



** Battle Network 2 has a lot of profanities (mostly from Lan) alongside some events that would not get past the radar in the future games.

to:

** Battle ''Battle Network 2 2'' has a lot of profanities (mostly from Lan) alongside some events that would not get past the radar in the future games.



** When it was first introduced in 2, the Undernet looks more like they are made of black giant speakers with some blue and orange splashes occasionally. Later games give the Undernet a hellish (3, 4 and 6) or graveyard (5) theme for the areas.

to:

** When it was first introduced in 2, in'' 2'', the Undernet looks more like they are made of black giant speakers with some blue and orange splashes occasionally. Later games give the Undernet a hellish (3, 4 (''3'', ''4'' and 6) ''6'') or graveyard (5) (''5'') theme for the areas.



* ElementalRockPaperScissors:
** Fire beats Wood beats Elec beats Aqua beats Fire from day one; ''6'' implements the [[TacticalRockPaperScissors tactical variant]] for the secondary elements (Sword beats Wind beats Cursor beats Breaking beats Sword).
** Also some sort of ReviveKillsZombie: Sword chips pierce the Shadow defense, while Cursor chips go through Invis and post-hit invincibility; Break chips, er, "break" through shielded enemies, and Wind chips remove barriers and auras.

to:

* ElementalRockPaperScissors:
**
ElementalRockPaperScissors: Fire beats Wood beats Elec beats Aqua beats Fire from day one; ''6'' implements the [[TacticalRockPaperScissors tactical variant]] for the secondary elements (Sword beats Wind beats Cursor beats Breaking beats Sword).
** Also some sort of ReviveKillsZombie: Sword chips pierce the Shadow defense, while Cursor chips go through Invis and post-hit invincibility; Break chips, er, "break" through shielded enemies, and Wind chips remove barriers and auras.
Sword).



* ReviveKillsZombie: Sword chips pierce the Shadow defense, while Cursor chips go through Invis and post-hit invincibility; Break chips, er, "break" through shielded enemies, and Wind chips remove barriers and auras.



* SequelSeries: ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' continues Battle Network's story 200 years into the future.



** In the second game, [[http://lpix.org/572354/image564.png there's a Game Cube logo in the scenery for the Scilabs' Mother Comp. where you fight Shadowman.]]

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** In the second game, [[http://lpix.org/572354/image564.png there's a Game Cube logo in the scenery for the Scilabs' Mother Comp. where you fight Shadowman.[=ShadowMan=].]]



** Machine Sword, which only hits paralyzed foes.

to:

** Machine Sword, which Sword deals a lot of damage, but only hits paralyzed foes.foes.
** Slasher deals damage to enemies without the need to aim, but only when they enter your side of the field.



* SmugSnake: [[spoiler: The Mayor in the sixth game]]. He wanted to be the final boss, but was hopelessly out of his league and was outplayed by both sides.

to:

* SmugSnake: [[spoiler: The Mayor [[spoiler:Mayor Cain in the sixth game]]. He wanted to be the final boss, but was hopelessly out of his league and was outplayed by both sides.



** Excluding Nebula in 4 and 5 each of the villain organizations have one female member. Madd in 1, Pride in 2, Anetta in 3, and Yukia in 6.

to:

** Excluding Nebula in 4 ''4'' and 5 ''5'' each of the villain organizations have one female member. Madd in 1, Pride in 2, Anetta in 3, and Yukia in 6.



* SpinOff / SequelSeries: ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' continues Battle Network's story 200 years into the future.



* StupidityIsTheOnlyOption: Late in Battle Network 3. [[spoiler: No matter how suspicious Mr. Match behaves and no matter how strange his requests, the plot will not advance until Lan & Mega help Mr. Match install his programs into Sci-Lab's network. Mega -- who ''knows'' Match played Lan to get him to cooperate -- has really no excuse]].

to:

* StupidityIsTheOnlyOption: Late in Battle ''Battle Network 3.3''. [[spoiler: No matter how suspicious Mr. Match behaves and no matter how strange his requests, the plot will not advance until Lan & Mega help Mr. Match install his programs into Sci-Lab's network. Mega -- who ''knows'' Match played Lan to get him to cooperate -- has really no excuse]].



** Battle Network 4 consists of a string of tournament arcs. Throughout the game Lan competes in three different tournaments, or, rather, blunders his way through a RandomEventsPlot over and over again; the tournament is actually the ExcusePlot tying the mismatched and unrelated chapters together.

to:

** Battle ''Battle Network 4 4'' consists of a string of tournament arcs. Throughout the game Lan competes in three different tournaments, or, rather, blunders his way through a RandomEventsPlot over and over again; the tournament is actually the ExcusePlot tying the mismatched and unrelated chapters together.



** Battles during Liberation Missions are also modified. First, battles are now timed. You have exactly [[RuleOfThree three]] turns to defeat the enemies or the boss - the instant the Custom Guage is filled, the menu appears, one turn down. If enemies are still left, that [=NetNavi=] ends his turn without having achieved anything except a possible loss of his own HP. (Luckily, the area boss will also maintain his lost HP after incomplete battles). This is made all the more difficult by the fact that, depending on how you start your battles, territory changes will factor in. You can literally be stuck in the center two columns with enemies on either side, which is even more difficult with enemies that can warp between the opposite columns of their territory.

to:

** Battles during Liberation Missions are also modified. First, battles are now timed. You have exactly [[RuleOfThree three]] turns to defeat the enemies or the boss - the instant the Custom Guage Gauge is filled, the menu appears, one turn down. If enemies are still left, that [=NetNavi=] ends his turn without having achieved anything except a possible loss of his own HP. (Luckily, the area boss will also maintain his lost HP after incomplete battles). This is made all the more difficult by the fact that, depending on how you start your battles, territory changes will factor in. You can literally be stuck in the center two columns with enemies on either side, which is even more difficult with enemies that can warp between the opposite columns of their territory.
5th Jan '17 6:32:15 PM kkhohoho
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*** Save for the MascotMook [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal Mett]], most viruses from the main series are unique. In the PlatformGame [[GaidenGame Network Transmission]], many of the viruses take the form of the original Mechaniloids (like Sniper and Hammer Joes). Fitting, as the game itself largely an exercise in [[NostalgiaLevel Nostalgia]].

to:

*** Save for the MascotMook [[AddedAlliterativeAppeal Mett]], most viruses from the main series are unique. In the PlatformGame [[GaidenGame Network Transmission]], many of the viruses take the form of the original Mechaniloids (like Sniper and Hammer Joes). Fitting, as the game itself is largely an exercise in [[NostalgiaLevel Nostalgia]].
5th Jan '17 6:30:04 PM kkhohoho
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* CerebusRollercoaster: The first game is rather light-hearted but isn't moreso than any saturday morning cartoon or Shounen Anime. The second game and third games up the ante, despite the silly situations. The fourth game then changes it to a borderline RandomEventsPlot and the later games are much more unrealistic [[JustifiedTrope It's notable that the series was intended to end with three]] and that 4-6 were a PostScriptSeason.

to:

* CerebusRollercoaster: The first game is rather light-hearted but isn't moreso than any saturday morning cartoon or Shounen Anime. The second game and third games up the ante, despite the silly situations. The fourth game then changes it to a borderline RandomEventsPlot and the later games are much more unrealistic unrealistic. [[JustifiedTrope It's notable that the series was intended to end with three]] and that 4-6 were a PostScriptSeason.
4th Jan '17 11:27:08 PM Tenma-Yuuki
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The series lasted for six games before concluding. It spawned a sequel series focusing on radio waves and set 200 years in the future, ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce''.

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The series lasted for six games before concluding.concluding, and is the second series in the Mega Man franchise to reach a proper conclusion. It spawned a sequel series focusing on radio waves and set 200 years in the future, ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce''.
27th Dec '16 2:53:00 AM MayIncon
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Added DiffLines:

** When it was first introduced in 2, the Undernet looks more like they are made of black giant speakers with some blue and orange splashes occasionally. Later games give the Undernet a hellish (3, 4 and 6) or graveyard (5) theme for the areas.
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