History VideoGame / TheSims

19th Mar '17 6:07:37 AM Adept
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* There are also multiple online sites dedicated to making custom mods, from new clothes, to new items, to super-realistic skins and eyes, to a Sims-based construction of [[LordOfTheRings Rivendell.]] The Sims games actually come with pre-constructed 'Mod' folders for you to put these things in.

to:

* There are also multiple online sites dedicated to making custom mods, from new clothes, to new items, to super-realistic skins and eyes, to a Sims-based construction of [[LordOfTheRings [[Film/LordOfTheRings Rivendell.]] The Sims games actually come with pre-constructed 'Mod' folders for you to put these things in.
14th Mar '17 5:51:53 PM LadyJafaria
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Added DiffLines:

* GameplayAndStorySegregation: You might think this doesn't apply to a game that doesn't really ''have'' a story outside of premade neighborhoods, but there are some little things that don't add up, like having everyone in your town be Mayor at once (although that's more Gameplay And Logic Segregation), or events mentioned by chance cards never having long-lasting effects even if they should. One chance card, notably, states that you ''start a war'' with another city, but after your active Sim takes his or her punishment, the war is never brought up again.
1st Mar '17 1:12:33 PM Andygal
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Hammerspace}}: This is apparently where Sims keep such things as mops, scrub brushes, rakes, fishing poles, and other things that appear from nowhere when needed. Later games added an inventory system so sims could also carry tons of things like harvested produce. In the third game they can carry ''cars'' and ''fire trucks'' in their inventories.
1st Mar '17 4:12:31 AM Tightwire
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* AmbiguouslyBrown: Bella Goth.
** Based on the names of her family members she seems to be of MixedAncestry, with Italian, Greek and Spanish names popping up on her family tree. Her husband Mortimer has English, French and German on his side by the same logic, making their two children the products of at least sextuple heritage. The same is true for a lot of characters whose family have been around for a few generations in-game. [[FridgeBrilliance It's no wonder the game engine don't recognise racial or ethnic origins, since canonically almost everybody in SimNation is mixed race.]]
** Any Medium or Dark Sim in [=TS1=] or [=TS2=], would probably qualify as Ambiguously Brown, since Sims don't really have any ethnicity unless you give them a name that implies they have one. (This also makes the lighter-skinned Sims [[{{Mukokuseki}} Ambiguously White]].) However, the range of customization options in ''The Sims 3'' makes it perfectly possible to create a classically African-looking, or northern Chinese-looking, or Japanese-looking, or whatever, Sim if you so wish.

to:

* AmbiguouslyBrown: Bella Goth.
** Based on the names of her family members she seems to be of MixedAncestry, with Italian, Greek
''TheSims1'' and Spanish names popping up on her family tree. Her husband Mortimer has English, French and German on his side by the same logic, making their two children the products of at least sextuple heritage. The same is true for a lot of characters whose family have been around for a few generations in-game. [[FridgeBrilliance It's no wonder the game engine don't recognise racial or ethnic origins, since canonically almost everybody in SimNation is mixed race.]]
** Any Medium or Dark Sim in [=TS1=] or [=TS2=], would probably qualify as Ambiguously Brown, since Sims don't really have any ethnicity unless you give them a name that implies they have one. (This also makes the lighter-skinned Sims [[{{Mukokuseki}} Ambiguously White]].) However, the range of customization
''TheSims2'' had less customisation options in ''The Sims 3'' for the face and body, meaning that a person was differentiated mostly by the colour of their skin, with examples like Bella Goth. ''TheSims3'' and ''TheSims4'' makes it perfectly possible to create edit the face and body more, and a classically African-looking, or northern Chinese-looking, or Japanese-looking, or whatever, Sim if you so wish.can have more accurate racial features than just a bland North American appearance.
22nd Feb '17 4:38:32 AM thewhitefairy
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Added DiffLines:

* DomesticApplianceDisaster: If a sim is not skilled at using certain appliances, then they can end up breaking them, such as the oven catching on fire if the sim doesn't know how to cook.
16th Feb '17 2:02:40 PM Dirtyblue929
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[[quoteright:349:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sims1_3591.png]]
[[caption-width-right:349:[-Forget it, Jake, it's [[Creator/WillWright Wright-Town]]-].]]

to:

[[quoteright:349:http://static.[[quoteright:286:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/sims1_3591.png]]
[[caption-width-right:349:[-Forget
org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_sims_3rd_gen_logo.png]]
[[caption-width-right:286:[-Forget
it, Jake, it's [[Creator/WillWright Wright-Town]]-].]]
11th Feb '17 2:16:40 PM Malady
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* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims1''[[/index]] (2000). The first game introduced the core features of the franchise: simulation of households; a large neighborhood of families you could control and intercontrol; purchasing increasingly-expensive and increasingly-efficient household objects; a comprehensive house-building feature which even trained architects enjoy using. Sim personalities worked on a PointBuild system using five ten-point scales with a total of twenty-five points to distribute between them: Outgoing/Shy, Grouchy/Nice, Playful/Serious, Neat/Sloppy, Active/Lazy, which tied in with star signs based loosely on the astrological signs of the WesternZodiac; an engine that is very receptive to {{Game Mod}}s. Having said that, there was no aging in the game: children remained children forever, nobody died (unless you [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential caused them to]]), and once you had made your Sims fat and rich there wasn't much else to do to or with them.
** [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut''[[/index]] (2003), which serves as a sequel to the console version of the first game. While the first console game was more or less a 3D port of the PC version with a story mode, the sequel had much more depth and personality. The main gimmick of the game is the ability to "Bust Out", which gave your main Sim the ability to visit their neighbors and interact with them. In the "Bust Out" story mode, your main Sim has [[BagOfSpilling lost everything]] due to the villainous Malcolm Landgraab, so they must advance to the top of their chosen career path, as well as fulfilling other goals and helping out a number of other Sims who've also been wronged by Malcolm. Bustin' Out also had a handheld version on the GBA and N-Gage systems, which was more of an adventure game with some visual sim elements, along with certain features from the main games such as fulfilling needs.
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims2''[[/index]] (2004) introduced three interconnected concepts: aging, Wants and Fears, and Aspiration. Sims now age through various stages--infant, toddler, child, teen, adult, elder --and could be created in any stage except the first. (College aged Young Adults were added in the first expansion pack.) They also came with an "Aspiration," an overall goal for their life: [[TrueCompanions Family]], [[ReallyGetsAround Romance]], [[OnlyInItForTheMoney Wealth]], [[PopularityPower Popularity]], [[FreakyIsCool Knowledge]], and (eventually) [[TheHedonist Pleasure]]. Starting with the first expansion pack, this would assign the Sim a ([[RandomNumberGod randomly-generated]]) Lifetime Wish, which keeps them happy for the rest of their lives if they achieved it. In the meanwhile, it also controlled what Wants and Fears would pop up; these were general life events, from "Have FirstKiss" to "Eat TrademarkFavoriteFood". These would contribute not only to a Lifetime Aspiration Score, which could be used to purchase various [[RuleOfFun loosely realistic]] in-game objects (the most basic of which being a literal Money Tree), but also to the Sim's real-time Aspiration meter. This corresponded roughly to self-esteem or general mood, and could override a Sim's physical-needs total if it was high enough. Of course, it also lost XXX points every few hours, and if it hit bottom the Sim would have a HeroicBSOD (PlayedForLaughs). Fulfilling the Sim's lifetime wish would fill their Aspiration bar to the max for the rest of their lives, but (of course) you get a certain amount of time to do this before they croak. Meanwhile, personalities continued to be calculated on the five scales/star sign model, but gradually more features were added through expansion packs, such as the ability to gain or lose personality points under certain circumstances and the introduction of memories, turn-ons, turn-offs, attraction/chemistry, interests and hobbies.
* [[index]]''VideoGame/TheUrbz''[[/index]] (2004) is a console spinoff, and a sequel game to the console game ''The Sims: Bustin' Out''. It takes place in an urban environment named Urbzville. Contrary to the main series, the characters are referred to as "Urbs" but are otherwise exactly like normal Sims. Unlike the main games there is no romance system and you cannot have children. The game follows a plot you must follow, with the protagonist needing to scale up the social hierarchy and befriend characters. A sequel was in development at one time but was cancelled before an official reveal.
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims3''[[/index]] (2009), placed more emphasis on the neighborhood by making it all accessible in realtime and making all families age and evolve along with yours, but this could be turned off. It did away entirely with the Aspiration meter and removed Fears; instead, when you fulfill a Want, it just adds a positive "moodlet" to your physical-needs total, thus streamlining gameplay immensely. Lifetime Aspiration Score is retained, but the prizes you get from it are mostly modifications to the Sim's capabilities instead of physical objects (BottomlessBladder, TheCasanova, etc). The PointBuild Personality was removed in favor of five "Traits" which had direct and practical effects on gameplay: for example, an Athletic Sim learns the Athletic skill faster and gets more enjoyment out of their workouts; a Clumsy Sim trips everywhere, which can add a ''lot'' to transit times; and an Evil Sim can gain enjoyment from messing with other Sims, or use a coffee machine to [[RuleOfFunny make Evil Lattes]]. Relationships were simplified, with Sims sharing a relationship bar so both parties have the same opinion of each other, no longer allowing unrequited feelings. Finally, ''The Sims 3'' added significant flexibility to the Sim and object design and customization options, though at the cost of very reduced support for user-generated, made-from-scratch objects, clothing and hairstyles.
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''[[/index]] (2011) is a standalone [[GameMod Total Conversion]] that put the Sims in a MedievalEuropeanFantasy. The game departs from ''The Sims'' formula to some extent, increasing the strategy and roleplaying aspects and removes the daily hindrances, such as the need to urinate, but still retains much of ''The Sims'' gameplay. The "Sim" the player nurtures throughout the game is the kingdom itself, though the populace can be customized as well. It is also one of the more violent games, featuring Religion, Alcoholism and Murder, themes not present in the older series without mods.
* [[index]]''The Sims: Freeplay''[[/index]] (December 15, 2011) An app game similar to ''VideoGame/TheSims2'' in gameplay but with ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' assets, and the ''VideoGame/FarmVille'' formula. Worth mentioning because they ''actually managed'' to alleviate the microtransactions criticism by finding a happy medium between the Farmville formula and single player gaming (the in game currency, simoleon, is easy to get, and Life Points can be earned from watching ads, hitting certain achievements, or even just completing tasks, instead of through exclusively buying them with real cash, and the wait time between actions is ''actually reasonable'' compared to many other games out in the market). The game is now in it's fourth year running and have seen dozens of updates and new contents- many available for free or via regular simoleons if you completed the given tasks in a limited time before becoming only available via Life Points.
* [[index]]''VideoGame/TheSims4''[[/index]] (September 2, 2014). EA and Maxis have said that this iteration of the ''Sims'' series celebrates "the heart and soul of the Sims themselves" and have the Sims show more personality than in previous installments; this was eventually executed by having all Sims have an overall "mood" which enhances their facility at certain interactions and slows down others. The game will feature new tools to customize worlds and share them with others. Unlike ''VideoGame/SimCity2013'', the game is a single-player offline experience, although you do need an Internet connection to play it anyway- to appease it's CopyProtection (which is based on Origin), and to connect to the "community" (which allows you to upload sims and houses to EA's servers, which would then make it available to other players for download).
* If you want altered forms of play, there's [[index]]Videogame/MySims[[/index]] for the UsefulNotes/NintendoWii and UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, which has the dressings of ''VideoGame/TheSims'' but lacks a lot of the essentials of the game. Instead, it's more like ''Videogame/AnimalCrossing'', but for people who prefer to work with cute chibi humans instead of a bossy tanuki. And there was a Website/{{Facebook}} version, merging the game with a ''Videogame/{{Farmville}}'' experience, but it was eventually closed due to lackluster player reception.

to:

\n* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims1''[[/index]] [[index]]
*''Videogame/TheSims1''[[/index]]
(2000). The first game introduced the core features of the franchise: simulation of households; a large neighborhood of families you could control and intercontrol; purchasing increasingly-expensive and increasingly-efficient household objects; a comprehensive house-building feature which even trained architects enjoy using. Sim personalities worked on a PointBuild system using five ten-point scales with a total of twenty-five points to distribute between them: Outgoing/Shy, Grouchy/Nice, Playful/Serious, Neat/Sloppy, Active/Lazy, which tied in with star signs based loosely on the astrological signs of the WesternZodiac; an engine that is very receptive to {{Game Mod}}s. Having said that, there was no aging in the game: children remained children forever, nobody died (unless you [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential caused them to]]), and once you had made your Sims fat and rich there wasn't much else to do to or with them.
them.[[index]]
** [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut''[[/index]] ''Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut''[[/index]] (2003), which serves as a sequel to the console version of the first game. While the first console game was more or less a 3D port of the PC version with a story mode, the sequel had much more depth and personality. The main gimmick of the game is the ability to "Bust Out", which gave your main Sim the ability to visit their neighbors and interact with them. In the "Bust Out" story mode, your main Sim has [[BagOfSpilling lost everything]] due to the villainous Malcolm Landgraab, so they must advance to the top of their chosen career path, as well as fulfilling other goals and helping out a number of other Sims who've also been wronged by Malcolm. Bustin' Out also had a handheld version on the GBA and N-Gage systems, which was more of an adventure game with some visual sim elements, along with certain features from the main games such as fulfilling needs.
needs.[[index]]
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims2''[[/index]] ''Videogame/TheSims2''[[/index]] (2004) introduced three interconnected concepts: aging, Wants and Fears, and Aspiration. Sims now age through various stages--infant, toddler, child, teen, adult, elder --and could be created in any stage except the first. (College aged Young Adults were added in the first expansion pack.) They also came with an "Aspiration," an overall goal for their life: [[TrueCompanions Family]], [[ReallyGetsAround Romance]], [[OnlyInItForTheMoney Wealth]], [[PopularityPower Popularity]], [[FreakyIsCool Knowledge]], and (eventually) [[TheHedonist Pleasure]]. Starting with the first expansion pack, this would assign the Sim a ([[RandomNumberGod randomly-generated]]) Lifetime Wish, which keeps them happy for the rest of their lives if they achieved it. In the meanwhile, it also controlled what Wants and Fears would pop up; these were general life events, from "Have FirstKiss" to "Eat TrademarkFavoriteFood". These would contribute not only to a Lifetime Aspiration Score, which could be used to purchase various [[RuleOfFun loosely realistic]] in-game objects (the most basic of which being a literal Money Tree), but also to the Sim's real-time Aspiration meter. This corresponded roughly to self-esteem or general mood, and could override a Sim's physical-needs total if it was high enough. Of course, it also lost XXX points every few hours, and if it hit bottom the Sim would have a HeroicBSOD (PlayedForLaughs). Fulfilling the Sim's lifetime wish would fill their Aspiration bar to the max for the rest of their lives, but (of course) you get a certain amount of time to do this before they croak. Meanwhile, personalities continued to be calculated on the five scales/star sign model, but gradually more features were added through expansion packs, such as the ability to gain or lose personality points under certain circumstances and the introduction of memories, turn-ons, turn-offs, attraction/chemistry, interests and hobbies.
hobbies.[[index]]
* [[index]]''VideoGame/TheUrbz''[[/index]] ''VideoGame/TheUrbz''[[/index]] (2004) is a console spinoff, and a sequel game to the console game ''The Sims: Bustin' Out''. It takes place in an urban environment named Urbzville. Contrary to the main series, the characters are referred to as "Urbs" but are otherwise exactly like normal Sims. Unlike the main games there is no romance system and you cannot have children. The game follows a plot you must follow, with the protagonist needing to scale up the social hierarchy and befriend characters. A sequel was in development at one time but was cancelled before an official reveal.
reveal.[[index]]
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims3''[[/index]] ''Videogame/TheSims3''[[/index]] (2009), placed more emphasis on the neighborhood by making it all accessible in realtime and making all families age and evolve along with yours, but this could be turned off. It did away entirely with the Aspiration meter and removed Fears; instead, when you fulfill a Want, it just adds a positive "moodlet" to your physical-needs total, thus streamlining gameplay immensely. Lifetime Aspiration Score is retained, but the prizes you get from it are mostly modifications to the Sim's capabilities instead of physical objects (BottomlessBladder, TheCasanova, etc). The PointBuild Personality was removed in favor of five "Traits" which had direct and practical effects on gameplay: for example, an Athletic Sim learns the Athletic skill faster and gets more enjoyment out of their workouts; a Clumsy Sim trips everywhere, which can add a ''lot'' to transit times; and an Evil Sim can gain enjoyment from messing with other Sims, or use a coffee machine to [[RuleOfFunny make Evil Lattes]]. Relationships were simplified, with Sims sharing a relationship bar so both parties have the same opinion of each other, no longer allowing unrequited feelings. Finally, ''The Sims 3'' added significant flexibility to the Sim and object design and customization options, though at the cost of very reduced support for user-generated, made-from-scratch objects, clothing and hairstyles.
hairstyles.[[index]]
* [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''[[/index]] ''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''[[/index]] (2011) is a standalone [[GameMod Total Conversion]] that put the Sims in a MedievalEuropeanFantasy. The game departs from ''The Sims'' formula to some extent, increasing the strategy and roleplaying aspects and removes the daily hindrances, such as the need to urinate, but still retains much of ''The Sims'' gameplay. The "Sim" the player nurtures throughout the game is the kingdom itself, though the populace can be customized as well. It is also one of the more violent games, featuring Religion, Alcoholism and Murder, themes not present in the older series without mods.
mods.[[index]]
* [[index]]''The ''The Sims: Freeplay''[[/index]] (December 15, 2011) An app game similar to ''VideoGame/TheSims2'' in gameplay but with ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' assets, and the ''VideoGame/FarmVille'' formula. Worth mentioning because they ''actually managed'' to alleviate the microtransactions criticism by finding a happy medium between the Farmville formula and single player gaming (the in game currency, simoleon, is easy to get, and Life Points can be earned from watching ads, hitting certain achievements, or even just completing tasks, instead of through exclusively buying them with real cash, and the wait time between actions is ''actually reasonable'' compared to many other games out in the market). The game is now in it's fourth year running and have seen dozens of updates and new contents- many available for free or via regular simoleons if you completed the given tasks in a limited time before becoming only available via Life Points. \n[[index]]
* [[index]]''VideoGame/TheSims4''[[/index]] ''VideoGame/TheSims4''[[/index]] (September 2, 2014). EA and Maxis have said that this iteration of the ''Sims'' series celebrates "the heart and soul of the Sims themselves" and have the Sims show more personality than in previous installments; this was eventually executed by having all Sims have an overall "mood" which enhances their facility at certain interactions and slows down others. The game will feature new tools to customize worlds and share them with others. Unlike ''VideoGame/SimCity2013'', the game is a single-player offline experience, although you do need an Internet connection to play it anyway- to appease it's CopyProtection (which is based on Origin), and to connect to the "community" (which allows you to upload sims and houses to EA's servers, which would then make it available to other players for download).
download).[[index]]
* If you want altered forms of play, there's [[index]]Videogame/MySims[[/index]] Videogame/MySims[[/index]] for the UsefulNotes/NintendoWii and UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, which has the dressings of ''VideoGame/TheSims'' but lacks a lot of the essentials of the game. Instead, it's more like ''Videogame/AnimalCrossing'', but for people who prefer to work with cute chibi humans instead of a bossy tanuki. And there was a Website/{{Facebook}} version, merging the game with a ''Videogame/{{Farmville}}'' experience, but it was eventually closed due to lackluster player reception.
11th Feb '17 2:13:30 PM Malady
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[[index]]
* ''Videogame/TheSims1''
* ''Videogame/TheSims2''
* ''Videogame/TheSims3''
* ''VideoGame/TheSims4''
* ''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''
[[/index]]

* ''Videogame/TheSims1'' (2000). The first game introduced the core features of the franchise: simulation of households; a large neighborhood of families you could control and intercontrol; purchasing increasingly-expensive and increasingly-efficient household objects; a comprehensive house-building feature which even trained architects enjoy using. Sim personalities worked on a PointBuild system using five ten-point scales with a total of twenty-five points to distribute between them: Outgoing/Shy, Grouchy/Nice, Playful/Serious, Neat/Sloppy, Active/Lazy, which tied in with star signs based loosely on the astrological signs of the WesternZodiac; an engine that is very receptive to {{Game Mod}}s. Having said that, there was no aging in the game: children remained children forever, nobody died (unless you [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential caused them to]]), and once you had made your Sims fat and rich there wasn't much else to do to or with them.
** ''[[Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut The Sims Bustin' Out]]'' (2003), which serves as a sequel to the console version of the first game. While the first console game was more or less a 3D port of the PC version with a story mode, the sequel had much more depth and personality. The main gimmick of the game is the ability to "Bust Out", which gave your main Sim the ability to visit their neighbors and interact with them. In the "Bust Out" story mode, your main Sim has [[BagOfSpilling lost everything]] due to the villainous Malcolm Landgraab, so they must advance to the top of their chosen career path, as well as fulfilling other goals and helping out a number of other Sims who've also been wronged by Malcolm. Bustin' Out also had a handheld version on the GBA and N-Gage systems, which was more of an adventure game with some visual sim elements, along with certain features from the main games such as fulfilling needs.
* ''Videogame/TheSims2'' (2004) introduced three interconnected concepts: aging, Wants and Fears, and Aspiration. Sims now age through various stages--infant, toddler, child, teen, adult, elder --and could be created in any stage except the first. (College aged Young Adults were added in the first expansion pack.) They also came with an "Aspiration," an overall goal for their life: [[TrueCompanions Family]], [[ReallyGetsAround Romance]], [[OnlyInItForTheMoney Wealth]], [[PopularityPower Popularity]], [[FreakyIsCool Knowledge]], and (eventually) [[TheHedonist Pleasure]]. Starting with the first expansion pack, this would assign the Sim a ([[RandomNumberGod randomly-generated]]) Lifetime Wish, which keeps them happy for the rest of their lives if they achieved it. In the meanwhile, it also controlled what Wants and Fears would pop up; these were general life events, from "Have FirstKiss" to "Eat TrademarkFavoriteFood". These would contribute not only to a Lifetime Aspiration Score, which could be used to purchase various [[RuleOfFun loosely realistic]] in-game objects (the most basic of which being a literal Money Tree), but also to the Sim's real-time Aspiration meter. This corresponded roughly to self-esteem or general mood, and could override a Sim's physical-needs total if it was high enough. Of course, it also lost XXX points every few hours, and if it hit bottom the Sim would have a HeroicBSOD (PlayedForLaughs). Fulfilling the Sim's lifetime wish would fill their Aspiration bar to the max for the rest of their lives, but (of course) you get a certain amount of time to do this before they croak. Meanwhile, personalities continued to be calculated on the five scales/star sign model, but gradually more features were added through expansion packs, such as the ability to gain or lose personality points under certain circumstances and the introduction of memories, turn-ons, turn-offs, attraction/chemistry, interests and hobbies.
* ''VideoGame/TheUrbz'' (2004) is a console spinoff, and a sequel game to the console game ''The Sims: Bustin' Out''. It takes place in an urban environment named Urbzville. Contrary to the main series, the characters are referred to as "Urbs" but are otherwise exactly like normal Sims. Unlike the main games there is no romance system and you cannot have children. The game follows a plot you must follow, with the protagonist needing to scale up the social hierarchy and befriend characters. A sequel was in development at one time but was cancelled before an official reveal.
* ''Videogame/TheSims3'' (2009), placed more emphasis on the neighborhood by making it all accessible in realtime and making all families age and evolve along with yours, but this could be turned off. It did away entirely with the Aspiration meter and removed Fears; instead, when you fulfill a Want, it just adds a positive "moodlet" to your physical-needs total, thus streamlining gameplay immensely. Lifetime Aspiration Score is retained, but the prizes you get from it are mostly modifications to the Sim's capabilities instead of physical objects (BottomlessBladder, TheCasanova, etc). The PointBuild Personality was removed in favor of five "Traits" which had direct and practical effects on gameplay: for example, an Athletic Sim learns the Athletic skill faster and gets more enjoyment out of their workouts; a Clumsy Sim trips everywhere, which can add a ''lot'' to transit times; and an Evil Sim can gain enjoyment from messing with other Sims, or use a coffee machine to [[RuleOfFunny make Evil Lattes]]. Relationships were simplified, with Sims sharing a relationship bar so both parties have the same opinion of each other, no longer allowing unrequited feelings. Finally, ''The Sims 3'' added significant flexibility to the Sim and object design and customization options, though at the cost of very reduced support for user-generated, made-from-scratch objects, clothing and hairstyles.
* ''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval'' (2011) is a standalone [[GameMod Total Conversion]] that put the Sims in a MedievalEuropeanFantasy. The game departs from ''The Sims'' formula to some extent, increasing the strategy and roleplaying aspects and removes the daily hindrances, such as the need to urinate, but still retains much of ''The Sims'' gameplay. The "Sim" the player nurtures throughout the game is the kingdom itself, though the populace can be customized as well. It is also one of the more violent games, featuring Religion, Alcoholism and Murder, themes not present in the older series without mods.
* ''The Sims: Freeplay'' (December 15, 2011) An app game similar to ''VideoGame/TheSims2'' in gameplay but with ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' assets, and the ''VideoGame/FarmVille'' formula. Worth mentioning because they ''actually managed'' to alleviate the microtransactions criticism by finding a happy medium between the Farmville formula and single player gaming (the in game currency, simoleon, is easy to get, and Life Points can be earned from watching ads, hitting certain achievements, or even just completing tasks, instead of through exclusively buying them with real cash, and the wait time between actions is ''actually reasonable'' compared to many other games out in the market). The game is now in it's fourth year running and have seen dozens of updates and new contents- many available for free or via regular simoleons if you completed the given tasks in a limited time before becoming only available via Life Points.
* ''VideoGame/TheSims4'' (September 2, 2014). EA and Maxis have said that this iteration of the ''Sims'' series celebrates "the heart and soul of the Sims themselves" and have the Sims show more personality than in previous installments; this was eventually executed by having all Sims have an overall "mood" which enhances their facility at certain interactions and slows down others. The game will feature new tools to customize worlds and share them with others. Unlike ''VideoGame/SimCity2013'', the game is a single-player offline experience, although you do need an Internet connection to play it anyway- to appease it's CopyProtection (which is based on Origin), and to connect to the "community" (which allows you to upload sims and houses to EA's servers, which would then make it available to other players for download).
* If you want altered forms of play, there's Videogame/MySims for the UsefulNotes/NintendoWii and UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, which has the dressings of ''VideoGame/TheSims'' but lacks a lot of the essentials of the game. Instead, it's more like ''Videogame/AnimalCrossing'', but for people who prefer to work with cute chibi humans instead of a bossy tanuki. And there was a Website/{{Facebook}} version, merging the game with a ''Videogame/{{Farmville}}'' experience, but it was eventually closed due to lackluster player reception.

to:

[[index]]

* ''Videogame/TheSims1''
* ''Videogame/TheSims2''
* ''Videogame/TheSims3''
* ''VideoGame/TheSims4''
* ''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''
[[/index]]

* ''Videogame/TheSims1''
[[index]]''Videogame/TheSims1''[[/index]] (2000). The first game introduced the core features of the franchise: simulation of households; a large neighborhood of families you could control and intercontrol; purchasing increasingly-expensive and increasingly-efficient household objects; a comprehensive house-building feature which even trained architects enjoy using. Sim personalities worked on a PointBuild system using five ten-point scales with a total of twenty-five points to distribute between them: Outgoing/Shy, Grouchy/Nice, Playful/Serious, Neat/Sloppy, Active/Lazy, which tied in with star signs based loosely on the astrological signs of the WesternZodiac; an engine that is very receptive to {{Game Mod}}s. Having said that, there was no aging in the game: children remained children forever, nobody died (unless you [[VideoGameCrueltyPotential caused them to]]), and once you had made your Sims fat and rich there wasn't much else to do to or with them.
** ''[[Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut The Sims Bustin' Out]]'' [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsBustinOut''[[/index]] (2003), which serves as a sequel to the console version of the first game. While the first console game was more or less a 3D port of the PC version with a story mode, the sequel had much more depth and personality. The main gimmick of the game is the ability to "Bust Out", which gave your main Sim the ability to visit their neighbors and interact with them. In the "Bust Out" story mode, your main Sim has [[BagOfSpilling lost everything]] due to the villainous Malcolm Landgraab, so they must advance to the top of their chosen career path, as well as fulfilling other goals and helping out a number of other Sims who've also been wronged by Malcolm. Bustin' Out also had a handheld version on the GBA and N-Gage systems, which was more of an adventure game with some visual sim elements, along with certain features from the main games such as fulfilling needs.
* ''Videogame/TheSims2'' [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims2''[[/index]] (2004) introduced three interconnected concepts: aging, Wants and Fears, and Aspiration. Sims now age through various stages--infant, toddler, child, teen, adult, elder --and could be created in any stage except the first. (College aged Young Adults were added in the first expansion pack.) They also came with an "Aspiration," an overall goal for their life: [[TrueCompanions Family]], [[ReallyGetsAround Romance]], [[OnlyInItForTheMoney Wealth]], [[PopularityPower Popularity]], [[FreakyIsCool Knowledge]], and (eventually) [[TheHedonist Pleasure]]. Starting with the first expansion pack, this would assign the Sim a ([[RandomNumberGod randomly-generated]]) Lifetime Wish, which keeps them happy for the rest of their lives if they achieved it. In the meanwhile, it also controlled what Wants and Fears would pop up; these were general life events, from "Have FirstKiss" to "Eat TrademarkFavoriteFood". These would contribute not only to a Lifetime Aspiration Score, which could be used to purchase various [[RuleOfFun loosely realistic]] in-game objects (the most basic of which being a literal Money Tree), but also to the Sim's real-time Aspiration meter. This corresponded roughly to self-esteem or general mood, and could override a Sim's physical-needs total if it was high enough. Of course, it also lost XXX points every few hours, and if it hit bottom the Sim would have a HeroicBSOD (PlayedForLaughs). Fulfilling the Sim's lifetime wish would fill their Aspiration bar to the max for the rest of their lives, but (of course) you get a certain amount of time to do this before they croak. Meanwhile, personalities continued to be calculated on the five scales/star sign model, but gradually more features were added through expansion packs, such as the ability to gain or lose personality points under certain circumstances and the introduction of memories, turn-ons, turn-offs, attraction/chemistry, interests and hobbies.
* ''VideoGame/TheUrbz'' [[index]]''VideoGame/TheUrbz''[[/index]] (2004) is a console spinoff, and a sequel game to the console game ''The Sims: Bustin' Out''. It takes place in an urban environment named Urbzville. Contrary to the main series, the characters are referred to as "Urbs" but are otherwise exactly like normal Sims. Unlike the main games there is no romance system and you cannot have children. The game follows a plot you must follow, with the protagonist needing to scale up the social hierarchy and befriend characters. A sequel was in development at one time but was cancelled before an official reveal.
* ''Videogame/TheSims3'' [[index]]''Videogame/TheSims3''[[/index]] (2009), placed more emphasis on the neighborhood by making it all accessible in realtime and making all families age and evolve along with yours, but this could be turned off. It did away entirely with the Aspiration meter and removed Fears; instead, when you fulfill a Want, it just adds a positive "moodlet" to your physical-needs total, thus streamlining gameplay immensely. Lifetime Aspiration Score is retained, but the prizes you get from it are mostly modifications to the Sim's capabilities instead of physical objects (BottomlessBladder, TheCasanova, etc). The PointBuild Personality was removed in favor of five "Traits" which had direct and practical effects on gameplay: for example, an Athletic Sim learns the Athletic skill faster and gets more enjoyment out of their workouts; a Clumsy Sim trips everywhere, which can add a ''lot'' to transit times; and an Evil Sim can gain enjoyment from messing with other Sims, or use a coffee machine to [[RuleOfFunny make Evil Lattes]]. Relationships were simplified, with Sims sharing a relationship bar so both parties have the same opinion of each other, no longer allowing unrequited feelings. Finally, ''The Sims 3'' added significant flexibility to the Sim and object design and customization options, though at the cost of very reduced support for user-generated, made-from-scratch objects, clothing and hairstyles.
* ''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval'' [[index]]''Videogame/TheSimsMedieval''[[/index]] (2011) is a standalone [[GameMod Total Conversion]] that put the Sims in a MedievalEuropeanFantasy. The game departs from ''The Sims'' formula to some extent, increasing the strategy and roleplaying aspects and removes the daily hindrances, such as the need to urinate, but still retains much of ''The Sims'' gameplay. The "Sim" the player nurtures throughout the game is the kingdom itself, though the populace can be customized as well. It is also one of the more violent games, featuring Religion, Alcoholism and Murder, themes not present in the older series without mods.
* ''The [[index]]''The Sims: Freeplay'' Freeplay''[[/index]] (December 15, 2011) An app game similar to ''VideoGame/TheSims2'' in gameplay but with ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' assets, and the ''VideoGame/FarmVille'' formula. Worth mentioning because they ''actually managed'' to alleviate the microtransactions criticism by finding a happy medium between the Farmville formula and single player gaming (the in game currency, simoleon, is easy to get, and Life Points can be earned from watching ads, hitting certain achievements, or even just completing tasks, instead of through exclusively buying them with real cash, and the wait time between actions is ''actually reasonable'' compared to many other games out in the market). The game is now in it's fourth year running and have seen dozens of updates and new contents- many available for free or via regular simoleons if you completed the given tasks in a limited time before becoming only available via Life Points.
* ''VideoGame/TheSims4'' [[index]]''VideoGame/TheSims4''[[/index]] (September 2, 2014). EA and Maxis have said that this iteration of the ''Sims'' series celebrates "the heart and soul of the Sims themselves" and have the Sims show more personality than in previous installments; this was eventually executed by having all Sims have an overall "mood" which enhances their facility at certain interactions and slows down others. The game will feature new tools to customize worlds and share them with others. Unlike ''VideoGame/SimCity2013'', the game is a single-player offline experience, although you do need an Internet connection to play it anyway- to appease it's CopyProtection (which is based on Origin), and to connect to the "community" (which allows you to upload sims and houses to EA's servers, which would then make it available to other players for download).
* If you want altered forms of play, there's Videogame/MySims [[index]]Videogame/MySims[[/index]] for the UsefulNotes/NintendoWii and UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, which has the dressings of ''VideoGame/TheSims'' but lacks a lot of the essentials of the game. Instead, it's more like ''Videogame/AnimalCrossing'', but for people who prefer to work with cute chibi humans instead of a bossy tanuki. And there was a Website/{{Facebook}} version, merging the game with a ''Videogame/{{Farmville}}'' experience, but it was eventually closed due to lackluster player reception.
1st Feb '17 4:06:33 AM Andygal
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** The ''manual'' for ''The Sims 2'' even includes a cheat code: "aging off", which does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. EA put it in the manual to ward off the inevitable barrage of TheyChangedItNowItSucks for people who didn't want their Sims dying on them (and who were presumably too incompetent to satisfy the Sims' wants enough to get Elixir of Life.) That, and Elders are restricted in their jobs and interactions. The skill meters and such are also designed for a Sim to build them since infancy, so it makes sense, at least for the first generation. Sims 3 and 4 provided menu options to disable aging instead.

to:

** The ''manual'' for ''The Sims 2'' even includes a cheat code: "aging off", which does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. EA put it in the manual to ward off the inevitable barrage of TheyChangedItNowItSucks for people who didn't want their Sims dying on them (and who were presumably too incompetent to satisfy the Sims' wants enough to get Elixir of Life.) That, and Elders are restricted in their jobs and interactions. The skill meters and such are also designed for a Sim to build them since infancy, so it makes sense, at least for the first generation. Sims 3 and 4 provided menu options to disable aging instead.instead with Sims 4 having separate options for played and unplayed Sims and for only the active household to age, as it was in Sims 2.
1st Feb '17 4:05:31 AM Andygal
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** The ''manual'' for ''The Sims 2'' even includes a cheat code: "aging off", which does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. EA put it in the manual to ward off the inevitable barrage of TheyChangedItNowItSucks for people who didn't want their Sims dying on them (and who were presumably too incompetent to satisfy the Sims' wants enough to get Elixir of Life.) That, and Elders are restricted in their jobs and interactions. The skill meters and such are also designed for a Sim to build them since infancy, so it makes sense, at least for the first generation.

to:

** The ''manual'' for ''The Sims 2'' even includes a cheat code: "aging off", which does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. EA put it in the manual to ward off the inevitable barrage of TheyChangedItNowItSucks for people who didn't want their Sims dying on them (and who were presumably too incompetent to satisfy the Sims' wants enough to get Elixir of Life.) That, and Elders are restricted in their jobs and interactions. The skill meters and such are also designed for a Sim to build them since infancy, so it makes sense, at least for the first generation. Sims 3 and 4 provided menu options to disable aging instead.
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