History VideoGame / TheBardsTaleTrilogy

15th Sep '17 6:54:16 PM altsan
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* ''The Bard's Tale III: The Thief of Fate'' (1988). The mad god Tarjan has finally lost it, destroying Skara Brae and wreaking havoc across other dimensions. The heroes must stop him once and for all.

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* ''The Bard's Tale III: The Thief of Fate'' (1988). The mad god Tarjan has finally lost it, destroying Skara Brae and wreaking havoc across other dimensions. The heroes must stop him once and for all.



** The official clue book for ''Tales of the Unknown'' is written as the journal kept by a previous party which attempted to solve the quest. Obviously, they failed; [[spoiler: after being defeated and trapped on the final level, their mages cast a spell to save the journal so that some future adventurers could use it. A side effect of the spell was that everything their party did, save for the journal itself, was erased from history.]] The final page is rather creepy. [[spoiler: "They come."]]

to:

** The official clue book for ''Tales of the Unknown'' is written as the journal kept by a previous party which attempted to solve the quest. Obviously, they failed; [[spoiler: after being defeated and trapped on the final level, their mages cast a spell to save the journal so that some future adventurers could use it. A side effect of the spell was that everything their party did, save for the journal itself, was erased from history.]] The final page is rather creepy. [[spoiler: "They come."]]



* BraggingRightsReward: The oft-acclaimed Spectre Snare in the first game (always lands a [[OneHitKill critical hit]], can cast Baylor's Spell Bind) can only be gained ''after'' killing Mangar. The good news is that it can be transferred to ''The Destiny Knight'', where it's downright ''[[DiscOneNuke mean]]'' for the first few dungeons. (Just remember to periodically sell it and buy it back so it doesn't disappear by losing its Spell Bind charges.)

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* BraggingRightsReward: The oft-acclaimed Spectre Snare in the first game (always lands a [[OneHitKill critical hit]], can cast Baylor's Spell Bind) can only be gained at the very end of the game; in the 8-bit version, it's entirely possible to find it only ''after'' killing Mangar. The good news is that it can be transferred to ''The Destiny Knight'', where it's downright ''[[DiscOneNuke mean]]'' for the first few dungeons. (Just remember to periodically sell it and buy it back so it doesn't disappear by losing its Spell Bind charges.)



** The first game has several magic items defined in its database (like 'Death Dagger' and 'Travelhelm') which cannot ever be obtained (they aren't given out by any in-game event, and they are outside the range of the random item-drop algorithm).



* MacGuffinDeliveryService: [[spoiler: Lagoth Zanta ''thinks'' he has manipulated the party to this effect, not realizing the true nature of the MacGuffin. This is especially-odd because he is supposed to have been the one who shattered the Destiny Staff into seven segments in the first place!]]

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* MacGuffinDeliveryService: Depending on how you interpret his intentions, [[spoiler: Lagoth Zanta ''thinks'' may ''think'' he has manipulated the party to this effect, not realizing the true nature of the MacGuffin. This A problem with this theory, however, is especially-odd because that he is supposed to have been supposedly the one who shattered the Destiny Staff Wand into seven segments in the first place!]]place.]] A simpler explanation may be that [[spoiler: he simply wants to send the party to their deaths, figuring one of the Snares will do the job without him jeopardizing his VillainWithGoodPublicity status.]]



** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and awkward interface, several monsters and items that didn't behave as they were supposed to, and a massively increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (There is a [[https://bardstale.brotherhood.de/talefiles/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=989 fan-made patch]] available for the MS-DOS version which fixes some of the problems with it.)

to:

** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also [[PortingDisaster notoriously problematic, problematic]], with a slow and awkward interface, several monsters and magic items that didn't behave as they were supposed to, work, monsters with ineffectual attacks, and a massively increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting nigh-impossible to play through. (There is a [[https://bardstale.brotherhood.de/talefiles/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=989 fan-made patch]] available for the MS-DOS version which fixes some of the problems with it.)



** In ''The Destiny Knight'', the Dream Mages who appear as random encounters in the Maze of Dread do nothing but raise illusory monsters. Three points cause this to be a Metal Menagerie-grade XP farm: Summons (including illusions) can't act until the turn after they appear, a high-level party will reliably disbelieve every single illusion the Dream Mages raise, and disbelieving an illusory monster counts as killing it for XP gain purposes. Just remember to kill off the mages after a while, as there's a cap on the XP and gold gain from each individual encounter (65280 per player character on the Commodore 64).

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** In ''The Destiny Knight'', the Dream Mages who appear as random encounters in the Maze of Dread do nothing but raise illusory monsters. Three points cause this to be a Metal Menagerie-grade XP farm: Summons (including illusions) can't act until the turn after they appear, a high-level party will reliably disbelieve every single illusion the Dream Mages raise, and disbelieving an illusory monster counts as killing it for XP gain purposes. Just If you're playing the 8-bit version, just remember to kill off the mages after a while, as there's a cap on the XP and gold gain from each individual encounter (65280 per player character on the Commodore 64).



* {{Remake}}: All three of the original 8-bit games were ported to several 16-bit platforms such as the Apple [=IIgs=], Amiga and PC, with major upgrades to the look and feel (see MultiPlatform, above). More recently, plans to update and re-release the trilogy for modern operating systems were announced by some of the original developers.

to:

* {{Remake}}: All three of the The original 8-bit games were ported to several 16-bit platforms such as the Apple [=IIgs=], Amiga and PC, with major upgrades to the look and feel (see MultiPlatform, above). More recently, plans to update and re-release the trilogy for modern operating systems were announced by some of the original developers.



* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of real (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just [[RocksFallEveryoneDies suddenly die]]. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Naturally, you cannot win the game without successfully completing every single Snare.

to:

* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of real (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just [[RocksFallEveryoneDies suddenly die]]. As icing on the cake, saving the game is you [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] cannot save the game]] inside a Snare.Snare, and even pausing is disabled. Naturally, you cannot win the game without successfully completing every single Snare.



** Not ''that'' mundane; the Broom casts Greater Levitation.

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** Not ''that'' mundane; the Broom casts Greater Levitation. Played straight, however with the Dork Ring, which does absolutely nothing.
1st Aug '17 9:03:30 AM altsan
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* GameMaker: The trilogy was followed up with ''The Bard's Tale Construction Set'' - an extremely limited tool which couldn't even accurately reproduce the first game's plot or mechanics, let alone the second or third games'.

to:

* GameMaker: The trilogy was followed up with ''The Bard's Tale Construction Set'' - an extremely limited tool which couldn't even accurately reproduce the first game's plot or mechanics, mechanics of the first game, let alone the second or third games'.third.



* MultiPlatform: All three games were originally written for the Apple [=IIe=] and then ported to various other platforms. Other 8-bit versions include the Commodore 64 and (at least for the first game) the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. 16-bit versions included the Commodore Amiga, MS-DOS, and (for the first two games) the Apple [=IIgs=]. Whether the 8-bit or 16-bit versions are better is a matter of opinion amongst fans of the game.

to:

* MultiPlatform: All three games were originally written for the Apple [=IIe=] and then ported to various other platforms. Other 8-bit versions include the Commodore 64 and (at least for (for the first game) the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. 16-bit versions included of each were subsequently released for platforms including the Commodore Amiga, MS-DOS, and (for the first two games) the Apple [=IIgs=]. Whether the The 8-bit or and 16-bit versions are better is a matter of opinion amongst fans of the game. both have their fans.



** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and awkward interface, several monsters and items that don't behave as they're supposed to, and a massively increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (There is a [[https://bardstale.brotherhood.de/talefiles/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=989 fan-made patch]] available for the MS-DOS version which fixes some of the problems with it.)

to:

** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and awkward interface, several monsters and items that don't didn't behave as they're they were supposed to, and a massively increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (There is a [[https://bardstale.brotherhood.de/talefiles/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=989 fan-made patch]] available for the MS-DOS version which fixes some of the problems with it.)



* {{Remake}}: The first two games were remade for the Apple IIGS and Amiga, and the third game was remade for the Amiga and PC.

to:

* {{Remake}}: The first two All three of the original 8-bit games were remade for ported to several 16-bit platforms such as the Apple IIGS and Amiga, and the third game was remade for the [=IIgs=], Amiga and PC.PC, with major upgrades to the look and feel (see MultiPlatform, above). More recently, plans to update and re-release the trilogy for modern operating systems were announced by some of the original developers.
* SequelDifficultySpike: ''The Destiny Knight'' was famously much, much harder than the first game, with its timed death puzzles, cryptic clues, and vastly more powerful monsters.



* ShoutOut: several, especially to ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' - ''Sir Robin's Tune'' allows escape from any encounter or prevents monsters summoning new monsters, and one of the consumable items available is the Holy Hand Grenade.

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* ShoutOut: several, Several, especially to ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'' - ''Sir Robin's Tune'' allows escape from any encounter or prevents monsters summoning new monsters, and one of the consumable items available is the Holy Hand Grenade.Grenade.
** The term 'Snare' pops up in several contexts in ''Bard's Tale I'' and ''II'', probably as a nod to the first game's original working title (see SpiritualSuccessor, below).



* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''Maze Master'', an obscure dungeon crawler for the Commodore 64 by the same author. When beaten it mentions ''Shadow Snare'', the working title of the first ''Bard's Tale'' game before Critchton switched publishers.

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* SpiritualSuccessor: To ''Maze Master'', an obscure dungeon crawler for the Commodore 64 by the same author. When beaten it mentions ''Shadow Snare'', the working title of the first ''Bard's Tale'' game before Critchton Cranford switched publishers.



* TakenForGranite: Several monsters can inflict this with their melee attacks. You can return the favour with the Stone Touch (in ''Tales of the Unknown'') or Petrify (in ''Thief of Fate'') spells.

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* TakenForGranite: Several monsters can inflict this with their melee attacks. You can return the favour with the Stone Touch (in ''Tales of the Unknown'') or Petrify (in ''Thief of Fate'') spells.spells, or with the Stoneblade weapon.



* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of ''real'' (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just suddenly die. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Naturally, you cannot win the game without successfully completing every single Snare.

to:

* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of ''real'' real (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just [[RocksFallEveryoneDies suddenly die.die]]. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Naturally, you cannot win the game without successfully completing every single Snare.


Added DiffLines:

** The 'Word of Fear' spell, which is supposed to reduce an enemy's effectiveness in combat, not only doesn't work properly in the first game; it was eventually discovered that, due to a bug in the game code, it actually ''boosts'' their effectiveness.
31st Jul '17 7:08:45 PM altsan
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The first two games were principally written by Michael Cranford for the Apple [=IIe=], with additional content, art, and porting to different platforms by various others at Interplay. Cranford left after the second game and Interplay developed ''Thief of Fate'' on their own.



* GameMaker: The trilogy was followed up with ''The Bard's Tale Construction Set'' - an extremely limited tool which couldn't even accurately reproduce the first game's plot, let alone the second or third.

to:

* GameMaker: The trilogy was followed up with ''The Bard's Tale Construction Set'' - an extremely limited tool which couldn't even accurately reproduce the first game's plot, plot or mechanics, let alone the second or third.third games'.



* MultiPlatform: All three games were originally written for the Apple IIE and then ported to various other platforms. Other 8-bit versions include the Commodore 64 and (at least for the first two games) the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. 16-bit versions included the Commodore Amiga, MS-DOS, and (for the first two games) the Apple IIGS. Whether the 8-bit or 16-bit versions are better is a matter of subjectivity among fans of the game.
** The 16-bit versions have greatly enhanced graphics, but their share of problems as well (see DummiedOut, above). Also, not all 16-bit versions provide the same experience: the Apple IIGS and Amiga versions have better graphics and sound than the MS-DOS version, which only supports EGA graphics and PC speaker audio.
** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and clumsy interface and a hugely increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (A fan-made patch for the MS-DOS version is available that fixes many of the problems with it.)

to:

* MultiPlatform: All three games were originally written for the Apple IIE [=IIe=] and then ported to various other platforms. Other 8-bit versions include the Commodore 64 and (at least for the first two games) game) the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. 16-bit versions included the Commodore Amiga, MS-DOS, and (for the first two games) the Apple IIGS. [=IIgs=]. Whether the 8-bit or 16-bit versions are better is a matter of subjectivity among opinion amongst fans of the game.
** The 16-bit versions have greatly enhanced graphics, but their share of problems as well (see DummiedOut, above). Also, not all 16-bit versions provide the same experience: the Apple IIGS [=IIgs=] and Amiga versions have better graphics and sound than the MS-DOS version, which only supports EGA graphics and PC speaker audio.
** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and clumsy interface awkward interface, several monsters and items that don't behave as they're supposed to, and a hugely massively increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (A (There is a [[https://bardstale.brotherhood.de/talefiles/forum/viewtopic.php?f=17&t=989 fan-made patch patch]] available for the MS-DOS version is available that which fixes many some of the problems with it.)



** ''Dragon Wars'', a game Interplay developed after ''Thief of Fate'', is considered by many to be an unofficial fourth installment. In fact, it originally was intended to be ''The Bard's Tale IV'', but publisher Electronic Arts, which held the rights to the name, wasn't interested in extending the franchise.



* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of ''real'' (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just suddenly die. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Needless to say, you cannot win the game without solving every Snare.

to:

* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of ''real'' (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just suddenly die. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Needless to say, Naturally, you cannot win the game without solving successfully completing every single Snare.
31st Jul '17 9:26:37 AM altsan
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Added DiffLines:

* DummiedOut: Some features of the original 8-bit versions of the game failed to make the transition to the 16-bit ports, although artifacts of them remain in the game. For example, an encounter on the final level of the first game (with 2 Liches) can only be activated by going to a particular location after the final battle but before leaving the dungeon; however, the 16-bit ports automatically return you to the Adventurer's Guild immediately upon winning the final battle, meaning that it's impossible to ever have that encounter. (The location in question is still flagged as special, however, suggesting that the code for the encounter, or part of it, is still present.)
** Also, Casinos are inexplicably present in the 16-bit versions of ''The Destiny Knight'', even though you are prevented from entering them (they are fully functional in the 8-bit versions).


Added DiffLines:

* MultiPlatform: All three games were originally written for the Apple IIE and then ported to various other platforms. Other 8-bit versions include the Commodore 64 and (at least for the first two games) the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. 16-bit versions included the Commodore Amiga, MS-DOS, and (for the first two games) the Apple IIGS. Whether the 8-bit or 16-bit versions are better is a matter of subjectivity among fans of the game.
** The 16-bit versions have greatly enhanced graphics, but their share of problems as well (see DummiedOut, above). Also, not all 16-bit versions provide the same experience: the Apple IIGS and Amiga versions have better graphics and sound than the MS-DOS version, which only supports EGA graphics and PC speaker audio.
** The Amiga version of ''Tales of the Unknown'' was the very first 16-bit port, and is generally considered one of the buggiest. The MS-DOS port of ''Thief of Fate'' was also notoriously problematic, with a slow and clumsy interface and a hugely increased random encounter frequency that many people found exhausting to play through. (A fan-made patch for the MS-DOS version is available that fixes many of the problems with it.)


Added DiffLines:

* TimedMission: In ''The Destiny Knight'', each dungeon (except for the starter dungeon) contains a lethal puzzle area called a Snare of Death. As soon as you enter a Snare, you have a fixed amount of ''real'' (not game) time to solve the puzzle or the entire party dies. The game doesn't show you how much time you have left, either; when the game determines that your time has run out, you just suddenly die. As icing on the cake, saving the game is [[SaveGameLimits disabled]] inside a Snare. Needless to say, you cannot win the game without solving every Snare.
25th Jul '17 9:01:53 PM altsan
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Added DiffLines:

** The official clue book for ''Tales of the Unknown'' is written as the journal kept by a previous party which attempted to solve the quest. Obviously, they failed; [[spoiler: after being defeated and trapped on the final level, their mages cast a spell to save the journal so that some future adventurers could use it. A side effect of the spell was that everything their party did, save for the journal itself, was erased from history.]] The final page is rather creepy. [[spoiler: "They come."]]


Added DiffLines:

** At least in the PC version of the game, the Spectre Snare ''can'' be obtained immediately before the final battle, but you have to take a particular route, which you're unlikely to do unless you already know about it. (There is a hint about this much earlier in the game[[labelnote:*]]"Seek the Snare from behind the scenes"[[/labelnote]], but it's so vaguely worded that even if you still remember it by that point, it's not likely to mean much to you.)
18th Jul '17 1:53:43 PM ProfessorDetective
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''The Bard's Tale Trilogy'' is a series of games developed by Creator/InterplayEntertainment and published by ElectronicArts. It was a first-person game in the style of the VideoGame/{{Wizardry}} series, but with more impressive sounds and graphics, especially the Apple IIGS and Commodore Amiga versions. As the title of this page suggests, there were three games in the series:

to:

''The Bard's Tale Trilogy'' is a series of games developed by Creator/InterplayEntertainment and published by ElectronicArts. It was a first-person game in the style of the VideoGame/{{Wizardry}} ''VideoGame/{{Wizardry}}'' series, but with more impressive sounds and graphics, especially the Apple IIGS and Commodore Amiga versions. As the title of this page suggests, there were three games in the series:
19th Jun '17 6:58:31 AM valar55
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* MagicMusic: This is what makes bards so important. If they have an instrument, they can sing a song that either lasts for the rest of combat, or lasts for a good chunk of city/dungeon exploration. As long as the song lasts, you get a particular boon (e.g. easier saving throws, regeneration, improved armor class, can always flee). The trick is that the bard's voice dries out after a singing a number of songs equal to their character level. You can "recharge" this by [[DrunkenMaster getting them a drink.]]

to:

* MagicMusic: This is what makes bards so important. If they have an instrument, they can sing a song that either lasts for the rest of combat, or lasts for a good chunk of city/dungeon exploration. As long as the song lasts, you get a particular boon (e.g. easier saving throws, regeneration, improved armor class, can always flee). The trick is that the bard's voice dries out after a singing a number of songs equal to their character level. You can "recharge" this by [[DrunkenMaster getting them a drink.]]
3rd Dec '16 12:23:33 AM Xtifr
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'''''The Bard's Tale Trilogy''''' is a series of games developed by Creator/InterplayEntertainment and published by ElectronicArts. It was a first-person game in the style of the VideoGame/{{Wizardry}} series, but with more impressive sounds and graphics, especially the Apple IIGS and Commodore Amiga versions. As the title of this page suggests, there were three games in the series:

to:

'''''The ''The Bard's Tale Trilogy''''' Trilogy'' is a series of games developed by Creator/InterplayEntertainment and published by ElectronicArts. It was a first-person game in the style of the VideoGame/{{Wizardry}} series, but with more impressive sounds and graphics, especially the Apple IIGS and Commodore Amiga versions. As the title of this page suggests, there were three games in the series:
2nd Nov '16 9:37:21 PM SuperDave17
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Added DiffLines:

* BoisterousBruiser: Werra was this down to a tee. He doesn't have any hard feelings at all after losing to both Hawkslayer and the party. In fact, he's thankful to all concerned for allowing him opportunities to engage in some fun fighting.
8th Oct '16 11:09:53 PM frogpatrol
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* AntiMagic: Anti-magic zones don't just prevent you from casting spells (except the most basic of light spells), they also ''turn off'' all persistent spells except light spells. In ''The Destiny Knight'', the '''entire Grey Crypt''' is a single massive anti-magic zone. Better bring a source of light that doesn't rely on spellcasting.

to:

* AntiMagic: Anti-magic zones don't just prevent you from casting spells (except the most basic of light spells), they also ''turn off'' all persistent spells except light spells. In ''The Destiny Knight'', the '''entire ''entire Grey Crypt''' Crypt'' is a single massive anti-magic zone. Better bring a source of light that which doesn't rely on spellcasting.
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