History VideoGame / StarTrekTextGame

23rd Oct '15 11:42:53 AM VenomLancerHae
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* AdaptationExpansion: Many versions of the game add extra elements to the basic gameplay, such as:
** CloakingDevice: ''EGA Trek'' also included Romul... "Vandal" ships with this ability.
** DeathOrGloryAttack: One frequent addition to the game is to equip a superweapon on the player's ship, like the DeathRay from ''EGA Trek''. If it worked, it killed every enemy in a quadrant. When it didn't work, it could do enough damage to destroy or cripple the player's ship, or (in ''EGA Trek'') mutate your crew and have them [[InterfaceScrew draw smiley faces on the interface while ignoring your orders]].
** UndergroundMonkey: ''EGA Trek'' had a variety of {{Palette Swap}}ed "Mongol" ships as EliteMooks.
** ''Supertrek'' has a use of shuttlecraft where you would mine for dilithium crystals on planets. This was an alternative to refueling at a starbase.
** ''Supertrek'' also had Romulans that were more of a nuisance than a threat. If you entered a Romulan quadrant, they'd simply politely ask you to leave. They didn't attack unless you attacked them first. And their attacks were weak.



* DeflectorShields

to:

* CloakingDevice: ''EGA Trek'' also included Romul... "Vandal" ships with this ability.
* DeathOrGloryAttack: One frequent addition to the game is to equip a superweapon on the player's ship, like the DeathRay from ''EGA Trek''. If it worked, it killed every enemy in a quadrant. When it didn't work, it could do enough damage to destroy or cripple the player's ship, or (in ''EGA Trek'') mutate your crew and have them [[InterfaceScrew draw smiley faces on the interface while ignoring your orders]].
%%
* DeflectorShields



* SpaceStation
* SubsystemDamage: Another possible UrExample.

to:

%% * SpaceStation
%% * SubsystemDamage: Another possible UrExample.



* TurnBasedStrategy
* {{Two-D Space}}

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%% * TurnBasedStrategy
%% * {{Two-D Space}}TwoDSpace
* UndergroundMonkey:
** ''EGA Trek'' had a variety of {{Palette Swap}}ed "Mongol" ships as EliteMooks.
** ''Supertrek'' has a use of shuttlecraft where you would mine for dilithium crystals on planets. This was an alternative to refueling at a starbase.
** ''Supertrek'' also had Romulans that were more of a nuisance than a threat. If you entered a Romulan quadrant, they'd simply politely ask you to leave. They didn't attack unless you attacked them first. And their attacks were weak.
11th Jul '15 5:17:49 PM nombretomado
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The first ''Franchise/StarTrek'' computer game [[note]]The original version used teletype for output, so it was a few years before it became a "video game"![[/note]] is a TurnBasedStrategy game written by Mike Mayfield in 1971 on a [[MainframesAndMinicomputers Sigma 7 mainframe]], using the BASIC programming language. It became one of the big hits of the early home computer era in the late [[TheSeventies 1970s]] and early [[TheEighties 1980s]].

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The first ''Franchise/StarTrek'' computer game [[note]]The original version used teletype for output, so it was a few years before it became a "video game"![[/note]] is a TurnBasedStrategy game written by Mike Mayfield in 1971 on a [[MainframesAndMinicomputers [[UsefulNotes/MainframesAndMinicomputers Sigma 7 mainframe]], using the BASIC programming language. It became one of the big hits of the early home computer era in the late [[TheSeventies 1970s]] and early [[TheEighties 1980s]].
24th May '15 5:51:16 PM ShinyTsukkomi
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BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A UsefulNotes/TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the UsefulNotes/AppleII, UsefulNotes/TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.

to:

BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A UsefulNotes/TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the UsefulNotes/AppleII, UsefulNotes/TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, UsefulNotes/IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.
2nd May '15 5:27:09 PM FordPrefect
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* EnemyDetectingRadar: Long-range scanners. Possibly the UrExample in video games. You could tell how many klingon warships were in a neighboring quadrant, but not precisely ''where'' they were in the quadrant.

to:

* EnemyDetectingRadar: Long-range scanners. Possibly the UrExample in video games. You could tell how many klingon Klingon warships were in a neighboring quadrant, but not precisely ''where'' they were in the quadrant.



* InsistentTerminology: The galactic grid is usually said to be composed of 64 quadrants in a standard game. A quadrant is actually a fourth of something. So it would be more proper to call them sectors, and their divisions subsectors. The ''StarTrek'' universe does properly divide the galaxy into four quadrants but these games were made decades before that development appeared. It may be an understandable mistake as the original series was sometimes erroneous and inconsistent in the use of the terms quadrant and sector.

to:

* InsistentTerminology: The galactic grid is usually said to be composed of 64 quadrants in a standard game. A quadrant is actually a fourth of something. So it would be more proper to call them sectors, and their divisions subsectors. The ''StarTrek'' universe does properly divide the galaxy into four quadrants quadrants, but these games were made decades before that development appeared. It may be an understandable mistake mistake, as the original series was sometimes erroneous and inconsistent in the use of the terms quadrant "quadrant" and sector."sector".



* ThatOneRule: Aiming torpedoes. The makers of the ''Star Trek III.5'' variant of the game actually sold aiming charts, so that you could figure out exactly what bearing to fire your torpedoes at depending on the sector the klingon ship was in.

to:

* ThatOneRule: Aiming torpedoes. The makers of the ''Star Trek III.5'' variant of the game actually sold aiming charts, so that you could figure out exactly what bearing to fire your torpedoes at at, depending on the sector the klingon Klingon ship was in.
2nd May '15 5:24:39 PM FordPrefect
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** ''Supertrek'' has a use of shuttlecraft where you would mine for dilithium crytals on planets. This was an alternative to refueling at a starbase.

to:

** ''Supertrek'' has a use of shuttlecraft where you would mine for dilithium crytals crystals on planets. This was an alternative to refueling at a starbase.
11th Aug '14 11:06:49 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* CaptainErsatz: Since the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise was copyrighted and trademarked, any company that wants to sell a variant of the game has to [[SerialNumbersFiledOff file all the serial numbers off]]. For example, when Radio Shack wanted to sell the Sol-20 variant "TREK 80" for its TRS80 microcomputer, they renamed it "Invasion Force", and had it feature the starship ''U.S.S. Hephaestus'' firing its masers and triton missiles at Jovian warships. Similarly, ''EGA Trek'' went with "Mongols". Sears Telegames exclusive release for Atari 2600 was called ''Stellar Track''.

to:

* CaptainErsatz: Since the ''Franchise/StarTrek'' franchise was copyrighted and trademarked, any company that wants to sell a variant of the game has to [[SerialNumbersFiledOff file all the serial numbers off]]. For example, when Radio Shack wanted to sell the Sol-20 variant "TREK 80" for its TRS80 UsefulNotes/TRS80 microcomputer, they renamed it "Invasion Force", and had it feature the starship ''U.S.S. Hephaestus'' firing its masers and triton missiles at Jovian warships. Similarly, ''EGA Trek'' went with "Mongols". Sears Telegames exclusive release for Atari 2600 was called ''Stellar Track''.
11th Aug '14 11:04:22 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the UsefulNotes/AppleII, TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.

to:

BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A TRS80 UsefulNotes/TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the UsefulNotes/AppleII, TRS80, UsefulNotes/TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.
10th Aug '14 3:13:15 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the AppleII, TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.

to:

BASIC was a very common programming language in the '70s, so the game was ported to minicomputers, and distributed in books and magazines as a type-in program. Later versions deepened the gameplay with exploration, mining missions, and (in some cases) "real time" play where the Klingons acted once every few seconds instead of once per turn.[[note]]A TRS80 adaptation named ''Graphictrek 2000'' even included steerable torpedoes[[/note]] It became one of the most popular games of the pre-PC college minicomputer era. In 1978, it was ported to Microsoft BASIC, the emerging standard for microcomputers. Versions appeared for the AppleII, UsefulNotes/AppleII, TRS80, and IBMPersonalComputer, and it was one of the most popular games on those platforms too. Derivatives with graphics and sound started appearing, in particular ''VideoGame/StarRaiders'', and the original faded into history.
5th Jun '14 5:07:39 PM avon
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** ''Supertrek'' also had Romulans that were more of a nuisance than a threat. If you entered a Romulan quadrant, they'd simply politely ask you to leave. They didn't attack unless you attacked them first.

to:

** ''Supertrek'' also had Romulans that were more of a nuisance than a threat. If you entered a Romulan quadrant, they'd simply politely ask you to leave. They didn't attack unless you attacked them first. And their attacks were weak.
5th Jun '14 5:07:08 PM avon
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Supertrek'' has a use of shuttlecraft where you would mine for dilithium crytals on planets. This was an alternative to refueling at a starbase.
** ''Supertrek'' also had Romulans that were more of a nuisance than a threat. If you entered a Romulan quadrant, they'd simply politely ask you to leave. They didn't attack unless you attacked them first.
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