History VideoGame / MegaManBattleNetwork

7th Oct '17 8:11:10 AM MayIncon
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** [=BN3=]'s jack-in sequence and [=NaviCust=] animation are removed from the North American releases to make enough space for the English text. The former makes an appearance in the [[Anime/MegamanNTWarrior NT Warrior anime]].
** [=BN5=]'s [=ShipComp and GargComp=] have their respective areas reduced from 4 to 3 in the North American releases. The removed areas return in [=Double Team DS.=]

to:

** [=BN3=]'s jack-in sequence and [=NaviCust=] animation are removed from the North American international releases to make enough space for the English text. The former makes an appearance in the [[Anime/MegamanNTWarrior NT Warrior anime]].
** [=BN5=]'s [=ShipComp and GargComp=] have their respective areas reduced from 4 to 3 in the North American international releases. The removed areas return in [=Double all versions of ''Double Team DS.=]DS''.
7th Oct '17 7:45:26 AM MayIncon
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** Obstacle chips and Terrain changing chips, especially in the third game where lots of strategies are made and broken by the same kind of chips. Their potency results in subsequent games reducing the strength, synergy and range of most terrain-changing abilities.

to:

** Obstacle chips and Terrain changing chips, especially in the third game where lots of strategies are made and broken by the same kind of chips. Their potency results in subsequent games reducing the availability, strength, chip synergy and range of most terrain-changing abilities.



* VisualInitiativeQueue: The program deck in Battle Chip Challenge requires the player to arrange Battle Chips in a flowchart-like array with divergent paths. At the start of every round, a selection of up to three chips will be made as the program randomly determines a path through the deck, and they will be used in that order. Each Navi uses a Program Deck, so c

to:

* VisualInitiativeQueue: The program deck in Battle Chip Challenge requires the player to arrange Battle Chips in a flowchart-like array with divergent paths. At the start of every round, a selection of up to three chips will be made as the program randomly determines a path through the deck, and they will be used in that order. Each Navi uses a Program Deck, so ccombat is the Navis using their first, second, and third Battle Chips, and then following up with their Signature Attack until one or the other is defeated.
* WakeUpCallBoss: [=ProtoMan=] is almost always this in his appearances; he moves faster than other enemies, [[OhCrap gets in your face]] more than other enemies, and makes use of hidden shielding and CounterAttack more than other enemies, requiring you to mostly wait for him to drop his guard... and then Counter Attack ''him'' in turn. (Mostly averted in 3, where he's saved for [[BonusBoss the post-game]]).
* WarmUpBoss: [=GutsMan=], by comparison, is almost always this in his appearances. He moves slower than other enemies, only gets in your face if you get too close to his area, has the most obvious tells where you can counter him, and he is constantly vulnerable. On top of that, his primary attack is a shockwave, making him little more than a bulky Mettaur virus. You can fight him within the first ten minutes of the first game, right after the tutorial, where he has a whopping 200 [=HP=].
* WeaksauceWeakness: Shadow viruses {{No Sell}}s everything but sword chips. There are no in-game justifications to this, but they are the only effective options for them.
* WeatherControlMachine:
** Made important in ''2'' when the computer suppressing the planet's weather is hacked, threatening to unleash years' worth of earthquakes and storms on the planet.
** Rehashed on more localized scales in ''4'' and ''6'', natch. In these cases, however, the real-world weather disruption is part of that chapter's boss Navi's schtick (in ''2'' it's just a byproduct of Net-centric weirdness).
* WelcomeToCorneria: Averted. NPC dialogue almost constantly changes, not only from chapter to chapter, but often with every triggered event flag during these chapters themselves.
* WellDoneSonGuy: The third game introduces us to Chaud's father, who is cold and aloof to everyone, even his son. His introduction alone re-colors Chaud's own haughty attitude in the first two games.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Throughout the series, characters simply disappear and are never mentioned again. While part of this is due to NominalImportance, it is sometimes quite odd. Sometimes it's handwaved by mentioning the character being in jail or something along those lines.
** There's a mysterious [=NetNavi=] in ''3'' that forges some connection between [=SciLab=], Bass, and Alpha. While the connection between those three entities is expounded, the Navi only appears for all of two scenes and we're never given any sort of closure regarding him.
** In the second game, Arashi Kazefuki fails Gospel and the Organizations leader tries to [[YouHaveFailedMe take him down with a suitcase bomb.]] The game explicitly mentions that the authorities didn't find any casualties associated with the bomb. However, the character doesn't appear again until the somewhat obscure Mega Man Battle Chip Challenge game which came out almost 2 years after the second game.
** Also from the second game, we have "The Doc" whose real name is never mentioned. He's a genius and mysterious programmer who resides in the Undernet, he can cure Freezeman's ice, his origin is never explained, the method to summon him is to invoke his code word on the Undernet chat board (the word(s) being, rather suspiciously, "WWW"), and arrives at Koto square after Megaman beats Freezeman to give exposition. He even says that he will send a bill directly to the government officials for services rendered (and has no doubt that they will pay). With the connections and skills all that implies, you think he would pop up now and again as an ally or a villain, but he never does.
** Similarly, you would think that Dr. Cossak would become more involved in the games after it's revealed that he created [[spoiler:Bass]] and that he would appear to help stop him in future games. Nope. He just vanishes from the series.
** Besides for Higsby, two other WWW members defected. They were Ms. Yuri, Ms. Mari's twin sister, and an old man who used to be Wily's assistant. This wouldn't be much of an issue if Lan hadn't needed Higsby to provide information on the WWW in both the second game and Transmission whereas the old man, who was with Wily since the beginning, would be much more familiar with the WWW's secrets. It could be explained as Lan not having either of their emails, but the makers of the game don't even bother with even the laziest handwave. Heck, Ms. Mari could probably have provided Lan with Yuri's contact information. You would think that the government officials would, at least, track them down for information after Lan found them tied up at Wily's base during the first game. [[AdultsAreUseless Nope.]]
** Zero from ''Network Transmission'' (set chronologically between the first two games) plays a major role in that game and [[spoiler:turns to the good side if you save him. With his strong sense of justice and disdain for the WWW,]] you would think that he would reappear later in the series right? No such luck.
** Other Navis that don't reappear or are mentioned are many of the bonus bosses from the games. These bosses often imply a hidden plot or scheme yet these plot threads never seem to travel between games (and even if the Navi does reappear, neither Megaman nor Lan recognize them, making the canon continuity of the secret areas very shaky). Oddly, by the start of the third game, Megaman could have fought the real Bass as many as '''''3''''' times after which Bass obviously escapes each time. However, in the third game, neither Lan nor Megaman recognize Bass from anywhere besides the fake version in the second game.
* WhatIf: The series stems from the question "What if Doctor Light worked in networking instead of robotics?" Meanwhile, Doctor Wily still worked in robotics, and became fiercely jealous when Light's projects took away his funding and public interest.
* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: Bass.EXE nurses a powerful grudge against humanity for giving him his DarkAndTroubledBackstory.
* WretchedHive: The Undernet is filled with criminal Navis, garden-variety thugs, and even Yakuza. The closest thing it has to a ruling class is "the Ranking", which is a selection of (up to) ten [=NetNavis=] carrying ranks; prospective Ranking entrants are encouraged to fight (kill, really, but [=MegaMan=] doesn't play that way) to the last man standing before they are sent after the Rank 10 [=NetNavi=].
* WhyDontYaJustShootHim: While Lan's opponents usually hack systems from out of sight, there are still plenty of instances in which Lan and his (generally larger and tougher) opponent both send their Navis to do battle from within the same room. In the time it takes to traverse a puzzle dungeon, fight through waves of RandomEncounters, and defeat a boss Navi, the enemy operator apparently never thinks to punch Lan out, or something. [[spoiler:They figure this out, but only right before the very end of the series.]]
** Approaching this problem from the other end is the question as to why the terrorist Operators never bail when the heroes happen upon them. It requires almost no effort to Jack a Navi Out from any location, but for some reason, most Navis linger for a BossBattle that they could stand to avoid. (Some Navis get around this by needing to complete an ongoing task, like [=BlastMan=], or not having anywhere to Jack-Out to or any means to do so, like Solo Navi [=BubbleMan=], but some, like [=ElecMan=] appear to gratuitously waste time by sticking around after their job is done.)
* YouAllLookFamiliar:
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d at one point. Justified in the Internet world, as the regularly reused navis are supposedly "standard" models. They're occasionally used by major characters; similarly, unimportant characters like [=LarkMan=] sometimes have unique sprites.
** There's a mention in ''6'' from the characters which notes that [=MegaMan=] "looks heavily modified", which possibly factors to the unique models.
** After an NPC stole Lan's battle chips during his first trip to Netopia in 2, another similar looking NPC notes how Lan stares at him angrily and said Lan shouldn't be blaming others just because they look alike.
* {{Zeerust}}: Zig-zagged - there's clearly "futuristic" technology that still doesn't look too out of place ten plus years later (Flat-screen television monitors, for example), but a clever eye can spot some outdated tech such as CRT monitors, which were much more common in the early 00s when the games were first created but are uncommon in the new tens. The games also show technology marching on in-universe as well - early on, a Navi user must physically insert the device into the jack-in port, the second game uses a wireless adapter as a plot point, and in the future games they can do so wirelessly - somewhat reflecting how technology with game boy connectivity (and other devices as well) marched on.
** [[JustifiedTrope Actually justified]] on two levels - you can conveniently jack into some of these devices implying that they were of recent creation (They were likely designed to look retro) ''and'' the game was set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture at best.
[[/folder]]
----
7th Oct '17 7:43:22 AM MayIncon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Obstacle chips and Terrain changing chips, especially in the third game where lots of strategies are made and broken by the same kind of chips. Their potency results in subsequent games reducing the strength and range of most terrain-changing abilities.

to:

** Obstacle chips and Terrain changing chips, especially in the third game where lots of strategies are made and broken by the same kind of chips. Their potency results in subsequent games reducing the strength strength, synergy and range of most terrain-changing abilities.



* VisualInitiativeQueue: The program deck in Battle Chip Challenge requires the player to arrange Battle Chips in a flowchart-like array with divergent paths. At the start of every round, a selection of up to three chips will be made as the program randomly determines a path through the deck, and they will be used in that order. Each Navi uses a Program Deck, so combat is the Navis using their first, second, and third Battle Chips, and then following up with their Signature Attack until one or the other is defeated.
* WakeUpCallBoss: [=ProtoMan=] is almost always this in his appearances; he moves faster than other enemies, [[OhCrap gets in your face]] more than other enemies, and makes use of hidden shielding and CounterAttack more than other enemies, requiring you to mostly wait for him to drop his guard... and then Counter Attack ''him'' in turn. (Mostly averted in 3, where he's saved for [[BonusBoss the post-game]]).
* WarmUpBoss: [=GutsMan=], by comparison, is almost always this in his appearances. He moves slower than other enemies, only gets in your face if you get too close to his area, has the most obvious tells where you can counter him, and he is constantly vulnerable. On top of that, his primary attack is a shockwave, making him little more than a bulky Mettaur virus. You can fight him within the first ten minutes of the first game, right after the tutorial, where he has a whopping 200 [=HP=].
* WeaksauceWeakness: Shadow viruses {{No Sell}}s everything but sword chips. There are no in-game justifications to this, but they are the only effective options for them.
* WeatherControlMachine:
** Made important in ''2'' when the computer suppressing the planet's weather is hacked, threatening to unleash years' worth of earthquakes and storms on the planet.
** Rehashed on more localized scales in ''4'' and ''6'', natch. In these cases, however, the real-world weather disruption is part of that chapter's boss Navi's schtick (in ''2'' it's just a byproduct of Net-centric weirdness).
* WelcomeToCorneria: Averted. NPC dialogue almost constantly changes, not only from chapter to chapter, but often with every triggered event flag during these chapters themselves.
* WellDoneSonGuy: The third game introduces us to Chaud's father, who is cold and aloof to everyone, even his son. His introduction alone re-colors Chaud's own haughty attitude in the first two games.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Throughout the series, characters simply disappear and are never mentioned again. While part of this is due to NominalImportance, it is sometimes quite odd. Sometimes it's handwaved by mentioning the character being in jail or something along those lines.
** There's a mysterious [=NetNavi=] in ''3'' that forges some connection between [=SciLab=], Bass, and Alpha. While the connection between those three entities is expounded, the Navi only appears for all of two scenes and we're never given any sort of closure regarding him.
** In the second game, Arashi Kazefuki fails Gospel and the Organizations leader tries to [[YouHaveFailedMe take him down with a suitcase bomb.]] The game explicitly mentions that the authorities didn't find any casualties associated with the bomb. However, the character doesn't appear again until the somewhat obscure Mega Man Battle Chip Challenge game which came out almost 2 years after the second game.
** Also from the second game, we have "The Doc" whose real name is never mentioned. He's a genius and mysterious programmer who resides in the Undernet, he can cure Freezeman's ice, his origin is never explained, the method to summon him is to invoke his code word on the Undernet chat board (the word(s) being, rather suspiciously, "WWW"), and arrives at Koto square after Megaman beats Freezeman to give exposition. He even says that he will send a bill directly to the government officials for services rendered (and has no doubt that they will pay). With the connections and skills all that implies, you think he would pop up now and again as an ally or a villain, but he never does.
** Similarly, you would think that Dr. Cossak would become more involved in the games after it's revealed that he created [[spoiler:Bass]] and that he would appear to help stop him in future games. Nope. He just vanishes from the series.
** Besides for Higsby, two other WWW members defected. They were Ms. Yuri, Ms. Mari's twin sister, and an old man who used to be Wily's assistant. This wouldn't be much of an issue if Lan hadn't needed Higsby to provide information on the WWW in both the second game and Transmission whereas the old man, who was with Wily since the beginning, would be much more familiar with the WWW's secrets. It could be explained as Lan not having either of their emails, but the makers of the game don't even bother with even the laziest handwave. Heck, Ms. Mari could probably have provided Lan with Yuri's contact information. You would think that the government officials would, at least, track them down for information after Lan found them tied up at Wily's base during the first game. [[AdultsAreUseless Nope.]]
** Zero from ''Network Transmission'' (set chronologically between the first two games) plays a major role in that game and [[spoiler:turns to the good side if you save him. With his strong sense of justice and disdain for the WWW,]] you would think that he would reappear later in the series right? No such luck.
** Other Navis that don't reappear or are mentioned are many of the bonus bosses from the games. These bosses often imply a hidden plot or scheme yet these plot threads never seem to travel between games (and even if the Navi does reappear, neither Megaman nor Lan recognize them, making the canon continuity of the secret areas very shaky). Oddly, by the start of the third game, Megaman could have fought the real Bass as many as '''''3''''' times after which Bass obviously escapes each time. However, in the third game, neither Lan nor Megaman recognize Bass from anywhere besides the fake version in the second game.
* WhatIf: The series stems from the question "What if Doctor Light worked in networking instead of robotics?" Meanwhile, Doctor Wily still worked in robotics, and became fiercely jealous when Light's projects took away his funding and public interest.
* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: Bass.EXE nurses a powerful grudge against humanity for giving him his DarkAndTroubledBackstory.
* WretchedHive: The Undernet is filled with criminal Navis, garden-variety thugs, and even Yakuza. The closest thing it has to a ruling class is "the Ranking", which is a selection of (up to) ten [=NetNavis=] carrying ranks; prospective Ranking entrants are encouraged to fight (kill, really, but [=MegaMan=] doesn't play that way) to the last man standing before they are sent after the Rank 10 [=NetNavi=].
* WhyDontYaJustShootHim: While Lan's opponents usually hack systems from out of sight, there are still plenty of instances in which Lan and his (generally larger and tougher) opponent both send their Navis to do battle from within the same room. In the time it takes to traverse a puzzle dungeon, fight through waves of RandomEncounters, and defeat a boss Navi, the enemy operator apparently never thinks to punch Lan out, or something. [[spoiler:They figure this out, but only right before the very end of the series.]]
** Approaching this problem from the other end is the question as to why the terrorist Operators never bail when the heroes happen upon them. It requires almost no effort to Jack a Navi Out from any location, but for some reason, most Navis linger for a BossBattle that they could stand to avoid. (Some Navis get around this by needing to complete an ongoing task, like [=BlastMan=], or not having anywhere to Jack-Out to or any means to do so, like Solo Navi [=BubbleMan=], but some, like [=ElecMan=] appear to gratuitously waste time by sticking around after their job is done.)
* YouAllLookFamiliar:
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d at one point. Justified in the Internet world, as the regularly reused navis are supposedly "standard" models. They're occasionally used by major characters; similarly, unimportant characters like [=LarkMan=] sometimes have unique sprites.
** There's a mention in ''6'' from the characters which notes that [=MegaMan=] "looks heavily modified", which possibly factors to the unique models.
** After an NPC stole Lan's battle chips during his first trip to Netopia in 2, another similar looking NPC notes how Lan stares at him angrily and said Lan shouldn't be blaming others just because they look alike.
* {{Zeerust}}: Zig-zagged - there's clearly "futuristic" technology that still doesn't look too out of place ten plus years later (Flat-screen television monitors, for example), but a clever eye can spot some outdated tech such as CRT monitors, which were much more common in the early 00s when the games were first created but are uncommon in the new tens. The games also show technology marching on in-universe as well - early on, a Navi user must physically insert the device into the jack-in port, the second game uses a wireless adapter as a plot point, and in the future games they can do so wirelessly - somewhat reflecting how technology with game boy connectivity (and other devices as well) marched on.
** [[JustifiedTrope Actually justified]] on two levels - you can conveniently jack into some of these devices implying that they were of recent creation (They were likely designed to look retro) ''and'' the game was set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture at best.
[[/folder]]
----

to:

* VisualInitiativeQueue: The program deck in Battle Chip Challenge requires the player to arrange Battle Chips in a flowchart-like array with divergent paths. At the start of every round, a selection of up to three chips will be made as the program randomly determines a path through the deck, and they will be used in that order. Each Navi uses a Program Deck, so combat is the Navis using their first, second, and third Battle Chips, and then following up with their Signature Attack until one or the other is defeated.
* WakeUpCallBoss: [=ProtoMan=] is almost always this in his appearances; he moves faster than other enemies, [[OhCrap gets in your face]] more than other enemies, and makes use of hidden shielding and CounterAttack more than other enemies, requiring you to mostly wait for him to drop his guard... and then Counter Attack ''him'' in turn. (Mostly averted in 3, where he's saved for [[BonusBoss the post-game]]).
* WarmUpBoss: [=GutsMan=], by comparison, is almost always this in his appearances. He moves slower than other enemies, only gets in your face if you get too close to his area, has the most obvious tells where you can counter him, and he is constantly vulnerable. On top of that, his primary attack is a shockwave, making him little more than a bulky Mettaur virus. You can fight him within the first ten minutes of the first game, right after the tutorial, where he has a whopping 200 [=HP=].
* WeaksauceWeakness: Shadow viruses {{No Sell}}s everything but sword chips. There are no in-game justifications to this, but they are the only effective options for them.
* WeatherControlMachine:
** Made important in ''2'' when the computer suppressing the planet's weather is hacked, threatening to unleash years' worth of earthquakes and storms on the planet.
** Rehashed on more localized scales in ''4'' and ''6'', natch. In these cases, however, the real-world weather disruption is part of that chapter's boss Navi's schtick (in ''2'' it's just a byproduct of Net-centric weirdness).
* WelcomeToCorneria: Averted. NPC dialogue almost constantly changes, not only from chapter to chapter, but often with every triggered event flag during these chapters themselves.
* WellDoneSonGuy: The third game introduces us to Chaud's father, who is cold and aloof to everyone, even his son. His introduction alone re-colors Chaud's own haughty attitude in the first two games.
* WhatHappenedToTheMouse: Throughout the series, characters simply disappear and are never mentioned again. While part of this is due to NominalImportance, it is sometimes quite odd. Sometimes it's handwaved by mentioning the character being in jail or something along those lines.
** There's a mysterious [=NetNavi=] in ''3'' that forges some connection between [=SciLab=], Bass, and Alpha. While the connection between those three entities is expounded, the Navi only appears for all of two scenes and we're never given any sort of closure regarding him.
** In the second game, Arashi Kazefuki fails Gospel and the Organizations leader tries to [[YouHaveFailedMe take him down with a suitcase bomb.]] The game explicitly mentions that the authorities didn't find any casualties associated with the bomb. However, the character doesn't appear again until the somewhat obscure Mega Man Battle Chip Challenge game which came out almost 2 years after the second game.
** Also from the second game, we have "The Doc" whose real name is never mentioned. He's a genius and mysterious programmer who resides in the Undernet, he can cure Freezeman's ice, his origin is never explained, the method to summon him is to invoke his code word on the Undernet chat board (the word(s) being, rather suspiciously, "WWW"), and arrives at Koto square after Megaman beats Freezeman to give exposition. He even says that he will send a bill directly to the government officials for services rendered (and has no doubt that they will pay). With the connections and skills all that implies, you think he would pop up now and again as an ally or a villain, but he never does.
** Similarly, you would think that Dr. Cossak would become more involved in the games after it's revealed that he created [[spoiler:Bass]] and that he would appear to help stop him in future games. Nope. He just vanishes from the series.
** Besides for Higsby, two other WWW members defected. They were Ms. Yuri, Ms. Mari's twin sister, and an old man who used to be Wily's assistant. This wouldn't be much of an issue if Lan hadn't needed Higsby to provide information on the WWW in both the second game and Transmission whereas the old man, who was with Wily since the beginning, would be much more familiar with the WWW's secrets. It could be explained as Lan not having either of their emails, but the makers of the game don't even bother with even the laziest handwave. Heck, Ms. Mari could probably have provided Lan with Yuri's contact information. You would think that the government officials would, at least, track them down for information after Lan found them tied up at Wily's base during the first game. [[AdultsAreUseless Nope.]]
** Zero from ''Network Transmission'' (set chronologically between the first two games) plays a major role in that game and [[spoiler:turns to the good side if you save him. With his strong sense of justice and disdain for the WWW,]] you would think that he would reappear later in the series right? No such luck.
** Other Navis that don't reappear or are mentioned are many of the bonus bosses from the games. These bosses often imply a hidden plot or scheme yet these plot threads never seem to travel between games (and even if the Navi does reappear, neither Megaman nor Lan recognize them, making the canon continuity of the secret areas very shaky). Oddly, by the start of the third game, Megaman could have fought the real Bass as many as '''''3''''' times after which Bass obviously escapes each time. However, in the third game, neither Lan nor Megaman recognize Bass from anywhere besides the fake version in the second game.
* WhatIf: The series stems from the question "What if Doctor Light worked in networking instead of robotics?" Meanwhile, Doctor Wily still worked in robotics, and became fiercely jealous when Light's projects took away his funding and public interest.
* WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds: Bass.EXE nurses a powerful grudge against humanity for giving him his DarkAndTroubledBackstory.
* WretchedHive: The Undernet is filled with criminal Navis, garden-variety thugs, and even Yakuza. The closest thing it has to a ruling class is "the Ranking", which is a selection of (up to) ten [=NetNavis=] carrying ranks; prospective Ranking entrants are encouraged to fight (kill, really, but [=MegaMan=] doesn't play that way) to the last man standing before they are sent after the Rank 10 [=NetNavi=].
* WhyDontYaJustShootHim: While Lan's opponents usually hack systems from out of sight, there are still plenty of instances in which Lan and his (generally larger and tougher) opponent both send their Navis to do battle from within the same room. In the time it takes to traverse a puzzle dungeon, fight through waves of RandomEncounters, and defeat a boss Navi, the enemy operator apparently never thinks to punch Lan out, or something. [[spoiler:They figure this out, but only right before the very end of the series.]]
** Approaching this problem from the other end is the question as to why the terrorist Operators never bail when the heroes happen upon them. It requires almost no effort to Jack a Navi Out from any location, but for some reason, most Navis linger for a BossBattle that they could stand to avoid. (Some Navis get around this by needing to complete an ongoing task, like [=BlastMan=], or not having anywhere to Jack-Out to or any means to do so, like Solo Navi [=BubbleMan=], but some, like [=ElecMan=] appear to gratuitously waste time by sticking around after their job is done.)
* YouAllLookFamiliar:
** {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d at one point. Justified in the Internet world, as the regularly reused navis are supposedly "standard" models. They're occasionally used by major characters; similarly, unimportant characters like [=LarkMan=] sometimes have unique sprites.
** There's a mention in ''6'' from the characters which notes that [=MegaMan=] "looks heavily modified", which possibly factors to the unique models.
** After an NPC stole Lan's battle chips during his first trip to Netopia in 2, another similar looking NPC notes how Lan stares at him angrily and said Lan shouldn't be blaming others just because they look alike.
* {{Zeerust}}: Zig-zagged - there's clearly "futuristic" technology that still doesn't look too out of place ten plus years later (Flat-screen television monitors, for example), but a clever eye can spot some outdated tech such as CRT monitors, which were much more common in the early 00s when the games were first created but are uncommon in the new tens. The games also show technology marching on in-universe as well - early on, a Navi user must physically insert the device into the jack-in port, the second game uses a wireless adapter as a plot point, and in the future games they can do so wirelessly - somewhat reflecting how technology with game boy connectivity (and other devices as well) marched on.
** [[JustifiedTrope Actually justified]] on two levels - you can conveniently jack into some of these devices implying that they were of recent creation (They were likely designed to look retro) ''and'' the game was set TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture at best.
[[/folder]]
----
c
7th Oct '17 7:41:59 AM MayIncon
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* BossInMooksClothing: Disjointed virus assortment can result in dangerously powerful viruses hiding in early areas. For example, in Battle Network 3, Elehornets are very rare encounters in the Teacher's Lounge server at ACDC Elementary. Elehornets are the [[UndergroundMonkey third version]] of a virus whose first and second versions, Elebee and Elewasp, are found in the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon and the BonusDungeon, respectively. Again, the third version hangs out ''at your school'', which is the first major area in the game. Such examples tend to be rare encounters -- merciful for the player just progressing through the game, but potentially frustrating for those trying to hunt them.

to:

* BossInMooksClothing: ''Battle Network 3'' has a handful of higher-level virus encounters dispersed throughout random computers that you can hunt down with search programs. Disjointed virus assortment can result in dangerously powerful viruses hiding in early areas. For example, in Battle Network 3, Elehornets are very rare encounters in the Teacher's Lounge server at ACDC Elementary. Elehornets are the [[UndergroundMonkey third version]] of a virus whose first and second versions, Elebee and Elewasp, are found in the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon and the BonusDungeon, respectively. Again, the third version hangs out ''at your school'', which is the first major area in the game. Such examples tend to be rare encounters -- merciful for the player just progressing through the game, but potentially frustrating for those trying to hunt them.



* BossInMookClothing: ''Battle Network 3'' has a handful of higher-level virus encounters dispersed throughout random computers that you can hunt down with search programs.
7th Oct '17 5:44:39 AM Gadjiltron
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** In every game from ''BN3'' on, achieving HundredPercentCompletion will upgrade the FinalBoss.

to:

** In every game from ''BN3'' ''[=BN3=]'' on, achieving HundredPercentCompletion will upgrade the FinalBoss.



* BossInMooksClothing: Disjointed virus assortment can result in dangerously powerful viruses hiding in early areas. For example, in Battle Network 3, Elehornets are very rare encounters in the Teacher's Lounge server at ACDC Elementary. Elehornets are the [[UndergroundMonkey third version]] of a virus whose first and second versions, Elebee and Elewasp, are found in the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon and the BonusDungeon, respectively. Again, the third version hangs out ''at your school'', which is the first major area in the game. Such examples tend to be rare encounters - merciful for the player just progressing through the game, but potentially frustrating for those trying to hunt them.



* BossRush: Found at the end of most games; in addition, the time trials in ''[=MMBN3=]'', but they come with asinine requirements.



* BossInMooksClothing: Disjointed virus assortment can result in dangerously powerful viruses hiding in early areas. For example, in Battle Network 3, Elehornets are very rare encounters in the Teacher's Lounge server at ACDC Elementary. Elehornets are the [[UndergroundMonkey third version]] of a virus whose first and second versions, Elebee and Elewasp, are found in the VeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon and the BonusDungeon, respectively. Again, the third version hangs out ''at your school'', which is the first major area in the game. Such examples tend to be rare encounters -- merciful for the player just progressing through the game, but potentially frustrating for those trying to hunt them.
* BossRush: The final dungeon of most games usually pits the player against improved versions of antagonistic bosses. In addition, the time trials in ''[=MMBN3=]'', but they come with asinine requirements.



* CastFromSanity: using the Dark Chips in [=BN4=] and [=BN5=] takes away your "sanity" from the invisible sanity gauge. Using them frequently enough will always make [=MegaMan=] be in the "dark" state, where he can get access to certain other powerful chips, but disables Soul Unisons and makes him unable to use "holy" chips like Sanctuary or Gun Del Sol. To get out of such a state, you have to do battles without using those chips, and you'll gradually turn better.

to:

* CastFromSanity: using Using the Dark Chips in [=BN4=] and [=BN5=] also takes away your "sanity" from the invisible sanity gauge. Using them frequently enough will always make [=MegaMan=] be in the "dark" state, where he can get access to certain other powerful chips, but disables Soul Unisons and makes him unable to use "holy" chips like Sanctuary or Gun Del Sol. To get out of such a state, you have to do battles without using those chips, and you'll gradually turn better.



* DesperationAttack: Beast Over in [=BN6=] is a transformation that functions like one. The conditions are that the player has used Beast Out and had it expire earlier in the battle before it becomes available. Bear in mind that Beast Out is already pretty strong and it would take a very strong enemy to still be standing after up to 3 rounds of it. Invoking this transformation turns [=MegaMan=] completely invincible and uncontrollable for the turn, jumping around the battlefield firing Buster shots and unleashing any loaded chips or Program Advances at ''double strength'' on top of the auto-target properties. Once the Custom Gauge fills, though, the transformation is cancelled, leaving [=MegaMan=] with debilitating debuffs and ailments, so this transformation is meant as a last resort to finish off the opponent in a pinch.
* DifficultButAwesome: There are a variety of chips that have [[GuideDangIt secret input commands]] that allow you to get some special functionality out of them...if you can punch them in fast enough. The most famous of these is the Variable Sword and Neo Variable Sword. The timing to input this code is shortly after using the chip, while holding the A button, and can be interrupted by enemy attacks, so it takes [[SomeDexterityRequired some physical skill to input the more complex commands.]]

to:

* DesperationAttack: Beast Over in [=BN6=] is a transformation that functions like one. The conditions are that the player has used Beast Out and had it expire earlier in the battle before it becomes available. Bear in mind that Beast Out is already pretty strong and it would take a very strong enemy to still be standing after up to 3 rounds of it. Invoking this transformation turns [=MegaMan=] completely invincible and uncontrollable for the turn, jumping around the battlefield firing Buster shots and unleashing any loaded chips or Program Advances at ''double strength'' on top of the auto-target properties. Once the Custom Gauge fills, though, the transformation is cancelled, leaving [=MegaMan=] severely weakened with debilitating debuffs and ailments, a case of HeroicRROD, so this transformation is meant as a last resort to finish off the opponent in a pinch.
* DifficultButAwesome: There are a variety of chips that have [[GuideDangIt secret input commands]] that allow you to get some special functionality out of them...if you can punch them in fast enough. The most famous of these is the Variable Sword and Neo Variable Sword. The timing to input this code is shortly after using the chip, while holding the A button, and can be interrupted by enemy attacks, so it takes [[SomeDexterityRequired some physical skill to input the more complex commands.commands while under fire.]]



** EncounterBait: The Oil Body, Fish, Battery, and Jungle programs increase the encounter rate for enemies of a certain Attribute - handy when hunting certain Battle Chips. Intentionally glitching the Sneak Run program turns it into a generalized form of this.

to:

** EncounterBait: The Oil Body, Fish, Battery, and Jungle programs increase the encounter rate for enemies of a certain Attribute - -- handy when hunting certain Battle Chips. Intentionally glitching the Sneak Run program turns it into a generalized form of this.



* EscapeBattleTechnique: Present in the first two games in the form of an "Escape" Battle Chip. In the first game, this was your ''only'' method of retreating from battle. The second game implemented the retreat command through the L button, and the battle chip then disappeared from all subsequent games.

to:

* EscapeBattleTechnique: Present in the first two games in the form of an "Escape" Battle Chip. In the first game, this was your ''only'' method of retreating from battle. The second game implemented the retreat command (with a chance of failure) through the L button, and the battle chip then disappeared from all subsequent games.



* JustKeepDriving: Averted - the cars actually stop when you step out into the street. The first game even has a section with functioning traffic lights.

to:

* JustKeepDriving: Averted - -- the cars actually stop when you step out into the street. The first game even has a section with functioning traffic lights.



** In ''Battle Network 5 DS'', some members of the same team can initiate a powerful CombinedAttack by tagging each other in while in Full-Synchro with Lan.

to:

** In ''Battle Network 5 DS'', some members of the same team can initiate a powerful CombinedAttack CombinationAttack by tagging each other in while in Full-Synchro with Lan.



** Experimented with in ''3'' and ''6'', in which [=MegaMan=] could domesticate and summon viruses through chips (the former) or copy them for tournament battle (the latter).
** You could even feed them in ''3'' to increase their power.

to:

** Experimented with in ''3'' and ''6'', in which [=MegaMan=] could domesticate and summon viruses through chips (the former) or copy them for tournament battle (the latter).
**
latter). You could even feed them in ''3'' to increase their power.



* SequelHook: The scene from ''[=BN2=]'' after the end credits, in which [[spoiler: Dr. Hikari suggests that someone was ''manipulating'' the leader of Gospel. That the Bonus Dungeon is named WWW Area doesn't help]].
* SequelSeries: ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' continues Battle Network's story 200 years into the future.

to:

* SequelHook: The scene from ''[=BN2=]'' after the end credits, in which [[spoiler: Dr. Hikari suggests that someone was ''manipulating'' the leader of Gospel. That the Bonus Dungeon is named WWW Area doesn't help]].
* SequelSeries: ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' continues Battle Network's story 200 years into the future.
SequelHook:


Added DiffLines:

** The scene from ''[=BN2=]'' after the end credits, in which [[spoiler: Dr. Hikari suggests that someone was ''manipulating'' the leader of Gospel. That the Bonus Dungeon is named WWW Area doesn't help]].
* SequelSeries: ''[[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Star Force]]'' continues Battle Network's story 200 years into the future.


Added DiffLines:

** NO-Beam hits everything down the row incredibly hard (its weakest form does ''200 damage''), but to use it you need an obstacle positioned behind you.
7th Oct '17 2:28:16 AM Gadjiltron
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%%* GameBreakingBug: See "UnwinnableByMistake."

to:

%%* * GameBreakingBug: See "UnwinnableByMistake."Battle Network 4, being the series' worst offender of ObviousBeta, has a handful of them. The Virtual Console release fortunately fixed most of these problems:
** During [=WoodMan's=] scenario in the ''Blue Moon'' version, the area will fail to load ''any time you leave a random encounter unless you're playing on an original {{UsefulNotes/GBA}}'' (that includes not just emulators, but the SP, Micro, Gameboy Player, and Nintendo DS). This will happen any time you battle viruses and even ''save'', so you better hope you can get through each of the Park Areas without either happening.[[note]]What's actually happening is that the load time (read: fading in) slows down (''way'' down), and if you wait for it to finish loading, it will return to full speed. Problem is, this could take easily twenty minutes for non-emulator systems, and even emulators with a forced speed boost can take their time.[[/note]] [[http://forums.therockmanexezone.com/topic/8858092/1/ Patches and AR codes that fix this]] have been developed by fans, however.
** A similar slowdown error caused by similar platform problems occurs in either version of ''4'' if one uses a [=GutsMan=] or [=AquaMan=] chip.
** An even worse example is the Free Space battle board. If you link up with the other version before you have all 6 of the double souls (this means a NewGamePlus ''Plus'' at the very minimum) then your game will crash and corrupt the game's code. And by that we mean that it carries a high chance to ''permanently break it!''



** Battle Network 4, being the series' worst offender of ObviousBeta, has a handful of them. The Virtual Console release fortunately fixed most of these problems:
*** During [=WoodMan's=] scenario in the ''Blue Moon'' version, the area will fail to load ''any time you leave a random encounter unless you're playing on an original {{UsefulNotes/GBA}}'' (that includes not just emulators, but the SP, Micro, Gameboy Player, and Nintendo DS). This will happen any time you battle viruses and even ''save'', so you better hope you can get through each of the Park Areas without either happening.[[note]]What's actually happening is that the load time (read: fading in) slows down (''way'' down), and if you wait for it to finish loading, it will return to full speed. Problem is, this could take easily twenty minutes for non-emulator systems, and even emulators with a forced speed boost can take their time.[[/note]] [[http://forums.therockmanexezone.com/topic/8858092/1/ Patches and AR codes that fix this]] have been developed by fans, however.
*** A similar slowdown error caused by similar platform problems occurs in either version of ''4'' if one uses a [=GutsMan=] chip.
*** There's also [=ColdMan=]'s scenario. The second phase of this scenario requires [=MegaMan=] to activate four different satellite dishes by sacrificing four fire chips, each a specific type and with a specific code. Woe unto he who does not have these chips because he fed them to a Chip Trader or traded them to a friend, because unless the Chip Trader decides to give them back, he's ''stuck''. (Be especially wary that this doesn't happen on the higher levels, where some of the viruses that drop these chips have disappeared from play).
*** An even worse example is the Free Space battle board. If you link up with the other version before you have all 6 of the double souls (this means a NewGamePlus ''Plus'' at the very minimum) then your game will crash and corrupt the game's code. And by that we mean that it carries a high chance to ''permanently break it!''

to:

** Battle Network 4, being the series' worst offender of ObviousBeta, has a handful of them. The Virtual Console release fortunately fixed most of these problems:
*** During [=WoodMan's=] scenario in the ''Blue Moon'' version, the area will fail to load ''any time you leave a random encounter unless you're playing on an original {{UsefulNotes/GBA}}'' (that includes not just emulators, but the SP, Micro, Gameboy Player, and Nintendo DS). This will happen any time you battle viruses and even ''save'', so you better hope you can get through each of the Park Areas without either happening.[[note]]What's actually happening is that the load time (read: fading in) slows down (''way'' down), and if you wait for it to finish loading, it will return to full speed. Problem is, this could take easily twenty minutes for non-emulator systems, and even emulators with a forced speed boost can take their time.[[/note]] [[http://forums.therockmanexezone.com/topic/8858092/1/ Patches and AR codes that fix this]] have been developed by fans, however.
*** A similar slowdown error caused by similar platform problems occurs in either version of ''4'' if one uses a [=GutsMan=] chip.
***
There's also [=ColdMan=]'s scenario.scenario in ''4''. The second phase of this scenario requires [=MegaMan=] to activate four different satellite dishes by sacrificing four fire chips, each a specific type and with a specific code. Woe unto he who does not have these chips because he fed them to a Chip Trader or traded them to a friend, because unless the Chip Trader decides to give them back, he's ''stuck''. (Be especially wary that this doesn't happen on the higher levels, where some of the viruses that drop these chips have disappeared from play).
*** An even worse example is the Free Space battle board. If you link up with the other version before you have all 6 of the double souls (this means a NewGamePlus ''Plus'' at the very minimum) then your game will crash and corrupt the game's code. And by that we mean that it carries a high chance to ''permanently break it!''
play).
22nd Sep '17 7:53:37 AM MayIncon
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[[folder:A to D]]

to:

[[folder:A [[folder:# to D]]D]]
* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: The series takes place during the ever popular year of 20XX. The first game was made back in 2001, when the internet was just beginning to be a household thing, hence the EverythingIsOnline focus. It's actually both amusing and scary how accurate-to-life some parts of this series are now that we've more-or-less hit that twenty minutes in RealLife as of 2017.



** Once you are given access to airplane travel, suddenly travelling to countries around the world is done almost instantly. Most notable during the [=KendoMan=] scenario, where Lan asked permission to delay the match for mere moments so that he can bring back Mr. Famous who is held hostage in Netfrica. Electopia and Netopia are relatively closer, yet it takes half a day to travel by plane in the second game.

to:

** Once you are given access to airplane travel, suddenly travelling to countries around the world is done almost instantly. Most notable While it is convenient for gameplay purposes, it causes some logical issues when strict time limit is concerned, most notably during the [=KendoMan=] scenario, scenario where Lan asked permission to delay the their match for mere moments what assumed to be a short time period so that he can bring back Mr. Famous who is held hostage in Netfrica. Electopia and Netopia are relatively closer, yet it takes half a day to travel by plane in the second game.



* TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture: The series takes place during the ever popular year of 20XX. The first game was made back in 2001, when the internet was just beginning to be a household thing, hence the EverythingIsOnline focus. It's actually both amusing and scary how accurate-to-life some parts of this series are now that we've more-or-less hit that twenty minutes in RealLife as of 2017.
21st Sep '17 7:13:56 PM charliebiggs
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** The third game doesn't even bother trying to hide it in the end game, when all the young male protagonists (Lan, Chaud, Dex, and Tora) head off to the WWW base and leave the girls behind. [[DudeWheresMyRespect Yai even points out that she was a quarterfinalist in the recent tournament (making her at least as good as Dex),]] but is immediately shut down by Chaud.

to:

** The third game doesn't even bother trying to hide it in the end game, endgame, when all the young male protagonists (Lan, Chaud, Dex, and Tora) head off to the WWW base and leave the girls behind. [[DudeWheresMyRespect Yai even points out that she was a quarterfinalist in the recent tournament (making her at least as good as Dex),]] but is immediately shut down by Chaud.
21st Sep '17 4:35:18 PM charliebiggs
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** Mayl in particular suffers from this; in the second game Lan forbids her from entering Yai's house when a criminal compromises it and fills it with gas (for context, she, Lan, and Dex had all just earned Z-licenses and thus she was at least Dex's equal, so according to the mechanics of the story itself, she was at least an entry-level city netbattler).

to:

** Mayl in particular suffers from this; in the second game Lan forbids her from entering Yai's house when a criminal compromises it and fills it with gas (for context, she, Lan, and Dex had all just earned Z-licenses and thus she was at least Dex's equal, so according to the mechanics of the story itself, she was at least an entry-level city netbattler).Netbattler).
** The third game doesn't even bother trying to hide it in the end game, when all the young male protagonists (Lan, Chaud, Dex, and Tora) head off to the WWW base and leave the girls behind. [[DudeWheresMyRespect Yai even points out that she was a quarterfinalist in the recent tournament (making her at least as good as Dex),]] but is immediately shut down by Chaud.
20th Sep '17 9:57:58 AM MasterJX
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** ''[=BN6=]'': He is at the center of an explosion that levels a sizable chunk of town. Not only did they find his body in the exact spot he was standing (again, at the center of an explosion that leveled a sizable chunk of town), but according to Lan, "he wasn't hurt very badly.", At least in the localized versions of the 6th game in the original Japanese versions of ''[=BN6=]'' he ends up dead from said explosion.

to:

** ''[=BN6=]'': He is at the center of an explosion that levels a sizable chunk of town. Not only did they find his body in the exact spot he was standing (again, at the center of an explosion that leveled a sizable chunk of town), but according to Lan, "he wasn't hurt very badly.", At least in the localized versions of the 6th game in the original Japanese versions of ''[=BN6=]'' he ends up dead from said explosion."
This list shows the last 10 events of 599. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.MegaManBattleNetwork