History VideoGame / GanbareGoemon

11th Feb '16 9:51:50 AM DracoKanji
Is there an issue? Send a Message
PSX was a DVR with a built in PS 2. To avoid confusion, abbreviating Play Station for the original console should be PS 1.
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation PSX]]): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) Goemon 2 SFC. ** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA).
to:
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation PSX]]): PS1]]): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) Goemon 2 SFC. ** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}S1): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA).

** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its PSX counterpart.
to:
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its PSX PS1 counterpart.
5th Feb '16 4:34:59 AM GrammarNavi
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Mr. Goemon'' (1986, Arcade) is a side-scrolling action game that is only thematically related to the later series, as it features a completely different gameplay and an art style based on ukyo paintings.
to:
* ''Mr. Goemon'' (1986, Arcade) UsefulNotes/{{Arcade|Game}}) is a side-scrolling action game that is only thematically related to the later series, as it features a completely different gameplay and an art style based on ukyo paintings.

*** ''Kessakusen! Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime to Magginesu'' (2005, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA): A port of the two first SFC games.
to:
*** ''Kessakusen! Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime to Magginesu'' (2005, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA): UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA): A port of the two first SFC games.

* Meanwhile, a plethora of GameBoy games have been released. Only two of them got released oversas: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Sarawareta Ebisumaru'' (1991, {{G|ameBoy}}B): Released in Europe as part of ''Konami GB Collection Vol.3'' as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (2000, {{G|ameBoy}}BC). It is available worldwide on the 3DS eShop. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuro Fune-tō no Nazo'' (1997, {{G|ameBoy}}B): a mediocre Zelda clone released as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, {{G|ameBoy}}B) in the west. * Other Japan-only GameBoy titles are: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Tengu-tō no Gyakushū'' (1999, {{G|ameBoy}}BC): an RPG like the Gaiden Famicom series. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, {{G|ameBoy}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Tries to capitalize on the Pokémon success. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Seikūshi Dainamaittsu Arawaru!!'' (2000, {{G|ameBoy}}BC), the best GameBoyColor entry in the series: it plays like a port of Goemon 2 SFC. * The PlayStation opuses were not met with nearly as much success as the N64 games. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, {{P|layStation}}SX): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, {{P|layStation}}SX): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, [[PlayStation PSX]]): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) Goemon 2 SFC. ** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, {{P|layStation}}SX): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA). * The Nintendo 64 games, notable for being localized more accurately: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, {{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, {{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its PSX counterpart. ** ''Ganbare Goemon Derodero Dōchū Obake Tenko Mori'' (1998. {{N|intendo64}}), Released in American as ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', and in Europe as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon 2'' (1998, {{N|intendo64}}64): a 2.5 sidescroller. A highlight of the series. ** ''Goemon Mononoke Sugoroku'' (1999, {{N|intendo64}}64): A Japan-only spin-off board game, with Mons elements. Links with ''Mononoke Dōchū''. * ''Bōken Jidai Katsugeki Goemon'' (2000, {{P|laystation2}}S2): A slightly DarkerAndEdgier attempt at reimagining the series, with a kid Goemon with a pet white tiger, and a more serious tone. Has cameos from long-time [=PCs=] Yae, Sasuke, and Ebisamaru. Has a complete [[VaporWare unreleased english localization]] by WorkingDesigns. * ''Ganbare Goemon: Tōkai Dōchū - Ōedo Tengu-ri Kaeshi no Maki'' (2005, {{N|intendoDS}}DS): Marks the return of the series to its former glory, with a gameplay similar to the first N64 with better controls. Upon being linked to the GBA port of the two first SNES games, it unlocks various cameos from earlier games [=NPCs=].
to:
* Meanwhile, a plethora of GameBoy UsefulNotes/GameBoy games have been released. Only two of them got released oversas: overseas: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Sarawareta Ebisumaru'' (1991, {{G|ameBoy}}B): UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B): Released in Europe as part of ''Konami GB Collection Vol.3'' as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (2000, {{G|ameBoy}}BC).UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC). It is available worldwide on the 3DS eShop. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuro Fune-tō no Nazo'' (1997, {{G|ameBoy}}B): UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B): a mediocre Zelda clone released as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, {{G|ameBoy}}B) UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoy}}B) in the west. * Other Japan-only GameBoy UsefulNotes/GameBoy titles are: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Tengu-tō no Gyakushū'' (1999, {{G|ameBoy}}BC): UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): an RPG like the Gaiden Famicom series. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Mononoke Dōchū - Tobidase Nabe Bugyō!'' (1999, {{G|ameBoy}}BC): UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC): Links with ''Mononoke Sugoroku''. Tries to capitalize on the Pokémon success. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Seikūshi Dainamaittsu Arawaru!!'' (2000, {{G|ameBoy}}BC), UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyColor}}BC), the best GameBoyColor UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor entry in the series: it plays like a port of Goemon 2 SFC. * The PlayStation UsefulNotes/PlayStation opuses were not met with nearly as much success as the N64 games. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Uchū Kaizoku Akogingu'' (1996, {{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): a 2D sidescroller, inspired from Goemon 3 SFC. It ditches long-time [=PCs=] Yae and Sasuke for two ReplacementScrappy old men. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Kuru Nara Koi! Ayashige Ikka no Kuroi Kage'' (1998, {{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): a full 3D game. Hit the PolygonCeiling pretty hard, and is widely considered the worst console Goemon game, save for its Goemon Impact sequences. ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Ōedo Daikaiten'' (2001, [[PlayStation [[UsefulNotes/PlayStation PSX]]): where the series went back to its 2D roots, with a 2.5D sidescroller, inspired from (and bordering on ripping off) Goemon 2 SFC. ** ''Goemon Shin Sedai Shūmei!'' (2001, {{P|layStation}}SX): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation}}SX): A spinoff with a futuristic setting and a new cast, with a young spiky-haired Goemon. Fans didn't appreciate. It was ported (with many cuts) to the GBA as ''Goemon New Age Shutsudō!'' (2002, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA). UsefulNotes/{{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA). * The Nintendo 64 UsefulNotes/{{Nintendo 64}} games, notable for being localized more accurately: ** ''Ganbare Goemon: Neo Momoyama Bakufu no Odori'' (1997, {{N|intendo64}}64), UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), released overseas as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon'' (1998, {{N|intendo64}}64).UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64). A full-3D platformer, yet more successful than its PSX counterpart. ** ''Ganbare Goemon Derodero Dōchū Obake Tenko Mori'' (1998. {{N|intendo64}}), UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64), Released in American as ''Goemon's Great Adventure'', and in Europe as ''Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon 2'' (1998, {{N|intendo64}}64): UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): a 2.5 sidescroller. A highlight of the series. ** ''Goemon Mononoke Sugoroku'' (1999, {{N|intendo64}}64): UsefulNotes/{{N|intendo64}}64): A Japan-only spin-off board game, with Mons elements. Links with ''Mononoke Dōchū''. * ''Bōken Jidai Katsugeki Goemon'' (2000, {{P|laystation2}}S2): UsefulNotes/{{P|layStation2}}S2): A slightly DarkerAndEdgier attempt at reimagining the series, with a kid Goemon with a pet white tiger, and a more serious tone. Has cameos from long-time [=PCs=] Yae, Sasuke, and Ebisamaru. Has a complete [[VaporWare unreleased english localization]] by WorkingDesigns. * ''Ganbare Goemon: Tōkai Dōchū - Ōedo Tengu-ri Kaeshi no Maki'' (2005, {{N|intendoDS}}DS): UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoDS}}DS): Marks the return of the series to its former glory, with a gameplay similar to the first N64 with better controls. Upon being linked to the GBA port of the two first SNES games, it unlocks various cameos from earlier games [=NPCs=].
8th Nov '15 9:04:06 AM LadyYuki
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* UnwillingSuspension: Koban the cat in ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja'' is suspended from the ceiling by a single rope when you find him.
6th Nov '15 5:32:27 PM tenryufan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* CutAndPasteTranslation: The instruction manual of ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja''. On the one hand, it's humorous tone fits the game fairly well. On the other hand, ''it completely makes stuff up''.
15th Jun '15 8:47:27 PM universalperson
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* CutAndPasteTranslation: The instruction manual of ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja''. On the one hand, it's humorous tone fits the game fairly well. On the other hand, ''it completely makes stuff up''.
11th Jun '15 2:28:45 PM macks2010
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Semantical correction. The intention was clear, the grammar was fine, but the meaning would imply something obviously not in the intention. That's as clearly as I can summarize it so if you're confused, just check the associated diff
While Western gamers are largely unfamiliar with the series, it's actually one of Konami's biggest {{Cash Cow Franchise}}s in Japan, having spawned a great number of games (including some manga, a few anime, and loads of merchandise) since its debut. But if the games are so popular, then why aren't more of them released in English?
to:
While Western gamers are largely unfamiliar with the series, it's actually one of Konami's biggest {{Cash Cow Franchise}}s in Japan, having spawned a great number of numerous games (including (but also some manga, a few anime, and loads of merchandise) since its debut. But if the games are so popular, then why aren't more of them released in English?
29th Nov '14 9:45:39 AM rjd1922
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Dōchū'' (1986, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) is the true game in the series, an attempt to create a 3D platformer on the NES by adopting an overhead view. It is notable for being the first 2 Megabit cartridge on the Famicom and the last game to feature old Konami logo. The [=MSX2=] version released in 1987 features redesigned stages in order to better suit the hardware's lack of scrolling capability. A sequel was released titled ''Ganbare Goemon 2'' (1989, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]), which added 2-player co-op and introduced Goemon's faithful sidekick, Ebisumaru. * Two spin-off traditional RPG surfaced: ''Ganbare Goemon Gaiden: Kieta Ōgun Kiseru'' (1990, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) and ''Ganbare Goemon Gaiden 2: Tenka no Zaihō'' (1992, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) . They are notable for using special double-sized cartridges, and for ditching the original gameplay in favour of a more elaborate story. Yae, and Kurobe (the ninja cat) are introduced here, with some cameos from [[Franchise/{{Castlevania}} Simon Belmont]] and VideoGame/{{Twinbee}}.
to:
* ''Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Dōchū'' (1986, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) is the true game in the series, an attempt to create a 3D platformer on the NES by adopting an overhead view. It is notable for being the first 2 Megabit cartridge on the Famicom and the last game to feature old Konami logo. The [=MSX2=] version released in 1987 features redesigned stages in order to better suit the hardware's lack of scrolling capability. A sequel was released titled ''Ganbare Goemon 2'' (1989, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]), which added 2-player co-op and introduced Goemon's faithful sidekick, Ebisumaru. * Two spin-off traditional RPG surfaced: ''Ganbare Goemon Gaiden: Kieta Ōgun Kiseru'' (1990, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) and ''Ganbare Goemon Gaiden 2: Tenka no Zaihō'' (1992, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) . They are notable for using special double-sized cartridges, and for ditching the original gameplay in favour of a more elaborate story. Yae, and Kurobe (the ninja cat) are introduced here, with some cameos from [[Franchise/{{Castlevania}} Simon Belmont]] and VideoGame/{{Twinbee}}.

** ''Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime Kyūshutsu Emaki'' (1991, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) was the first one, and the only of the SNES offering to have a release overseas as ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja'' (1992{{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}NES). ** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second had a case of SequelDifficultyDrop, and the third was similar in many aspects to Zelda II, although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard. *** ''Ganbare Goemon 2: Kiteretsu Shōgun Magginesu'' (1993, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) *** ''Ganbare Goemon 3: Shishi Jūrokubē no Karakuri Manji-gatame'' (1994, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) *** ''Ganbare Goemon Kirakira Dōchū - Boku ga Dancer ni Natta Wake'' (1995, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC)
to:
** ''Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime Kyūshutsu Emaki'' (1991, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]) was the first one, and the only of the SNES offering to have a release overseas as ''Legend of the Mystical Ninja'' (1992{{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}NES). (1992, [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SNES]]). ** There were three more Super Famicom offerings: the second had a case of SequelDifficultyDrop, and the third was similar in many aspects to ''[[VideoGame/ZeldaIITheAdventureOfLink Zelda II, II]]'', although with the best side-scrolling sections in the entire series. Both of them introduced Mode-7 mecha boss battles, after the castles' bosses. These starred the famous [[HumongousMecha Goemon Impact]]. The fourth one is the one with the best level-design, graphics and situations, although it is NintendoHard. *** ''Ganbare Goemon 2: Kiteretsu Shōgun Magginesu'' (1993, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]) *** ''Ganbare Goemon 3: Shishi Jūrokubē no Karakuri Manji-gatame'' (1994, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC) [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]) *** ''Ganbare Goemon Kirakira Dōchū - Boku ga Dancer ni Natta Wake'' (1995, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC)[[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]])

* Another puzzler spin-off, with prerendered graphics, starring Ebisumaru, has been released as ''Soreyuke Ebisumaru: Karakuri Meiro'' (1996, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC), with FakeDifficulty due to awful isometric perspective controls.
to:
* Another puzzler spin-off, with prerendered graphics, starring Ebisumaru, has been released as ''Soreyuke Ebisumaru: Karakuri Meiro'' (1996, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC), [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem SFC]]), with FakeDifficulty due to awful isometric perspective controls.
14th Aug '14 1:32:57 AM Saurubiker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
*** ''Kessakusen! Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime to Magginesu'' (2005, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA): A port of the two first SNES games.
to:
*** ''Kessakusen! Ganbare Goemon: Yuki-hime to Magginesu'' (2005, {{G|ameBoyAdvance}}BA): A port of the two first SNES SFC games.
14th Aug '14 1:32:27 AM Saurubiker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
*** ''Ganbare Goemon 4: Kirakira Dōchū - Boku ga Dancer ni Natta Wake'' (1995, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC)
to:
*** ''Ganbare Goemon 4: Kirakira Dōchū - Boku ga Dancer ni Natta Wake'' (1995, {{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}FC)
14th Aug '14 1:31:38 AM Saurubiker
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Mr. Goemon'' (1986, Arcade) is a side-scrolling action game that is only thematically related to the later series, as it features a completely different gameplay and art style. When Konami decided to release a spinoff for home consoles titled''Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Dōchū'' (1986, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) (1987, [=MSX2=]), its popularity exploded, paving the way for a long-running franchise. It was ported to the GBA in 2004 as part of the Famicom Mini collection. It has a direct sequel improving the same gameplay style, called ''Ganbare Goemon 2'' (1989, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]).
to:
* ''Mr. Goemon'' (1986, Arcade) is a side-scrolling action game that is only thematically related to the later series, as it features a completely different gameplay and an art style. When Konami decided to release a spinoff for home consoles titled''Ganbare style based on ukyo paintings. * ''Ganbare Goemon! Karakuri Dōchū'' (1986, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]) (1987, [=MSX2=]), its popularity exploded, paving is the way true game in the series, an attempt to create a 3D platformer on the NES by adopting an overhead view. It is notable for a long-running franchise. It was ported to being the GBA in 2004 as part of first 2 Megabit cartridge on the Famicom Mini collection. It has a direct and the last game to feature old Konami logo. The [=MSX2=] version released in 1987 features redesigned stages in order to better suit the hardware's lack of scrolling capability. A sequel improving the same gameplay style, called was released titled ''Ganbare Goemon 2'' (1989, [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem FC]]).FC]]), which added 2-player co-op and introduced Goemon's faithful sidekick, Ebisumaru.
This list shows the last 10 events of 68. Show all.