History VideoGame / FireEmblemAkaneia

5th Aug '16 4:23:40 PM Starlight36
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** Some classes in Dark Dragon and the Sword of Light couldn't promote, even ones that had an obvious class that they would promote into already in the game. Fighters, Pirates, and Thieves simply had nothing to promote into, while Knights and Hunters were unable to promote despite Generals and Horsemen already existing in the game. Remakes have since fixed this, however, by implementing proper promotions for Knights, Hunters, Fighters, and Pirates, and allowing Thieves and other classes without promoted forms to reach level 30 as compensation.

to:

** Some classes in Dark Shadow Dragon and the Sword Blade of Light couldn't promote, even ones that had an obvious class that they would promote into already in the game. Fighters, Pirates, and Thieves simply had nothing to promote into, while Knights and Hunters were unable to promote despite Generals and Horsemen already existing in the game. Remakes have since fixed this, however, by implementing proper promotions for Knights, Hunters, Fighters, and Pirates, and allowing Thieves and other classes without promoted forms to reach level 30 as compensation.
5th Aug '16 4:22:44 PM Starlight36
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** Some classes in Dark Dragon and the Sword of Light couldn't promote, even ones that had an obvious class that they would promote into already in the game. Fighters, Pirates, and Thieves simply had nothing to promote into, while Knights and Hunters were unable to promote despite Generals and Horsemen already existing in the game. Remakes have since changed this, however.

to:

** Some classes in Dark Dragon and the Sword of Light couldn't promote, even ones that had an obvious class that they would promote into already in the game. Fighters, Pirates, and Thieves simply had nothing to promote into, while Knights and Hunters were unable to promote despite Generals and Horsemen already existing in the game. Remakes have since changed fixed this, however.however, by implementing proper promotions for Knights, Hunters, Fighters, and Pirates, and allowing Thieves and other classes without promoted forms to reach level 30 as compensation.
5th Aug '16 4:19:43 PM Starlight36
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** [[NoExperiencePointsForMedic Using healing staves didn't yield EXP in the original]]; instead, healers could only gain [=EXP=] and level up by ''surviving being attacked''. On the upside, the [=EXP=] yield per battle survived is equivalent to having ''killed'' the enemy that attacked them, which leads to an unintentional PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling of sorts for your healers in Chapter 3, by abusing a Thief standing adjacent to a fortress, allowing you to quickly—and relatively safely—boost your healers all the way up to the level cap of 20 very early in the game.

to:

** [[NoExperiencePointsForMedic Using healing staves didn't yield EXP in the original]]; instead, healers could only gain [=EXP=] and level up by ''surviving being attacked''. On the upside, the [=EXP=] yield per battle survived is equivalent to having ''killed'' the enemy that attacked them, which leads to an unintentional PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling of sorts for your healers in Chapter 3, 3; by abusing a Thief standing adjacent to a fortress, allowing you to can quickly—and relatively safely—boost your healers all the way up to the level cap of 20 very early in the game.



* LostForever: The Falchion in ''Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light'' and ''Mystery of the Emblem''. [[EleventhHourSuperpower You know, the sword that is pretty much the only way to win the game]]? ''Shadow Dragon'' fixes that by giving you a weaker version if you fail to get the actual Falchion and let Tiki (the other primary way to beat the final boss) die, though in the remake the Falchion isn't necessary to beat the boss. If, for example, Marth was barely used throughout the game and thus still of a low level, it's still possible to complete the final chapter with said low-level Marth sitting on a fort to prevent reinforcements spawning while others take down the boss. Even in the original, it was possible to [[DeathOfAThousandCuts cut]] [[CherryTapping him to death]].

to:

* LostForever: The Falchion in ''Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light'' and ''Mystery of the Emblem''. [[EleventhHourSuperpower You know, the sword that is pretty much the only way to win the game]]? ''Shadow Dragon'' fixes that by giving you a weaker version if you fail to get the actual Falchion and let Tiki (the other primary way to beat the final boss) die, though in the remake the Falchion isn't necessary to beat the boss. If, for example, Marth was barely used throughout the game and thus still of a low level, it's still possible to complete the final chapter with said low-level Marth sitting on a fort to prevent reinforcements spawning while others take down the boss. Even in the original, it was possible to [[DeathOfAThousandCuts cut]] cut him]] [[CherryTapping him to death]].
5th Aug '16 4:18:03 PM Starlight36
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** Using healing staves didn't yield [=EXP=] in the original; instead, healers could only gain [=EXP=] and level up by ''surviving being attacked''. On the upside, the [=EXP=] yield per battle survived is equivalent to having ''killed'' the enemy that attacked them, which leads to an unintentional PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling of sorts for your healers in Chapter 3, by abusing a Thief standing adjacent to a fortress, allowing you to quickly—and relatively safely—boost your healers all the way up to the level cap of 20 very early in the game.

to:

** [[NoExperiencePointsForMedic Using healing staves didn't yield [=EXP=] EXP in the original; original]]; instead, healers could only gain [=EXP=] and level up by ''surviving being attacked''. On the upside, the [=EXP=] yield per battle survived is equivalent to having ''killed'' the enemy that attacked them, which leads to an unintentional PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling of sorts for your healers in Chapter 3, by abusing a Thief standing adjacent to a fortress, allowing you to quickly—and relatively safely—boost your healers all the way up to the level cap of 20 very early in the game.
5th Aug '16 4:13:48 PM Starlight36
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** [[RareCandy Stat boosters]] were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger improvement than an additional four points in any other stat. Shadow Dragon, of course, syncs the stat boosters up with their modern counterparts, making them significantly more balanced.

to:

** [[RareCandy Stat boosters]] were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP).HP) being outliers. The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger improvement than an additional four points in any other stat. Shadow Dragon, of course, syncs the stat boosters up with their modern counterparts, making them significantly more balanced.
5th Aug '16 4:10:40 PM Starlight36
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** [[RareCandy Stat boosters]] were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger impact than an additional four points in any other stat.

to:

** [[RareCandy Stat boosters]] were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger impact improvement than an additional four points in any other stat.stat. Shadow Dragon, of course, syncs the stat boosters up with their modern counterparts, making them significantly more balanced.
5th Aug '16 4:07:59 PM Starlight36
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** Stat boosters were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger impact than an additional four points in any other stat.

to:

** [[RareCandy Stat boosters boosters]] were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger impact than an additional four points in any other stat.
5th Aug '16 4:06:39 PM Starlight36
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Stat boosters were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4~+7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which is a ''much'' bigger increase than an additional four points in any other stat.

to:

** Stat boosters were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4~+7 +4 to +7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which which, in practice, is a ''much'' bigger increase impact than an additional four points in any other stat.
5th Aug '16 4:03:52 PM Starlight36
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* EasyModeMockery: If you kept on [[WeHaveReserves losing your replacements]], ''Shadow Dragon'' would start giving you ones with rather insulting names like "Lucer", "Auffle", "Laim", "Rejek", "Owend", "Wymp", and "Wieklin".


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** Stat cap variance between classes wasn't introduced yet, and as a result, Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light had universal caps of 52 for maximum HP and 20 for all other stats.
** Double attacking originally only required an attack speed lead of ''1'' in order to pull off, making them much more frequent for both player and enemy units.
** While weapon weight existed, no stat counteracted it, making it effectively a varying fixed speed penalty attached to each weapon.
** Stat boosters were a lot more potent than their future counterparts, which made them downright excessive when combined with Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light's much smaller stat scale. Most stat boosters give in the ballpark of +4~+7 to their respective stats, with the outlying Dracoshield (+3 Defense) and Seraph Robe (+9 Max HP). The most egregious, however, despite falling inside the general range, is the Boots, which give a whopping ''+4 Movement'', which is a ''much'' bigger increase than an additional four points in any other stat.
* EasyModeMockery: If you kept on [[WeHaveReserves losing your replacements]], ''Shadow Dragon'' would start giving you ones with rather insulting names like "Lucer", "Auffle", "Laim", "Rejek", "Owend", "Wymp", and "Wieklin".
5th Aug '16 3:40:55 PM Starlight36
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** The sidequest requirements imply that those replacement units that you get for losing too much characters actually existed, and they are the ones sacrificed in order to attain the sidequest characters. In the beginning of Book 2 Tutorial, My Unit can visit Marth attending to a graveyard of fallen soldiers, implying that.


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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: The original Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light for the Famicom/NES, in droves:
** The iconic [[ElementalRockPaperScissors Weapon Triangle]] didn't exist yet, and wouldn't be introduced until [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Genealogy of the Holy War]]. As a result, weapon types weren't distinguished all that differently from how they would be in a more standard [=RPG=].
** Different weapon ranks for each weapon type also had yet to be introduced. Instead, there existed a "Weapon Level" ''stat'', increased randomly during level up just like any other stat. Weapons had numerical weapon level values that a compatible character's Weapon Level stat would need to match or exceed in order to be able to use them. However, despite the cap being 20, the highest weapon level requirement of any regular weapon is ''9''. The only ones higher are [[InfinityPlusOneSword the legendary Lance, Gradivus]], at 14, and [[InfinityPlusOneSword the legendary Bow, Parthia]], at 13.
** All throughout the first three games, Axes as a weapon type were inexplicably shafted for some reason. Shadow Dragon and the Blade of Light gave you only four Axe-users near the beginning, neither of the two Axe-using classes could promote, and armories stop selling Axes altogether after Chapter 7, with a single odd last call for rearming your Axe-wielders in Chapter 20. In Gaiden and the original Mystery of the Emblem, however, Axes were simply an enemy-only weapon type, with a few popping up in Mystery of the Emblem to serve as VendorTrash.
** Magic in general was very strange compared to later installments. The "Magic" stat simply didn't exist yet, and nothing existed to take its place in the calculations for magical attack power. Additionally, all characters barring [[EleventhHourRanger Gotoh]] had 0 base Resistance, and ''nobody'' had any Resistance growth; the only ways to increase Resistance were temporarily with a Ward staff, or permanently with a Talisman. As a result of this, Magic tomes ended up being functionally [[FixedDamageAttack Fixed Damage Attacks]] most of the time, albeit with the same chance of striking a damage-tripling critical hit as any other attack.
** Some classes in Dark Dragon and the Sword of Light couldn't promote, even ones that had an obvious class that they would promote into already in the game. Fighters, Pirates, and Thieves simply had nothing to promote into, while Knights and Hunters were unable to promote despite Generals and Horsemen already existing in the game. Remakes have since changed this, however.
** The Mercenary and Myrmidon class lines were originally a single class line, using the names of the Mercenary-family classes but functioning like a blend of the two. Additionally, Knights were able to wield both Swords and Lances, as opposed to being restricted to one weapon type.
** Using healing staves didn't yield [=EXP=] in the original; instead, healers could only gain [=EXP=] and level up by ''surviving being attacked''. On the upside, the [=EXP=] yield per battle survived is equivalent to having ''killed'' the enemy that attacked them, which leads to an unintentional PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling of sorts for your healers in Chapter 3, by abusing a Thief standing adjacent to a fortress, allowing you to quickly—and relatively safely—boost your healers all the way up to the level cap of 20 very early in the game.
** Experience yield calculations were also very rigid, and much more transparent than in later games. Enemies have [=EXP=] "stats", just like player-controlled characters, which, for enemies, is used to indicate how much [=EXP=] a same-tier unit will receive for killing them. For engagements that fail to kill the enemy, the amount of [=EXP=] gained is equal to the amount of damage your character did, up to 20 [=EXP=].
** Item durabilities were much less symmetrical than the now standard "multiples of five" setup, and weapons weren't divided as cleanly into sets of equivalent power tiers as in later games. The Iron Sword was the only base weapon labeled with a material (the others being simply Lance, Axe, and Bow), and, in the original game, Marth got no fewer than ''three'' different personal Swords throughout the game! One of these Swords, Mercurius, has since been made accessible to all Sword-wielding characters in remakes, but originally, it was Marth-exclusive, like Rapiers or the iconic [[InfinityPlusOneSword Falchion]].
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