History VideoGame / EmperorRiseOfTheMiddleKingdom

17th Jan '18 6:21:21 AM BeerBaron
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* VideoGameDelegationPenalty: Inverted with bribing armies. This is much faster than actually fighting, which cuts into your manpower, slowing down production for months, and frees you from having to maintain expensive troops. That said, if you maintain zero troops whatsoever other cities will happily attack you.
29th Nov '17 9:34:35 AM DrakeClawfang
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* JustTheFirstCitizen: Your formal title is usually just "city administrator". Despite this, you not only control the entire day-to-day functions of your city, you also run the military, oversee international trade and diplomacy, and are routinely sent out to found other cities from scratch. While you are almost never TheEmperor, you might as well be for how powerful you are.
27th Nov '17 6:07:58 PM DrakeClawfang
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** AI cities will often laugh in your face if you demand something of them, even if it's something they produce in surplus and you have previously sent them dozens of units of goods they need. Conversely, when the AI demands something of you, they will be outraged if you don't comply, even if there's no reasonable way for you to get what they want in time. For instance, they'll demand crops that are out of season, or commodities you simply can't produce, and expect you to pay up with as little as two months of notice.

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** AI cities will often laugh in your face if you demand something of them, even if it's something they produce in surplus and you have previously sent them dozens of units of goods they need. Conversely, when the AI demands something of you, they will be outraged if you don't comply, even if there's no reasonable way for you to get what they want in time. For instance, they'll demand crops that are out of season, or commodities you simply can't produce, and expect you to pay up fork over a dozen units of it with as little as two months of notice.
27th Nov '17 6:05:20 PM DrakeClawfang
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* ChekhovsGunman: Those Nomad Camps in the north? Just another city, in fact they quickly become hard to negotiate with, not that there's much to make trade worth it. They're eventually a minor nuisance, best to forget about them and just build up an army in case they attack. Fast forward to the last campaign where they aren't even on the map, until the last few missions where they reappear, now named... '''Mongolian Empire'''? OhCrap.

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* ChekhovsGunman: Those Nomad Camps in the north? Just another city, in fact they quickly become hard to negotiate with, not that there's much to make trade worth it. They're eventually a minor nuisance, best to forget about them and just build up an army in case they attack. Fast forward to the last campaign few campaigns where they aren't even on the map, until the last final few missions where they reappear, now named... '''Mongolian Empire'''? OhCrap.
27th Nov '17 6:01:58 PM DrakeClawfang
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* LoopholeAbuse: Buildings that spawn service walkers, like religious shrines, inspector towers, and so forth, will only have their walkers walk so far before they return to their spawn building. However, on the return trip they will always take the shortest path back, disregarding gates and roadblocks to get back. Clever city planning can exploit this to effectively double their patrol zone. For example, a herbalist walker will walk 30 tiles before returning to their shop; build their patrol path in a loop 58 tiles long, and when they hit their 30th tile they'll keep walking along the other side of the loop since it is the shorter path back.

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* LoopholeAbuse: LoopholeAbuse:
**
Buildings that spawn service walkers, like religious shrines, inspector towers, and so forth, will only have their walkers walk so far before they return to their spawn building. However, on the return trip they will always take the shortest path back, disregarding gates and roadblocks to get back. Clever city planning can exploit this to effectively double their patrol zone. For example, a herbalist walker will walk 30 tiles before returning to their shop; build their patrol path in a loop 58 tiles long, and when they hit their 30th tile they'll keep walking along the other side of the loop since it is the shorter path back.back.
** A building's feng shui cannot change after it is constructed. This can be exploited by putting buildings near trees to get them good feng shui, then destroying those trees to change the elemental alignment of the terrain so different buildings can be placed there.
26th Nov '17 10:09:25 AM DrakeClawfang
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* HollywoodSpelling: Some city and people names are spelled phonetically instead of how they ought to be spelled. Somewhat justifiable since they're all in Ancient Chinese, and a lot of such names probably can be translated into direct English in different ways.

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* HollywoodSpelling: Some city and people names are spelled phonetically instead of how they ought to be spelled. Somewhat justifiable since they're all in Ancient Chinese, and a lot of such names probably can be translated into direct English in different ways.


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* WrittenByTheWinners: PlayedForLaughs. As far as the narrators are concerned, whatever ruler you are serving at the time, regardless of what they are actually doing, are virtuous and wise... right up until they get deposed by someone who doesn't like them, in which case that narrator will sneer at the past ruler was an insidious and weak usurper.
26th Nov '17 7:05:05 AM DrakeClawfang
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* LoopholeAbuse: Buildings that spawn service walkers, like religious shrines, inspector towers, and so forth, will only have their walkers walk so far before they return to their spawn building. However, on the return trip they will always take the shortest path back, disregarding gates and roadblocks to get back. Clever city planning can exploit this to effectively double their patrol zone. For example, a herbalist walker will walk 30 tiles before returning to their shop; build their patrol path in a loop 58 tiles long, and when they hit their 30th tile they'll keep walking along the other side of the loop since it is the shorter path back.
23rd Nov '17 5:54:52 PM DrakeClawfang
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* DiabolusExMachina: You can reduce the chance of a natural disaster occuring by keeping the ancestors appeased, but sooner or later, it'll hit even if they adore you. Droughts you may not even notice and floods can be prevented by building away from the river. But earthquakes? On a bad day, expect to see more than half your city crumble into ruins instantly, likely killing a good chunk of your population, destroying stockpiles of goods, and costing you thousands in repairs to replace it all. A sufficiently bad earthquake hitting the right buildings could reset an entire city back to square one.
22nd Nov '17 9:29:34 PM DrakeClawfang
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* TooDumbToLive: AI cities never learn that if you've got a standing army as large as the game allows, maybe they shouldn't make unreasonable demands of you, or refuse and insult you when you demand something of them. They will do the latter even if your army just returned from ''conquering'' them and making them your vassal. As mentioned above, your rivals will demand resources of you with the warning if you don't comply they'll just march into your city and take them by force. It's almost always a hollow threat, but you the player have full right and ability to actually do it.

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* TooDumbToLive: AI cities never learn that if you've got a standing army as large as the game allows, maybe they shouldn't make unreasonable demands of you, or refuse and insult you when you demand something of them. They will do the latter even if your army just returned from ''conquering'' them and making them your vassal. As mentioned above, your rivals will demand resources of you with the warning if you don't comply they'll just march into your city and take them what they want by force. It's almost always a hollow threat, threat coming from an AI opponent, but you the player have full right and ability to can actually do it.
26th Sep '17 2:31:50 PM Chabal2
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** Natural disaster messages claim angry ancestors sent a flood or earthquake... but use the same one when scripted disasters occur.



* NiceJobFixingItVillain: One mission has a rival city suggest a joint building project: a canal that will increase trade. At the end of the mission, it turns out the idea was to tie up resources and manpower in a pointless construction project... except now the canal really did boost trade.

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* NiceJobFixingItVillain: One mission has a rival city suggest a joint building project: a canal that will increase trade. At the end of the mission, it turns out the idea was to tie up resources and manpower in a pointless construction project...project, leaving the city ripe for conquest... except now the canal really did boost trade.



* ShootTheMessenger: Emissaries leaving for other cities express fears that this may be their fate, while you can execute foreign emissaries (if for some reason you want your name to be mud).



** When a city is conquered, you can set the tribute to be whatever good you need if you have enough cash, including goods they need to import.

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** When a city is conquered, you can set the tribute to be whatever good you need if you have enough don't need cash, including goods they need to import.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.EmperorRiseOfTheMiddleKingdom