History VideoGame / DanceDanceRevolution

7th Jan '18 8:00:09 PM Lirodon
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** ''[=DanceDanceRevolution A=]'' (2016) \\
Announced on February 2016, released in March 2016 as another update to DDR 2014; features a revamped song selection interface, and major changes to the grading and scoring systems. This was the first release to reach North America since 2010, with a list of licensed songs (including songs by Music/{{Pitbull}} and Music/{{Zedd}}) added to coincide with the North American release. The North American release is the first release one to have proper [=eAMUSEMENT=] support.[[note]]There was a location test for [=eAMUSEMENT=] with the North American build of ''[=SuperNOVA=] 2'', but it never got beyond the testing stage.[[/note]]

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** * ''[=DanceDanceRevolution A=]'' (2016) \\
Announced on February 2016, released in March 2016 as another an online update to that replaced DDR 2014; features a revamped song selection interface, and major changes to the grading and scoring systems. This was the first release to reach North America since 2010, with a list of licensed songs (including songs by Music/{{Pitbull}} and Music/{{Zedd}}) among others added to coincide with the North American release. The North American release is the first release one to have proper [=eAMUSEMENT=] support.[[note]]There was a location test for [=eAMUSEMENT=] with the North American build of ''[=SuperNOVA=] 2'', but it never got beyond the testing stage.[[/note]]
7th Jan '18 1:12:07 PM nombretomado
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** A similar reset happened for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 versions released in 2010, which were titled just "Dance Dance Revolution" in North America. The Wii version also brought an UnexpectedGameplayChange by extending its motion control integration into a new ''JustDance''-esque "Choreography" mode, which used special charts containing a variety of new hand motions for the Wii Remote and Nunchuck to form more varied routines (Meanwhile, the [=PS3=] version had players using the [=PlayStation Move=] wand to hit targets in the corner of the screen. It wasn't that great) In Europe however, they got re-branded as "Hottest Party 4" and "New Moves" respectively. The next game "Dance Dance Revolution II", was essentially the console port of X3 vs 2nd Mix (if it followed the same pattern of the U.S. [=PS2=] releases, that is; as most of it was an X2 AC catchup)

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** A similar reset happened for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 versions released in 2010, which were titled just "Dance Dance Revolution" in North America. The Wii version also brought an UnexpectedGameplayChange by extending its motion control integration into a new ''JustDance''-esque ''VideoGame/JustDance''-esque "Choreography" mode, which used special charts containing a variety of new hand motions for the Wii Remote and Nunchuck to form more varied routines (Meanwhile, the [=PS3=] version had players using the [=PlayStation Move=] wand to hit targets in the corner of the screen. It wasn't that great) In Europe however, they got re-branded as "Hottest Party 4" and "New Moves" respectively. The next game "Dance Dance Revolution II", was essentially the console port of X3 vs 2nd Mix (if it followed the same pattern of the U.S. [=PS2=] releases, that is; as most of it was an X2 AC catchup)
4th Jan '18 8:14:36 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** The early DDR games had a very different design than current ones; originally your song selector was a giant "jukebox" wheel of discs with a distinctively clunky sound. 4th Mix shifted to a theme-based sort system along with a song picked with a horizontal selection of 7 slanted banners, though this particular system got a little cumbersome given that said banners were shown as "pages", and when you went beyond what was on screen, it shifted to a completely different page. 5th Mix introduced the more familiar "song wheel" interface that lasted until ''X'' before being replaced by a song select interface that is often compared to the iPod's Cover Flow interface. ''DDR A'' replaced it with a Sound Voltex-esque jacket grid.

to:

** The early DDR games had a very different design than current ones; originally your song selector was a giant "jukebox" wheel of discs with a distinctively clunky sound. 4th Mix shifted to a theme-based sort system along with a song picked with a horizontal selection of 7 slanted banners, though this particular system got a little cumbersome given that said banners were shown as "pages", and when you went beyond what was on screen, it shifted to a completely different page. 5th Mix introduced the more familiar "song wheel" interface that lasted until ''X'' before being replaced by a song select interface that is often compared to the iPod's Cover Flow interface. ''DDR A'' replaced it with a Sound Voltex-esque ''VideoGame/SoundVoltex''-esque jacket grid.
4th Jan '18 5:30:54 AM 404waffles
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** The early DDR games had a very different design than current ones; originally your song selector was a giant "jukebox" wheel of discs with a distinctively clunky sound. 4th Mix shifted to a theme-based sort system along with a song picked with a horizontal selection of 7 slanted banners, though this particular system got a little cumbersome given that said banners were shown as "pages", and when you went beyond what was on screen, it shifted to a completely different page. 5th Mix introduced the more familiar "song wheel" interface that lasted until ''X'' before being replaced by the current song select interface that is often compared to the iPod's Cover Flow interface.

to:

** The early DDR games had a very different design than current ones; originally your song selector was a giant "jukebox" wheel of discs with a distinctively clunky sound. 4th Mix shifted to a theme-based sort system along with a song picked with a horizontal selection of 7 slanted banners, though this particular system got a little cumbersome given that said banners were shown as "pages", and when you went beyond what was on screen, it shifted to a completely different page. 5th Mix introduced the more familiar "song wheel" interface that lasted until ''X'' before being replaced by the current a song select interface that is often compared to the iPod's Cover Flow interface.interface. ''DDR A'' replaced it with a Sound Voltex-esque jacket grid.
2nd Jan '18 6:52:23 PM xxxplizit
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*** The BPM gimmicks was such a blatant fake difficulty that DDR A's final Encore Extra Stage, Ace for Aces, marks the first time in DDR history that split-BPM has ever been used. Like Over The "Period", accessing it as an Encore Extra Stage involves AA'ing an exceptionally hard song (Endymion, a 19 on Challenge that many would argue should be a 20). Like Over The "Period", you have to get a Full Perfect Combo to clear it. Like Over The "Period", the charts also includes BPM changes all over the place... unless you're on Basic, which just stays at a consistent BPM except for one stop. Even Konami realized how unfair the BPM gimmicks were and threw the people doing this song on lighter difficulties a bone.

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*** ** The BPM gimmicks was such a blatant fake difficulty that DDR A's final Encore Extra Stage, Ace for Aces, marks the first time in DDR history that split-BPM has ever been used. Like Over The "Period", accessing it as an Encore Extra Stage involves AA'ing an exceptionally hard song (Endymion, a 19 on Challenge that many would argue should be a 20). Like Over The "Period", you have to get a Full Perfect Combo to clear it. Like Over The "Period", the charts also includes BPM changes all over the place... unless you're on Basic, which just stays at a consistent BPM except for one stop. Even Konami realized how unfair the BPM gimmicks were and threw the people doing this song on lighter difficulties a bone. Oh, and good luck with Expert, which doubles the consistent BPM.
23rd Dec '17 11:08:54 AM DDRMASTERM
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* LaterInstallmentWeirdness: ''DDR'' (2013) breaks the longs
tanding tradition of Goods breaking combo and damaging "battery" lifebars.

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* LaterInstallmentWeirdness: ''DDR'' (2013) breaks the longs
tanding
longstanding tradition of Goods breaking combo and damaging "battery" lifebars.
9th Dec '17 1:52:44 PM KitsuneZeta
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Added DiffLines:

*** The BPM gimmicks was such a blatant fake difficulty that DDR A's final Encore Extra Stage, Ace for Aces, marks the first time in DDR history that split-BPM has ever been used. Like Over The "Period", accessing it as an Encore Extra Stage involves AA'ing an exceptionally hard song (Endymion, a 19 on Challenge that many would argue should be a 20). Like Over The "Period", you have to get a Full Perfect Combo to clear it. Like Over The "Period", the charts also includes BPM changes all over the place... unless you're on Basic, which just stays at a consistent BPM except for one stop. Even Konami realized how unfair the BPM gimmicks were and threw the people doing this song on lighter difficulties a bone.
7th Dec '17 7:48:11 AM Macsen
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** One of the reasons it was difficult to export the games early on was because of the choice of licenses. In particular, the decision to include a couple of German-based Europop acts known for racier lyrics: Captain Jack, and E-Rotic. Several of Captain Jack's cleaner songs ultimately made it to America, and even one E-Rotic song ("In The Heat of the Night", admittedly probably their cleanest song) made an American home version (''Extreme 2'').

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** One of the reasons it was difficult to export the games early on was because of the choice of licenses. In particular, the decision to include a couple of German-based Germany-based Europop acts known for racier lyrics: Captain Jack, and E-Rotic. E-Rotic.[[note]]Ironically, the original title singer of Captain Jack, Franky Gee, was a Cuban-American expatriate who was originally one of the earliest refugees of the Franco revolution.[[/note]] Several of Captain Jack's cleaner songs ultimately made it to America, and even one E-Rotic song ("In The Heat of the Night", admittedly probably their cleanest song) made an American home version (''Extreme 2'').
7th Dec '17 7:45:45 AM Macsen
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Added DiffLines:

** One of the reasons it was difficult to export the games early on was because of the choice of licenses. In particular, the decision to include a couple of German-based Europop acts known for racier lyrics: Captain Jack, and E-Rotic. Several of Captain Jack's cleaner songs ultimately made it to America, and even one E-Rotic song ("In The Heat of the Night", admittedly probably their cleanest song) made an American home version (''Extreme 2'').
7th Dec '17 7:32:16 AM Macsen
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--> ''"Dance, please! Daaaaaance!"'' \\

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--> ''"Dance, -->''"Dance, please! Daaaaaance!"'' \\


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* SpitefulAI: The announcers in the earliest games can be particularly mean if you're not doing well.
-->'''Male Announcer''' (in DDR 1st Mix): I can't stand watching you! Go back to your mother!\\
'''Female Announcer''' (in DDR Solo): ''Please'', tell me you're not ''really'' trying.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.DanceDanceRevolution