History VideoGame / DanceDanceRevolution

27th Jul '17 12:02:41 AM LucaEarlgrey
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** The North American version of ''A'' has premium mode much like other regions' versions, however instead of premium mode costing extra, Konami simply mandates that premium mode cost the same as standard mode, likely as an AntiFrustrationFeature necessary due to Dave & Buster's and Round 1 USA using cards for credits where one swipe adds one credit and PASELI [[NoExportForYou being Japan-only]].

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** The North American version of ''A'' has premium mode much like other regions' versions, however instead of premium mode costing extra, Konami simply mandates that premium mode cost the same as standard mode, likely as an AntiFrustrationFeature necessary due to Dave & Buster's and Round 1 USA using cards for credits where one swipe adds one credit (thus, making premium cost extra would result in a credit costing ''at least'' 2 USD before discounts) and PASELI [[NoExportForYou being Japan-only]].
25th Jul '17 11:28:42 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** CUTIE CHASER's 6-panel Maniac chart has a jump right before the point where the player can start hitting notes, and as such it's impossible to get a Perfect on it. Even if you play the chart perfectly, you'll still get one Great no matter what.

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** CUTIE CHASER's 6-panel Maniac chart has a jump right before the point where the player can start hitting notes, and as such it's impossible to get a Perfect on it. Even if you play the chart perfectly, you'll still get one Great no matter what. The two console versions that feature this chart attempt to fix it in their own ways: ''KONAMIX'' shifts all notes an eighth-beat ahead (thus creating a bigger problem), while the PC ''DDR'' game simply removes the first three notes.
23rd Jul '17 10:43:26 PM xxxplizit
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** DDR A has one in the form of the unlock requirement for "Endymion". You need to complete two entire quests before you even have hopes to get it, which take at least around ''80'' credits in total (give or take depending on your dedication on playing), after which you need to be on Rinon Level 3, which takes 7 credits for an upgrade that only lasts for a day. Lasting a day or not, however, becomes moot when you find out that selecting the song demotes you to Level 1 anyway.

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** DDR A has one in the form of the unlock requirement for "Endymion".Endymion. You need to complete two entire quests before you even have hopes to get it, which take at least around ''80'' credits in total (give or take depending on your dedication on playing), after which you need to be on Rinon Level 3, which takes 7 credits for an upgrade that only lasts for a day. Lasting a day or not, however, becomes moot when you find out that selecting the song demotes you to Level 1 anyway.anyway.
*** Take UpToEleven with Endymion's Challenge Chart (19). To unlock it, you have to not only complete Endymion Expert (18) with an AA or higher, but beat the Encore Extra Stage (Ace for Aces) with the required Perfect Full Combo. The process to play Endymion as listed above still applies, but with Challenge being available. Good luck with that.
15th Jul '17 1:59:33 PM LucaEarlgrey
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DDR returns to the arcade in style with the first major release in four years, and the first truly "global" release (Japan, U.S., and Europe got pretty much the same game, a change which necessitated a new set of licensed songs). Brought along a new hardware platform, enabling tightened graphics and futuristic 3D stages with characters. The Japanese version also introduced [=e-AMUSEMENT=] to the franchise.

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DDR returns to the arcade in style with the first major release in four years, and the first truly "global" release (Japan, U.S., and Europe got pretty much the same game, a change which necessitated a new set of licensed songs). Brought along a new hardware platform, enabling tightened graphics and futuristic 3D stages with characters. The Japanese version also introduced [=e-AMUSEMENT=] [=eAMUSEMENT=] to the franchise.



Announced on February 2016, released in March 2016 as another update to DDR 2014; features a revamped song selection interface, and major changes to the grading and scoring systems. This was the first release to reach North America since 2010, with a list of licensed songs (including songs by Music/{{Pitbull}} and Music/{{Zedd}}) added to coincide with the North American release.

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Announced on February 2016, released in March 2016 as another update to DDR 2014; features a revamped song selection interface, and major changes to the grading and scoring systems. This was the first release to reach North America since 2010, with a list of licensed songs (including songs by Music/{{Pitbull}} and Music/{{Zedd}}) added to coincide with the North American release. The North American release is the first release one to have proper [=eAMUSEMENT=] support.[[note]]There was a location test for [=eAMUSEMENT=] with the North American build of ''[=SuperNOVA=] 2'', but it never got beyond the testing stage.[[/note]]
15th Jul '17 8:31:46 AM Exusia
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** DDR A features ''EXTRA EXCLUSIVE'', 10 songs over the game's lifetime that are, well, exclusive to Extra Stage. The Rinon's Adventure mini-game permanently unlocks them over time. After all ten are unlocked and you have a full Heat Level, you unlock a brand-new Extra Stage. Attempting it completely drains your Heat Level, meaning you can only try it once every seven credits. Clearing this with a high enough score unlocks the Encore Extra Stage.

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** DDR A features ''EXTRA EXCLUSIVE'', 10 songs over the game's lifetime that are, well, exclusive to Extra Stage. The Rinon's Adventure mini-game permanently unlocks them over time. After all ten are unlocked and you have a full Heat Level, you unlock a brand-new Extra Stage. Attempting it completely drains your Heat Level, meaning you can only try it once every seven credits. Clearing this with a high enough score AA+ or better unlocks the Encore Extra Stage.
15th Jul '17 5:32:08 AM AntonF
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[[folder: Japanese home releases]]
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (1999, UsefulNotes/PlayStation)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 2ndReMIX=]'' (1999, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 2ndReMIX APPEND CLUB VERSiON vol.1=]'' (1999, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=Dancing Stage featuring TRUE KISS DESTINATION=]'' (1999, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 2ndReMIX APPEND CLUB VERSiON vol.2=]'' (1999, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 2ndMIX Dreamcast Edition=]'' (2000, [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]])
* ''[=Dancing Stage featuring DREAMS COME TRUE=]'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution CLUB VERSiON Dreamcast Edition=]'' (2000, Dreamcast)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 3rdMIX=]'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution GB=]'' (2000, UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution GB2=]'' (2000, Game Boy Color)
* ''[=おはスタ DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution ディズニーダンシングミュージアム=]'' (2000, [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 64]])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Disney's RAVE=]'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution BEST HITS=]'' (2000, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=おはスタ DanceDanceRevolution GB=]'' (2001, Game Boy Color)
* ''[=DanceDanceREV=]'' (2001, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 4thMIX=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution GB3=]'' (2001, Game Boy Color)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution GB Disney Mix=]'' (2001, Game Boy Color)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution EXTRA MIX=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution 5thMIX=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DDRMAX -DanceDanceRevolution 6thMIX=]'' (2002, UsefulNotes/PlayStation2)
* ''[=エアロビクスレボリューション=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DDRMAX2 -DanceDanceRevolution 7thMIX=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution EXTREME=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Party Collection=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution DX=]'' (2004, Mobile phones)
* ''ダイエットチャンネル'' (2004, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DDR FESTIVAL -DanceDanceRevolution-=]'' (2004, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution with MARIO=]'' (2005, [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution STR!KE=]'' (2006, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution SuperNOVA=]'' (2007, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution HOTTEST PARTY=]'' (2007, UsefulNotes/{{Wii}})
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution SuperNOVA2=]'' (2008, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''ダンスダンスレボリューション フルフル♪パーティー'' (2008, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution X=]'' (2009, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S=]'' (2009, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S+=]'' (2009, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution MUSIC FIT=]'' (2010, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Pocket Edition=]'' (2013, Mobile phones)
[[/folder]]

[[folder: North American home releases]]
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Disney MIX=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution KONAMIX=]'' (2002, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2002, PC)
* ''[=DDRMAX -DanceDanceRevolution-=]'' (2002, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DDRMAX2 -DanceDanceRevolution-=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution ULTRAMIX=]'' (2003, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}})
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution EXTREME=]'' (2004, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution ULTRAMIX2=]'' (2004, Xbox)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution EXTREME2=]'' (2005, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution MARIO MIX=]'' (2005, [=GameCube=])
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution ULTRAMIX3=]'' (2005, Xbox)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution SuperNOVA=]'' (2006, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution ULTRAMIX4=]'' (2006, Xbox)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Strawberry Shortcake=]'' (2006, TV)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution DVD Game=]'' (2006, DVD)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution UNIVERSE=]'' (2007, UsefulNotes/Xbox360)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution SuperNOVA2=]'' (2007, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution HOTTEST PARTY=]'' (2007, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution UNIVERSE2=]'' (2007, Xbox 360)
* ''[=My First DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2007, TV)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Disney Channel EDITION=]'' (2008, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution X=]'' (2008, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution HOTTEST PARTY2=]'' (2008, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Mobius=]'' (2008, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution UNIVERSE3=]'' (2008, Xbox 360)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S=]'' (2009, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Disney Grooves=]'' (2009, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution X2=]'' (2009, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution HOTTEST PARTY3=]'' (2009, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S+=]'' (2010, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2010, UsefulNotes/PlayStation3) (2011, Xbox 360)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution=]'' (2010, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution FREEDOM=]'' (2011, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution II=]'' (2011, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Classroom Edition=]'' (2012, PC)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution DANCE WARS=]'' (2013, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Pocket Edition=]'' (2013, Mobile phones)
[[/folder]]

[[folder: European home releases]]
* ''[=Dancing Stage EuroMIX=]'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''Dancing Stage Disney MIX'' (2001, [=PlayStation=])
* ''Dancing Stage PARTY EDITION'' (2002, [=PlayStation=])
* ''[=Dancing Stage MegaMiX=]'' (2003, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''Dancing Stage Fever'' (2003, [=PlayStation=], [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''Dancing Stage Unleashed'' (2004, Xbox)
* ''Dancing Stage Fusion'' (2004, [=PlayStation=], [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=Dancing Stage Unleashed2=]'' (2005, Xbox)
* ''Dancing Stage MARIO MIX'' (2005, [=GameCube=])
* ''Dancing Stage Max'' (2005, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=Dancing Stage Unleashed3=]'' (2006, Xbox)
* ''[=Dancing Stage SuperNOVA=]'' (2007, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''Dancing Stage UNIVERSE'' (2007, Xbox 360)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution DVD Game=]'' (2007, DVD)
* ''Dancing Stage HOTTEST PARTY'' (2008, Wii)
* ''[=Dancing Stage SuperNOVA2=]'' (2008, [=PlayStation=] 2)
* ''[=Dancing Stage UNIVERSE2=]'' (2008, Xbox 360)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Winx Club=]'' (2009, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S=]'' (2009, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution hottest party2=]'' (2009, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution hottest party3=]'' (2010, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution S+=]'' (2010, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution FREEDOM=]'' (2011, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution New Moves=]'' (2011, [=PlayStation=] 3)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution hottest party4=]'' (2011, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution hottest party5=]'' (2011, Wii)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution DANCE WARS=]'' (2013, Mobile phones)
* ''[=DanceDanceRevolution Pocket Edition=]'' (2013, Mobile phones)
[[/folder]]



* AllOrNothing: Two particularly {{Brutal Bonus Level}}s -- "Love Is The Power -Re:born-" and "Over The 'Period'", back when they were exclusively Encore Extra Stage songs -- demanded a Perfect Full Combo (all Perfect or Marvelous) to clear; even a single Great would result in an instant failure.

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* AllOrNothing: Two Three particularly {{Brutal Bonus Level}}s -- "Love Is The Power -Re:born-" and -Re:born-", "Over The 'Period'", and "Ace for Aces", back when they were exclusively Encore Extra Stage songs -- demanded a Perfect Full Combo (all Perfect or Marvelous) to clear; even a single Great would result in an instant failure.



* TheArtifact: "Sakura"'s Challenge chart was originally meant to be used for the One More Extra Stage of ''Extreme'', just as "Kakumei"'s Challenge chart was used in ''[=MAX2=]''. However, beyond the location test, the plan didn't carry on and "Dance Dance Revolution" is instead used as the OMES. This is also why it's easier than its Heavy/Expert chart (in contrast to the Challenge charts of other Bemani crossovers in that game); like Kakumei, it had special purpose other than just to provide challenge.



* AscendedGlitch: bag's Challenge chart in ''X2'' is simply its Expert stepchart pre-''X'' era, i.e. with all its 24th notes rounded to the 64th notes.



* Music/TheCancanSong: "Kick The Can", a licensed song by Bus Stop in ''[=4thMix=]''.



* CopyProtection: The 2013 and succeeding versions require a connection to Konami's e-Amusement network in order to run, as it is part of Konami's shared-profit "e-Amusement Participation" network. No connection, no DDR for you. And don't think about just simply attempting to make a connection to e-Amusement, as Konami only accepts connections from arcades officially registered with the network. Before the arrival of DDR A in select Dave & Buster's outlets and in Round1 USA outlets, there are no DDR machines connected to the official network in the states.

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* CopyProtection: The 2013 and succeeding versions require a connection to Konami's e-Amusement network in order to run, as it is part of Konami's shared-profit "e-Amusement Participation" network. No connection, no DDR for you. And don't think about just simply attempting to make a connection to e-Amusement, as Konami only accepts connections from arcades officially registered with the network. Before the arrival of DDR A in select Dave & Buster's outlets and in Round1 [=Round1=] USA outlets, there are no DDR machines connected to the official network in the states.



* DarkerAndEdgier: [=DDRMAX2=] pulls this one. It features a lot of [[RedAndBlackAndEvilAllOver black and red]], the select screen music is a toned-down disco version of ''PARANOIA survivor'', and almost of all of the new songs are {{Trance}}[[note]]Trance is mainly used to evoke a personal emotional feeling on the listeners[[/note]] in one way of another. The boss songs, MAXX Unlimited and Kakumei, are a lot darker than the previous boss songs MAX 300 and CANDY; MAXX Unlimited is stuck up with the Trance syndrome unlike the drum-heavy MAX 300, while Kakumei is a modern rendition of a classical music[[note]]Fun fact: trance is widely considered to be something of a SpiritualSuccessor to classical music.[[/note]] (namely, Chopin's Revolutionary Etude), in contrast to the happy hardcore CANDY.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: DarkerAndEdgier:
** Songs remixed by [=U1-ASAMi=] under his 2MB alias are usually a lot darker and/or creepier than the original versions. Oh, they're also tend to be much harder, as well. "Healing Vision (Angelic mix)", "MAX. (period)", and "Fascination (eternal love mix)" are examples.
**
[=DDRMAX2=] pulls this one. It features a lot of [[RedAndBlackAndEvilAllOver black and red]], the select screen music is a toned-down disco version of ''PARANOIA survivor'', and almost of all of the new songs are {{Trance}}[[note]]Trance is mainly used to evoke a personal emotional feeling on the listeners[[/note]] in one way of another. The boss songs, MAXX Unlimited and Kakumei, are a lot darker than the previous boss songs MAX 300 and CANDY; MAXX Unlimited is stuck up with the Trance syndrome unlike the drum-heavy MAX 300, while Kakumei is a modern rendition of a classical music[[note]]Fun fact: trance is widely considered to be something of a SpiritualSuccessor to classical music.[[/note]] (namely, Chopin's Revolutionary Etude), in contrast to the happy hardcore CANDY.



* EndOfSeriesAwareness: A downplayed example for Extreme. While DDR was never meant to end with that game (as many people believe), Bemani did want to take a break for the arcade production for some time, hence the 4-year hiatus. Since four years are not a short time, some send-offs were thrown: several songs were created with a celebration theme (1998, Dance Dance Revolution, Graduation, MAX. (period)) and the fact that the arcade version include almost all Konami Originals that have appeared in the series so far hints at its "ultimate" nature. The console version also boasts 200-something tracklist, ''far'' higher than any previous game's list (which range from 40-70ish).

to:

* EndOfSeriesAwareness: A downplayed example for Extreme. While DDR was never meant to end with that game (as many people believe), Bemani did want to take a break for the arcade production for some time, hence the 4-year hiatus. Since four years are not a short time, some send-offs were thrown: several songs were created with a celebration theme (1998, Dance Dance Revolution, Graduation, MAX. (period)) and the fact that the arcade version include includes almost all Konami Originals that have appeared in the series so far hints at its "ultimate" nature. The console version also boasts 200-something 100-something tracklist, ''far'' higher than any previous game's list (which range from 40-70ish).



* FakeLongevity: [=DDR 2014=]'s Replicant D Ignition mode just to play the 2 songs on Encore Extra Stage, depending on the 2 phases: MAX.(Period) Expert (Phase 1) and Over The "Period" Difficult AND Full Perfect Combo mode (Phase 2). It takes an excessive amounts of sessions to play it. First, you have to pass Truare on Extra Stage to even unlock the folder. Second, you have to fill the "Nitro points", which takes time to fill, depending on the song you have to play. Third, you have to collect orbs by completing one of the 5 Extra Stage songs unlocked with the vial in the song folder with a AA ranking on Expert. Fourth, once all 5 orbs are completed, the 6th Extra Stage song, either EGOISM 440 Expert (Phase 1) or Max.(Period) Revised Challenge (Phase 2), will be available as an Extra Stage; keep in mind that all orbs will be lost once the 6th song is played and you would have to retrieve the orbs all over again. Lastly, getting a AA on any of the 2 songs will immediately grant you to any of the 2 songs with the mentioned condition; getting the song again requires repeating the process again, so make the Encore Extra Stage play count.
** Averted on August 6th, 2015's update after months of struggle to play those 2 songs, though you still have to unlock them on Extra Attack. December 24th's update fully unlocks them without any requirements.

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* FakeLongevity: [=DDR 2014=]'s FakeLongevity:
** "Valkyrie dimension" in X2's
Replicant D Ignition D-Action can only be accessed by collecting six medals from six songs whose unlock requirements are notorious GuideDangIt. Collecting medals requires you to AA them on Expert (keep in mind that 3 of them are 17 footers, though if you're going for [[NintendoHard VD]] you're most likely experienced already), and when you access VD (more like being forced to do it; earning the sixth medal immediately prompts you for the next stage), ''all medals are immediately thrown to the garbage can''.
** DDR 2014's Replicant D-Ignition
mode has a similar premise, in which you have to jump through multiple hoops even just to play open the 2 folder, then going through more hoops to unlock the songs on Encore Extra Stage, in it. Accessing a penultimate song, like the VD case, discards your precious orbs that you collected from the previous songs. And then you find out that you need to do all of that hoop-jumping twice.
** DDR A has one in the form of the unlock requirement for "Endymion". You need to complete two entire quests before you even have hopes to get it, which take at least around ''80'' credits in total (give or take
depending on the 2 phases: MAX.(Period) Expert (Phase 1) and Over The "Period" Difficult AND Full Perfect Combo mode (Phase 2). It takes an excessive amounts of sessions to play it. First, your dedication on playing), after which you have need to pass Truare be on Extra Stage to even unlock the folder. Second, you have to fill the "Nitro points", Rinon Level 3, which takes time to fill, depending on 7 credits for an upgrade that only lasts for a day. Lasting a day or not, however, becomes moot when you find out that selecting the song you have to play. Third, you have to collect orbs by completing one of the 5 Extra Stage songs unlocked with the vial in the song folder with a AA ranking on Expert. Fourth, once all 5 orbs are completed, the 6th Extra Stage song, either EGOISM 440 Expert (Phase 1) or Max.(Period) Revised Challenge (Phase 2), will be available as an Extra Stage; keep in mind that all orbs will be lost once the 6th song is played and you would have to retrieve the orbs all over again. Lastly, getting a AA on any of the 2 songs will immediately grant demotes you to any of the 2 songs with the mentioned condition; getting the song again requires repeating the process again, so make the Encore Extra Stage play count.
** Averted on August 6th, 2015's update after months of struggle to play those 2 songs, though you still have to unlock them on Extra Attack. December 24th's update fully unlocks them without any requirements.
Level 1 anyway.



** Certain changes to the infrastructure on DDR 2013 (with a greater reliance on online patching) have theoretically made it the last version Konami ever needs to release (either that, or it'll be a long while before the next one). However, this has been a general trend across all of the Bemani games lately; they pushed out the ''VideoGame/SoundVoltex'' sequel using just a title update rather than a hard drive swap too.
*** The Encore Extra Stage of the Replicant D-Ignition event? [[spoiler:That aforementioned certain song on the console version of Extreme.]] Don't worry to those afraid of any endgame as such; that song is just the first phase (the second song is [[spoiler: [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall Over The "Period"]].]]

to:

** Certain changes to the infrastructure on DDR 2013 (with a greater reliance on online patching) have theoretically made it the last version Konami ever needs arcade game to release (either that, or it'll be a long while before the next one). However, this has been a general trend across all of the Bemani physically released; future games lately; they pushed out are released through online patching. This is much to the ''VideoGame/SoundVoltex'' sequel using just a title update rejoice of arcade operators, of course (face it, you'd rather choose constant internet service rather than a hard drive swap too.
*** The Encore Extra Stage of the Replicant D-Ignition event? [[spoiler:That aforementioned certain song on the console version of Extreme.]] Don't worry to those afraid of any endgame as such; that song is just the first phase (the second song is [[spoiler: [[LeaningOnTheFourthWall Over The "Period"]].]]
buying entire cabinets).



** Recent games feature special Extra Stages that would require you to do some kind of requirements at first. It began with the "X-Specials" in DDRX, former boss songs with new Boss charts requiring you to do something that has something to do with that mix; for example, doing the Step Step Code ''on the select button below the screen'' to access [=PARANOiA=] Rebirth (X-Special). [=DDRX2=] takes this UpToEleven in unlocking some songs; one of the hidden requirements surely won't be discovered had someone wasn't nerd enough to ''open an old folder and play a certain song that everyone would have already forgotten by now''[[note]]It's KISS KISS KISS[[/note]].

to:

** Recent games feature special Extra Stages that would require you to do some kind of requirements at first. It began with the "X-Specials" in DDRX, former boss songs with new Boss charts requiring you to do something that has something to do with that mix; for example, doing the Step Step Code ''on the select button below the screen'' to access [=PARANOiA=] Rebirth (X-Special). [=DDRX2=] takes this UpToEleven in unlocking some songs; one of the hidden requirements surely won't be discovered had someone wasn't nerd enough to ''open open an old folder and play a certain song that everyone would have already forgotten by now''[[note]]It's now[[note]]It's KISS KISS KISS[[/note]].



* InNameOnly: There's very few similarities between the Japanese and American console releases of ''DDR Extreme''. The former is essentially a port of the arcade version. The U.S. version is practically an entirely different game, with a different soundtrack and brand new interface. The Japanese ''DDR Festival'' is basically a re-skin of it with further changes, including new J-pop licenses and songs previously seen on the Xbox versions elsewhere.
** Likewise, the [=PS2=] version of ''DDR X2'' ended up going down a completely different road from the eventual arcade version. The former is essentially the content from ''Hottest Party 3'' latched onto an iteration of the ''DDR X'' interface. ''X2'' AC [[UpToEleven on the other hand...]]

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* InNameOnly: InNameOnly:
**
There's very few similarities between the Japanese and American console releases of ''DDR Extreme''. The former is essentially a port of the arcade version. The U.S. version is practically an entirely different game, with a different soundtrack and brand new interface. The Japanese ''DDR Festival'' is basically a re-skin of it with further changes, including new J-pop licenses and songs previously seen on the Xbox versions elsewhere.
** Likewise, the [=PS2=] version of ''DDR X2'' ended up going down a completely different road from the eventual arcade version. The former is essentially the content from ''Hottest Party 3'' latched onto an iteration of the ''DDR X'' interface. ''X2'' AC [[UpToEleven on the other hand...]]hand is a full new entry to the arcade series, with a completely different tracklist. Strangely, its song wheel is reminiscent of Hottest Party 3.



** The DDR X announcer is probably the most hammiest of all, thanks to being a JiveTurkey. It may have fit well on X due to its urban theme, but it sticks out like a sore thumb on what are essentially Extreme II, Hottest Party 5 AC, and DDR 2013.

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** The DDR X announcer is probably the most hammiest of all, thanks to being a JiveTurkey. It may have fit well on X ''X'' due to its urban theme, but it sticks out like a sore thumb on what are essentially Extreme II, Hottest Party 5 AC, and DDR 2013.''X2'' onward, which don't share the same theme.



** Most of Valkyrie dimension runs at a standard 186 BPM. Just before the end, it suddenly falls to 46 BPM (1/4 speed) as the melody drops out for one measure of [[NothingIsScarier complete silence]], then the speed suddenly jumps to 372 BPM (double speed) and it blasts out four measures of percussion resembling machine-gun fire.
** 888's ending on Challenge. About 80% of the way through, the song's speed suddenly doubles, itself not too uncommon for boss songs. What ''is'' uncommon is that about 10 seconds later, per the song's title, the stepchart throws out a stream at a blindingly fast rate of 888 steps per minute (almost 15 steps per second). It was long regarded as ''the'' fastest sustained stream in the entire franchise, for almost three years until Valkyrie dimension's unlocked Challenge chart topped it with a brief 480 BPM 8th note stream (960 steps per minute) at its beginning.

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** Most of Valkyrie dimension runs at a standard 186 BPM. Just before the end, it suddenly falls to 46 BPM (1/4 speed) as the melody drops out for one measure of [[NothingIsScarier complete silence]], then the speed suddenly jumps to 372 BPM (double speed) and it blasts out four measures of percussion resembling machine-gun fire.
fire. It gets worse in the Challenge chart, which has a jump in the middle of it.
** 888's ending on Challenge. About 80% of the way through, the song's speed suddenly doubles, itself not too uncommon for boss songs. What ''is'' uncommon is that about 10 seconds later, per the song's title, the stepchart throws out a Its 444 BPM 8th note stream at a blindingly fast rate of 888 steps per minute (almost (nearly 15 steps per second). It second) in the last 10 seconds of the song was long regarded as ''the'' the fastest sustained stream of any song in the entire franchise, for almost three years series until Valkyrie dimension's unlocked dimension Challenge chart topped dethroned it 3 years later with a its brief 480 BPM 8th note stream (960 fest (16 steps per minute) at second) that single-handedly earned it its beginning.record-breaking 19 foot rating.



* [[LethalJokeCharacter Lethal Joke Song]]: The "[insert name here] Radar Special" songs are these. Their charts are made to max out a certain aspect of the Groove Radar, which means without much consideration, and thus essentially jokes. Yet many of them are hard precisely ''because'' of this mentality. The ultimate example of a Lethal Joke Song is the sixth Radar Special, DEAD END (Groove Radar Special), whose chart is made to max out ''every single'' aspects, giving [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umwrzdFEdUw this kind of chart]] for everyone to see.

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* [[LethalJokeCharacter Lethal Joke Song]]: The "[insert name here] Radar Special" songs are these. Their charts are made to max out a certain aspect of the Groove Radar, which means without much consideration, and thus essentially jokes. Yet many of them are hard precisely ''because'' of this mentality. The ultimate example of a Lethal Joke Song is the sixth Radar Special, DEAD END (Groove Radar Special), whose chart is made to max out ''every single'' every single aspects, giving [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umwrzdFEdUw this kind of chart]] for everyone to see.



** Edits on the arcade version were scrapped on [=SuperNOVA=], but returned on [=DDR X=] with support for USB flash drives and integration with the e-Amusement (and the ability for [[AscendedFanon edit charts popular with players to be deployed to other machines]]). Of course, this required [=DDR X=]'s Japanese [=PS2=] version as a middleman, and even files generated from that wouldn't work on American arcade versions. Konami alleviated this with an [[http://ddredit.konamionline.com/ddrse/ online app]], but it doesn't support all songs.

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** Edits on the arcade version were scrapped on [=SuperNOVA=], but returned on [=DDR X=] with support for USB flash drives and integration with the e-Amusement (and the ability for [[AscendedFanon edit charts popular with players to be deployed to other machines]]).machines). Of course, this required [=DDR X=]'s Japanese [=PS2=] version as a middleman, and even files generated from that wouldn't work on American arcade versions. Konami alleviated this with an [[http://ddredit.konamionline.com/ddrse/ online app]], but it doesn't support all songs.



* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters

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* LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters[[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters Loads and Loads of Songs]]:
** The latest arcade version has a library of over 720 tracks (and growing). It doesn't count removed songs, either.
** The Japanese console release of ''Extreme'' has something like 110 songs, probably the most any console DDR game has achieved.
** The trope applies to the characters as well, especially in pre-''[=SuperNova=]'' games, as unlike the latter the characters are polygonal but not overly detailed (and cartoonish). ''Party Collection'' showcases the most any game can have by having ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xtZMPZh8Pc 60 characters]]''.



** The "Evolved" series of boss songs uses this in a way. Each of them is [[ThemeNaming named after a major city]] (it started with cities in Japan, but then went to New York and L.A., returning to Tohoku on the most recent game), and most of them have three variations each, picked at random when the song is selected. All three of them sound exactly alike for about the first 1/3 of the song before diverging (i.e. one version might steadily speed up, one version might go into an intense breakdown, one may just slow down a bit), thus the player usually cannot tell which version has been selected until that point.
*** A few subversions: L.A. Evolved, only existing on the console-exclusive Universe series, has no variations whatsoever. Roppongi Evolved has an arcade-exclusive fourth version which is significantly harder than the other three, and in its debut game it was an Encore Extra Stage to boot. Tohoku Evolved changes nothing but the very last jump; [[DoubleSubversion however]], it comes at a nearly impossible-to-read BPM, thus keeping the mentality of the player not knowing which version it is until the change appears.

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** The "Evolved" series of boss songs uses this in a way. Each of them is [[ThemeNaming named after a major city]] (it started with cities in Japan, but then went to New York and L.A., returning to Tohoku on the most recent game), and most of them have three variations each, picked at random when the song is selected. All three of them sound exactly alike for about the first 1/3 of the song before diverging (i.e. one version might steadily speed up, one version might go into an intense breakdown, one may just slow down a bit), thus the player usually cannot tell which version has been selected until that point.
***
point.\\
\\
A few subversions: L.A. Evolved, only existing on the console-exclusive Universe series, has no variations whatsoever. Roppongi Evolved has an arcade-exclusive fourth version which is significantly harder than the other three, and in its debut game it was an Encore Extra Stage to boot. Tohoku Evolved changes nothing but the very last jump; [[DoubleSubversion however]], it comes at a nearly impossible-to-read BPM, thus keeping the mentality of the player not knowing which version it is until the change appears.



* MoodWhiplash: The earlier Encore Extra Stages, which are easier, evokes this feeling once you pass the NintendoHard Extra Stages. Going from MAX 300 to CANDY, for example, is quite a contrast.
** DDR X3 brings this aspect with a vengeance. The last Extra Stage song is Tohoku EVOLVED, which is an unusually hard 17-footer with a LastNoteNightmare at the end, while the song itself is a heartful dedication to the recent Japan earthquake and tsunami. What EES song do you get to access after this? LOVE IS THE POWER, a moderately-slow house song rated 10.

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* MoodWhiplash: The earlier Encore Extra Stages, which are easier, evokes this feeling once you pass the NintendoHard Extra Stages. Going from MAX 300 to CANDY, for example, is quite a contrast.
**
contrast. DDR X3 brings this aspect with a vengeance. The last Extra Stage song is Tohoku EVOLVED, which is an unusually hard 17-footer with a LastNoteNightmare at the end, while the song itself is a heartful dedication to the recent Japan earthquake and tsunami. What EES song do you get to access after this? LOVE IS THE POWER, a moderately-slow house song rated 10.



* MultiPlatform: Averted in a way in America until the Hottest Party 3 sequel, as each console got its own separate game yearly. [=PlayStation=] versions were aligned with the arcade mixes, the Wii had the party play and gimmick-based Hottest Party series, and the UsefulNotes/XBox[=/=]UsefulNotes/XBox360 versions (Ultramix and Universe) had a more diverse song selection (which often involved rather interesting and unexpected Bemani crossovers), DownloadableContent and Xbox Live multiplayer, [[FandomNod Fandom Nods]] galore, and more "advanced" play styles (such as the infamous Quad mode). Even the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]] got involved with ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolutionMarioMix'' one time.

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* MultiPlatform: MultiPlatform:
**
Averted in a way in America until the Hottest Party 3 sequel, as each console got its own separate game yearly. [=PlayStation=] versions were aligned with the arcade mixes, the Wii had the party play and gimmick-based Hottest Party series, and the UsefulNotes/XBox[=/=]UsefulNotes/XBox360 versions (Ultramix and Universe) had a more diverse song selection (which often involved rather interesting and unexpected Bemani crossovers), DownloadableContent and Xbox Live multiplayer, [[FandomNod Fandom Nods]] galore, and more "advanced" play styles (such as the infamous Quad mode). Even the [[UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube GameCube]] got involved with ''VideoGame/DanceDanceRevolutionMarioMix'' one time.



* OddlyNamedSequel: After three ''Hottest Party'' games on the Wii, the next release on the system and the [=PS3=] was just called ''Dance Dance Revolution'' in America. However, the ''Hottest Party'' name was kept in Europe (creating ''[=HP4=]'' and ''[=HP5=]''), and the [=PS3=] version was renamed "Dance Dance Revolution: New Moves".

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* OddlyNamedSequel: OddlyNamedSequel2ElectricBoogaloo:
** The titling of the arcade series tends to change every few games released. The first five main titles have normal numbered titles, then it's followed by ''DDRMAX 6thMix'', ''[=DDRMAX2 7thMix=]'', ''DDR Extreme'', ''[=DDR SuperNova=]'', ''[=DDR SuperNova 2=]'', ''X'', ''X2'', ''X3 vs 2ndMix'', ''2013'', ''2014'', and ''A''.
**
After three ''Hottest Party'' games on the Wii, the next release on the system and the [=PS3=] was just called ''Dance Dance Revolution'' in America. However, the ''Hottest Party'' name was kept in Europe (creating ''[=HP4=]'' and ''[=HP5=]''), and the [=PS3=] version was renamed "Dance Dance Revolution: New Moves".
* Music/OdeToJoy: "End of the Century" from [=3rdMix=] is a vocal remix of this.



* OneGameForThePriceOfTwo: The Japanese home release of ''Extreme'' and ''Party Collection'' are supposed to be two sides of the same game. The latter includes revivals that appear in the arcade release of ''Extreme'' but don't make it to the console. It can be easily told since, unlike overseas releases, Japan usually doesn't hand out console games quickly (''PC'' is released mere two months after ''Extreme'') and content-less (''PC'' has 47 songs, while ''Extreme'' has over 100).



** Ditto with "Ace for Aces" in ''A'', though the Difficult stepchart is comparatively easier than the above (13, as opposed to OTP's 15).



* PublicDomainSoundtrack: The classical songs, "La Cucaracha", as well as "La Bamba", which actually has both an instrumental and a vocal versions hovering around in the latest arcade release. Its public domain status is probably the reason why the vocal version hasn't been removed yet (like other songs of the same artist, all of which are covers of licensed songs).



** "Perfect" steps can be topped by "Marvelous" steps in some games. First in Nonstop modes only, then full-time beginning on [=SuperNOVA 2=].
*** Justified in that the first DDR arcade machines ran at 30 fps and Perfect steps resulted from triggering the arrow within 1 frame (literally the best timing the machine could pick up). When machines were upgraded to 60 fps, the Perfect window had to be scaled to 2 frames to keep player's grades the same. Only then did they add Marvelous timing for the new 1 frame window.

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** "Perfect" steps can be topped by "Marvelous" steps in some games. First in Nonstop modes only, then full-time beginning on [=SuperNOVA 2=].
***
2=]. Justified in that the first DDR arcade machines ran at 30 fps and Perfect steps resulted from triggering the arrow within 1 frame (literally the best timing the machine could pick up). When machines were upgraded to 60 fps, the Perfect window had to be scaled to 2 frames to keep player's grades the same. Only then did they add Marvelous timing for the new 1 frame window.



* RedSkyTakeWarning:
** The Replicant D-Action and Replicant D-Ignition events color the usual interface (light green in ''X2'' and blue and pink in ''2014'') purple. An ominous-sounding BGM is heard while you're inside the mode, too.
** An example truer to the trope name, having "Endymion" selectable as Extra Stage in ''A'' changes the sky blue background with poofy white clouds to blood red sky alongside a jitter effect as the screen goes through the clouds faster than usual, just to tell you loud and clear that THE SONG MEANS BUSINESS (admittedly, [[NintendoHard it does]]).



** "Jupiter (Bringer of Jollity)" is a rendition of Gustav Holst's "Jupiter", a part of The Planets.



* SequelDifficultyDrop: On Hottest Party 4 (CS) and DDR 2013 (AC), Goods no longer break your combo, nor do they drain your life meter on Extra Stages or the "Risky" option. It doesn't affect how scores are calculated, though.
* SexyWhateverOutfit: In the second and third "Hottest Party" games, Jun wears a skimpy version of the Japanese folklore goddess dress, while in the fourth and fifth games she wears a sexy angel dress.
** Also in the fourth game, Ceja wears a sexy lady Navy uniform.

to:

* SequelDifficultyDrop: On Hottest Party 4 (CS) and DDR 2013 (AC), Goods no longer break your combo, nor do they drain your life meter on Extra Stages or the "Risky" option. It However, it still doesn't affect how scores are calculated, though.
until ''A'' rolls around.
* SexyWhateverOutfit: SexyWhateverOutfit:
**
In the second and third "Hottest Party" games, Jun wears a skimpy version of the Japanese folklore goddess dress, while in the fourth and fifth games she wears a sexy angel dress.
** Also in the fourth HP game, Ceja wears a sexy lady Navy uniform.



** "In The Zone" from DDR '10 and X3 is a love note to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBA_in_the_Zone NBA In The Zone]], licensed basketball games made by Konami, with the song itself being an arranged vocal version of the intro theme to its third installment, ''In The Zone '98''.
*** Much earlier than that, "After the Game of Love" was essentially the results music from ''In The Zone '98'' but with lyrics. Further referencing it is the artist name for both "After the Game of Love" and "In The Zone", NPD3 (itself an alias for Yuichi "U1" Asami, whose first project at Konami was ''In The Zone '98''), being the initials of the Japanese version's name, ''NBA Power Dunkers 3''.

to:

** "In The Zone" from DDR '10 and X3 is a love note Several pertaining to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBA_in_the_Zone NBA In The Zone]], licensed basketball games made by Konami, Konami:
*** "In The Zone" from DDR '10 and X3 is a love note to the entire series,
with the song itself being an arranged vocal version of the intro theme to its third installment, ''In The Zone '98''.
*** Much earlier than that, "After the Game of Love" was essentially the results music from ''In The Zone '98'' but with lyrics. Further referencing it is the artist name for both "After the Game of Love" and "In The Zone", NPD3 [=NPD3=] (itself an alias for Yuichi "U1" Asami, whose first project at Konami was ''In The Zone '98''), being the initials of the Japanese version's name, ''NBA Power Dunkers 3''.



* UsefulNotes/TheSolarSystem: Is the subject of the "Grand Cross Planet" series of songs in ''[=SuperNova 2=]''. It has songs representing all planets, plus the Sun and the Moon. [[ScienceMarchesOn Including Pluto]], but then again the game does make fun of this by adding a remix of Pluto's song to represent [[PlutoIsExpendable its desolation]], which as it turns out is one of the hardest songs in the series.



** Unintentionally invoked by another hilarious DDR 2013 glitch with "RЁVOLUTIΦN" (a rock song with a female vocalist) on one cabinet, where [[http://youtu.be/Xio_SqN-1X0 the background video randomly changes]] to that of three completely different songs (one of which is a rock song with a ''male'' vocalist!).
* SpellMyNameWithAnS:
** Satomi Takasugi is spelled as Sotomi Takasugi in US/EU DDR X2 AC.

to:

** Unintentionally invoked by another a hilarious DDR 2013 glitch with "RЁVOLUTIΦN" (a rock song with a female vocalist) on one cabinet, where [[http://youtu.be/Xio_SqN-1X0 the background video randomly changes]] to that of three completely different songs (one of which is a rock song with a ''male'' vocalist!).
* SpellMyNameWithAnS:
**
SpellMyNameWithAnS: Satomi Takasugi is spelled as Sotomi Takasugi in US/EU DDR X2 AC.



** Some of the songs before [=SuperNova=] had spike balls this in their background movies. Max 300 is one of the more infamous ones.

to:

** Some of the songs before [=SuperNova=] had spike balls this in their background movies. Max 300 is one 300's full video, in fact, entirely consists of the more infamous ones.nothing but [[ThatCameOutWrong balls]].



* UnlockableContent

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* UnlockableContentUnlockableContent: Up to ''Extreme'', arcade games used codes inserted by arcade operators to unlock hidden features, including songs, courses, and modes. These codes were handed out from Konami themselves, though periodically so as not to ruin the fun, particularly when Extra Stages were introduced in ''MAX''. ''[=MAX2=]'' also allowed players to cooperatively unlock features using the credit point system. By SuperNova, e-Amusement has taken the job, with unlockables being delivered online. [[NoExportForYou In Asia at least]]; countries without e-Amusement still need codes.



** "DEAD END (Groove Radar Special)" comes to mind due to maximizing all 5 of the Groove Radar's section as a gimmick. Not only that, but both Challenge Charts are so bad that it is enough to cause major foot strain due to awkward arrow placements.
*** Averted in DDRX as the chart no longer maxes out the groove radar due to DDRX's revised measuring system.

to:

** "DEAD END (Groove Radar Special)" comes to mind due to maximizing all 5 of the Groove Radar's section as a gimmick. Not only that, but both Challenge Charts are so bad that it is enough to cause major foot strain due to awkward arrow placements.
***
placements. Averted in DDRX as the chart no longer maxes out the groove radar due to DDRX's revised measuring system.



* VirtualPaperDoll

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* VirtualPaperDollVirtualPaperDoll: Some characters have alternate costumes for them to wear.
14th Jul '17 9:49:54 PM Exusia
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** DDR A features ''EXTRA EXCLUSIVE'', 10 songs over the game's lifetime that are, well, exclusive to Extra Stage. The Rinon's Adventure mini-game permanently unlocks them over time. At the very end of it, if you have a full Heat Level, you unlock a brand-new Extra Stage. Attempting it completely drains your Heat Level; meaning you can only try it once every seven credits. Clearing this with a high enough score unlocks the Encore Extra Stage.

to:

** DDR A features ''EXTRA EXCLUSIVE'', 10 songs over the game's lifetime that are, well, exclusive to Extra Stage. The Rinon's Adventure mini-game permanently unlocks them over time. At the very end of it, if After all ten are unlocked and you have a full Heat Level, you unlock a brand-new Extra Stage. Attempting it completely drains your Heat Level; Level, meaning you can only try it once every seven credits. Clearing this with a high enough score unlocks the Encore Extra Stage.
14th Jul '17 5:05:49 PM Exusia
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Added DiffLines:

** DDR A features ''EXTRA EXCLUSIVE'', 10 songs over the game's lifetime that are, well, exclusive to Extra Stage. The Rinon's Adventure mini-game permanently unlocks them over time. At the very end of it, if you have a full Heat Level, you unlock a brand-new Extra Stage. Attempting it completely drains your Heat Level; meaning you can only try it once every seven credits. Clearing this with a high enough score unlocks the Encore Extra Stage.
13th Jul '17 8:22:51 PM LucaEarlgrey
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** The North American version of ''A'' has premium mode much like other regions' versions, however instead of premium mode costing extra, Konami simply mandates that premium mode cost the same as standard mode, likely as an AntiFrustrationFeature necessary due to Dave & Buster's and Round 1 USA using cards for credits where one swipe adds one credit.

to:

** The North American version of ''A'' has premium mode much like other regions' versions, however instead of premium mode costing extra, Konami simply mandates that premium mode cost the same as standard mode, likely as an AntiFrustrationFeature necessary due to Dave & Buster's and Round 1 USA using cards for credits where one swipe adds one credit.credit and PASELI [[NoExportForYou being Japan-only]].
13th Jul '17 1:26:33 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* AllOrNothing: Two particularly {{Brutal Bonus Level}}s -- "Love Is The Power -Re:born-" and "Over The 'Period'", back when they were exclusively Encore Extra Stage songs -- demanded a Perfect Full Combo (all Perfect or Marvelous) to clear; even a Great would result in an instant failure.

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* AllOrNothing: Two particularly {{Brutal Bonus Level}}s -- "Love Is The Power -Re:born-" and "Over The 'Period'", back when they were exclusively Encore Extra Stage songs -- demanded a Perfect Full Combo (all Perfect or Marvelous) to clear; even a single Great would result in an instant failure.
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