History VideoGame / DanceDanceRevolution

18th Jul '16 6:16:04 PM CRMartin
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** DDRMAX: "So Deep (Perfect Sphere Remix)" from DDRMAX is also a particularly infamous one; it's a 9 on Heavy, but its filled to the brim with tiring gallops.

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** DDRMAX: "So Deep (Perfect Sphere Remix)" from DDRMAX is also a particularly infamous one; it's a 9 on Heavy, but its it's filled to the brim with tiring gallops.



** DDR Extreme: A couple of examples here:
*** "[[{{Music/Aqua}} Cartoon Heroes]] (Speedy Mix)" from ''DDR Extreme'' on Singles Heavy. It is widely considered one of the most difficult 9-footers, if not the most difficult, in the entire series because it throws a wide variety of patterns at you, from gallops to crossovers to double steps to jackhammers to lengthy streams, all at a relatively fast speed (170 BPM). Unless you're adept at each of these patterns, expect to fail this song over and over again. If using the DDRX rating, this would easily fall under a 14 or a 15.

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** DDR Extreme: A couple of examples here:
''DDR Extreme'' gives us the following:
*** "[[{{Music/Aqua}} Cartoon Heroes]] (Speedy Mix)" from ''DDR Extreme'' on Singles Heavy.Heavy. A very cutesy, upbeat song from the Dancemania album series, but don't let that fool you. It is widely considered one of the most difficult 9-footers, if not the most difficult, in the entire series because it throws a wide variety of patterns at you, from gallops to crossovers to double steps to jackhammers to lengthy streams, all at a relatively fast speed (170 BPM). Unless you're adept at each of these patterns, expect to fail this song over and over again. If using On the DDRX rating, DDR X scale, this would easily fall under a 14 or a 15.



*** The Least 100 Seconds Double Heavy, labeled as an 8. The crooked step patterns, combined with a very high speed makes it very easy to get thrown off. This is averted in [=DDRX=] as the chart overhauled re-rating is a 13 and later a 14 in [=DDRX2=], nearly equal to a boss song.

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*** The Least 100 Seconds Double Heavy, labeled as an 8. The crooked step patterns, combined with a very high speed makes it very easy to get thrown off. This is averted in [=DDRX=] as In [=DDRX=], the chart overhauled re-rating is rating has been changed to a 13 13, and later a 14 in [=DDRX2=], nearly equal to a boss song.[=DDRX2=].
12th Jul '16 2:15:03 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* BoringButPractical:
** Holding onto the safety bar makes the player look like they're not dancing at all, but it does help the player maintain their balance on harder charts.
** "Bracketing", in which the player keeps their feet on the inner corner brackets of the four panels so that they don't have to move their feet as much.
9th Jul '16 2:42:31 AM jerenze
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* CopyProtection: The 2013 arcade game requires a connection to Konami's e-Amusement network in order to run, as it is part of Konami's shared-profit "e-Amusement Participation" network. No connection, no DDR for you. And don't think about just simply attempting to make a connection to e-Amusement, as Konami only accepts connections from arcades officially registered with the network, and to this date there are zero DDR 2013 machines connected from outside of Asia, though with the expansion of Japanese amusement center chain Round 1 into the United States, DDR 2013 in the West is very much a possibility.

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* CopyProtection: The 2013 arcade game requires and succeeding versions require a connection to Konami's e-Amusement network in order to run, as it is part of Konami's shared-profit "e-Amusement Participation" network. No connection, no DDR for you. And don't think about just simply attempting to make a connection to e-Amusement, as Konami only accepts connections from arcades officially registered with the network, network. Before the arrival of DDR A in select Dave & Buster's outlets and to this date in Round1 USA outlets, there are zero no DDR 2013 machines connected from outside of Asia, though with to the expansion of Japanese amusement center chain Round 1 into the United States, DDR 2013 official network in the West is very much a possibility.states.
11th Jun '16 12:54:38 AM LucaEarlgrey
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** Until Extreme, DDR was the main vehicle used by record label Toshiba EMI to promote its dance music compilations ''Dancemania''; the label had made a deal with Konami to advertise the albums in-game (typically in attract mode), in exchange for letting them use songs from them as the bulk of their soundtrack (in fact, ''Solo Bass Mix'' was sourced almost exclusively from "Dancemania Bass", as in Miami Bass). Additionally, the partnership also allowed the label to distribute the official DDR soundtrack albums, which as a result could contain both the "licensed" music and the original songs.

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** Until Extreme, DDR was the main vehicle used by record label Toshiba EMI to promote its dance music compilations ''Dancemania''; the label had made a deal with Konami to advertise the albums in-game (typically in attract mode), in exchange for letting them use songs from them as the bulk of their soundtrack (in fact, ''Solo Bass Mix'' was sourced almost exclusively from "Dancemania Bass", as in Miami Bass). Additionally, the partnership also allowed the label to distribute the official DDR soundtrack albums, which as a result could contain both the "licensed" music and the original songs.songs, unlike many modern BEMANI soundtracks that have only original songs and not licensed ones.
3rd Jun '16 9:46:17 AM nombretomado
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** A similar reset happened for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 versions released in 2010, which were titled just "Dance Dance Revolution" in North America. The Wii version also brought an UnexpectedGameplayChange by extending its motion control integration into a new ''JustDance''-esque "Choreography" mode, which used special charts containing a variety of new hand motions for the Wii Remote and Nunchuck to form more varied routines (Meanwhile, the [=PS3=] version had players using the [=PlayStation Move=] wand to hit targets in the corner of the screen. It wasn't that great) In Europe however, they got re-branded as "Hottest Party 4" and "New Moves" respectively. The next game "Dance Dance Revolution II", was essentially the console port of X3 vs 2nd Mix (if it followed the same pattern of the U.S. PS2 releases, that is; as most of it was an X2 AC catchup)

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** A similar reset happened for the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 versions released in 2010, which were titled just "Dance Dance Revolution" in North America. The Wii version also brought an UnexpectedGameplayChange by extending its motion control integration into a new ''JustDance''-esque "Choreography" mode, which used special charts containing a variety of new hand motions for the Wii Remote and Nunchuck to form more varied routines (Meanwhile, the [=PS3=] version had players using the [=PlayStation Move=] wand to hit targets in the corner of the screen. It wasn't that great) In Europe however, they got re-branded as "Hottest Party 4" and "New Moves" respectively. The next game "Dance Dance Revolution II", was essentially the console port of X3 vs 2nd Mix (if it followed the same pattern of the U.S. PS2 [=PS2=] releases, that is; as most of it was an X2 AC catchup)



** America's ''Dance Dance Revolution Konamix'' and Europe's ''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' are practically identical, except the one Japanese-language song in Konamix got replaced with five licensed songs: "Can't Get You Out Of My Head" by Kylie Minogue, "Don't Stop Movin'" by S Club 7, "My Favourite Game" by The Cardigans, "The Bad Touch" by The Bloodhound Gang and "You Got The Love" by Rufus feat. Chaka Khan. It's also one of the better games to be released in Europe having more songs than many PS2 versions and the licences weren't bad either.

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** America's ''Dance Dance Revolution Konamix'' and Europe's ''Dancing Stage Party Edition'' are practically identical, except the one Japanese-language song in Konamix got replaced with five licensed songs: "Can't Get You Out Of My Head" by Kylie Minogue, "Don't Stop Movin'" by S Club 7, "My Favourite Game" by The Cardigans, "The Bad Touch" by The Bloodhound Gang and "You Got The Love" by Rufus feat. Chaka Khan. It's also one of the better games to be released in Europe having more songs than many PS2 [=PS2=] versions and the licences weren't bad either.



** ''Dance Dance Revolution Extreme'' for the PS2 had an especially bad bug: omitting the "Dance Mode" option, which would turn off the non-directional buttons on the controller that would be located in the corners of a dance mat. Since these buttons were also mapped to directions on the dance pad, playing any song on a mat became prohibitively difficult if not impossible, as the player would constantly trigger inadvertent steps by touching the corner buttons during a song. The worst thing about this one is that the option is in the game, and works fine if turned on, there's just no way to turn it on without hacking the save file. Oops.

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** ''Dance Dance Revolution Extreme'' for the PS2 [=PS2=] had an especially bad bug: omitting the "Dance Mode" option, which would turn off the non-directional buttons on the controller that would be located in the corners of a dance mat. Since these buttons were also mapped to directions on the dance pad, playing any song on a mat became prohibitively difficult if not impossible, as the player would constantly trigger inadvertent steps by touching the corner buttons during a song. The worst thing about this one is that the option is in the game, and works fine if turned on, there's just no way to turn it on without hacking the save file. Oops.



** Beginning in 2009, Konami decided to be a bit more consistent; the games -- which were, in fact, originally announced under the title of ''Dance Dance Revolution'' -- would now have a common soundtrack between platforms, but each platform still ended up having different engines, interfaces, and features. The PS2 and Wii versions would be known as ''X2'' and ''Hottest Party 3'' respectively on release.

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** Beginning in 2009, Konami decided to be a bit more consistent; the games -- which were, in fact, originally announced under the title of ''Dance Dance Revolution'' -- would now have a common soundtrack between platforms, but each platform still ended up having different engines, interfaces, and features. The PS2 [=PS2=] and Wii versions would be known as ''X2'' and ''Hottest Party 3'' respectively on release.



* OldShame[[invoked]]: Naoki Maeda really regrets 'LET THEM MOVE' (a song from 2nd Mix). The song has since become unavailable in Arcade and Console versions for years. Unfortunately for Naoki, although the song disappeared from the main game modes, home version developers had a habit of using it as a tutorial song. It kept appearing in Lesson Mode well into the PS2 era.

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* OldShame[[invoked]]: Naoki Maeda really regrets 'LET THEM MOVE' (a song from 2nd Mix). The song has since become unavailable in Arcade and Console versions for years. Unfortunately for Naoki, although the song disappeared from the main game modes, home version developers had a habit of using it as a tutorial song. It kept appearing in Lesson Mode well into the PS2 [=PS2=] era.
21st May '16 9:00:14 PM nombretomado
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* OddlyNamedSequel: After three ''Hottest Party'' games on the Wii, the next release on the system and the PS3 was just called ''Dance Dance Revolution'' in America. However, the ''Hottest Party'' name was kept in Europe (creating ''[=HP4=]'' and ''[=HP5=]''), and the PS3 version was renamed "Dance Dance Revolution: New Moves".

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* OddlyNamedSequel: After three ''Hottest Party'' games on the Wii, the next release on the system and the PS3 [=PS3=] was just called ''Dance Dance Revolution'' in America. However, the ''Hottest Party'' name was kept in Europe (creating ''[=HP4=]'' and ''[=HP5=]''), and the PS3 [=PS3=] version was renamed "Dance Dance Revolution: New Moves".
17th May '16 12:33:06 AM Dimas28
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* EndOfSeriesAwareness: A downplayed example for Extreme. While DDR was never meant to end with that game (as many people believe), Bemani did want to take a break for the arcade production for some time, hence the 4-year hiatus. Since four years are not a short time, some send-offs were thrown: several songs were created with a celebration theme (1998, Dance Dance Revolution, Graduation, MAX. (period)) and the fact that the arcade version include almost all Konami Originals that have appeared in the series so far hints at its "ultimate" nature. The console version also boasts 200-something tracklist, ''far'' higher than any previous game's list (which range from 40-70ish).


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** While jumps are essential part of a song's difficulty, having heavy loads of them while at the same time throwing them from nowhere is just as much a Fake Difficulty as any other. Many songs that are rated high would actually be far easier had the jumps not exist, such as NGO Challenge's infamous jump fest towards the end, which earns it the rare 18 rating, even though it actually has lesser streams than the Expert chart.


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* [[LethalJokeCharacter Lethal Joke Song]]: The "[insert name here] Radar Special" songs are these. Their charts are made to max out a certain aspect of the Groove Radar, which means without much consideration, and thus essentially jokes. Yet many of them are hard precisely ''because'' of this mentality. The ultimate example of a Lethal Joke Song is the sixth Radar Special, DEAD END (Groove Radar Special), whose chart is made to max out ''every single'' aspects, giving [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umwrzdFEdUw this kind of chart]] for everyone to see.


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* PostFinalBoss: Some Encore Extra Stages are engineered to be this; they're far easier than the Extra Stage songs preceding them, though the player also have to deal with some very annoying gimmicks (such as the universal OneHitPointWonder). CANDY, Kakumei, Dance Dance Revolution, on the bounce, and LOVE IS THE POWER -Reborn- are all examples.
18th Apr '16 11:14:20 PM Lirodon
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* OldSaveBonus: 5th Mix on [=PlayStation=] could unlock all the content on 4th and Extra Mix. Similarly, the Wii's Hottest Party 2 through 5 can unlock content from the preceding version.
** Actually, it's a trait of the Japanese console releases (at least until they decided to solely focus on the arcades after DDRX). If you have a successor game, you can use the "save file update" to automatically unlock everything in the previous game (having [=DDRMAX2=]'s file unlocks DDRMAX's unlockables, having Festival's unlocks Party Collection's, and so on).

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* OldSaveBonus: 5th Mix on Japanese [=PlayStation=] could unlock all the content on 4th and Extra Mix. Similarly, ports, as well as the Wii's Hottest Party 2 through 5 can unlock content from the preceding version.
** Actually, it's a trait of the Japanese console releases (at least until they decided to solely focus on the arcades after DDRX). If you have a successor game, you can use the "save file update"
5, allow players to automatically unlock everything in the previous game (having a 5th Mix save file unlocks 4th Mix and Extra Mix's unlockables, having [=DDRMAX2=]'s file unlocks DDRMAX's unlockables, having Festival's unlocks Party Collection's, and so on).having Hottest Party 2 unlocks Hottest Party 1, etc).
18th Apr '16 4:13:48 PM KizunaTallis
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* DarkerAndEdgier: [=DDRMAX2=] pulls this one. It features a lot of [[RedAndBlackAndEvilAllOver black and red]], the select screen music is a toned-down disco version of freaking ''PARANOIA survivor'', and almost of all of the new songs are {{Trance}}[[note]] Trance is mainly used to evoke a personal emotional feeling on the listeners[[/note]] in one way of another. The boss songs, MAXX Unlimited and Kakumei, are a lot darker than the previous boss songs MAX 300 and CANDY; MAXX Unlimited is stuck up with the Trance syndrome unlike the drum-heavy MAX 300, while Kakumei is a modern rendition of a classical music[[note]]Fun fact: Classical music is regarded as the ancient precursor of, you guessed it, Trance.[[/note]] (namely, Chopin's Revolutionary Etude), in contrast to the happy hardcore-CANDY.

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* DarkerAndEdgier: [=DDRMAX2=] pulls this one. It features a lot of [[RedAndBlackAndEvilAllOver black and red]], the select screen music is a toned-down disco version of freaking ''PARANOIA survivor'', and almost of all of the new songs are {{Trance}}[[note]] Trance {{Trance}}[[note]]Trance is mainly used to evoke a personal emotional feeling on the listeners[[/note]] in one way of another. The boss songs, MAXX Unlimited and Kakumei, are a lot darker than the previous boss songs MAX 300 and CANDY; MAXX Unlimited is stuck up with the Trance syndrome unlike the drum-heavy MAX 300, while Kakumei is a modern rendition of a classical music[[note]]Fun fact: Classical music trance is regarded as the ancient precursor of, you guessed it, Trance.widely considered to be something of a SpiritualSuccessor to classical music.[[/note]] (namely, Chopin's Revolutionary Etude), in contrast to the happy hardcore-CANDY.hardcore CANDY.
7th Apr '16 2:40:22 PM Lirodon
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** Some versions, especially console versions, have contained [[http://zenius-i-vanisher.com/v5.2/viewthread.php?threadid=1939&page=1 unused charts, music, and graphics]]. The infamous "Oni Glitch" on Extreme AC exposes some [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlhBcwmLohk strange and sometimes incomplete Challenge charts]]; such as a hilariously incomplete "Last Message" chart that consists of nothing until part-way in (where there is a random [=L/R=] stream, and later a sequence only using Lefts), an equally bizarre "Higher (Next Morning Mix)" that only consists of lefts, and complete "Love <3 Shine" and "Dam Dariam" charts. Though, the latter fits the song in an awkward way, they're steps for a completely different song!

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** Some versions, especially console versions, have contained [[http://zenius-i-vanisher.com/v5.2/viewthread.php?threadid=1939&page=1 unused charts, music, and graphics]]. The infamous "Oni Glitch" on Extreme AC exposes some [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlhBcwmLohk strange and sometimes incomplete Challenge charts]]; such as a hilariously incomplete "Last Message" chart that consists of nothing until part-way in (where there is a random [=L/R=] stream, and later a sequence only using Lefts), an equally bizarre "Higher (Next Morning Mix)" that only consists of lefts, and complete "Love <3 Shine" and "Dam Dariam" charts. Though, the The latter fits the song in an awkward way, they're steps for way ... but fans later figured out that they are actually meant to go with "Give it Up", a completely different song!Captain Jack song that may have been cut from Extreme.
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