History VideoGame / AFinalUnity

12th Feb '17 10:18:00 AM Headrock
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* BrokenAesop: Upon making the right choice for the final test to win the Unity Device, you as Picard rationalize it after the fact as obeying the Prime Directive, which doesn't even make sense considering the context (instead of, say, pointing out that since they all agreed that it should be used for the benefit of all races, that should include the Borg as well, and since it isn't possible to negotiate with them, the only way it can be used to their benefit is by not using it to destroy them). The keepers of the Unity Device congratulate you on having the wisdom not to use the device for petty ends. This essentially implies that because they believe in the very simple concept of non-interference, the relatively young Federation is wiser and more enlightened than the million year old Chodak race which actually built the Unity Device in the first place, when the real overall message of the game had so far been about friendship, co-operation, and mutual respect and trust between different and alien cultures.

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* BrokenAesop: Upon making At the right choice for very end of the final test game, Picard is given the option to win use the Unity Device, you as Picard rationalize it after Device to [[spoiler:annihilate the fact Borg]]. He decides not to take this option, and wins control of the Unity Device as a result. After the fact, he rationalizes the decision as obeying the Prime Directive, which doesn't even make sense considering the context (instead of, say, pointing out that since they all agreed that it should be used for the benefit of all races, that should include the Borg as well, and since it isn't possible to negotiate with them, the only way it can be used to their benefit is by not using it to destroy them). Directive. The keepers of the Unity Device congratulate you him on having the wisdom not to use the device for petty ends. This ends, which essentially implies that because they believe it believes in the very simple concept of non-interference, the relatively young Federation is wiser and more enlightened than the million year old Chodak race which actually built the Unity Device in the first place, when place.
** This is further broken in that
the real overall message of the entire game had so far been right up to that point (as was that of the television series) was all about friendship, co-operation, cooperation and mutual respect and trust between different and alien cultures.
26th Oct '16 7:36:00 PM Headrock
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The meat of the game lies in roughly two dozen sequential away missions, which are played in a [[PointAndClick]] adventure style that is somewhat similar to that of the previous games. This time around, you get to select which of the officers from the Enterprise-D you'd like to beam down with you. Your choice of which characters to bring on a mission can heavily influence how smoothly the mission is going to go. The characters you've brought with you have conversations with one another and offer comments and advice. The usefulness of that advice varies based on the difficulty level, but also on whether or not the characters you brought along actually have any expertise to contribute. Good diplomacy and defusing dangerous situations is once again critical in this game, and losing any crew member results in an instant GameOver.

to:

The meat of the game lies in roughly two dozen sequential away missions, which are played in a [[PointAndClick]] PointAndClick adventure style that is somewhat similar to that of the previous games. This time around, you get to select which of the officers from the Enterprise-D you'd like to beam down with you. Your choice of which characters to bring on a mission can heavily influence how smoothly the mission is going to go. The characters you've brought with you have conversations with one another and offer comments and advice. The usefulness of that advice varies based on the difficulty level, but also on whether or not the characters you brought along actually have any expertise to contribute. Good diplomacy and defusing dangerous situations is once again critical in this game, and losing any crew member results in an instant GameOver.
26th Oct '16 7:33:47 PM Headrock
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Like its predecessors, ''A Final Unity'' is a direct translation of the show from a television format into an adventure game format. This means that the aesthetic style, writing style and structure of the show are faithfully represented in the game, and in surprising detail. Unlike its ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries TOS'' predecessors, which were highly episodic in nature, ''A Final Unity'' is built entirely around a central StoryArc. It is designed to resemble a single, multi-part episode of the television series, whose story unfolds over a long sequence of away missions, space battles, conversations on the ship, and even some rudimentary management of the ship itself.

to:

Like its predecessors, ''A Final Unity'' is a direct translation of the show from a television format into an adventure game format. This means that the aesthetic style, writing style and structure of the show are faithfully represented in the game, and in surprising detail. Unlike its ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries TOS'' TOS]]'' predecessors, which were highly episodic in nature, ''A Final Unity'' is built entirely around a central StoryArc. It is designed to resemble a single, multi-part episode of the television series, whose story unfolds over a long sequence of away missions, space battles, conversations on the ship, and even some rudimentary management of the ship itself.
26th Oct '16 7:33:24 PM Headrock
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Unlike its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[VideoGame/StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''VideoGame/JudgmentRites'') ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story built to resemble one (very-)long episode in the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, conversations on board, space battles, and away-missions.

The episode begins with the Enterprise encountering a tiny ship fleeing Romulan space, through the Romulan Neutral Zone and into Federation space. It is pursued by a Garidian Warbird - a race sharing much of its technology with the Romulans. After the Enterprise intervenes and sends the Garidians back whence they came, the rescued ship turns out to hold religious refugees. They ask Picard to assist them in rediscovering some ancient texts that could possibly lead to a revolution back on their home planet. However, the investigation into these ancient texts [[PlotTwist eventually leads]] to the re-discovery of an ancient civilization that once spanned a major portion of the galaxy, and disappeared overnight some 900,000 years ago.

The game contains about two dozen away missions, played in point-and-click adventure style similar to that of the previous games. This time, you can select pretty much any of the regular crew-member from the Enterprise D to beam down. Making the correct choice of characters to bring to a mission can heavily influence how well or how easy the mission is going to go. The characters you bring on away missions also offer insightful advice - and the usefulness of that advice is based on the difficulty level, and whether the characters you brought along actually have any expertise to contribute. Good diplomacy and defusing dangerous situations is once again critical, and losing any crew member results in an instant GameOver.

Space combat is now done via various command posts that control the different systems on board the ship: from directing weapon-fire to energy distribution, navigation and even tractor beams. Battles can be very difficult and very engrossing. These battles differ from previous games in that the arcade-like controls and flight mechanics have been replaced with a much more complex (and confusing) simulator of ship-to-ship combat, closer to the ones used in games like ''VideoGame/StarTrekBridgeCommander''.

Once again, pretty much the entire regular cast from the television show gave their voices to this game, with plenty of dialogue for all of them. The game successfully manages to capture the feel of an actual episode (or, more like, a multi-episode arc) in the series, right down to the Teaser at the beginning, the sounds and visuals, and of course the type of conflicts usually presented in Next Generation episodes. This should not be surprising, as much of the story and direction aspects were done by the creators and writers of ''The Next Generation'' and ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.

''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekGenerations Star Trek: Generations]]'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek video game franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).

to:

Unlike Like its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[VideoGame/StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''VideoGame/JudgmentRites'') predecessors, ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story direct translation of the show from a television format into an adventure game format. This means that the aesthetic style, writing style and structure of the show are faithfully represented in the game, and in surprising detail. Unlike its ''[[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries TOS'' predecessors, which were highly episodic in nature, ''A Final Unity'' is built entirely around a central StoryArc. It is designed to resemble one (very-)long a single, multi-part episode in of the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has series, whose story unfolds over a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, long sequence of away missions, space battles, conversations on board, space battles, the ship, and away-missions.

even some rudimentary management of the ship itself.

The episode story begins with the Enterprise encountering a tiny ship fleeing Romulan space, through the Romulan Neutral Zone and into Federation space. It is pursued by a Garidian Warbird belonging to the Garidians - a race sharing that shares much of its technology with the Romulans. After the Enterprise intervenes and sends the Garidians back whence they came, the rescued ship turns out to hold religious refugees. refugees fleeing from Garid. They ask Picard to assist them in rediscovering some ancient texts that could possibly might lead to a revolution back on their home planet. However, the investigation into these ancient texts [[PlotTwist eventually leads]] to the re-discovery of an ancient civilization that once spanned a major portion of the galaxy, and disappeared overnight some 900,000 years ago.

The meat of the game contains about lies in roughly two dozen sequential away missions, which are played in point-and-click a [[PointAndClick]] adventure style that is somewhat similar to that of the previous games. This time, time around, you can get to select pretty much any which of the regular crew-member officers from the Enterprise D Enterprise-D you'd like to beam down. Making the correct down with you. Your choice of which characters to bring to on a mission can heavily influence how well or how easy smoothly the mission is going to go. The characters you've brought with you bring on away missions also have conversations with one another and offer insightful advice - comments and the advice. The usefulness of that advice is varies based on the difficulty level, and but also on whether or not the characters you brought along actually have any expertise to contribute. Good diplomacy and defusing dangerous situations is once again critical, critical in this game, and losing any crew member results in an instant GameOver.

Space combat For the first time in ''Star Trek'' videogame history, ''A Final Unity'' includes 3D-rendered space battles. Combat is now done via handled through the various command posts that control the different systems on board the ship: from directing weapon-fire to energy distribution, navigation weapon-fire, distributing energy, maneuvering around the battlefield, and even using tractor beams. Battles can be very difficult and very engrossing. These battles engrossing, and differ from previous games in that the arcade-like controls and flight mechanics have been replaced with a much more complex (and confusing) simulator of ship-to-ship combat, closer to the ones used in games like ''VideoGame/StarTrekBridgeCommander''.

''VideoGame/StarTrekBridgeCommander''. Furthermore, players have the option of relegating control to their officers during battle.

Once again, pretty much the entire regular cast from the television show gave their voices to this game, with plenty of dialogue for all of them. The game successfully manages to capture the feel of an actual episode (or, more like, a multi-episode arc) in the series, right down to the Teaser at the beginning, the sounds and visuals, and of course the type of conflicts usually presented in Next Generation ''Next Generation'' episodes. This should not be surprising, as much of the story and direction aspects were done by the creators and writers of ''The Next Generation'' and ''[[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Deep Space Nine]]''.

''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekGenerations Star Trek: Generations]]'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek video game videogame franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).
1st May '15 6:41:23 AM Willbyr
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''Franchise/StarTrek: A Final Unity'' is the third in a series of [[AdventureGame Adventure Games]] based on the Star Trek universe, made for the PC in 1995 by Creator/MicroProse. It marked the first Star Trek adventure game written about the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' franchise, the first to be released only in a fully-voiced CD-ROM edition, and the first to feature "Super-VGA" graphics.

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/6e3fa358c91f108e1272ca3fc9942ff7.jpg]]

''Franchise/StarTrek: A Final Unity'' is the third in a series of [[AdventureGame Adventure Games]] {{Adventure Game}}s based on the Star Trek Franchise/StarTrek universe, made for the PC in 1995 by Creator/MicroProse. It marked the first Star Trek adventure game written about the ''[[Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration Next Generation]]'' franchise, the first to be released only in a fully-voiced CD-ROM edition, and the first to feature "Super-VGA" graphics.



''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekGenerations Star Trek: Generations]]'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek videogame franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).

to:

''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekGenerations Star Trek: Generations]]'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek videogame video game franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).


Added DiffLines:

9th Mar '15 3:12:39 PM Lance
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''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''Star Trek: Generations'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek videogame franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).

to:

''A Final Unity'' is also considered the last Star Trek adventure game to avert TheProblemWithLicensedGames, and is still remembered fondly. The next attempt resulted in ''Star ''[[VideoGame/StarTrekGenerations Star Trek: Generations'', Generations]]'', a mediocre game based on a movie of the same name. This coincided with the general decline of the adventure-game genre as a whole. At the same time, the Star Trek videogame franchise began moving into more serious ship-to-ship and fleet-to-fleet combat simulations (with the occasional lower-quality adventure being released to a less receptive crowd).
8th Mar '15 4:33:15 AM jormis29
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Unlike its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[VideoGame/StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''JudgmentRites'') ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story built to resemble one (very-)long episode in the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, conversations on board, space battles, and away-missions.

to:

Unlike its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[VideoGame/StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''JudgmentRites'') ''VideoGame/JudgmentRites'') ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story built to resemble one (very-)long episode in the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, conversations on board, space battles, and away-missions.
16th Feb '15 3:14:32 AM jormis29
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Space combat is now done via various command posts that control the different systems on board the ship: from directing weapon-fire to energy distribution, navigation and even tractor beams. Battles can be very difficult and very engrossing. These battles differ from previous games in that the arcade-like controls and flight mechanics have been replaced with a much more complex (and confusing) simulator of ship-to-ship combat, closer to the ones used in games like ''[[StarTrekBridgeCommander Star Trek: Bridge Commander]]''.

to:

Space combat is now done via various command posts that control the different systems on board the ship: from directing weapon-fire to energy distribution, navigation and even tractor beams. Battles can be very difficult and very engrossing. These battles differ from previous games in that the arcade-like controls and flight mechanics have been replaced with a much more complex (and confusing) simulator of ship-to-ship combat, closer to the ones used in games like ''[[StarTrekBridgeCommander Star Trek: Bridge Commander]]''.
''VideoGame/StarTrekBridgeCommander''.
15th Jan '15 11:08:15 AM TheUnsquished
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Unlike its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''JudgmentRites'') ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story built to resemble one (very-)long episode in the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, conversations on board, space battles, and away-missions.

to:

Unlike its [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Original Series]]-based predecessors (''[[StarTrek25thAnniversary (''[[VideoGame/StarTrek25thAnniversary 25th Anniversary]]'' and ''JudgmentRites'') ''A Final Unity'' is a single, self-contained story built to resemble one (very-)long episode in the television series. It contains everything you'd find in an episode: it has a teaser, the famous [=TNG=] intro sequence, conversations on board, space battles, and away-missions.
26th Aug '14 5:52:19 PM MyFinalEdits
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Added DiffLines:

* ReplayMode: The game allows the player to go to the Holodeck of the Enterprise where he/she can rewatch the game's custscenes.
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