History VerySpecialEpisode / WesternAnimation

7th Mar '17 2:13:29 PM Monolaf317
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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has moments that smack of this trope. "Princess Cookie" is unusual, because it's played like a classic VerySpecialEpisode, but isn't topical and doesn't have a moral. Baby Snaps is a cookie who holds up a convenience store and holds the customers hostage, demanding Princess Bubblegum's crown. In an unusually sombre flashback, he tells Jake about Bubblegum's visit to his orphanage when he was a child. She told him he could be anything he wanted, and, seeing how happy she made the other children, he told her he wanted to be a princess like her. She laughed at him, and he spent the rest of his life coveting her crown. Jake tells him he doesn't need her crown to be a princess, and that he can found his own kingdom where anyone can be what they want. Jake tries to help him escape, but when the law catches up to them, Snaps attempts suicide by jumping off a cliff. The last scene is set in a mental hospital, as Jake brings a crown made out of a flower to Snaps, declaring him an honorary princess. Between the toned-down humour, the flashback, the explicit suicide scene and all the emotional monologuing about being oneself, it feels like an intentional pastiche of cliched VerySpecialEpisodes, but unlike a classic VSE, it's not explicitly about some particular social issue. It just seems to exist for its own sake.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has moments that smack of this trope. "Princess Cookie" is unusual, because it's played like a classic VerySpecialEpisode, but isn't topical and doesn't have a moral. Baby Snaps is a cookie who holds up a convenience store and holds the customers hostage, demanding Princess Bubblegum's crown. In an unusually sombre flashback, he tells Jake about Bubblegum's visit to his orphanage when he was a child. She told him he could be anything he wanted, and, seeing how happy she made the other children, he told her he wanted to be a princess like her. She laughed at him, and he spent the rest of his life coveting her crown. Jake tells him he doesn't need her crown to be a princess, and that he can found his own kingdom where anyone can be what they want. Jake tries to help him escape, but when the law catches up to them, Snaps attempts suicide by jumping off a cliff. The last scene is set in a mental hospital, as Jake brings a crown made out of a flower to Snaps, declaring him an honorary princess. Between the toned-down humour, the flashback, the explicit suicide scene and all the emotional monologuing about being oneself, it feels like an intentional pastiche of cliched VerySpecialEpisodes, {{Very Special Episode}}s, but unlike a classic VSE, it's not explicitly about some particular social issue. It just seems to exist for its own sake.
2nd Mar '17 11:36:10 AM luiginumber3
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* ''WesternAnimation/BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand'' did an anti-drug episode, though due to the show's sci-fi setting the popular genre convention that [[ILoveNuclearPower Radiation gives you superpowers]] is used as a metaphor for it.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BuzzLightyearOfStarCommand'' did an anti-drug episode, though due to the show's sci-fi setting the popular genre convention that [[ILoveNuclearPower Radiation radiation gives you superpowers]] is used as a metaphor for it.
1st Mar '17 3:46:33 PM mariofan1000
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' features a downplayed example in the form of [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS5E20TheCatfish "The Catfish"]]. The basic plot is that Louie, Gumball and Darwin's step-grandfather, has 0 friends on Elmoreplus (the show's fictional counterpart to Facebook) and they decide to make a fake profile for a woman named Muriel and friend him. Eventually, Louie starts to become genuinely attached to the fictional woman, and "she" tells him to meet her at the mall so that Gumball and Darwin can eventually come clean about the whole thing. However, Granny Jojo, Louie's wife, eventually finds out about it and misinterprets a message he sent Muriel saying "I think I want to be more than just Elmore Plus friends" (when he really just meant being real-life friends) and goes to the mall with him. Gumball and Darwin then discover that the woman that Gumball used as an avatar works at the mall, and have to stop Jojo from essentially brutalizing an innocent woman. They succeed, Louie finds out the truth about Muriel, and tells Gumball and Darwin that what they did was called Catfishing and is illegal. It's one of the few times on the show where there is a genuine aesop that isn't undercut for laughs, but it's a downplayed example because the episode, tonally, is still as comedic and wacky as every other episode.
10th Feb '17 10:33:03 PM livestockgeorge
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* ''WesternAnimation/AdventureTime'' has moments that smack of this trope. "Princess Cookie" is unusual, because it's played like a classic VerySpecialEpisode, but isn't topical and doesn't have a moral. Baby Snaps is a cookie who holds up a convenience store and holds the customers hostage, demanding Princess Bubblegum's crown. In an unusually sombre flashback, he tells Jake about Bubblegum's visit to his orphanage when he was a child. She told him he could be anything he wanted, and, seeing how happy she made the other children, he told her he wanted to be a princess like her. She laughed at him, and he spent the rest of his life coveting her crown. Jake tells him he doesn't need her crown to be a princess, and that he can found his own kingdom where anyone can be what they want. Jake tries to help him escape, but when the law catches up to them, Snaps attempts suicide by jumping off a cliff. The last scene is set in a mental hospital, as Jake brings a crown made out of a flower to Snaps, declaring him an honorary princess. Between the toned-down humour, the flashback, the explicit suicide scene and all the emotional monologuing about being oneself, it feels like an intentional pastiche of cliched VerySpecialEpisodes, but unlike a classic VSE, it's not explicitly about some particular social issue. It just seems to exist for its own sake.
28th Jan '17 2:34:13 PM twilicorn
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** Another episode featured George befriending a rabbit named Carl, who happens to have Asperger's Syndrome. The episode deals with George learning about Asperger's and autism in general. Unlike most VSE's, however, Carl has shown up in later episodes.

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** Another episode featured George befriending a rabbit named Carl, who happens to have Asperger's Syndrome. The episode deals with George learning about Asperger's and autism in general. Unlike most VSE's, however, Carl has shown up averts the LongLostUncleAesop trope by appearing in later episodes.



** "April 9th", which was made in response to the 9/11 attacks, dealt with the students dealing with the aftermath of a large fire at the school.

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** "April 9th", which 9th" is a unique case, as it was made in response to the 9/11 attacks, dealt though it did not mention them directly. Instead, the focus was on [[http://bluehairedspidey.tumblr.com/post/147990335662/manamana6672-missespeon teaching the target audience to deal with the emotions they may face in a similar crisis]]. The episode's main storyline involved the students dealing with the aftermath of a large fire at the school.school, a situation which would evoke similar reactions to 9/11 from kids.
20th Nov '16 2:01:36 PM StFan
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* VentureBrothers did a parody of one. Interestingly, the parody didn't come from the issue not being taken seriously, or the issue being something unimportant, but rather the issue being something so awkward most shows wouldn't talk about it: testicular torsion. At the end of the episode everyone looks extremely awkward as they're made to talk to the camera about a serious medical condition affecting male genitals.

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* VentureBrothers ''WesternAnimation/TheVentureBrothers'' did a parody of one. Interestingly, the parody didn't doesn't come from the issue not being taken seriously, or the issue being something unimportant, but rather the issue being something so awkward most shows wouldn't talk about it: testicular torsion. At the end of the episode everyone looks extremely awkward as they're made to talk to the camera about a serious medical condition affecting male genitals.
15th Nov '16 4:35:23 PM Unicorndance
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** "The Great [=MacGrady=]" has the kids finding out lunchlady Mrs. [=MacGrady=] has been diagnosed with cancer. It was dedicated to its writer, Leah Ryan, who passed away from the disease, to the point where Mrs. [=MacGrady=]'s name was changed to Leah (it was usually Sarah) for the episode. Sadly, the episode rarely airs anymore as Lance Armstrong guest-starred in the episode, and after the doping scandal that cost him all of his Tour de France titles...

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** "The Great [=MacGrady=]" has the kids finding out lunchlady Mrs. [=MacGrady=] has been diagnosed with cancer. It was dedicated to its writer, Leah Ryan, who passed away from the disease, to the point where Mrs. [=MacGrady=]'s name was changed to Leah (it was usually Sarah) for the episode. Sadly, the episode rarely airs anymore as Lance Armstrong guest-starred in the episode, and after the doping scandal that cost him all of his Tour de France titles... However, the cancer actually goes away quite fast.
** In "Binky Goes Nuts," it is revealed Binky is allergic to peanuts. His mom was very worried.
** "Buster's Breathless": Buster finds out he has asthma.



* If you count toilet-training episodes as such:
** ''WesternAnimation/DanielTigersNeighborhood'' had one about stopping whatever you are doing to use the bathroom.
** ''Nina Needs to Go!'' is an entire show about toilet training...albeit with an increasingly idiotic series of events and horrible cases of AesopAmnesia.
** Another Disney Junior short series, ''Shane's Kindergarten Countdown'', had an episode about this.



* While not in the same vein as most other VSE, ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' had one episode where the gang deals with a headless skateborder ghost. As they're putting the clues together, they discover a cache of drugs which earns disapproving tones from Velma and Scooby (Velma says the word "drugs" with plenty of venom in her voice while Scooby responds "Drugs? RUCK!") In the end, they find out that the ghost was a former skateboarding champ who had been disgraced for using drugs.

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* While not in the same vein as most other VSE, ''WesternAnimation/APupNamedScoobyDoo'' had one episode where the gang deals with a headless skateborder ghost. As they're putting the clues together, they discover a cache of [[DrugsAreBad drugs which earns disapproving tones from Velma and Scooby Scooby]] (Velma says the word "drugs" with plenty of venom in her voice while Scooby responds "Drugs? RUCK!") YUCK!") In the end, they find out that the ghost was a former skateboarding champ who had been disgraced for using drugs.
6th Nov '16 3:47:56 PM SparkPlugTheTroper
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** One infamous episode titled "Bleep" featured DW learning a "swear" word and accidentally causing other kids in her class to say it. Rather than explaining that certain words may be considered offensive or rude, DW's mother basically says "It means I want to hurt your feelings". Not helped that the swear word is never given any context as to its meaning.

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** One infamous episode titled "Bleep" featured DW learning a "swear" word and accidentally causing other kids in her class to say it. Rather than explaining that certain words may be considered offensive or rude, DW's mother basically says "It means I want to hurt your feelings". Not helped that the swear word is never given any context as to its meaning. (Granted, the beginning of the episode did explain how and why the bleep is used, so the episode was probably more of a demonstration of how the bleep is used than a VSE about swearing. The production team probably focused more on the bleeping.)
27th Oct '16 5:26:09 PM twilicorn
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* Unlike most VSE, ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}} 's "The Misery Chick" is about exploring grief from a teenager's perspective instead of a child's one. In the episode, a previous quarterback is praised as a hero despite being a egotistical {{Jerkass}}. Right after Jane and Daria joke about him dying, he actually ''is'' killed by [[DeathByIrony his own goal post]]. Daria's classmates and teacher, viewing her as "the misery chick", come to her for advice on how to deal with their varying feelings on the tragedy, which Daria gets fed up with. Jane then goes out of her way to avoid her when she starts feeling that Daria isn't taking his death seriously. Finally, Daria explains believing that the world has its losses as well it's gains doesn't make her miserable, just "not like them", and that even though he was a jerk, it's still horrible that he had to die. At the end of the episode, Daria advises a guilt-striken Sandi to "find some other way to feel, then you won't feel sad."

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* Unlike most VSE, ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}} 's ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}''[='=]s "The Misery Chick" is about exploring grief from a teenager's perspective instead of a child's one. In the episode, a previous quarterback is praised as a hero despite being a egotistical {{Jerkass}}. Right after Jane and Daria joke about him dying, he actually ''is'' killed by [[DeathByIrony his own goal post]]. Daria's classmates and teacher, viewing her as "the misery chick", come to her for advice on how to deal with their varying feelings on the tragedy, which Daria gets fed up with. Jane then goes out of her way to avoid her when she starts feeling that Daria isn't taking his death seriously. Finally, Daria explains believing that the world has its losses as well it's gains doesn't make her miserable, just "not like them", and that even though he was a jerk, it's still horrible that he had to die. At the end of the episode, Daria advises a guilt-striken guilt-stricken Sandi to "find some other way to feel, then you won't feel sad."
31st Aug '16 3:42:19 PM ironicusername
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* Unlike most VSE, ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}} 's "The Misery Chick" is about exploring grief from a teenager's perspective instead of a child's one. In the episode, a previous quarterback is praised as a hero despite being a egotistical {{Jerkass}}. Right after Jane and Daria joke about him dying, he actually ''is'' killed by [[DeathByIrony his own goal post]]. Daria's classmates and teacher, viewing her as "the misery chick", come to her for advice on how to deal with their varying feelings on the tragedy, which Daria gets fed up with. Jane then goes out of her way to avoid her when she starts feeling that Daria isn't taking his death seriously. Finally, Daria explains believing that the world has its losses as well it's gains doesn't make her miserable, just "not like them", and that even though he was a jerk, it's still horrible that he had to die. At the end of the episode, Daria advises a guilt-striken Sandi to "find some other way to feel, then you won't feel sad."
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