History ValuesDissonance / ProfessionalWrestling

9th Sep '15 9:22:53 AM thecarolinabull01
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* It can be pretty offensive watching WWE's heel Divas go about their slutty antics. But older or conservative viewers are liable to get a dissonant feeling while watching ''face'' Divas behave the exact same way. Candice Michelle was particularly guilty of this: even as a face, she would sometimes plant a pseudo-lesbian kiss on other face Divas such as Wrestling/TorrieWilson, deeply troubling some viewers [[GirlOnGirlIsHot while inevitably delighting others]]. Wrestling/MickieJames's PsychoLesbian also almost completely failed to get over anyway that wasn't positive, as she was never booed for an extended amount of time despite quickly dropping all her previous sympathetic traits.

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* It can be pretty offensive watching WWE's heel Divas go about their slutty antics. But older or conservative viewers are liable to get a dissonant feeling while watching ''face'' Divas behave the exact same way. Candice Michelle Wrestling/CandiceMichelle was particularly guilty of this: even as a face, she would sometimes plant a pseudo-lesbian kiss on other face Divas such as Wrestling/TorrieWilson, deeply troubling some viewers [[GirlOnGirlIsHot while inevitably delighting others]]. Wrestling/MickieJames's PsychoLesbian also almost completely failed to get over anyway that wasn't positive, as she was never booed for an extended amount of time despite quickly dropping all her previous sympathetic traits.



** During the late 1990s and early 2000s, it was common to see men beating up women. Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin was known to give "stunners" to multiple women, including Stephanie [=McMahon=] Linda [=McMahon=], Wrestling/{{Chyna}} and Wrestling/StacyKeibler, all to loud cheers of the audience. But when Wrestling/{{Umaga}} brutally beat super-hot WWE diva Maria during a match, and later, when the 7-foot-3 Great Khali began choking the life and shaking like a rag doll super-sexy diva Ashley Massaro to the point where she began bleeding from the mouth, the fans were outraged.

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** During the late 1990s and early 2000s, it was common to see men beating up women. Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin was known to give "stunners" to multiple women, including Stephanie [=McMahon=] Linda [=McMahon=], Wrestling/{{Chyna}} and Wrestling/StacyKeibler, all to loud cheers of the audience. But when Wrestling/{{Umaga}} brutally beat super-hot WWE diva Maria [[Wrestling/MariaKanellis Maria]] during a match, and later, when the 7-foot-3 Great Khali began choking the life and shaking like a rag doll super-sexy diva Ashley Massaro Wrestling/AshleyMassaro to the point where she began bleeding from the mouth, the fans were outraged.
1st Jul '15 10:50:17 PM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: Wrestling/{{WWE}} and Wrestling/{{TNA}}) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and {{signature move}}s).

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* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: Wrestling/{{WWE}} and Wrestling/{{TNA}}) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and {{signature move}}s). Terminology too, as calling a pro wrestling angle a "storyline" would be considered an insult prior to 1989.
8th Jun '15 10:00:33 PM IAmTheRooster
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Added DiffLines:

** Somewhat subverted with Jack Swagger's heel run, which took popular conservative idealogies and turned them into cartoonishly exaggerated villainous versions. However to some people, [[StrawmanHasAPoint he and Zeb were right.]]
20th Apr '15 6:57:40 PM johnnyfog
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* Up until the 1980s, it was taboo for a man to even so much as threaten a woman, be she a fan, a wrestler or a valet. While comedian Andy Kaufman once had an act where he would wrestle a woman, the objective was never to injure the woman; this was more for showmanship and to sell his act to a male audience. The changes came in the late 1980s, when Wrestling/MissElizabeth the valet (and real-life wife) of Wrestling/RandySavage was shoved by the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan, had her wrist and ankle broken by various heels, was slapped by Wrestling/JakeRoberts (after being made to beg for Savage's well-being), had her name sullied by Bad News Brown, and was constantly threatened, all to the outrage of the face-leaning announcers; at one time, Wrestling/AndreTheGiant grabbed Elizabeth's hair and was planning to brutally injure her, but Roberts -- several years before he himself slapped Elizabeth -- stopped the whole thing. While Elizabeth was a face, the face-leaning announcers would invariably cheer when the heel Sensational Sherri was knocked around, usually by the Wrestling/UltimateWarrior. At the same time, heelish announcer Wrestling/JesseVentura condemned Sherri being beaten up but blamed Elizabeth when she was in danger. (Even Wrestling/BobbyHeenan, during "Tuesday in Texas," was shocked when Roberts slapped Elizabeth, sure that a [=DDT=] was coming.)

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* Up until the 1980s, it was taboo for a man to even so much as threaten a woman, be she a fan, a wrestler or a valet. While comedian Andy Kaufman once had an act where he would wrestle a woman, the objective was never to injure the woman; this was more for showmanship and to sell his act to a male audience. The changes came in the late 1980s, when Wrestling/MissElizabeth the valet (and real-life wife) of Wrestling/RandySavage was shoved by the Wrestling/HonkyTonkMan, had her wrist and ankle broken by various heels, was slapped by Wrestling/JakeRoberts (after being made to beg for Savage's well-being), had her name sullied by Bad News Brown, and was constantly threatened, all to the outrage of the face-leaning announcers; at one time, Wrestling/AndreTheGiant grabbed Elizabeth's hair and was planning to brutally injure her, but Roberts -- several years before he himself slapped Elizabeth -- stopped the whole thing. While Elizabeth was a face, the face-leaning announcers would invariably cheer when the heel [[Wrestling/SherriMartel Sensational Sherri Sherri]] was knocked around, usually by the Wrestling/UltimateWarrior.Wrestling/UltimateWarrior[!]. At the same time, heelish announcer Wrestling/JesseVentura condemned Sherri being beaten up but blamed Elizabeth when she was in danger. (Even Wrestling/BobbyHeenan, during "Tuesday in Texas," was shocked when Roberts slapped Elizabeth, sure that a [=DDT=] was coming.)
30th Mar '15 11:01:00 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: Wrestling/{{WWE}} and Wrestling/{{TNA}}) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and signature moves).

to:

* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: Wrestling/{{WWE}} and Wrestling/{{TNA}}) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and signature moves).{{signature move}}s).
30th Mar '15 10:54:05 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: WWE and TNA) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and signature moves).
* In Chris Jericho's book, he mentioned a case of this during a WWE tour in Tokyo. The people behind the scenes were horrified at how quiet the audience was, thinking the crowd was dead and weren't enjoying the show. Jericho (who worked extensively in Japan before joining WWE) tried to explain how the Japanese take a more academic approach to wrestling, ''analyzing'' the match quietly rather than simply ''watching'' it and cheering. He mentioned how the brass were still uneasy about it and still piped in crowd noise for the TV broadcast. This isn't limited to wrestling, either, see the real life section of JapanesePoliteness.

to:

* Pro Wrestling around the world varies according to perception and style, and wrestlers who work in multiple countries tend to adapt their style to the local brand. It also varies with time. For the USA, during television's infancy in the 1950s, wrestling matches were mostly just wrestling and if they weren't it involved mostly punching. In the 1980s, it began to be considered an addictive, but cheesy soap opera. In the 1990s, talking, entrances and promos greatly outpaced matches themselves, which also tended to have even more brawling and use of weapons than actual wrestling. At its lowest points worst, USA wrestling is sideshow, at times, literally for concerts and such. Big time wrestling (read: WWE Wrestling/{{WWE}} and TNA) Wrestling/{{TNA}}) has become increasingly scripted, with emphasis on storyline and "high spots" (big stunts and signature moves).
* In Chris Jericho's Wrestling/ChrisJericho's book, he mentioned a case of this during a WWE tour in Tokyo. The people behind the scenes were horrified at how quiet the audience was, thinking the crowd was dead and weren't enjoying the show. Jericho (who worked extensively in Japan before joining WWE) tried to explain how the Japanese take a more academic approach to wrestling, ''analyzing'' the match quietly rather than simply ''watching'' it and cheering. He mentioned how the brass were still uneasy about it and still piped in crowd noise for the TV broadcast. This isn't limited to wrestling, either, see the real life section of JapanesePoliteness.
30th Mar '15 10:48:32 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Foreign wrestlers (or [[FakeNationality American wrestlers]] ''[[FakeNationality playing]]'' [[FakeNationality foreigners]]) are [[ForeignWrestlingHeel usually booked as the heels]], and nationality was usually played up as part of the gimmick until very recently. Villainous nationalities included [[ThoseWackyNazis German]], [[DirtyCommunists Russian]], [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japanese]], and - somewhat ironically, as the best technical wrestlers in the world have come from there - Canadian, particularly ''[[FrenchJerk French]]''-Canadian. However, when these characters would wrestle before crowds in their homelands (or supposed homelands), they would as often as not be booked to win the match, and gain wild applause from the audience despite still being heels! (Wrestling/JerryLawler referred to these incidents as [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "Bizarro World."]])

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* Foreign wrestlers (or [[FakeNationality American wrestlers]] ''[[FakeNationality playing]]'' [[FakeNationality wrestlers billed as foreigners]]) are [[ForeignWrestlingHeel usually booked as the heels]], and nationality was usually played up as part of the gimmick until very recently. Villainous nationalities included [[ThoseWackyNazis German]], [[DirtyCommunists Russian]], [[JapanTakesOverTheWorld Japanese]], and - somewhat ironically, as the best technical wrestlers in the world have come from there - Canadian, particularly ''[[FrenchJerk French]]''-Canadian. However, when these characters would wrestle before crowds in their homelands (or supposed homelands), they would as often as not be booked to win the match, and gain wild applause from the audience despite still being heels! (Wrestling/JerryLawler referred to these incidents as [[Franchise/{{Superman}} "Bizarro World."]])
30th Mar '15 10:46:48 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* The big issue in recent years has been the furor over unprotected chairshots. Knowing what we know now, any new fans to professional wrestling will probably wince when they go back to look at hardcore matches from the WWF's Wrestling/AttitudeEra or, God forbid, Wrestling/{{ECW}}.

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* The big issue in recent years has been the furor over unprotected chairshots. Knowing what we know now, any new fans to professional wrestling will probably wince when they go back to look at hardcore matches from the WWF's Wrestling/AttitudeEra or, God forbid, Wrestling/{{ECW}}. (ironically, the wrestlers in much more violent promotions that proceeded them such as Wrestling/{{FMW}} and W*ING, still knew to protect their heads and nobody thought less of Kanemura for it)
30th Dec '14 12:08:24 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Masks used to be incredibly common in USA wrestling and still are in Latin American Wrestling, especially Mexico thanks to the legendary careers of The Masked Marvel, The Blue Demon, Wrestling/ElSanto, Atlantis, Mascarita Sagrada, Wrestling/{{Mistico}} ect, the [[HumiliatingWager ever popular mask vs mask wager]] and TheReveal that follows. In the USA though, masks fell out of favor in the so called "Rock N' Wrestling Era" when wrestling was crossing over with other forms of media such as movies and cartoons, leaving wrestlers to think masks would hamper their marketing value even though they never stopped Mexicans from getting movies or comics. However, with the rise of the internet, masks started making a small comeback in the 50 states as they were one of the surefire ways to force a gap between professional and private life, helping keep the mystique of TheGimmick-Wrestling/{{Chikara}} in particular ran with this.

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* Masks used to be incredibly common in USA wrestling and still are in Latin American Wrestling, especially Mexico thanks to the legendary careers of The Masked Marvel, The Blue Demon, Wrestling/ElSanto, Atlantis, Mascarita Sagrada, Wrestling/{{Mistico}} ect, the [[HumiliatingWager ever popular mask vs mask wager]] and TheReveal that follows. In the USA though, masks fell out of favor in the so called "Rock N' Wrestling Era" when wrestling was crossing over with other forms of media such as movies and cartoons, leaving wrestlers to think masks would hamper their marketing value even though they never stopped Mexicans from getting movies or comics. However, with the rise of the internet, masks started making a small comeback in the 50 states as they were one of the surefire ways to force a gap between professional and private life, helping keep the mystique of TheGimmick-Wrestling/{{Chikara}} TheGimmick-Wrestling/KaijuBigBattel and Wrestling/{{Chikara}} in particular ran with this.
30th Dec '14 12:06:06 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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** Malia Hosaka was intended to be brought in as a Rocky Balboa underdog from the crowd to challenge {{Wrestling/Ivory}} for the Women's Championship. They dropped the angle when people recognized Hosaka from a couple of WCW appearances. Not likely to happen these days when it's virtually impossible for any indie wrestler to be completely unknown.

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** Malia Hosaka was intended to be brought in as a Rocky Balboa underdog from the crowd to challenge {{Wrestling/Ivory}} for the Women's Championship. They dropped the angle when people recognized Hosaka from a couple of WCW appearances. Not likely to happen these days when it's virtually impossible for any indie wrestler to be completely unknown.unknown.
* Masks used to be incredibly common in USA wrestling and still are in Latin American Wrestling, especially Mexico thanks to the legendary careers of The Masked Marvel, The Blue Demon, Wrestling/ElSanto, Atlantis, Mascarita Sagrada, Wrestling/{{Mistico}} ect, the [[HumiliatingWager ever popular mask vs mask wager]] and TheReveal that follows. In the USA though, masks fell out of favor in the so called "Rock N' Wrestling Era" when wrestling was crossing over with other forms of media such as movies and cartoons, leaving wrestlers to think masks would hamper their marketing value even though they never stopped Mexicans from getting movies or comics. However, with the rise of the internet, masks started making a small comeback in the 50 states as they were one of the surefire ways to force a gap between professional and private life, helping keep the mystique of TheGimmick-Wrestling/{{Chikara}} in particular ran with this.
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