History ValuesDissonance / Other

17th Sep '17 1:36:58 AM jamespolk
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* The "WesternAnimation/DuckAndCover" from 1951 was to inform people on what to do in case of nuclear strike. This is controversial because its not clear if such tactic worked in a nuclear strike. Some videos, like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R5g9v0fzkc this one]] from Howcast, updated it in case of a terrorist attack. In fact, many would regard Duck and Cover as a scare tactic due to the early in the Cold War when it was released. However, it [[NotCompletelyUseless has served a purpose]] when it comes to earthquakes where one must hide underneath an object like a strong-enough table to withstands falling debris. It also was the basics on tornado-drills since seeking cover is key.

to:

* The "WesternAnimation/DuckAndCover" "Film/DuckAndCover" from 1951 was to inform people on what to do in case of nuclear strike. This is controversial because its not clear if such tactic worked in a nuclear strike. Some videos, like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R5g9v0fzkc this one]] from Howcast, updated it in case of a terrorist attack. In fact, many would regard Duck and Cover as a scare tactic due to the early in the Cold War when it was released. However, it [[NotCompletelyUseless has served a purpose]] when it comes to earthquakes where one must hide underneath an object like a strong-enough table to withstands falling debris. It also was the basics on tornado-drills since seeking cover is key.
16th Sep '17 7:11:06 PM jamespolk
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* The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKqXu-5jw60 Duck and Cover]] from 1951 was to inform people on what to do in case of nuclear strike. This is controversial because its not clear if such tactic worked in a nuclear strike. Some videos, like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R5g9v0fzkc this one]] from Howcast, updated it in case of a terrorist attack. In fact, many would regard Duck and Cover as a scare tactic due to the early in the Cold War when it was released. However, it [[NotCompletelyUseless has served a purpose]] when it comes to earthquakes where one must hide underneath an object like a strong-enough table to withstands falling debris. It also was the basics on tornado-drills since seeking cover is key.

to:

* The [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKqXu-5jw60 Duck and Cover]] "WesternAnimation/DuckAndCover" from 1951 was to inform people on what to do in case of nuclear strike. This is controversial because its not clear if such tactic worked in a nuclear strike. Some videos, like [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4R5g9v0fzkc this one]] from Howcast, updated it in case of a terrorist attack. In fact, many would regard Duck and Cover as a scare tactic due to the early in the Cold War when it was released. However, it [[NotCompletelyUseless has served a purpose]] when it comes to earthquakes where one must hide underneath an object like a strong-enough table to withstands falling debris. It also was the basics on tornado-drills since seeking cover is key.
5th Sep '17 6:48:14 AM Pichu-kun
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* Cat experts and charities in the USA often cite allowing your cat to roam outdoors as a hallmark of a negligent owner, and many feline documentaries (such as ''My Cat From Hell'') and advice columns will be scandalised should they come across a cat with unlimited access to the outdoors. As a result, European owners can come in for a hard time should they read, watch or interact with such sites / shows / books, as mentioned [[http://cats.about.com/od/faqcatcare/f/ukoutdoors.htm here]], especially since USA-based shows and advice tends to dominate. In many European countries, including the UK, common consensus considers it cruel to ''deny'' cats access to the outdoors, with many charities refusing to rehome cats in flats (apartments) or houses with no outdoor space. The only exceptions are shows that seek to rehome pets which may (somewhat reluctantly) advise owners to keep a particular cat indoors for health reasons (such as Feline HIV) or if it is likely to be stolen. The key factors involved in this difference mainly come down to traffic / population density (the USA has many more cars and much busier roads), hazards (the UK has very few wild animals that would actively prey on a cat) and law (cats are legally permitted to roam freely in the UK, and owners are not accountable for their cats in the same way that a dog owner is accountable for their dog). This may also be a matter of human convenience too -- with so many people in the US living in apartments, sticking to the "cats must have access to the outdoors" rule would deny many people the right to keep a cat. Maintaining that ''all'' cats should be kept indoors levels the playing field.
** This becomes especially obvious in UK documentaries such as ''The Secret Life of Cats'', where the whole point is to explore what cats get up to when they leave the house. UK documentaries are fascinated with the "wild side" of cats, and generally advocate respecting their independence, while US shows like ''My Cat From Hell'' work on the premise that well-adjusted cats should be touchy-feely and happy to snuggle with their owners.
** Australia, meanwhile, has the opposite of the US predator problem, in that the main concern with cats being allowed to roam outside is not other animals preying on them, but the cats preying on native animals. Protecting native species is SeriousBusiness in Australia, so their stance tends to fall between the US and the UK's extremes: let your cats roam in the daytime, but keep them indoors at night.
** Another feline-related one: Declawing is thorny territory in the US, but not illegal. It is ''certainly'' illegal in many other countries, which have deemed it mutilation of an animal. This comes up less often than the indoor/outdoor debate, since many US experts are also adamantly against declawing, but in a UK or European show, this would be grounds to call the RSPCA/SSPCA, not just a slap on the metaphorical wrist for the owner[[note]]The reason declawing is so controversial is because it involves not simply cutting the claw down, but removing the end bone of the paw, where the claw grows from - in a human, this would be like removing the tips of your fingers to the joint[[/note]].

to:

* Cat experts and charities in the USA often cite allowing your cat to roam outdoors as a hallmark of a negligent owner, and many feline documentaries (such as ''My Cat From Hell'') and advice columns will be scandalised should they come across a cat with unlimited access to the outdoors. As a result, European owners can come in for a hard time should they read, watch or interact with such sites / shows / books, as mentioned [[http://cats.about.com/od/faqcatcare/f/ukoutdoors.htm here]], especially since USA-based shows and advice tends to dominate. In many European countries, including the UK, common consensus considers it cruel to ''deny'' cats access to the outdoors, with many charities refusing to rehome cats in flats (apartments) or houses with no outdoor space. The only exceptions are shows that seek to rehome pets which may (somewhat reluctantly) advise owners to keep a particular cat indoors for health reasons (such as Feline HIV) or if it is likely to be stolen. The key factors involved in this difference mainly come down to traffic / population density (the USA has many more cars and much busier roads), hazards (the UK has very few wild animals that would actively prey on a cat) and law (cats are legally permitted to roam freely in the UK, and owners are not accountable for their cats in the same way that a dog owner is accountable for their dog). This may also be a matter of human convenience too -- with so many people in the US living in apartments, sticking to the "cats must have access to the outdoors" rule would deny many people the right to keep a cat. Maintaining that ''all'' cats should be kept indoors levels the playing field.
**
field. The US also has more animals unaccustomed to cats or that can be endangered by cats, causing outside cats to be worse to the environment than in the UK. This becomes especially obvious in UK documentaries such as ''The Secret Life of Cats'', where the whole point is to explore what cats get up to when they leave the house. UK documentaries are fascinated with the "wild side" of cats, and generally advocate respecting their independence, while US shows like ''My Cat From Hell'' work on the premise that well-adjusted cats should be touchy-feely and happy to snuggle with their owners.
**
owners. Australia, meanwhile, has the opposite of the US predator problem, in that the main concern with cats being allowed to roam outside is not other animals preying on them, but the cats preying on native animals. Protecting native species is SeriousBusiness in Australia, so their stance tends to fall between the US and the UK's extremes: let your cats roam in the daytime, but keep them indoors at night.
** * Another feline-related one: Declawing is thorny territory in the US, but not illegal. It is ''certainly'' illegal in many other countries, which have deemed it mutilation of an animal. This comes up less often than the indoor/outdoor debate, since many US experts are also adamantly against declawing, but in a UK or European show, this would be grounds to call the RSPCA/SSPCA, not just a slap on the metaphorical wrist for the owner[[note]]The reason declawing is so controversial is because it involves not simply cutting the claw down, but removing the end bone of the paw, where the claw grows from - in a human, this would be like removing the tips of your fingers to the joint[[/note]].
1st Sep '17 4:12:12 PM CharlesPhipps
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Added DiffLines:

** Mind you, there's also CompletelyMissingThePoint that as a metaphor for God and his relationship to his worshipers, it's about saying God will take back those who have strayed from his path and the already righteous shouldn't feel jealous this is a cause for celebration.
14th Jul '17 10:00:12 AM DoctorCooper
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[[noreallife]]




[[AC:Uncategorized]]
* Google often has interesting little statements under the search bar. One of these was "Quick! Name the last time you played hooky. If you canít remember, youíre probably overdue." (Non Americans may have to then Google what 'hooky' means).
* TheSeventies comedy star [[Series/TheGoodies Bill Oddie]] ran into trouble in the 1990's by failing to grasp the nature of comedy had changed, and some of the personas that had made him famous in TheSixties were no longer politically correct. ''Rastus Watermelon'' was a sound-only character Bill invented in voice only for the {{Radio}} precursor, ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain'', a stereotyped black man he later reprized in blackface, as part of Series/TheGoodies. [[note]]In common with other ISIRTA voices recycled for the show, his appearance drew a huge cheer from the studio audience. This sort of reaction is ''hard'' for a comedian to let go of.[[/note]] Bill Oddie seemed unable to grasp this character had become politically incorrect with the years and became visibly angry when gently told by Creator/StephenFry he could not use this, and other familiar radio voices, during a 1990's comedy benefit show Fry was producing. Bill had also written a comedy song, which relied on long-outdated comedy about gay stereotypes. As it was for an AIDS charity benefit, Fry said this was out too. While Oddie later apologized, the spat was embarrassing and unedifying to those who witnessed it, and may have contributed to Bill retiring from active comedy performance to concentrate on his natural history shows.
* This can apply (in part) to any story that teaches the moral about "obeying your parents", or even respecting your elders.[[note]]Because after all, respect is a two way-street. That is, if you show disrespect for someone, they'll show disrespect towards you, no matter how old the two people/entities are.[[/note]] In part, because while it's important that one should at least oblige their parents/teachers/caregivers/etc. if told to do chores/homework/etc., it's important to remember that "grown-ups" are not always right, especially when [[AbusiveParents more serious]] situations are involved.
** The above can also more generally apply do "doing what you're told", or even (especially in cases where the police or the military are involved) "following orders". After all, [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight there are times to do what you're told/follow orders, and times to do what you know is right/follow your heart]]...
* Stand-up comedy gets hit pretty hard with this trope; some jokes that may have been fine in the seventies, eighties, and even the nineties would ''not'' fly today.
** Big names in comedy in TheSixties and TheSeventies such as Bernard Manning and Jim Davidson were particularly vilified in later decades. Manning's career never really recovered after he was ambushed on a spoof chat show, and incited into making seriously racist and homophobic references which were a large part of his stand-up routine. Again, as with Bill Oddie, this was a case of a man who simply did not realise the world had moved on and outside a cirle of devoted fans, his humour wasn't thought of as acceptably TV mainstream any more. Meanwhile other comics such as Roy "Chubby" Brown simply didn't care and took RefugeInAudacity.
* The importance of Holidays varies greatly, not just place-to-place, but also generation to generation. Most notably in the United States; while Christmas is the undisputed champion of holidays, its chief rival tends to be Thanksgiving among people middle-aged-and up, and Halloween among Generation X and Millennials. Halloween used to be rather insignificant in Britain, with Bonfire Night (five days after Halloween) being the bigger event. This has changed particularly from the mid-late 80s/early 90s onward, and Halloween has risen in popularity.
* As Germany, and most European countries in general, don't have a significant Native American or Hispanic population, dressing up as a stereotypical "Indian" or "Mexican" during carnival season or at a costume party may be considered uninspired, but basically never inappropriate or racist.
* The word "race" is commonly used to refer to black, white and so on in English. It is also used as a shorthand for discussions about subjects having to do with that issue. (E.g. "the President has failed to address race"). A dictionary might tell you the German translation of that word is "Rasse", but if you use that word the same way as Americans you are in for a world of hurt. Many Germans will remind you that "Rasse" is a useless construct that does not actually exist. It's safe to say the national debates are ''very'' different, though the casual racism is NotSoDifferent at the same time that it manifests in different ways and against different groups[[note]]It helps though that Europeans did not evolve a concept of 'whiteness' the same way Americans did. For most Europeans the people next door where always much more important to distance from and most of those were more or less white[[/note]].
** For an example in Germany 'Neger' which would translate to 'Negro' is an outdated term, but does not bring nearly the heat as its American counterpart. Some Germans even defend using "Neger" because it is "not as bad as" another term with n and after all, it used to be quite a common word (just like "negro" in the US well into the 1960s)
* PatrioticFervor tends to be seen differently across cultures, English-speaking countries being prouder regarding their national culture than European nations: The most extreme examples are the U.S., whose nationalism is often seen as over-the-top by foreigners, with Germany being the polar opposite, thoroughly avoiding to invoke national pride for almost a century for evident reasons.
* Back in the early 20th century, children in Sweden were taught to admire warrior kings like Gustav II Adolf (1594-1632) and Carl XII (1682-1719). They were seen as heroes, who had made Sweden a great country, dying gloriously for their land in wars. But the huge popularity of these warrior kings has plummeted since the 1960s as tolerance for militarism, imperialism and nationalism has decreased. Books are still written about Gustav II Adolf and Carl XII, of course. But a modern writer will most likely bring attention to how they committed what we today would see as war crimes, and how the common people had to suffer[[note]]The men had to go to war, where plenty of them would either die or become crippled, and women and children had to starve at home, when they could not keep the agriculture going without the men's help.[[/note]] because the kings had illusions of grandeur.
* Depending on the region - specifically the temperature - wearing less clothing in public. If it's a very hot climate then walking around in less clothes would be considered acceptable because of the heat. In the UK however, where the climate is colder, walking around in shorts, tube tops, tank tops etc. would be looked down on - unless it was a particularly hot day. Lest you think this only affects women, shirt buttons in a business setting comes up too. In a warmer region, having two or more buttons undone would be fine. In a colder one, less so, because it evokes the IntimateOpenShirt. Similarly, even businesspeople or the president are unlikely to ever wear a suit in places like UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}}, while even fairly low-level office grunts in places like UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} are more or less forced to wear a suit most of the year.
* Red hair is viewed differently depending on where you live. In Europe--especially the UK, Ireland, and Russia--gingers are prone to mockery. In the US and Canada however, red hair carries no particular social stigma. If anything, it's quite the opposite; [[HeroesWantRedheads gingers are often fetishized]] in North American media precisely because of their rarity. The popularity of classic actress Creator/MaureenOhara, dubbed the "Queen of Technicolor" due to having bright red hair and green eyes just as movies started getting filmed in color, may have helped improve the perception of redheads in North America.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar has had some of this happen in multiple ways:
** [[SocietyMarchesOn Different Timeframes]]: Words, phrases, and innuendos that were considered rude or worse have been placed on the page, but a younger reader might be confused because of how casually some of them have been used. (A good example: "Suck(s)" or "Crap". Up until the late 90s - early 00s, it was considered quite rude for a character to say that something or something "Sucks" or that something is "Crappy". They are still considered rude, but not nearly as rude as they were in the past.) See also GetTheeToANunnery.
** [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch Regional slang]] and a more straight-up variation of this for foreign-made works. Some cultures might have a more liberal view of something that other cultures take more offense at. In one culture, GettingCrapPastTheRadar is just business as normal to another.
* A geographical Sliding Scale of Conservatism vs. Liberalism (in general terms) would have The East as very conservative, The U.S. and South Africa as mostly conservative, The Commonwealth and Latin America as mostly liberal and Europe as very liberal. Note that this tends to vary (often wildly) between regions/countries.
* In English-speaking countries, the word "liberal" refers to someone in the center-left of the political spectrum, often translating into "socialist". In Continental Europe and Australia however, "liberal" is someone in the center-right, if not outright right-wing.
** Actually, in the US and UK, a politician who declares himself a "socialist" is as good as dead (at least until the 2017 election in Britain where despite being vilified by a right-wing media, a Labour Party that nakedly and unashamedly used the S-word not only held its own, it increased its share of the vote, won seats, and crippled a Tory government). In other countries, socialist and ''communist'' parties are very influential.
* In former WarsawPact countries, the political spectrum is quite different from the Western European one. This is mainly the result of these countries getting invaded twice, first by Nazis, then by Soviets in quick succession and with a lot of RapePillageandBurn. And considering most of these countries weren't particularly democratic even before the nazi invasion meant that the population had no experience with modern democracies after TheGreatPoliticsMessUp. This resulted in almost all major parties being big government (as small government would mean people's -already quite meager by western standards- social security would dry-up) and conservative by western standards, with socialist parties going for the nostalgia of the ColdWar usually favoured by the poor and the elderly, while nationalist parties go for the Interbellum or even before generally favoured by the middle class and the middle-aged. With green, liberal or multiculturalist parties never getting more than a few percent and their stance on pro-multiculturalism, pro-minority(be it racial or sexual) and anti-tradition meaning they are unlikely to ever be considered viable choices.
* Some neighboring countries have notoriously different customs that often clash:
** The US and Canada: The former takes religion quite seriously and considers government should butt in as least as possible. The latter treats religion as a strictly private matter and government is seen as a provider that must take care of its citizens.
** Holland and Belgium: The main reason the Dutch have such lax drug laws is because of their ''laissez-faire'' stance on everything, while Belgium is somewhat more on par with Europeans' view of things.
** Spain and Portugal: Friends in Spain tend to greet each other very affectionately, with men often kissing in the cheek. In Portugal, two male friends won't even hug, no matter how close they are. The same happens between Argentina (or other Hispanic country) and Brazil.
* Guns are commonplace in America, being a stereotypical feature for foreigners. In most of Europe, not even ''the police'' is allowed to carry guns when on the beat. Actually, some do not even have (primarily the Nordic countries)
** This is changing rapidly. In 2017 it is not uncommon to see fully armed policemen on the streets in Britain, especially in London and more so after the terrorist attacks of May/June 2017. This is far less common outside the capital; visitors from OopNorth can express visible consternation to see armed police patrols at main railway stations in London, a sort of regionalised Values Dissonance.
* Sexuality is a highly contentious issue between the East and the West: Arabs and Asians in particular have a very paternalistic stance on the matter, something that for most Westerners [[PedoHunt is just plain wrong]]. On the flip side, homosexuality is increasingly tolerated or accepted in the West, while being regarded as a deadly sin (or at the very least social suicide) in the East. Latin countries tend to emphasize sex more than the rest of the Western world.
* Latin societies are also more matriarchal in comparison to Anglo-Saxon and Teutonic/Scandinavian cultures (not to mention Eastern cultures). As a result, gender roles and the importance of marriage are far smaller issues in Latin countries, whose female beauty standard is more stout and... "muscular" rather than the hourglass figure idealized in most European cultures.
* Money and private property is seen differently by most religions: Judaism is known for advocating frugality ([[AllJewsAreCheapskates to the point of becoming a stereotypical trait]]). Presbyterianism and (to a lesser extent) Anglicanism heavily endorse capitalism and private enterprise, something seen as quite obscene by other Christian creeds (most notoriously Catholicism), which instead advocate for sharing one's riches, something also advocated by Muslims. Eastern religions (and the Amish) go one step further, considering that private possessions are incompatible with an spiritual life.
* Young adults still living with their parents beyond college:
** Generational divide: In the baby boomer/early-X era, being a BasementDweller was synonymous with being an immature freeloader. With worsening economic conditions in the late 2000s, late-X'ers and millennials became pretty much forced to stay with the folks... indefinitely (in case of not having enough to live with their friends/acquaintances), to the point of having to settle down with mom and pop (decades ago, it would be the ''other'' way around).
** Regional divide: If living with the parents was not an option in Western countries, this was the norm in poorer nations.
* Until fairly recently internet content providers were often criticized when they resorted to "e-begging" to pay for a project. More recently, as platforms like YouTube have seriously reduced ad revenue, while standards of quality online have increased, turning to sources like Patreon has become the norm.
* In the Catalan-speaking provinces of Spain as well as Andorra, there is a traditional Christmas figurine called the "caganer" or "crapper", which is a little man wearing a barretina (traditional hat) and mooning the audience while he poops. The fact that he is a traditional part ''of the Nativity set'' (as much as the wise men and the baby Jesus) can cause foreigners, who see it as irreverent and inappropriate, to raise their eyebrows. However, the people in these regions love him, and it is considered an honor to be made into a caganeró there are a large variety of caganers depicting politicians, celebrities and even the Pope taking a dump. In this region, the poop symbolizes fertilization of crops- as such, the caganer is seen as welcoming the new year.

to:

\n[[AC:Uncategorized]]\n* Google often has interesting little statements under the search bar. One of these was "Quick! Name the last time you played hooky. If you canít remember, youíre probably overdue." (Non Americans may have to then Google what 'hooky' means).\n* TheSeventies comedy star [[Series/TheGoodies Bill Oddie]] ran into trouble in the 1990's by failing to grasp the nature of comedy had changed, and some of the personas %%Do not add an uncategorized section. Remember that had made him famous in TheSixties were no longer politically correct. ''Rastus Watermelon'' was a sound-only character Bill invented in voice only for the {{Radio}} precursor, ''Radio/ImSorryIllReadThatAgain'', a stereotyped black man he later reprized in blackface, as part of Series/TheGoodies. [[note]]In common with other ISIRTA voices recycled for the show, his appearance drew a huge cheer from the studio audience. This sort of reaction is ''hard'' for a comedian to let go of.[[/note]] Bill Oddie seemed unable to grasp this character had become politically incorrect with the years and became visibly angry when gently told by Creator/StephenFry he could not use this, and other familiar radio voices, during a 1990's comedy benefit show Fry was producing. Bill had also written a comedy song, which relied on long-outdated comedy about gay stereotypes. As it was for an AIDS charity benefit, Fry said this was out too. While Oddie later apologized, the spat was embarrassing and unedifying to those who witnessed it, and may have contributed to Bill retiring from active comedy performance to concentrate on his natural history shows.
* This can apply (in part) to any story that teaches the moral about "obeying your parents", or even respecting your elders.[[note]]Because after all, respect is a two way-street. That is, if you show disrespect for someone, they'll show disrespect towards you, no matter how old the two people/entities are.[[/note]] In part, because while it's important that one should at least oblige their parents/teachers/caregivers/etc. if told to do chores/homework/etc., it's important to remember that "grown-ups" are not always right, especially when [[AbusiveParents more serious]] situations are involved.
** The above can also more generally apply do "doing what you're told", or even (especially in cases where the police or the military are involved) "following orders". After all, [[ScrewTheRulesImDoingWhatsRight there are times to do what you're told/follow orders, and times to do what you know is right/follow your heart]]...
* Stand-up comedy gets hit pretty hard with this trope; some jokes that may have been fine in the seventies, eighties, and even the nineties would ''not'' fly today.
** Big names in comedy in TheSixties and TheSeventies such as Bernard Manning and Jim Davidson were particularly vilified in later decades. Manning's career never really recovered after he was ambushed on a spoof chat show, and incited into making seriously racist and homophobic references which were a large part of his stand-up routine. Again, as with Bill Oddie, this was a case of a man who simply did not realise the world had moved on and outside a cirle of devoted fans, his humour wasn't thought of as acceptably TV mainstream any more. Meanwhile other comics such as Roy "Chubby" Brown simply didn't care and took RefugeInAudacity.
* The importance of Holidays varies greatly, not just place-to-place, but also generation to generation. Most notably in the United States; while Christmas is the undisputed champion of holidays, its chief rival tends to be Thanksgiving among people middle-aged-and up, and Halloween among Generation X and Millennials. Halloween used to be rather insignificant in Britain, with Bonfire Night (five days after Halloween) being the bigger event. This has changed particularly from the mid-late 80s/early 90s onward, and Halloween has risen in popularity.
* As Germany, and most European countries in general, don't have a significant Native American or Hispanic population, dressing up as a stereotypical "Indian" or "Mexican" during carnival season or at a costume party may be considered uninspired, but basically never inappropriate or racist.
* The word "race" is commonly used to refer to black, white and so on in English. It is also used as a shorthand for discussions about subjects having to do with that issue. (E.g. "the President has failed to address race"). A dictionary might tell you the German translation of that word is "Rasse", but if you use that word the same way as Americans you are in for a world of hurt. Many Germans will remind you that "Rasse" is a useless construct that does not actually exist. It's safe to say the national debates are ''very'' different, though the casual racism is NotSoDifferent at the same time that it manifests in different ways and against different groups[[note]]It helps though that Europeans did not evolve a concept of 'whiteness' the same way Americans did. For most Europeans the people next door where always much more important to distance from and most of those were more or less white[[/note]].
** For an example in Germany 'Neger' which would translate to 'Negro' is an outdated term, but does not bring nearly the heat as its American counterpart. Some Germans even defend using "Neger" because it is "not as bad as" another term with n and after all, it used to be quite a common word (just like "negro" in the US well into the 1960s)
* PatrioticFervor tends to be seen differently across cultures, English-speaking countries being prouder regarding their national culture than European nations: The most extreme
examples are the U.S., whose nationalism is often seen as over-the-top by foreigners, with Germany being the polar opposite, thoroughly avoiding to invoke national pride for almost a century for evident reasons.
* Back in the early 20th century, children in Sweden were taught to admire warrior kings like Gustav II Adolf (1594-1632) and Carl XII (1682-1719). They were seen as heroes, who had made Sweden a great country, dying gloriously for their land in wars. But the huge popularity of these warrior kings has plummeted since the 1960s as tolerance for militarism, imperialism and nationalism has decreased. Books are still written about Gustav II Adolf and Carl XII, of course. But a modern writer will most likely bring attention to how they committed what we today would see as war crimes, and how the common people had to suffer[[note]]The men had to go to war, where plenty of them would either die or become crippled, and women and children had to starve at home, when they could not keep the agriculture going without the men's help.[[/note]] because the kings had illusions of grandeur.
* Depending on the region - specifically the temperature - wearing less clothing in public. If it's a very hot climate then walking around in less clothes would be considered acceptable because of the heat. In the UK however, where the climate is colder, walking around in shorts, tube tops, tank tops etc. would be looked down on - unless it was a particularly hot day. Lest you think this only affects women, shirt buttons in a business setting comes up too. In a warmer region, having two or more buttons undone would be fine. In a colder one, less so, because it evokes the IntimateOpenShirt. Similarly, even businesspeople or the president are unlikely to ever wear a suit in places like UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}}, while even fairly low-level office grunts in places like UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} are more or less forced to wear a suit most of the year.
* Red hair is viewed differently depending on where you live. In Europe--especially the UK, Ireland, and Russia--gingers are prone to mockery. In the US and Canada however, red hair carries no particular social stigma. If anything, it's quite the opposite; [[HeroesWantRedheads gingers are often fetishized]] in North American media precisely because of their rarity. The popularity of classic actress Creator/MaureenOhara, dubbed the "Queen of Technicolor" due to having bright red hair and green eyes just as movies started getting filmed in color, may have helped improve the perception of redheads in North America.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar has had some of this happen in multiple ways:
** [[SocietyMarchesOn Different Timeframes]]: Words, phrases, and innuendos that were considered rude or worse have been placed on the page, but a younger reader might be confused because of how casually some of them have been used. (A good example: "Suck(s)" or "Crap". Up until the late 90s - early 00s, it was considered quite rude for a character to say that something or something "Sucks" or that something is "Crappy". They are still considered rude, but not nearly as rude as they were in the past.) See also GetTheeToANunnery.
** [[DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch Regional slang]] and a more straight-up variation of this for foreign-made works. Some cultures might have a more liberal view of something that other cultures take more offense at. In one culture, GettingCrapPastTheRadar is just business as normal to another.
* A geographical Sliding Scale of Conservatism vs. Liberalism (in general terms) would have The East as very conservative, The U.S. and South Africa as mostly conservative, The Commonwealth and Latin America as mostly liberal and Europe as very liberal. Note that this tends to vary (often wildly) between regions/countries.
* In English-speaking countries, the word "liberal" refers to someone in the center-left of the political spectrum, often translating into "socialist". In Continental Europe and Australia however, "liberal" is someone in the center-right, if not outright right-wing.
** Actually, in the US and UK, a politician who declares himself a "socialist" is as good as dead (at least until the 2017 election in Britain where despite being vilified by a right-wing media, a Labour Party that nakedly and unashamedly used the S-word not only held its own, it increased its share of the vote, won seats, and crippled a Tory government). In other countries, socialist and ''communist'' parties are very influential.
* In former WarsawPact countries, the political spectrum is quite different from the Western European one. This is mainly the result of these countries getting invaded twice, first by Nazis, then by Soviets in quick succession and with a lot of RapePillageandBurn. And considering most of these countries weren't particularly democratic even before the nazi invasion meant that the population had no experience with modern democracies after TheGreatPoliticsMessUp. This resulted in almost all major parties being big government (as small government would mean people's -already quite meager by western standards- social security would dry-up) and conservative by western standards, with socialist parties going for the nostalgia of the ColdWar usually favoured by the poor and the elderly, while nationalist parties go for the Interbellum or even before generally favoured by the middle class and the middle-aged. With green, liberal or multiculturalist parties never getting more than a few percent and their stance on pro-multiculturalism, pro-minority(be it racial or sexual) and anti-tradition meaning they are unlikely to ever be considered viable choices.
* Some neighboring countries have notoriously different customs that often clash:
** The US and Canada: The former takes religion quite seriously and considers government should butt in as least as possible. The latter treats religion as a strictly private matter and government is seen as a provider that must take care of its citizens.
** Holland and Belgium: The main reason the Dutch have such lax drug laws is because of their ''laissez-faire'' stance on everything, while Belgium is somewhat more on par with Europeans' view of things.
** Spain and Portugal: Friends in Spain tend to greet each other very affectionately, with men often kissing in the cheek. In Portugal, two male friends won't even hug, no matter how close they are. The same happens between Argentina (or other Hispanic country) and Brazil.
* Guns are commonplace in America, being a stereotypical feature for foreigners. In most of Europe, not even ''the police'' is allowed to carry guns when on the beat. Actually, some do not even have (primarily the Nordic countries)
** This is changing rapidly. In 2017 it is not uncommon to see fully armed policemen on the streets in Britain, especially in London and more so after the terrorist attacks of May/June 2017. This is far less common
outside the capital; visitors from OopNorth can express visible consternation to see armed police patrols at main railway stations in London, a sort of regionalised Values Dissonance.
* Sexuality is a highly contentious issue between the East and the West: Arabs and Asians in particular have a very paternalistic stance on the matter, something that for most Westerners [[PedoHunt is just plain wrong]]. On the flip side, homosexuality is increasingly tolerated or accepted in the West, while being regarded as a deadly sin (or at the very least social suicide) in the East. Latin countries tend to emphasize sex more than the rest of the Western world.
* Latin societies
media are also more matriarchal in comparison to Anglo-Saxon and Teutonic/Scandinavian cultures (not to mention Eastern cultures). As a result, gender roles and the importance of marriage are far smaller issues in Latin countries, whose female beauty standard is more stout and... "muscular" rather than the hourglass figure idealized in most European cultures.
* Money and private property is seen differently by most religions: Judaism is known for advocating frugality ([[AllJewsAreCheapskates to the point of becoming a stereotypical trait]]). Presbyterianism and (to a lesser extent) Anglicanism heavily endorse capitalism and private enterprise, something seen as quite obscene by other Christian creeds (most notoriously Catholicism), which instead advocate for sharing one's riches, something also advocated by Muslims. Eastern religions (and the Amish) go one step further, considering that private possessions are incompatible with an spiritual life.
* Young adults still living with their parents beyond college:
** Generational divide: In the baby boomer/early-X era, being a BasementDweller was synonymous with being an immature freeloader. With worsening economic conditions in the late 2000s, late-X'ers and millennials became pretty much forced to stay with the folks... indefinitely (in case of
not having enough to live with their friends/acquaintances), to the point of having to settle down with mom and pop (decades ago, it would be the ''other'' way around).
** Regional divide: If living with the parents was not an option in Western countries, this was the norm in poorer nations.
* Until fairly recently internet content providers were often criticized when they resorted to "e-begging" to pay for a project. More recently, as platforms like YouTube have seriously reduced ad revenue, while standards of quality online have increased, turning to sources like Patreon has become the norm.
* In the Catalan-speaking provinces of Spain as well as Andorra, there is a traditional Christmas figurine called the "caganer" or "crapper", which is a little man wearing a barretina (traditional hat) and mooning the audience while he poops. The fact that he is a traditional part ''of the Nativity set'' (as much as the wise men and the baby Jesus) can cause foreigners, who see it as irreverent and inappropriate, to raise their eyebrows. However, the people in these regions love him, and it is considered an honor to be made into a caganeró there are a large variety of caganers depicting politicians, celebrities and even the Pope taking a dump. In this region, the poop symbolizes fertilization of crops- as such, the caganer is seen as welcoming the new year.
allowed.
19th Jun '17 7:37:30 PM ConnorMcLay
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* Google often has interesting little statements under the search bar. One of these was "Quick! Name the last time you played hooky. If you canít remember, youíre probably overdue."

to:

* Google often has interesting little statements under the search bar. One of these was "Quick! Name the last time you played hooky. If you canít remember, youíre probably overdue."" (Non Americans may have to then Google what 'hooky' means).
19th Jun '17 7:32:20 PM ConnorMcLay
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* Violence in sport has become a major source of values dissonance. It's not uncommon to come across hockey and football fans who laud the days of aggressive hits, and in the case of hockey, fights. The 1980s and early 1990s NHL exemplified this, when fighting and brawls were practically over the top, especially in the Norris Division (Which was nicknamed the "Chuck Norris Division" for this very reason).

to:

* Violence in sport has become a major source of values dissonance. It's not uncommon to come across ice hockey and football fans who laud the days of aggressive hits, and in the case of hockey, fights. The 1980s and early 1990s NHL exemplified this, when fighting and brawls were practically over the top, especially in the Norris Division (Which was nicknamed the "Chuck Norris Division" for this very reason).
15th Jun '17 4:46:06 AM molace
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Added DiffLines:

* In former WarsawPact countries, the political spectrum is quite different from the Western European one. This is mainly the result of these countries getting invaded twice, first by Nazis, then by Soviets in quick succession and with a lot of RapePillageandBurn. And considering most of these countries weren't particularly democratic even before the nazi invasion meant that the population had no experience with modern democracies after TheGreatPoliticsMessUp. This resulted in almost all major parties being big government (as small government would mean people's -already quite meager by western standards- social security would dry-up) and conservative by western standards, with socialist parties going for the nostalgia of the ColdWar usually favoured by the poor and the elderly, while nationalist parties go for the Interbellum or even before generally favoured by the middle class and the middle-aged. With green, liberal or multiculturalist parties never getting more than a few percent and their stance on pro-multiculturalism, pro-minority(be it racial or sexual) and anti-tradition meaning they are unlikely to ever be considered viable choices.
13th Jun '17 5:41:09 PM aristos_achaion
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* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCKxWQCs3f0 1960s Jell-O Ad]]. About how Chinese people have trouble not calling it "Jerro". Fun? And how they can't eat anything without chopsticks.

to:

* [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCKxWQCs3f0 1960s Jell-O Ad]]. About how Chinese people have trouble not calling it "Jerro". Fun? And how they can't eat anything without chopsticks. And how the spoon is a Western invention.[[note]]Also a CriticalResearchFailure: Archeologists have found Chinese spoons [[OlderThanDirt as far back as]] [[UsefulNotes/DynastiesFromShangToQing the Shang Dynasty]].[[/note]]
9th Jun '17 2:09:56 AM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Website/AdTurds'' often points out the largely scathing British response to American-styled advertising, especially adverts from the USA which are shown pretty much verbatim in Britain with very little post-production. Ads of the long-winded and hard-sell {{Infomercial}} style are especially loathed and draw a bucket of bile upon themselves.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ValuesDissonance.Other