History ValuesDissonance / LiveActionTV

18th Oct '17 12:01:56 PM kquinn0830
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** Also relating to Chandler, DependingOnTheWriter, his animosity towards his father comes from the fact that his father left his family and the whole relationship is based on the divorce-child anger, or because he's embarrassed of his father being a gay crossdresser, putting QueerPeopleAreFunny into effect. These days, these jokes would at best be outdated and at worst be considered homophobic or transphobic. This is made even worse considering that Chandler's father is implied to have been a loving and present father in his life, with Chandler being the one embarrassed about him, and the reason why they aren't close anymore comes only from Chandler.

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** Also relating to Chandler, DependingOnTheWriter, his animosity towards his father comes from the fact that his father left his family and the whole relationship is based on the divorce-child anger, or because he's embarrassed of his father being a gay crossdresser, putting QueerPeopleAreFunny into effect. These days, these jokes would at best be outdated and at worst be considered homophobic or transphobic. This is made even worse considering that Chandler's father is implied to have been a loving and present father in his life, with Chandler being the one embarrassed about him, and the reason why they aren't close anymore comes only from Chandler.
12th Oct '17 11:41:50 PM Anicomicgeek
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* Parts of ''Series/MarriedWithChildren'' have aged badly.
** Even with the controversy of the show (or just plain BlackComedy of its nature), some elements of the show, given its genre and prime-time hours (and the basic cable channel it was on), wouldn't fly nowadays. Case in point, in the first couple of seasons, Peg smoked like a chimney. Also, even if it were for only a few episodes and with that blink-and-you'll-miss-it moments, Kelly wore a bomber jacket with a Confederate flag patch on it.
** An especially bad one involving Bud when he decides to get revenge on a girl who's been stringing him along in the hopes of making another guy jealous. He convinces the guy--who couldn't care less about the girl--to entice her into meeting him under the bleachers for sex. Later, we see the girl emerging from the bleachers, adjusting her clothes, completely unaware that she just had sex with ''Bud'', as we see him coming out a few seconds later. As a Website/YouTube commentator put it: "Why is the audience cheering the fact that Bud just RAPED that girl?"
** Along the same lines, anytime Al had sex with Peg against his will (or vice versa), or Bud was grabbed by a fat woman and forced to have sex with her. Played for laughs, but would be viewed as spousal rape and female-on-male rape, respectively, today.
** Also, in the episode "Her Cups Runneth Over"[[note]]i.e., the episode that got Terry Rakolta riled up [[/note]] has Steve ogling a mannequin dressed in a leather mini-skirt and match pasties, which he then begins to poke at. Al wanders over, comments to him "Steve, aren't you ashamed of yourself?" for doing it, which makes him reply back, "Oh, come on, Al; she was asking for it! You can see the way she's dressed!"
** Both of the episodes "Requiem for a Dead Barber" and "Calendar Girl" would cause a lot of controversy and backlash if aired today. The former can come off as homophobic (particularly the part where Al complaining to his friends about their ridiculous hairstyles and saying how they need to put their heads under a hose and "wash the gay away") and the latter's ending can be seen as ''extremely'' transphobic.
11th Sep '17 4:21:20 AM emmaliza
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** ''Series/DegrassiJuniorHigh'' also twice portrays sexual assault with a quite [[VictimBlaming victim-blame]][[BuffySpeak y]] undertone that would not wash today. Most notably in the episode "What A Night", where Stephanie's subplot where she suffers DateRapeAverted from a soap star is mostly played as AnAesop about "not getting into risky situations", because she agreed to go on a date with him in the first place, and lied about her age (itself an example of ValuesDissonance, as she claims to be sixteen rather than fourteen, which to many audience members seems hardly much better). The soap star himself is a complete KarmaHoudini. Contrast this with the ''Series/DegrassiTheNextGeneration'' episode "Shout", where Paige is date raped at a party by an older boy, and a lot of emphasis is placed on the fact that Paige's behaviour, including drinking, flirting with the perpetrator, and even asking to go upstairs, does ''not'' mean the assault was her fault. There's also the infamous scene in "Taking Off" where Wheels is molested by a man who picks him up hitchhiking. This [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment never comes up again]], leading viewers to conclude it was only included in the episode as an example of [[CantGetAwayWithNuthin the terrible things that will happen to you if you hitchhike]].
** Snake's extremely cold initial reaction to his brother coming out as gay in "He Ain't Heavy" seems a lot less sympathetic nowadays, where gay acceptance is much more widespread, especially coming from [[NiceGuy Snake]]. However he does come around in the end, alleviating this somewhat. Harder to accept is the fact the Simpson parents disown Snake's brother at the end of the episode, which is portrayed as a bad thing, but somewhat understandable. To a modern audience, this is almost a MoralEventHorizon, and the fact Snake's relationship with his parents is unchanged after this seems deeply odd.
9th Sep '17 3:36:24 PM nombretomado
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* ''Series/{{JAG}}'' is an interesting example showing change over the lifetime of the show. In early seasons, the presence of female pilots (or women in general) on warships was controversial. It was the subject of the pilot movie, and they had [[AmericanGladiators Raye "Zap" Hollitt]] playing one of the pilots, apparently because only a woman built like a bodybuilder could realistically be expected to survive on a warship. Not only would this seem dated a decade later to the audience, but female pilots and ships crew eventually became totally unremarkable within the show itself.

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* ''Series/{{JAG}}'' is an interesting example showing change over the lifetime of the show. In early seasons, the presence of female pilots (or women in general) on warships was controversial. It was the subject of the pilot movie, and they had [[AmericanGladiators [[Series/AmericanGladiators Raye "Zap" Hollitt]] playing one of the pilots, apparently because only a woman built like a bodybuilder could realistically be expected to survive on a warship. Not only would this seem dated a decade later to the audience, but female pilots and ships crew eventually became totally unremarkable within the show itself.
8th Sep '17 10:29:27 AM Sonicfan001
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* ''Bat Masterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.

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* ''Bat Masterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an a woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.
30th Aug '17 5:58:09 PM Temmere
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* ''The Danny Thomas Show": In the episode "Terry at the Crossroads," Danny is worried because his daughter Terry is mostly interested in sports, and a boy she likes doesn't seem to see her as a pretty girl that he should ask to a dance. Danny tries to tell her how she can be more feminine, including the advice "A girl's job on Earth is to make the man feel like a big, important, strong somebody." Terry finally can't take it anymore and snaps, "You men think the whole world revolves around you! Well I've got news for you, this isn't a man's world anymore, it's also a woman's world! And I have a perfect right to dress the way I want to and to live the way I want to! And I don't have to go around drooling over boys just to make them feel important!" It's pretty impressive (especially considering it was made in 1957). But then in the next scene, when the boy Terry likes comes to pick her up for bowling, she comes out in a dress (she'd been wearing sweatshirts and pants up till then) and says she doesn't want to go bowling. She acts flirtatious and fawning, just the way Danny told her to, for no clear reason at all. It's presented as a happy ending that she turns her back on the things she likes so a boy will like her more.
1st Aug '17 7:22:38 AM JJHIL325
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* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after the transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.

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* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after given the ongoing transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]].controversies]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.
1st Aug '17 2:41:19 AM MarkLungo
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** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen", when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman". This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.

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** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The "[[Recap/TheWildWildWestS1E11TheNightOfTheRedEyedMadmen The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen", Madmen]]", when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman". This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.
27th Jul '17 2:59:22 PM AgProv
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* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.

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* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.comment.
* Stand-up comedy, especially when a performer is translating their act from stage to TV, gets hit pretty hard with this trope; some jokes that may have been fine in the seventies, eighties, and even the nineties would ''not'' fly today. Big names in comedy in TheSixties and TheSeventies such as Bernard Manning and Jim Davidson were particularly vilified in later decades. Manning's career never really recovered after he was ambushed on TV on a spoof chat show, and incited into making seriously racist and homophobic references which were a large part of his stand-up routine. Again, as with Bill Oddie, this was a case of a man who simply did not realise the world had moved on and outside a circle of devoted fans, his humour wasn't thought of as acceptably TV mainstream any more. Meanwhile other comics such as Roy "Chubby" Brown simply didn't care and took RefugeInAudacity.
24th Jul '17 12:27:16 PM ectostar
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* ''Series/BatMasterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.

to:

* ''Series/BatMasterson'' ''Bat Masterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.



** The series' sexism is codified in the rule that Witch Magic cannot overrule Warlock Magic. [[MagicAIsMagicA Period.]] Meaning that the weakest Warlock is stronger than the strongest witch, just because. Made overt by the episode where Samantha persuades a milquetoast HenpeckedHusband Warlock to stand up to his harpy of a wife. Once he decides to assert himself, her most powerful curses can't affect him. And of course, the wife sees his new assertiveness as arousing and immediately takes a more subservient stance towards him.

to:

** The series' sexism is codified in the rule that Witch Magic cannot overrule Warlock Magic. [[MagicAIsMagicA Period.]] Period]]. Meaning that the weakest Warlock is stronger than the strongest witch, just because. Made overt by the episode where Samantha persuades a milquetoast HenpeckedHusband Warlock to stand up to his harpy of a wife. Once he decides to assert himself, her most powerful curses can't affect him. And of course, the wife sees his new assertiveness as arousing and immediately takes a more subservient stance towards him.



* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:

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* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] {{lampshade|Hanging}}s this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:
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