History ValuesDissonance / LiveActionTV

1st Aug '17 7:22:38 AM JJHIL325
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* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after the transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.

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* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after given the ongoing transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]].controversies]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.
1st Aug '17 2:41:19 AM MarkLungo
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** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen", when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman". This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.

to:

** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The "[[Recap/TheWildWildWestS1E11TheNightOfTheRedEyedMadmen The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen", Madmen]]", when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman". This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.
27th Jul '17 2:59:22 PM AgProv
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* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.

to:

* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.comment.
* Stand-up comedy, especially when a performer is translating their act from stage to TV, gets hit pretty hard with this trope; some jokes that may have been fine in the seventies, eighties, and even the nineties would ''not'' fly today. Big names in comedy in TheSixties and TheSeventies such as Bernard Manning and Jim Davidson were particularly vilified in later decades. Manning's career never really recovered after he was ambushed on TV on a spoof chat show, and incited into making seriously racist and homophobic references which were a large part of his stand-up routine. Again, as with Bill Oddie, this was a case of a man who simply did not realise the world had moved on and outside a circle of devoted fans, his humour wasn't thought of as acceptably TV mainstream any more. Meanwhile other comics such as Roy "Chubby" Brown simply didn't care and took RefugeInAudacity.
24th Jul '17 12:27:16 PM ectostar
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* ''Series/BatMasterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.

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* ''Series/BatMasterson'' ''Bat Masterson'' [[note]] set in the 1870s [[/note]] has an episode where an woman female is spanked for her crimes, which even in 1959 was common in prison. Today, that kind of punishment would’ve been grounds for a lawsuit.



** The series' sexism is codified in the rule that Witch Magic cannot overrule Warlock Magic. [[MagicAIsMagicA Period.]] Meaning that the weakest Warlock is stronger than the strongest witch, just because. Made overt by the episode where Samantha persuades a milquetoast HenpeckedHusband Warlock to stand up to his harpy of a wife. Once he decides to assert himself, her most powerful curses can't affect him. And of course, the wife sees his new assertiveness as arousing and immediately takes a more subservient stance towards him.

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** The series' sexism is codified in the rule that Witch Magic cannot overrule Warlock Magic. [[MagicAIsMagicA Period.]] Period]]. Meaning that the weakest Warlock is stronger than the strongest witch, just because. Made overt by the episode where Samantha persuades a milquetoast HenpeckedHusband Warlock to stand up to his harpy of a wife. Once he decides to assert himself, her most powerful curses can't affect him. And of course, the wife sees his new assertiveness as arousing and immediately takes a more subservient stance towards him.



* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:

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* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] {{lampshade|Hanging}}s this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:
24th Jul '17 12:20:09 PM ectostar
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** And that's not even getting into the show's use of DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale; Debra's treatment of Ray (often involving things like {{GroinAttack}}s, Ray being tossed against bookshelves, and tons of condescending verbal abuse) is treated as being A-Okay and lovably wacky, while if Ray ever complains in the slightest about Debra, then ''he'' is treated as being "obviously wrong" in-universe, while Debra is portrayed as being some sort of martyr.

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** And that's not even getting into the show's use of DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale; Debra's treatment of Ray (often involving things like {{GroinAttack}}s, {{Groin Attack}}s, Ray being tossed against bookshelves, and tons of condescending verbal abuse) is treated as being A-Okay and lovably wacky, while if Ray ever complains in the slightest about Debra, then ''he'' is treated as being "obviously wrong" in-universe, while Debra is portrayed as being some sort of martyr.
20th Jul '17 4:01:23 PM LaptopGuy
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** The show has an [[http://www.hulu.com/watch/9225/barney-miller-rape episode]] where a woman comes into the police station distraught and says she's been raped. When it turns out that it was her husband, it's treated as a big joke and she ''learns her lesson'' that she should put out. Words cannot describe how cringe-inducing this is now.

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** The show has an [[http://www.hulu.com/watch/9225/barney-miller-rape episode]] where a woman comes into the police station distraught and says she's been raped. When it turns out that it was her husband, it's treated as a big joke and she ''learns her lesson'' that she should put out. Words cannot describe how cringe-inducing this is now.now, with the public increasingly sympathetic to rape victims and marital rape being taken just as seriously nowadays as other types of rape.
20th Jul '17 3:42:43 AM sotnosen95
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** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimes sometimes joins in on the antics of the other brothers). What was seen as hilarious and possibly normal for some people back then would have people in today's time wondering why no one ever calls social services on the parents.

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** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimes sometimes joins in on the antics of the other brothers). What was seen as hilarious and possibly normal for some people back then would have people in today's time wondering why no one ever calls social services on the parents.



* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' frequent calls out and Lampshades values dissonance, where Joel / Mike and the 'bots will riff on a movie for the horribly dated or inappropriate attitudes it displays. This is particularly prevalent in their riffs on informational short films from the '50s, where the crew will mercilessly mock the film for its outdated attitudes to family life, gender politics, racism, social behavior and so forth.

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* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' frequent frequently calls out and Lampshades values dissonance, lampshades ValuesDissonance, where Joel / Mike Joel/Mike and the 'bots will riff on a movie for the horribly dated or inappropriate attitudes it displays. This is particularly prevalent in their riffs on informational short films from the '50s, where the crew will mercilessly mock the film for its outdated attitudes to family life, gender politics, racism, social behavior and so forth.



** The short that precedes ''Catching Trouble'', ''Aquatic Wizards'', has the narrator call a Hispanic jumper "a Mexican jumping bean." The Bots proceed to tear him a new one, with Crow calling him a "white fascist," and Tom pegging him as a fat ignorant hick who gets paid to talk into a microphone and eat pretzels all day.

to:

** The short that precedes ''Catching Trouble'', ''Aquatic Wizards'', has the narrator call a Hispanic jumper "a Mexican jumping bean." bean". The Bots proceed to tear him a new one, with Crow calling him a "white fascist," fascist", and Tom pegging him as a fat ignorant hick who gets paid to talk into a microphone and eat pretzels all day.



* ''"Pipo De Clown"'', a Dutch children's show, was very popular in from the 1950s until the 1970. It featured a white man dressed as a Native American, speaking in childlike sentences. Nowadays this seems horribly racist.

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* ''"Pipo De Clown"'', a Dutch children's show, was very popular in the country from the 1950s until the 1970.1970s. It featured a white man dressed as a Native American, speaking in childlike sentences. Nowadays this seems horribly racist.



* ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' the famous episode "Accidents Happen" has Alan bringing a real looking fake gun to school for career day claiming he wants to be Rambo; post-Columbine he would've at the very least been suspended.

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* ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' In ''Series/PunkyBrewster'', the famous episode "Accidents Happen" has Alan bringing a real looking real-looking fake gun to school for career day day, claiming he wants to be Rambo; post-Columbine post-Columbine, he would've at the very least been suspended.



* ''Series/{{Skins}}'' has a somewhat...casual attitude toward teenage sex, which significantly freaks out American audiences; British viewers, on the other hand, view it as merely as an over-the-top if, at heart, accurate depiction. Particularly, the U.S. version of ''Skins'' had to change the resolution of the HotForStudent relationship in the first season. While the British don't exactly look ''kindly'' upon student-teacher romances, in America the [[PaedoHunt cultural taboo against it]] is so strong that even a neutral portrayal (as the original British version gives) would be seen as irresponsible. So in the American version, we see [[spoiler: Chris and Tina's relationship get found out, and Tina arrested and fired with a promise never to contact Chris again]]. In the original, [[spoiler: Chris simply realizes that Jal is better for him than Angie (the character on which Tina was based), and they both move on]].

to:

* ''Series/{{Skins}}'' has a somewhat... casual attitude toward teenage sex, which significantly freaks out American audiences; British viewers, on the other hand, view it as merely as an over-the-top if, at heart, accurate depiction. Particularly, the U.S. version of ''Skins'' had to change the resolution of the HotForStudent relationship in the first season. While the British don't exactly look ''kindly'' upon student-teacher romances, in America the [[PaedoHunt cultural taboo against it]] is so strong that even a neutral portrayal (as the original British version gives) would be seen as irresponsible. So in the American version, we see [[spoiler: Chris and Tina's relationship get found out, and Tina arrested and fired with a promise never to contact Chris again]]. In the original, [[spoiler: Chris simply realizes that Jal is better for him than Angie (the character on which Tina was based), and they both move on]].



* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' gives a possible InUniverse Example with Picard's refusal to save populations threatened with natural disaster in the episodes "Homeward" and "Pen Pals" due to being prewarp, so doing so would violate the Prime Directive. Kirk would not approve...

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* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' gives a possible InUniverse Example example with Picard's refusal to save populations threatened with natural disaster in the episodes "Homeward" and "Pen Pals" due to being prewarp, so doing so would violate the Prime Directive. Kirk would not approve...



** The first season episode when Archer decides to let an entire race die out because it's "nature's plan" is particularly upsetting because of its ridiculous use of HollywoodGenetics. Supposedly, a race is unable to "evolve" because of another species, and that species is "evolving" to die out. A passing understanding of genetics shows how foolish it is, making the choice to let a race die out so the other can "evolve," somehow, seem all the more insane.

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** The first season episode when Archer decides to let an entire race die out because it's "nature's plan" is particularly upsetting because of its ridiculous use of HollywoodGenetics. Supposedly, a race is unable to "evolve" because of another species, and that species is "evolving" to die out. A passing understanding of genetics shows how foolish it is, making the choice to let a race die out so the other can "evolve," "evolve", somehow, seem all the more insane.



** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that may seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory, up to and including [[spoiler: attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]

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** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that may seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory, up to and including [[spoiler: attempted [[spoiler:attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]] Federation]].



** Also in "The Cage", somewhat jarring to modern viewers might be Captain Pike's unwillingness to allow, and discomfort with having, a woman on the bridge (when a female yeoman comes up to deliver a report)... [[OneOfTheBoys with the exception of Number One, that is.]]

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** Also in "The Cage", somewhat jarring to modern viewers might be Captain Pike's unwillingness to allow, and discomfort with having, a woman on the bridge (when a female yeoman comes up to deliver a report)... [[OneOfTheBoys with the exception of Number One, that is.]]is]].



** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen," when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman." This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.

to:

** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen," Madmen", when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman." woman". This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.



** All that said, there ''are'' exceptions [[spoiler: such as Laurette in "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2," Posey in "The Night of the Poisonous Posey" and most dramatically Astarte in "The Night of the Druid's Blood," who's not only caught but will, it's implied, hang for her crimes. And Jim makes it clear he isn't sorry.]]

to:

** All that said, there ''are'' exceptions [[spoiler: such as Laurette in "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2," 2", Posey in "The Night of the Poisonous Posey" Posey", and most dramatically Astarte in "The Night of the Druid's Blood," Blood", who's not only caught but will, it's implied, hang for her crimes. And Jim makes it clear he isn't sorry.]]



* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.
----sometimes

to:

* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.
----sometimes
comment.
19th Jul '17 11:44:51 PM Acebrock
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** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimes

to:

** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimessometimes sometimes joins in on the antics of the other brothers). What was seen as hilarious and possibly normal for some people back then would have people in today's time wondering why no one ever calls social services on the parents.
** A season one episode has Lois being told by another parent that Malcolm has been throwing around "the R word." No, he wasn't calling other kids retarded (an especially easy mistake to make since the premise is that Malcolm is a genius), but the joke is supposed to be that there is no offensive "R word" and the other parents are indulging in PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.
* Invoked by Tina Fey in her acceptance speech for the Mark Twain prize.
-->"I hope that, like Mark Twain, people one day look back at my work and say, 'Wow, that is actually pretty racist.'"
* ''[[Series/{{MASH}} M*A*S*H]]'' is a show that covers a lot of contemporary social issues in a progressive light (especially after Alan Alda was given a great deal of creative control). However, the show still has a tendency to handle rape in a distasteful manner. Not that an actual rape is joked about or anything' rather, that such a serious subject is handled with a lot of comedic fodder. One can argue that a show that tries to bring humor to dark circumstances is simply attempting the same thing. However, dark circumstances on ''M*A*S*H'' are still handled in a dramatic fashion, so the show's trivialization of rape is rather cringe-worthy. Even the writers in the later retrospectives on the show regret the rape jokes, and asked "What were we thinking?"
* ''Series/{{Mastermind}}'' is a popular UK quiz show where people really have to study to be able to answer questions. Only the person who makes it through the first round, the semi-finals and wins the finals gets a prize: an engraved glass. Little time is spent on the candidate him/herself. In the Netherlands, not far from the UK, the format completely flopped. The public was upset that non-winners didn't get anything, and they wanted more details of the candidates' personal lives.
* ''Series/{{Maury}}'' never does shows where the audience tries to find out a trans person's or crossdresser's sex anymore, likely due to changing views on LGBTQ people.
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' [[InvertedTrope inverts it]]. By modern standards, Uther is a ruthless tyrant. By general medieval standards, he would be considered rather benevolent.
* ''Series/MindYourLanguage'' is today considered to be at best embarrassingly xenophobic; at worst, blatantly racist. However, when it aired in the late 1970s, the show was appreciated for having a comparatively diverse cast with several actors of colour.
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' isn't immune either.
** Watch the ''Erizabeth L'' episode, where Italian director Luchino Visconti is revealed to be a Japanese imposter with a drawn-out JapaneseRanguage joke and Terry Jones in {{yellowface}}; he then does it again in blackface, when he plays an African impersonating another Italian director, Michelangelo Antonioni.
** The name given to the friend of the mother of the Secretary of State for Overseas Affairs, who is just about to make a major speech about Rhodesia in the Commons but wouldn't mind a cup of tea first, is ''Mrs Nigger-Baiter''. This is of course done deliberately for shock value, but the dissonance is much more glaring today than it was in the early 70s.
* An episode of ''Series/MorkAndMindy'' has Mork go up against an overgrown bully named George. George stalks Mindy, makes threatening phone calls to Mork and hangs out menacingly near their house. This is treated as creepy jerkassery, but no one even thinks of calling the police. Ironically, it would take the death of another of Pam Dawber's co-stars (Rebecca Schaffer of ''My Sister Sam'') to get the first anti-stalking laws passed in America.
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' frequent calls out and Lampshades values dissonance, where Joel / Mike and the 'bots will riff on a movie for the horribly dated or inappropriate attitudes it displays. This is particularly prevalent in their riffs on informational short films from the '50s, where the crew will mercilessly mock the film for its outdated attitudes to family life, gender politics, racism, social behavior and so forth.
** This reaches an apotheosis with the short film ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0248722/ Catching Trouble]]'' (episode 315). Filmed in 1936, it presents a lighthearted look at Ross Allen, who captures animals for his zoo - with his bare hands. This involves poking them with sticks, knocking them out of tall trees - by cutting the trees down - and trapping them in a bag, with the help of "his faithful Seminole". On one occasion he starts a small forest fire in order to drive out a snake, and eventually he grabs two bear cubs who scream in a particularly pitiful way (their mother is strangely absent). Then one of the cubs attempts to escape from the boat by swimming, but as a camera just happens to be underwater, it seems clear that he was provoked into jumping off the boat just so that he could be recaptured. Joel and The Bots became audibly upset over the course of the film, culminating in Joel apologising on behalf of humanity.
** A second apotheosis comes with ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0276048/ A Date With Your Family]]'', a short film from 1950 which is intended to teach kids how to have dinner with their parents. The film's portrait of family life circa 1950 - in which everything has to be arranged so that the father will not be upset when he returns from a hard day at the office - exactly fits the modern stereotype of that era. The narration, which is delivered by [[Series/LeaveItToBeaver Hugh Beaumont]], gives such as advice as "pleasant, unemotional conversation helps the digestion", and observes that "these boys greet their Dad as though they were genuinely glad to see him, as though they really missed him". The narrator further points out how the mother and sister of the family "owe it" to their menfolk to be attractive and charming, and encourages the son to compliment the ladies' cooking as "this will make them want to continue pleasing you."
** While not quite as jarring as the above two, the Union Pacific safety film "Days of Our Years" features a segment where a husband drops his wife in labor off at the hospital, and is then encouraged by the doctors to go on ahead to work while they take care of business. (This was during a time when women were kept sedated during childbirth, so it's not like the husband's presence would mean much to the wife either way.) Against that though, the tradition of the new father handing cigars to everyone at the workplace almost fails to rate a mention.
** The short advertising spot for a home economics major for female college students takes quite a few hits. While most of the short is rather progressive in asserting that most of its graduates went on to have careers, the hosts audibly boo when the short gushes over a graduate who takes on the "full-time career" of being a housewife.
** The short that precedes ''Catching Trouble'', ''Aquatic Wizards'', has the narrator call a Hispanic jumper "a Mexican jumping bean." The Bots proceed to tear him a new one, with Crow calling him a "white fascist," and Tom pegging him as a fat ignorant hick who gets paid to talk into a microphone and eat pretzels all day.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after the transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'', in one episode ("The Pig Who Came to Dinner"), features a guest appearance by Bobby Riggs in which he plays up his sexist public image. If similar statements had been made about blacks, for example, they would ''never'' have been tolerated, but women were apparently AcceptableTargets back then and Riggs' bigotry is largely played for laughs.
* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' features a scene where Mimoso Raton (a baby mouse) walks into a room, and a woman jumps onto a chair because she is terrified of him. And this is shown as perfectly normal and expected. This show ran in Mexico during the first half of the 1980s. Imagine the backlash and accusations of sexism the producers would have received if the same scene had been aired in the USA during the same time period.
* ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'': Del's homophobia, which is PlayedForLaughs in a way that reflected society's attitudes at the time the early seasons were filmed. Interestingly, the show notes the change in opinions - Rodney is much more accepting, and calls Del out when he suspects that he could have gotten [=AIDS=] from an effeminate hairdresser.
* ''Series/OnTheBuses'' has one episode where the main characters Stan and Jack notice that their homemade beer makes Stan's sister and brother-in-law so out of their minds that they want to have sex with each other, even though they normally don't. So they decide to make some more and get the women at their work so out of their mind that they'll have sex with them, not really knowing what they are doing. This is treated as harmless fun.
* ''Patrulla Fronteriza: Prohibido Pasar'', a reality show on the National Geographic Channel, provides more fun with Latin American ValuesDissonance! It's about the patrols of the USA/Mexico border and their heroic fight against the evils from the outside. If you don't get it, just ask how many Latin Americans have relatives living illegally in the USA.
* ''"Pipo De Clown"'', a Dutch children's show, was very popular in from the 1950s until the 1970. It featured a white man dressed as a Native American, speaking in childlike sentences. Nowadays this seems horribly racist.
* In ''Series/PoliceWoman'', FairCop Pepper Anderson's male colleagues keep complimenting her on her good looks, beautiful eyes and so on. Today this would at best be considered unprofessional catcalling and at worst sexual harassment.
* ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'' plays out like this, because it barely alters anything from the original Sentai script, which results in a diverse, and western, group of Power Rangers acting ''very'' strangely to most western viewers, portraying Japanese values.
** All of them have been trained to be Samurai Rangers from childhood onward, and they are expected to drop anything they had going on to take up that duty when called upon. This includes any job they have been holding down. This doesn't bode well to a Western audience, who see no reason why both can't still be performed. Meanwhile, a Japanese audience sees this as appropriate, with familial duty (for the Greater Good) being deemed more important than personal independence.
** Blue Ranger Kevin chewing out Gold Ranger Antonio for wanting to be a Samurai Ranger when he was never from a Samurai family to begin with. Aside from the obvious problem that ''none of the original cast are Japanese'', this again ties in with the whole family and honor idea. Most people would commend Antonio for doing something that he considers right and working his ass off to become fit for a Samurai Ranger.
** Mia's line of how "every girl's dream is to get married" and her horrible fear of being a [[LethalChef bad cook]]. While dreaming of getting married is still a rather common idea that any person can have at some point, she puts a lot of emphasis on it and seems to have not much of a life plan beyond that. While her not being a good cook isn't a problem to most Western audiences, it does make more sense to a Japanese audience. Getting married is an expected societal norm for women, especially by the age of [[ChristmasCake 25]], and being a good cook is expected of a housewife. This goes into the strict gender roles still present in Japan.
* ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' the famous episode "Accidents Happen" has Alan bringing a real looking fake gun to school for career day claiming he wants to be Rambo; post-Columbine he would've at the very least been suspended.
* ''Series/{{QI}}'' had an episode discussing a man from Japan who survived both bombings - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTaqBnNLUU a man who took a train from Hiroshima to Nagasaki just in time for the second blast]]. Most Brits wouldn't have thought twice about it. Interesting figures from even the grisliest chapters of history are routinely discussed, lampooned, and milked for laughs on the show, all in the name of being interesting. To British people, it's actually quite cosy comedy, and the clip no more harmful than anything else they've broadcast. Some Japanese media networks disagreed however, and the very existence of such a conversation - not broadcast in Japan, incidentally - was reported as an abomination, as it broke a cultural taboo. To some of the people of Japan, the subject's off-limits to the whole universe. To the UK, it's just quite interesting. It should, however, be pointed out that there are plenty of people from Japan commenting on that video that they don't see what the fuss is about.
** All the more interesting when you consider an earlier segment, which features far more jokes at the expense of Japanese accents and culture. If anything, you would expect ''that'' segment to have offended Japanese people, but instead a far milder one caused controversy, despite mainly discussing how extraordinary it was that Japanese trains were running the day after Hiroshima, which the panelists said would never happen in London.
* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' has an episode where Harvey says he doesn't want to go to college, and wants to jump straight into being a mechanic - prompting Sabrina to fret about his lack of ambition. After the 2008 recession, Harvey's plan to jump into a job with a steady income seems much more sensible.
* ''Series/{{Scandal}}'': Abby, on Stephen: "I don't understand why a successful, charming man like him, with a good job, needs to sleep with whores." Abby is hardly an innocent, nor Stephen's actual wife.
* ''Series/{{SCTV}}'': Dave Thomas did at least two characters in yellowface. Thomas plays Lin Ye Tang in multiple episodes, while playing Tim Ishimuni in 3.
* The DVD releases of the early seasons of ''Series/SesameStreet'' are given a label warning that they are intended for adult viewing for nostalgia purposes, as the standards of what is appropriate for children to watch have gotten stricter. The episodes include the likes of an adult Muppet approaching a bunch of kids and pulling letters out of his trenchcoat.
* ''Series/{{Skins}}'' has a somewhat...casual attitude toward teenage sex, which significantly freaks out American audiences; British viewers, on the other hand, view it as merely as an over-the-top if, at heart, accurate depiction. Particularly, the U.S. version of ''Skins'' had to change the resolution of the HotForStudent relationship in the first season. While the British don't exactly look ''kindly'' upon student-teacher romances, in America the [[PaedoHunt cultural taboo against it]] is so strong that even a neutral portrayal (as the original British version gives) would be seen as irresponsible. So in the American version, we see [[spoiler: Chris and Tina's relationship get found out, and Tina arrested and fired with a promise never to contact Chris again]]. In the original, [[spoiler: Chris simply realizes that Jal is better for him than Angie (the character on which Tina was based), and they both move on]].
* ''Series/TheSingingRingingTree'': The princess gets cursed with ugliness as a reflection of her inner character, with her beauty gradually being restored as this character reforms. What might seem a little jarring to modern viewers (aside from any UnfortunateImplications arising from BeautyEqualsGoodness being invoked here) is that part of this involves [[YouGottaHaveBlueHair her hair being turned green]], something which is an acceptable style statement now, but not in the 1950s when the original film it was adapted from was made, and probably impossible to achieve in the MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' gives a possible InUniverse Example with Picard's refusal to save populations threatened with natural disaster in the episodes "Homeward" and "Pen Pals" due to being prewarp, so doing so would violate the Prime Directive. Kirk would not approve...
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' doesn't have the Directive yet, but the crew still makes some pretty dissonant noninterference decisions:
** The first season episode when Archer decides to let an entire race die out because it's "nature's plan" is particularly upsetting because of its ridiculous use of HollywoodGenetics. Supposedly, a race is unable to "evolve" because of another species, and that species is "evolving" to die out. A passing understanding of genetics shows how foolish it is, making the choice to let a race die out so the other can "evolve," somehow, seem all the more insane.
** The second season episode when everyone agrees that extending the right to an education to the third-gendered cogenitor on an alien ship, discriminated against because of its gender, is a horrible idea.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that may seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory, up to and including [[spoiler: attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]
** The show's tacit acknowledgement that Kira was a member of a terrorist cell during the Cardassian occupation can raise a few eyebrows now that the word has become so much more politically charged after events like the September 11th attacks.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'':
** The treatment of women can feel sexist to the modern viewer, despite the fact that the show usually pushes standards of equality that were [[FairForItsDay radical for the time]]. ("But there ''was'' prejudice on Earth once! I remember reading about it in a history book!") In fact, the only reason there isn't ''more'' obvious gender equity on the original Enterprise is ExecutiveMeddling by nervous suits who thought the very presence of females would imply rampant promiscuity among the crew. According to producers who worked on the series, though, even though Gene Roddenberry did want more female characters, it was less in the name of real, honest gender equity and more in the name of skirts and tops that exemplified the TheissTitillationTheory (there's a reason a ''Trek'' girl is that trope's image). But hey, at least they're there and (sometimes) involved in the plot.
** The miniskirts come across today as making female officers seem less professional than the male officers and more like sex symbols. While they ''are'' {{Fanservice}}, the miniskirt in TheSixties was also a [[FashionDissonance symbol of female empowerment and liberation]], so this is also a lot of UnintentionalPeriodPiece (and with a bit of {{Zeerust}}, for a good measure).
** A reason women are treated as mostly eye-candy on the original series might have to do with the poor reaction of test audiences to the original pilot, "The Cage", in 1964. Gene Roddenberry claimed that a lot of women objected to seeing a woman in a position of authority (Number One, played by Majel Barrett), and the fact that the female crew members wore pants.
** Also in "The Cage", somewhat jarring to modern viewers might be Captain Pike's unwillingness to allow, and discomfort with having, a woman on the bridge (when a female yeoman comes up to deliver a report)... [[OneOfTheBoys with the exception of Number One, that is.]]
** The original series also has [=McCoy=] constantly insulting Spock's Vulcan heritage by calling him such things as "you green-blooded Vulcan" or "you pointed-eared hobgoblin". In real-world terms, this is essentially the same thing as racial insults, and [[NoSuchThingAsHR shouldn't HR be doing something about that]]? Within the show, it's considered a harmless part of Spock and [=McCoy's=] VitriolicBestBuds relationship. May also count as DeliberateValuesDissonance, since Spock has no emotional sensibilities with which to be offended due to his Vulcan mental discipline.
* ''Series/StillStanding'' has one episode-long RunningGag mention that Bill took Tina (the youngest daughter) to a bar. Bill, whenever this is mentioned, adds, "''AND GRILL''!". The joke may be lost on some - it's actually not as bad to have taken Tina to a bar and grill as the characters make it out to be. Many restaurants are in fact a "Bar and Grill" technically, and many actually ''do'' allow children, just as long as they don't consume alcohol.
* ''Series/TheThornBirds'' upset a great many viewers when it first aired in 1983 due to its depiction of a Catholic priest falling in love with a woman and eventually consummating his relationship with her. Other viewers lauded said depiction. Oddly, ''all'' of these people seemed to overlook the UnfortunateImplications of the fact that said priest had [[WifeHusbandry known this woman since she was a child and had a hand in raising her]].
* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' actually uses time travel to explicitly call this out on a couple of occasions.
** In the episode "Captain Jack Harkness", Jack and Toshiko are transported back to WWII, where Jack meets the ''real'' Jack Harkness that he originally stole the identity of (as described in ''Doctor Who''). It turns out that the real Jack is gay, and is, as to be expected in the 1940's, in denial about it. Both Jacks are massively attracted to each other, and Torchwood's Jack, knowing that the real Jack is destined to die the following day, dances with and shares a passionate kiss with his namesake before returning to the 21st century.
** In "To the Last Man", Torchwood has been keeping a young WWI soldier in [[HumanPopsicle cryogenic suspension]] since the war, taking him out annually for checkup, because they know he will be crucial to resolving some temporal crisis. The tragedy is that they removed him from a military hospital, where he was catatonic from shell shock. When they return him to his own time, he will revert to that condition and be executed by the military for "cowardice", as shell shock (PTSD) was not recognized as an actual medical condition at the time and soldiers who suffered from it actually ''were'' executed.
* In the British series ''Tripped'', Milo and Danny go to an AlternateUniverse, and one of the key things differentiating that world from this one is that gun control is much more relaxed in the UK, as one character actually pulls a gun on Milo, shocking him. In the US, it wouldn't make sense for one to be shocked at someone having a gun. Of course, even your average (unarmed) American would be scared to have someone point a gun at him.
* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:
-->"No one seems to care about the wee boy getting battered. Thankfully, some things in Scotland have changed for the better."
* ''Series/WhosTheBoss'' has this trope applied to the ''title'', as it would never even occur to most viewers nowadays to question whether a live-in housekeeper could presume to be the head-of-household's "boss", merely because the employee happens to be male and the employer happens to be female. Indeed, few of the show's once-groundbreaking role reversals would raise an eyebrow today.
* ''Series/TheWildWildWest'':
** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen," when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman." This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.
** The entire last scene of "The Night of the Firebrand" just drips with misogyny, as West and Gordon decide that Vixen O'Shaughnessy's punishment (for helping mastermind an attempted massacre at a military fort and a coup against Canada) is to be "forced to return to the feminine fold" so that she will "leave the fighting to us," by which they mean they're just going to make her return to the ladies' finishing school she escaped from. When she objects and goes into a CharacterFilibuster about all the wrongs that still need fighting against in the world, West basically gives her a Vulcan nerve pinch (a RunningGag in this episode) and reflects that he'd better tell the school's headmistress how to do it.
** "The Night of the Tycoons" romps home with the gold in Sexist Episode Writing; other episodes have female villains, but there's an unpleasant tone throughout the episode suggesting women have no business being in charge of huge corporations, capped off by its tag scene with Lionel's fiancee Kyra booted off to the kitchen and Jim telling him he's got to keep these women in their place.
** All that said, there ''are'' exceptions [[spoiler: such as Laurette in "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2," Posey in "The Night of the Poisonous Posey" and most dramatically Astarte in "The Night of the Druid's Blood," who's not only caught but will, it's implied, hang for her crimes. And Jim makes it clear he isn't sorry.]]
* ''Series/WKRPInCincinnati'': Herb's constant pursuit of Jennifer would very likely result in a sexual harassment suit nowadays.
* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.
----sometimes
17th Jul '17 10:12:43 PM SickBoy
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** When Lucy is pregnant, not only dp they not use the word "pregnant", but in the episode where Lucy's trying to get the message across to Desi that they're having a baby, she looks to be about 5 minutes away from going into labor, which makes it all the weirder that it takes him so long to get it.

to:

** When Lucy is pregnant, not only dp do they not use the word "pregnant", but in the episode where Lucy's trying to get the message across to Desi that they're having a baby, she looks to be about 5 minutes away from going into labor, which makes it all the weirder that it takes him so long to get it.



** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimes joins in on the antics of the other brothers). What was seen as hilarious and possibly normal for some people back then would have people in today's time wondering why no one ever calls social services on the parents.
** A season one episode has Lois being told by another parent that Malcolm has been throwing around "the R word." No, he wasn't calling other kids retarded (an especially easy mistake to make since the premise is that Malcolm is a genius), but the joke is supposed to be that there is no offensive "R word" and the other parents are indulging in PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.
* Invoked by Tina Fey in her acceptance speech for the Mark Twain prize.
-->"I hope that, like Mark Twain, people one day look back at my work and say, 'Wow, that is actually pretty racist.'"
* ''[[Series/{{MASH}} M*A*S*H]]'' is a show that covers a lot of contemporary social issues in a progressive light (especially after Alan Alda was given a great deal of creative control). However, the show still has a tendency to handle rape in a distasteful manner. Not that an actual rape is joked about or anything' rather, that such a serious subject is handled with a lot of comedic fodder. One can argue that a show that tries to bring humor to dark circumstances is simply attempting the same thing. However, dark circumstances on ''M*A*S*H'' are still handled in a dramatic fashion, so the show's trivialization of rape is rather cringe-worthy. Even the writers in the later retrospectives on the show regret the rape jokes, and asked "What were we thinking?"
* ''Series/{{Mastermind}}'' is a popular UK quiz show where people really have to study to be able to answer questions. Only the person who makes it through the first round, the semi-finals and wins the finals gets a prize: an engraved glass. Little time is spent on the candidate him/herself. In the Netherlands, not far from the UK, the format completely flopped. The public was upset that non-winners didn't get anything, and they wanted more details of the candidates' personal lives.
* ''Series/{{Maury}}'' never does shows where the audience tries to find out a trans person's or crossdresser's sex anymore, likely due to changing views on LGBTQ people.
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' [[InvertedTrope inverts it]]. By modern standards, Uther is a ruthless tyrant. By general medieval standards, he would be considered rather benevolent.
* ''Series/MindYourLanguage'' is today considered to be at best embarrassingly xenophobic; at worst, blatantly racist. However, when it aired in the late 1970s, the show was appreciated for having a comparatively diverse cast with several actors of colour.
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' isn't immune either.
** Watch the ''Erizabeth L'' episode, where Italian director Luchino Visconti is revealed to be a Japanese imposter with a drawn-out JapaneseRanguage joke and Terry Jones in {{yellowface}}; he then does it again in blackface, when he plays an African impersonating another Italian director, Michelangelo Antonioni.
** The name given to the friend of the mother of the Secretary of State for Overseas Affairs, who is just about to make a major speech about Rhodesia in the Commons but wouldn't mind a cup of tea first, is ''Mrs Nigger-Baiter''. This is of course done deliberately for shock value, but the dissonance is much more glaring today than it was in the early 70s.
* An episode of ''Series/MorkAndMindy'' has Mork go up against an overgrown bully named George. George stalks Mindy, makes threatening phone calls to Mork and hangs out menacingly near their house. This is treated as creepy jerkassery, but no one even thinks of calling the police. Ironically, it would take the death of another of Pam Dawber's co-stars (Rebecca Schaffer of ''My Sister Sam'') to get the first anti-stalking laws passed in America.
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' frequent calls out and Lampshades values dissonance, where Joel / Mike and the 'bots will riff on a movie for the horribly dated or inappropriate attitudes it displays. This is particularly prevalent in their riffs on informational short films from the '50s, where the crew will mercilessly mock the film for its outdated attitudes to family life, gender politics, racism, social behavior and so forth.
** This reaches an apotheosis with the short film ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0248722/ Catching Trouble]]'' (episode 315). Filmed in 1936, it presents a lighthearted look at Ross Allen, who captures animals for his zoo - with his bare hands. This involves poking them with sticks, knocking them out of tall trees - by cutting the trees down - and trapping them in a bag, with the help of "his faithful Seminole". On one occasion he starts a small forest fire in order to drive out a snake, and eventually he grabs two bear cubs who scream in a particularly pitiful way (their mother is strangely absent). Then one of the cubs attempts to escape from the boat by swimming, but as a camera just happens to be underwater, it seems clear that he was provoked into jumping off the boat just so that he could be recaptured. Joel and The Bots became audibly upset over the course of the film, culminating in Joel apologising on behalf of humanity.
** A second apotheosis comes with ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0276048/ A Date With Your Family]]'', a short film from 1950 which is intended to teach kids how to have dinner with their parents. The film's portrait of family life circa 1950 - in which everything has to be arranged so that the father will not be upset when he returns from a hard day at the office - exactly fits the modern stereotype of that era. The narration, which is delivered by [[Series/LeaveItToBeaver Hugh Beaumont]], gives such as advice as "pleasant, unemotional conversation helps the digestion", and observes that "these boys greet their Dad as though they were genuinely glad to see him, as though they really missed him". The narrator further points out how the mother and sister of the family "owe it" to their menfolk to be attractive and charming, and encourages the son to compliment the ladies' cooking as "this will make them want to continue pleasing you."
** While not quite as jarring as the above two, the Union Pacific safety film "Days of Our Years" features a segment where a husband drops his wife in labor off at the hospital, and is then encouraged by the doctors to go on ahead to work while they take care of business. (This was during a time when women were kept sedated during childbirth, so it's not like the husband's presence would mean much to the wife either way.) Against that though, the tradition of the new father handing cigars to everyone at the workplace almost fails to rate a mention.
** The short advertising spot for a home economics major for female college students takes quite a few hits. While most of the short is rather progressive in asserting that most of its graduates went on to have careers, the hosts audibly boo when the short gushes over a graduate who takes on the "full-time career" of being a housewife.
** The short that precedes ''Catching Trouble'', ''Aquatic Wizards'', has the narrator call a Hispanic jumper "a Mexican jumping bean." The Bots proceed to tear him a new one, with Crow calling him a "white fascist," and Tom pegging him as a fat ignorant hick who gets paid to talk into a microphone and eat pretzels all day.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after the transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'', in one episode ("The Pig Who Came to Dinner"), features a guest appearance by Bobby Riggs in which he plays up his sexist public image. If similar statements had been made about blacks, for example, they would ''never'' have been tolerated, but women were apparently AcceptableTargets back then and Riggs' bigotry is largely played for laughs.
* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' features a scene where Mimoso Raton (a baby mouse) walks into a room, and a woman jumps onto a chair because she is terrified of him. And this is shown as perfectly normal and expected. This show ran in Mexico during the first half of the 1980s. Imagine the backlash and accusations of sexism the producers would have received if the same scene had been aired in the USA during the same time period.
* ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'': Del's homophobia, which is PlayedForLaughs in a way that reflected society's attitudes at the time the early seasons were filmed. Interestingly, the show notes the change in opinions - Rodney is much more accepting, and calls Del out when he suspects that he could have gotten [=AIDS=] from an effeminate hairdresser.
* ''Series/OnTheBuses'' has one episode where the main characters Stan and Jack notice that their homemade beer makes Stan's sister and brother-in-law so out of their minds that they want to have sex with each other, even though they normally don't. So they decide to make some more and get the women at their work so out of their mind that they'll have sex with them, not really knowing what they are doing. This is treated as harmless fun.
* ''Patrulla Fronteriza: Prohibido Pasar'', a reality show on the National Geographic Channel, provides more fun with Latin American ValuesDissonance! It's about the patrols of the USA/Mexico border and their heroic fight against the evils from the outside. If you don't get it, just ask how many Latin Americans have relatives living illegally in the USA.
* ''"Pipo De Clown"'', a Dutch children's show, was very popular in from the 1950s until the 1970. It featured a white man dressed as a Native American, speaking in childlike sentences. Nowadays this seems horribly racist.
* In ''Series/PoliceWoman'', FairCop Pepper Anderson's male colleagues keep complimenting her on her good looks, beautiful eyes and so on. Today this would at best be considered unprofessional catcalling and at worst sexual harassment.
* ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'' plays out like this, because it barely alters anything from the original Sentai script, which results in a diverse, and western, group of Power Rangers acting ''very'' strangely to most western viewers, portraying Japanese values.
** All of them have been trained to be Samurai Rangers from childhood onward, and they are expected to drop anything they had going on to take up that duty when called upon. This includes any job they have been holding down. This doesn't bode well to a Western audience, who see no reason why both can't still be performed. Meanwhile, a Japanese audience sees this as appropriate, with familial duty (for the Greater Good) being deemed more important than personal independence.
** Blue Ranger Kevin chewing out Gold Ranger Antonio for wanting to be a Samurai Ranger when he was never from a Samurai family to begin with. Aside from the obvious problem that ''none of the original cast are Japanese'', this again ties in with the whole family and honor idea. Most people would commend Antonio for doing something that he considers right and working his ass off to become fit for a Samurai Ranger.
** Mia's line of how "every girl's dream is to get married" and her horrible fear of being a [[LethalChef bad cook]]. While dreaming of getting married is still a rather common idea that any person can have at some point, she puts a lot of emphasis on it and seems to have not much of a life plan beyond that. While her not being a good cook isn't a problem to most Western audiences, it does make more sense to a Japanese audience. Getting married is an expected societal norm for women, especially by the age of [[ChristmasCake 25]], and being a good cook is expected of a housewife. This goes into the strict gender roles still present in Japan.
* ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' the famous episode "Accidents Happen" has Alan bringing a real looking fake gun to school for career day claiming he wants to be Rambo; post-Columbine he would've at the very least been suspended.
* ''Series/{{QI}}'' had an episode discussing a man from Japan who survived both bombings - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTaqBnNLUU a man who took a train from Hiroshima to Nagasaki just in time for the second blast]]. Most Brits wouldn't have thought twice about it. Interesting figures from even the grisliest chapters of history are routinely discussed, lampooned, and milked for laughs on the show, all in the name of being interesting. To British people, it's actually quite cosy comedy, and the clip no more harmful than anything else they've broadcast. Some Japanese media networks disagreed however, and the very existence of such a conversation - not broadcast in Japan, incidentally - was reported as an abomination, as it broke a cultural taboo. To some of the people of Japan, the subject's off-limits to the whole universe. To the UK, it's just quite interesting. It should, however, be pointed out that there are plenty of people from Japan commenting on that video that they don't see what the fuss is about.
** All the more interesting when you consider an earlier segment, which features far more jokes at the expense of Japanese accents and culture. If anything, you would expect ''that'' segment to have offended Japanese people, but instead a far milder one caused controversy, despite mainly discussing how extraordinary it was that Japanese trains were running the day after Hiroshima, which the panelists said would never happen in London.
* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' has an episode where Harvey says he doesn't want to go to college, and wants to jump straight into being a mechanic - prompting Sabrina to fret about his lack of ambition. After the 2008 recession, Harvey's plan to jump into a job with a steady income seems much more sensible.
* ''Series/{{Scandal}}'': Abby, on Stephen: "I don't understand why a successful, charming man like him, with a good job, needs to sleep with whores." Abby is hardly an innocent, nor Stephen's actual wife.
* ''Series/{{SCTV}}'': Dave Thomas did at least two characters in yellowface. Thomas plays Lin Ye Tang in multiple episodes, while playing Tim Ishimuni in 3.
* The DVD releases of the early seasons of ''Series/SesameStreet'' are given a label warning that they are intended for adult viewing for nostalgia purposes, as the standards of what is appropriate for children to watch have gotten stricter. The episodes include the likes of an adult Muppet approaching a bunch of kids and pulling letters out of his trenchcoat.
* ''Series/{{Skins}}'' has a somewhat...casual attitude toward teenage sex, which significantly freaks out American audiences; British viewers, on the other hand, view it as merely as an over-the-top if, at heart, accurate depiction. Particularly, the U.S. version of ''Skins'' had to change the resolution of the HotForStudent relationship in the first season. While the British don't exactly look ''kindly'' upon student-teacher romances, in America the [[PaedoHunt cultural taboo against it]] is so strong that even a neutral portrayal (as the original British version gives) would be seen as irresponsible. So in the American version, we see [[spoiler: Chris and Tina's relationship get found out, and Tina arrested and fired with a promise never to contact Chris again]]. In the original, [[spoiler: Chris simply realizes that Jal is better for him than Angie (the character on which Tina was based), and they both move on]].
* ''Series/TheSingingRingingTree'': The princess gets cursed with ugliness as a reflection of her inner character, with her beauty gradually being restored as this character reforms. What might seem a little jarring to modern viewers (aside from any UnfortunateImplications arising from BeautyEqualsGoodness being invoked here) is that part of this involves [[YouGottaHaveBlueHair her hair being turned green]], something which is an acceptable style statement now, but not in the 1950s when the original film it was adapted from was made, and probably impossible to achieve in the MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' gives a possible InUniverse Example with Picard's refusal to save populations threatened with natural disaster in the episodes "Homeward" and "Pen Pals" due to being prewarp, so doing so would violate the Prime Directive. Kirk would not approve...
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' doesn't have the Directive yet, but the crew still makes some pretty dissonant noninterference decisions:
** The first season episode when Archer decides to let an entire race die out because it's "nature's plan" is particularly upsetting because of its ridiculous use of HollywoodGenetics. Supposedly, a race is unable to "evolve" because of another species, and that species is "evolving" to die out. A passing understanding of genetics shows how foolish it is, making the choice to let a race die out so the other can "evolve," somehow, seem all the more insane.
** The second season episode when everyone agrees that extending the right to an education to the third-gendered cogenitor on an alien ship, discriminated against because of its gender, is a horrible idea.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that may seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory, up to and including [[spoiler: attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]
** The show's tacit acknowledgement that Kira was a member of a terrorist cell during the Cardassian occupation can raise a few eyebrows now that the word has become so much more politically charged after events like the September 11th attacks.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'':
** The treatment of women can feel sexist to the modern viewer, despite the fact that the show usually pushes standards of equality that were [[FairForItsDay radical for the time]]. ("But there ''was'' prejudice on Earth once! I remember reading about it in a history book!") In fact, the only reason there isn't ''more'' obvious gender equity on the original Enterprise is ExecutiveMeddling by nervous suits who thought the very presence of females would imply rampant promiscuity among the crew. According to producers who worked on the series, though, even though Gene Roddenberry did want more female characters, it was less in the name of real, honest gender equity and more in the name of skirts and tops that exemplified the TheissTitillationTheory (there's a reason a ''Trek'' girl is that trope's image). But hey, at least they're there and (sometimes) involved in the plot.
** The miniskirts come across today as making female officers seem less professional than the male officers and more like sex symbols. While they ''are'' {{Fanservice}}, the miniskirt in TheSixties was also a [[FashionDissonance symbol of female empowerment and liberation]], so this is also a lot of UnintentionalPeriodPiece (and with a bit of {{Zeerust}}, for a good measure).
** A reason women are treated as mostly eye-candy on the original series might have to do with the poor reaction of test audiences to the original pilot, "The Cage", in 1964. Gene Roddenberry claimed that a lot of women objected to seeing a woman in a position of authority (Number One, played by Majel Barrett), and the fact that the female crew members wore pants.
** Also in "The Cage", somewhat jarring to modern viewers might be Captain Pike's unwillingness to allow, and discomfort with having, a woman on the bridge (when a female yeoman comes up to deliver a report)... [[OneOfTheBoys with the exception of Number One, that is.]]
** The original series also has [=McCoy=] constantly insulting Spock's Vulcan heritage by calling him such things as "you green-blooded Vulcan" or "you pointed-eared hobgoblin". In real-world terms, this is essentially the same thing as racial insults, and [[NoSuchThingAsHR shouldn't HR be doing something about that]]? Within the show, it's considered a harmless part of Spock and [=McCoy's=] VitriolicBestBuds relationship. May also count as DeliberateValuesDissonance, since Spock has no emotional sensibilities with which to be offended due to his Vulcan mental discipline.
* ''Series/StillStanding'' has one episode-long RunningGag mention that Bill took Tina (the youngest daughter) to a bar. Bill, whenever this is mentioned, adds, "''AND GRILL''!". The joke may be lost on some - it's actually not as bad to have taken Tina to a bar and grill as the characters make it out to be. Many restaurants are in fact a "Bar and Grill" technically, and many actually ''do'' allow children, just as long as they don't consume alcohol.
* ''Series/TheThornBirds'' upset a great many viewers when it first aired in 1983 due to its depiction of a Catholic priest falling in love with a woman and eventually consummating his relationship with her. Other viewers lauded said depiction. Oddly, ''all'' of these people seemed to overlook the UnfortunateImplications of the fact that said priest had [[WifeHusbandry known this woman since she was a child and had a hand in raising her]].
* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' actually uses time travel to explicitly call this out on a couple of occasions.
** In the episode "Captain Jack Harkness", Jack and Toshiko are transported back to WWII, where Jack meets the ''real'' Jack Harkness that he originally stole the identity of (as described in ''Doctor Who''). It turns out that the real Jack is gay, and is, as to be expected in the 1940's, in denial about it. Both Jacks are massively attracted to each other, and Torchwood's Jack, knowing that the real Jack is destined to die the following day, dances with and shares a passionate kiss with his namesake before returning to the 21st century.
** In "To the Last Man", Torchwood has been keeping a young WWI soldier in [[HumanPopsicle cryogenic suspension]] since the war, taking him out annually for checkup, because they know he will be crucial to resolving some temporal crisis. The tragedy is that they removed him from a military hospital, where he was catatonic from shell shock. When they return him to his own time, he will revert to that condition and be executed by the military for "cowardice", as shell shock (PTSD) was not recognized as an actual medical condition at the time and soldiers who suffered from it actually ''were'' executed.
* In the British series ''Tripped'', Milo and Danny go to an AlternateUniverse, and one of the key things differentiating that world from this one is that gun control is much more relaxed in the UK, as one character actually pulls a gun on Milo, shocking him. In the US, it wouldn't make sense for one to be shocked at someone having a gun. Of course, even your average (unarmed) American would be scared to have someone point a gun at him.
* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:
-->"No one seems to care about the wee boy getting battered. Thankfully, some things in Scotland have changed for the better."
* ''Series/WhosTheBoss'' has this trope applied to the ''title'', as it would never even occur to most viewers nowadays to question whether a live-in housekeeper could presume to be the head-of-household's "boss", merely because the employee happens to be male and the employer happens to be female. Indeed, few of the show's once-groundbreaking role reversals would raise an eyebrow today.
* ''Series/TheWildWildWest'':
** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen," when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman." This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.
** The entire last scene of "The Night of the Firebrand" just drips with misogyny, as West and Gordon decide that Vixen O'Shaughnessy's punishment (for helping mastermind an attempted massacre at a military fort and a coup against Canada) is to be "forced to return to the feminine fold" so that she will "leave the fighting to us," by which they mean they're just going to make her return to the ladies' finishing school she escaped from. When she objects and goes into a CharacterFilibuster about all the wrongs that still need fighting against in the world, West basically gives her a Vulcan nerve pinch (a RunningGag in this episode) and reflects that he'd better tell the school's headmistress how to do it.
** "The Night of the Tycoons" romps home with the gold in Sexist Episode Writing; other episodes have female villains, but there's an unpleasant tone throughout the episode suggesting women have no business being in charge of huge corporations, capped off by its tag scene with Lionel's fiancee Kyra booted off to the kitchen and Jim telling him he's got to keep these women in their place.
** All that said, there ''are'' exceptions [[spoiler: such as Laurette in "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2," Posey in "The Night of the Poisonous Posey" and most dramatically Astarte in "The Night of the Druid's Blood," who's not only caught but will, it's implied, hang for her crimes. And Jim makes it clear he isn't sorry.]]
* ''Series/WKRPInCincinnati'': Herb's constant pursuit of Jennifer would very likely result in a sexual harassment suit nowadays.
* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.
----

to:

** The series has a massively dysfunctional family (immature father, overbearing mother, the youngest and oldest brother causing destruction and mayhem inside and outside the home, and the middle child who gets ignored, tormented at school, and sometimes joins in on the antics of the other brothers). What was seen as hilarious and possibly normal for some people back then would have people in today's time wondering why no one ever calls social services on the parents.
** A season one episode has Lois being told by another parent that Malcolm has been throwing around "the R word." No, he wasn't calling other kids retarded (an especially easy mistake to make since the premise is that Malcolm is a genius), but the joke is supposed to be that there is no offensive "R word" and the other parents are indulging in PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad.
* Invoked by Tina Fey in her acceptance speech for the Mark Twain prize.
-->"I hope that, like Mark Twain, people one day look back at my work and say, 'Wow, that is actually pretty racist.'"
* ''[[Series/{{MASH}} M*A*S*H]]'' is a show that covers a lot of contemporary social issues in a progressive light (especially after Alan Alda was given a great deal of creative control). However, the show still has a tendency to handle rape in a distasteful manner. Not that an actual rape is joked about or anything' rather, that such a serious subject is handled with a lot of comedic fodder. One can argue that a show that tries to bring humor to dark circumstances is simply attempting the same thing. However, dark circumstances on ''M*A*S*H'' are still handled in a dramatic fashion, so the show's trivialization of rape is rather cringe-worthy. Even the writers in the later retrospectives on the show regret the rape jokes, and asked "What were we thinking?"
* ''Series/{{Mastermind}}'' is a popular UK quiz show where people really have to study to be able to answer questions. Only the person who makes it through the first round, the semi-finals and wins the finals gets a prize: an engraved glass. Little time is spent on the candidate him/herself. In the Netherlands, not far from the UK, the format completely flopped. The public was upset that non-winners didn't get anything, and they wanted more details of the candidates' personal lives.
* ''Series/{{Maury}}'' never does shows where the audience tries to find out a trans person's or crossdresser's sex anymore, likely due to changing views on LGBTQ people.
* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' [[InvertedTrope inverts it]]. By modern standards, Uther is a ruthless tyrant. By general medieval standards, he would be considered rather benevolent.
* ''Series/MindYourLanguage'' is today considered to be at best embarrassingly xenophobic; at worst, blatantly racist. However, when it aired in the late 1970s, the show was appreciated for having a comparatively diverse cast with several actors of colour.
* ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'' isn't immune either.
** Watch the ''Erizabeth L'' episode, where Italian director Luchino Visconti is revealed to be a Japanese imposter with a drawn-out JapaneseRanguage joke and Terry Jones in {{yellowface}}; he then does it again in blackface, when he plays an African impersonating another Italian director, Michelangelo Antonioni.
** The name given to the friend of the mother of the Secretary of State for Overseas Affairs, who is just about to make a major speech about Rhodesia in the Commons but wouldn't mind a cup of tea first, is ''Mrs Nigger-Baiter''. This is of course done deliberately for shock value, but the dissonance is much more glaring today than it was in the early 70s.
* An episode of ''Series/MorkAndMindy'' has Mork go up against an overgrown bully named George. George stalks Mindy, makes threatening phone calls to Mork and hangs out menacingly near their house. This is treated as creepy jerkassery, but no one even thinks of calling the police. Ironically, it would take the death of another of Pam Dawber's co-stars (Rebecca Schaffer of ''My Sister Sam'') to get the first anti-stalking laws passed in America.
* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'' frequent calls out and Lampshades values dissonance, where Joel / Mike and the 'bots will riff on a movie for the horribly dated or inappropriate attitudes it displays. This is particularly prevalent in their riffs on informational short films from the '50s, where the crew will mercilessly mock the film for its outdated attitudes to family life, gender politics, racism, social behavior and so forth.
** This reaches an apotheosis with the short film ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0248722/ Catching Trouble]]'' (episode 315). Filmed in 1936, it presents a lighthearted look at Ross Allen, who captures animals for his zoo - with his bare hands. This involves poking them with sticks, knocking them out of tall trees - by cutting the trees down - and trapping them in a bag, with the help of "his faithful Seminole". On one occasion he starts a small forest fire in order to drive out a snake, and eventually he grabs two bear cubs who scream in a particularly pitiful way (their mother is strangely absent). Then one of the cubs attempts to escape from the boat by swimming, but as a camera just happens to be underwater, it seems clear that he was provoked into jumping off the boat just so that he could be recaptured. Joel and The Bots became audibly upset over the course of the film, culminating in Joel apologising on behalf of humanity.
** A second apotheosis comes with ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0276048/ A Date With Your Family]]'', a short film from 1950 which is intended to teach kids how to have dinner with their parents. The film's portrait of family life circa 1950 - in which everything has to be arranged so that the father will not be upset when he returns from a hard day at the office - exactly fits the modern stereotype of that era. The narration, which is delivered by [[Series/LeaveItToBeaver Hugh Beaumont]], gives such as advice as "pleasant, unemotional conversation helps the digestion", and observes that "these boys greet their Dad as though they were genuinely glad to see him, as though they really missed him". The narrator further points out how the mother and sister of the family "owe it" to their menfolk to be attractive and charming, and encourages the son to compliment the ladies' cooking as "this will make them want to continue pleasing you."
** While not quite as jarring as the above two, the Union Pacific safety film "Days of Our Years" features a segment where a husband drops his wife in labor off at the hospital, and is then encouraged by the doctors to go on ahead to work while they take care of business. (This was during a time when women were kept sedated during childbirth, so it's not like the husband's presence would mean much to the wife either way.) Against that though, the tradition of the new father handing cigars to everyone at the workplace almost fails to rate a mention.
** The short advertising spot for a home economics major for female college students takes quite a few hits. While most of the short is rather progressive in asserting that most of its graduates went on to have careers, the hosts audibly boo when the short gushes over a graduate who takes on the "full-time career" of being a housewife.
** The short that precedes ''Catching Trouble'', ''Aquatic Wizards'', has the narrator call a Hispanic jumper "a Mexican jumping bean." The Bots proceed to tear him a new one, with Crow calling him a "white fascist," and Tom pegging him as a fat ignorant hick who gets paid to talk into a microphone and eat pretzels all day.
* In the ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' season 1 episode "Dead Man Talking" (which was first released in 2004), the team's attitude towards the woman who turns out to be a pre-op transsexual, as well as the killer of the week, comes off as pretty transphobic nowadays. First of all, after TheReveal, they refer to her as a "guy", or with male pronouns, even as a "he-she" (which some consider a slur these days). In particular, Gibbs' snark about "adding that misdemeanor to the murder charge", regarding the woman having used the female restroom, [[HarsherInHindsight is especially cringeworthy after the transgender bathroom controversies of 2016]]. Secondly, Tony has flirted and has set up a date with the woman before anybody else found out about her being both the murderer and born male. However, Kate seems far more shocked about "Tony's on a date with a guy!", rather than Tony being on a date with the murderer responsible for the death of one of their fellow agents and who was most likely planning on killing Tony. Finally, the killer most likely didn't transition because he actually identifies himself as a woman, but because it's the ultimate disguise to get away with his crimes, lending to the {{Unfortunate Implication}} that transsexuality is used by criminals to hide themselves from the law.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'', in one episode ("The Pig Who Came to Dinner"), features a guest appearance by Bobby Riggs in which he plays up his sexist public image. If similar statements had been made about blacks, for example, they would ''never'' have been tolerated, but women were apparently AcceptableTargets back then and Riggs' bigotry is largely played for laughs.
* ''Series/OdiseaBurbujas'' features a scene where Mimoso Raton (a baby mouse) walks into a room, and a woman jumps onto a chair because she is terrified of him. And this is shown as perfectly normal and expected. This show ran in Mexico during the first half of the 1980s. Imagine the backlash and accusations of sexism the producers would have received if the same scene had been aired in the USA during the same time period.
* ''Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses'': Del's homophobia, which is PlayedForLaughs in a way that reflected society's attitudes at the time the early seasons were filmed. Interestingly, the show notes the change in opinions - Rodney is much more accepting, and calls Del out when he suspects that he could have gotten [=AIDS=] from an effeminate hairdresser.
* ''Series/OnTheBuses'' has one episode where the main characters Stan and Jack notice that their homemade beer makes Stan's sister and brother-in-law so out of their minds that they want to have sex with each other, even though they normally don't. So they decide to make some more and get the women at their work so out of their mind that they'll have sex with them, not really knowing what they are doing. This is treated as harmless fun.
* ''Patrulla Fronteriza: Prohibido Pasar'', a reality show on the National Geographic Channel, provides more fun with Latin American ValuesDissonance! It's about the patrols of the USA/Mexico border and their heroic fight against the evils from the outside. If you don't get it, just ask how many Latin Americans have relatives living illegally in the USA.
* ''"Pipo De Clown"'', a Dutch children's show, was very popular in from the 1950s until the 1970. It featured a white man dressed as a Native American, speaking in childlike sentences. Nowadays this seems horribly racist.
* In ''Series/PoliceWoman'', FairCop Pepper Anderson's male colleagues keep complimenting her on her good looks, beautiful eyes and so on. Today this would at best be considered unprofessional catcalling and at worst sexual harassment.
* ''Series/PowerRangersSamurai'' plays out like this, because it barely alters anything from the original Sentai script, which results in a diverse, and western, group of Power Rangers acting ''very'' strangely to most western viewers, portraying Japanese values.
** All of them have been trained to be Samurai Rangers from childhood onward, and they are expected to drop anything they had going on to take up that duty when called upon. This includes any job they have been holding down. This doesn't bode well to a Western audience, who see no reason why both can't still be performed. Meanwhile, a Japanese audience sees this as appropriate, with familial duty (for the Greater Good) being deemed more important than personal independence.
** Blue Ranger Kevin chewing out Gold Ranger Antonio for wanting to be a Samurai Ranger when he was never from a Samurai family to begin with. Aside from the obvious problem that ''none of the original cast are Japanese'', this again ties in with the whole family and honor idea. Most people would commend Antonio for doing something that he considers right and working his ass off to become fit for a Samurai Ranger.
** Mia's line of how "every girl's dream is to get married" and her horrible fear of being a [[LethalChef bad cook]]. While dreaming of getting married is still a rather common idea that any person can have at some point, she puts a lot of emphasis on it and seems to have not much of a life plan beyond that. While her not being a good cook isn't a problem to most Western audiences, it does make more sense to a Japanese audience. Getting married is an expected societal norm for women, especially by the age of [[ChristmasCake 25]], and being a good cook is expected of a housewife. This goes into the strict gender roles still present in Japan.
* ''Series/PunkyBrewster'' the famous episode "Accidents Happen" has Alan bringing a real looking fake gun to school for career day claiming he wants to be Rambo; post-Columbine he would've at the very least been suspended.
* ''Series/{{QI}}'' had an episode discussing a man from Japan who survived both bombings - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTaqBnNLUU a man who took a train from Hiroshima to Nagasaki just in time for the second blast]]. Most Brits wouldn't have thought twice about it. Interesting figures from even the grisliest chapters of history are routinely discussed, lampooned, and milked for laughs on the show, all in the name of being interesting. To British people, it's actually quite cosy comedy, and the clip no more harmful than anything else they've broadcast. Some Japanese media networks disagreed however, and the very existence of such a conversation - not broadcast in Japan, incidentally - was reported as an abomination, as it broke a cultural taboo. To some of the people of Japan, the subject's off-limits to the whole universe. To the UK, it's just quite interesting. It should, however, be pointed out that there are plenty of people from Japan commenting on that video that they don't see what the fuss is about.
** All the more interesting when you consider an earlier segment, which features far more jokes at the expense of Japanese accents and culture. If anything, you would expect ''that'' segment to have offended Japanese people, but instead a far milder one caused controversy, despite mainly discussing how extraordinary it was that Japanese trains were running the day after Hiroshima, which the panelists said would never happen in London.
* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' has an episode where Harvey says he doesn't want to go to college, and wants to jump straight into being a mechanic - prompting Sabrina to fret about his lack of ambition. After the 2008 recession, Harvey's plan to jump into a job with a steady income seems much more sensible.
* ''Series/{{Scandal}}'': Abby, on Stephen: "I don't understand why a successful, charming man like him, with a good job, needs to sleep with whores." Abby is hardly an innocent, nor Stephen's actual wife.
* ''Series/{{SCTV}}'': Dave Thomas did at least two characters in yellowface. Thomas plays Lin Ye Tang in multiple episodes, while playing Tim Ishimuni in 3.
* The DVD releases of the early seasons of ''Series/SesameStreet'' are given a label warning that they are intended for adult viewing for nostalgia purposes, as the standards of what is appropriate for children to watch have gotten stricter. The episodes include the likes of an adult Muppet approaching a bunch of kids and pulling letters out of his trenchcoat.
* ''Series/{{Skins}}'' has a somewhat...casual attitude toward teenage sex, which significantly freaks out American audiences; British viewers, on the other hand, view it as merely as an over-the-top if, at heart, accurate depiction. Particularly, the U.S. version of ''Skins'' had to change the resolution of the HotForStudent relationship in the first season. While the British don't exactly look ''kindly'' upon student-teacher romances, in America the [[PaedoHunt cultural taboo against it]] is so strong that even a neutral portrayal (as the original British version gives) would be seen as irresponsible. So in the American version, we see [[spoiler: Chris and Tina's relationship get found out, and Tina arrested and fired with a promise never to contact Chris again]]. In the original, [[spoiler: Chris simply realizes that Jal is better for him than Angie (the character on which Tina was based), and they both move on]].
* ''Series/TheSingingRingingTree'': The princess gets cursed with ugliness as a reflection of her inner character, with her beauty gradually being restored as this character reforms. What might seem a little jarring to modern viewers (aside from any UnfortunateImplications arising from BeautyEqualsGoodness being invoked here) is that part of this involves [[YouGottaHaveBlueHair her hair being turned green]], something which is an acceptable style statement now, but not in the 1950s when the original film it was adapted from was made, and probably impossible to achieve in the MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' gives a possible InUniverse Example with Picard's refusal to save populations threatened with natural disaster in the episodes "Homeward" and "Pen Pals" due to being prewarp, so doing so would violate the Prime Directive. Kirk would not approve...
* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' doesn't have the Directive yet, but the crew still makes some pretty dissonant noninterference decisions:
** The first season episode when Archer decides to let an entire race die out because it's "nature's plan" is particularly upsetting because of its ridiculous use of HollywoodGenetics. Supposedly, a race is unable to "evolve" because of another species, and that species is "evolving" to die out. A passing understanding of genetics shows how foolish it is, making the choice to let a race die out so the other can "evolve," somehow, seem all the more insane.
** The second season episode when everyone agrees that extending the right to an education to the third-gendered cogenitor on an alien ship, discriminated against because of its gender, is a horrible idea.
* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'':
** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that may seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory, up to and including [[spoiler: attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]
** The show's tacit acknowledgement that Kira was a member of a terrorist cell during the Cardassian occupation can raise a few eyebrows now that the word has become so much more politically charged after events like the September 11th attacks.
* ''Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries'':
** The treatment of women can feel sexist to the modern viewer, despite the fact that the show usually pushes standards of equality that were [[FairForItsDay radical for the time]]. ("But there ''was'' prejudice on Earth once! I remember reading about it in a history book!") In fact, the only reason there isn't ''more'' obvious gender equity on the original Enterprise is ExecutiveMeddling by nervous suits who thought the very presence of females would imply rampant promiscuity among the crew. According to producers who worked on the series, though, even though Gene Roddenberry did want more female characters, it was less in the name of real, honest gender equity and more in the name of skirts and tops that exemplified the TheissTitillationTheory (there's a reason a ''Trek'' girl is that trope's image). But hey, at least they're there and (sometimes) involved in the plot.
** The miniskirts come across today as making female officers seem less professional than the male officers and more like sex symbols. While they ''are'' {{Fanservice}}, the miniskirt in TheSixties was also a [[FashionDissonance symbol of female empowerment and liberation]], so this is also a lot of UnintentionalPeriodPiece (and with a bit of {{Zeerust}}, for a good measure).
** A reason women are treated as mostly eye-candy on the original series might have to do with the poor reaction of test audiences to the original pilot, "The Cage", in 1964. Gene Roddenberry claimed that a lot of women objected to seeing a woman in a position of authority (Number One, played by Majel Barrett), and the fact that the female crew members wore pants.
** Also in "The Cage", somewhat jarring to modern viewers might be Captain Pike's unwillingness to allow, and discomfort with having, a woman on the bridge (when a female yeoman comes up to deliver a report)... [[OneOfTheBoys with the exception of Number One, that is.]]
** The original series also has [=McCoy=] constantly insulting Spock's Vulcan heritage by calling him such things as "you green-blooded Vulcan" or "you pointed-eared hobgoblin". In real-world terms, this is essentially the same thing as racial insults, and [[NoSuchThingAsHR shouldn't HR be doing something about that]]? Within the show, it's considered a harmless part of Spock and [=McCoy's=] VitriolicBestBuds relationship. May also count as DeliberateValuesDissonance, since Spock has no emotional sensibilities with which to be offended due to his Vulcan mental discipline.
* ''Series/StillStanding'' has one episode-long RunningGag mention that Bill took Tina (the youngest daughter) to a bar. Bill, whenever this is mentioned, adds, "''AND GRILL''!". The joke may be lost on some - it's actually not as bad to have taken Tina to a bar and grill as the characters make it out to be. Many restaurants are in fact a "Bar and Grill" technically, and many actually ''do'' allow children, just as long as they don't consume alcohol.
* ''Series/TheThornBirds'' upset a great many viewers when it first aired in 1983 due to its depiction of a Catholic priest falling in love with a woman and eventually consummating his relationship with her. Other viewers lauded said depiction. Oddly, ''all'' of these people seemed to overlook the UnfortunateImplications of the fact that said priest had [[WifeHusbandry known this woman since she was a child and had a hand in raising her]].
* ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' actually uses time travel to explicitly call this out on a couple of occasions.
** In the episode "Captain Jack Harkness", Jack and Toshiko are transported back to WWII, where Jack meets the ''real'' Jack Harkness that he originally stole the identity of (as described in ''Doctor Who''). It turns out that the real Jack is gay, and is, as to be expected in the 1940's, in denial about it. Both Jacks are massively attracted to each other, and Torchwood's Jack, knowing that the real Jack is destined to die the following day, dances with and shares a passionate kiss with his namesake before returning to the 21st century.
** In "To the Last Man", Torchwood has been keeping a young WWI soldier in [[HumanPopsicle cryogenic suspension]] since the war, taking him out annually for checkup, because they know he will be crucial to resolving some temporal crisis. The tragedy is that they removed him from a military hospital, where he was catatonic from shell shock. When they return him to his own time, he will revert to that condition and be executed by the military for "cowardice", as shell shock (PTSD) was not recognized as an actual medical condition at the time and soldiers who suffered from it actually ''were'' executed.
* In the British series ''Tripped'', Milo and Danny go to an AlternateUniverse, and one of the key things differentiating that world from this one is that gun control is much more relaxed in the UK, as one character actually pulls a gun on Milo, shocking him. In the US, it wouldn't make sense for one to be shocked at someone having a gun. Of course, even your average (unarmed) American would be scared to have someone point a gun at him.
* ''Watching Ourselves'', a documentary about the history of television in Scotland, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this. In one clip from an old documentary about glue-sniffing, a father quite casually mentions beating up his son, who can't be much more than eleven or twelve, in front of the police:
-->"No one seems to care about the wee boy getting battered. Thankfully, some things in Scotland have changed for the better."
* ''Series/WhosTheBoss'' has this trope applied to the ''title'', as it would never even occur to most viewers nowadays to question whether a live-in housekeeper could presume to be the head-of-household's "boss", merely because the employee happens to be male and the employer happens to be female. Indeed, few of the show's once-groundbreaking role reversals would raise an eyebrow today.
* ''Series/TheWildWildWest'':
** More than once, a villainess is given much a lighter punishment than her male counterparts [[spoiler: such as Morn in "The Night of the Flying Pie Plate," who gets a lighter sentence than her other conspirators]], or is even allowed to walk away scot-free, apparently simply because she is a beautiful woman. This is compounded at the end of "The Night of the Red-Eyed Madmen," when the villainess gives a rather insightful, moving speech about how she'd only wanted to be seen as more than "just a woman." This small step forward is promptly ignored in favor of having her and another woman fawn over a new dress and begin discussing how to look their best when the train pulls into Carson City.
** The entire last scene of "The Night of the Firebrand" just drips with misogyny, as West and Gordon decide that Vixen O'Shaughnessy's punishment (for helping mastermind an attempted massacre at a military fort and a coup against Canada) is to be "forced to return to the feminine fold" so that she will "leave the fighting to us," by which they mean they're just going to make her return to the ladies' finishing school she escaped from. When she objects and goes into a CharacterFilibuster about all the wrongs that still need fighting against in the world, West basically gives her a Vulcan nerve pinch (a RunningGag in this episode) and reflects that he'd better tell the school's headmistress how to do it.
** "The Night of the Tycoons" romps home with the gold in Sexist Episode Writing; other episodes have female villains, but there's an unpleasant tone throughout the episode suggesting women have no business being in charge of huge corporations, capped off by its tag scene with Lionel's fiancee Kyra booted off to the kitchen and Jim telling him he's got to keep these women in their place.
** All that said, there ''are'' exceptions [[spoiler: such as Laurette in "The Night of the Winged Terror, Part 2," Posey in "The Night of the Poisonous Posey" and most dramatically Astarte in "The Night of the Druid's Blood," who's not only caught but will, it's implied, hang for her crimes. And Jim makes it clear he isn't sorry.]]
* ''Series/WKRPInCincinnati'': Herb's constant pursuit of Jennifer would very likely result in a sexual harassment suit nowadays.
* ''Series/ZCars'', which by today's cop-show standards is exceedingly tame, once ran an episode where the cops have to bust a child-porn ring engaged in making dubious home movies. The series screened in the early evening, just after teatime. In the 1970s, long before the emergence of the modern frenzied hysteria about paedophilia, this passed by a British TV audience without undue comment.
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17th Jul '17 10:10:17 PM SickBoy
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* ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' (the 1920's-1950's series), as one of the first mainstream depictions of a Jewish family from a Jewish perspective, likely has quite a few even for its contemporary audience. Fleeing the Nazis is a perfectly normal explanation for why a distant cousin is Irish and doesn't elicit any reaction, while a woman finding out that neither the male nor female potential name for her grandkid is going to be after either of her late parents or her late in-laws is treated as if her kid had dismembered her dog right in front of her (the plot is resolved when her son-in-law explains that they had just chosen Americanized translations of the names). Another plot that has a similar level of anguish is when Sammy discovers that his new girlfriend has escaped from an asylum and that he'll have to trick her into returning for her own good (the episode ends with him getting off with her early to presumably live on the run, but the next episode is lost).

to:

* ''Series/TheGoldbergs'' ''The Goldbergs'' (the 1920's-1950's series), as one of the first mainstream depictions of a Jewish family from a Jewish perspective, likely has quite a few even for its contemporary audience. Fleeing the Nazis is a perfectly normal explanation for why a distant cousin is Irish and doesn't elicit any reaction, while a woman finding out that neither the male nor female potential name for her grandkid is going to be after either of her late parents or her late in-laws is treated as if her kid had dismembered her dog right in front of her (the plot is resolved when her son-in-law explains that they had just chosen Americanized translations of the names). Another plot that has a similar level of anguish is when Sammy discovers that his new girlfriend has escaped from an asylum and that he'll have to trick her into returning for her own good (the episode ends with him getting off with her early to presumably live on the run, but the next episode is lost).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ValuesDissonance.LiveActionTV