History ValuesDissonance / LiveActionTV

2nd Dec '16 7:29:12 AM isolato
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* An [[DeliberateValuesDissonace in-universe]] CrossesTheLineTwice example from ''Series/FawltyTowers'' is the classic dialogue where the elderly Major (who is slightly senile and blissfully unaware of the ''faux pas'' he's committing) is getting nostalgic about a girlfriend who he brought to a cricket match at Lords. He recalled he had to upbraid her about her use of unacceptable language (there's some real dissonance here as well: today the subject is considered by some to be too sensitive even to joke about, leading to the line being cut by the BBC in 2013 rebroadcasts):

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* An [[DeliberateValuesDissonace [[DeliberateValuesDissonance in-universe]] CrossesTheLineTwice example from ''Series/FawltyTowers'' is the classic dialogue where the elderly Major (who is slightly senile and blissfully unaware of the ''faux pas'' he's committing) is getting nostalgic about a girlfriend who he brought to a cricket match at Lords. He recalled he had to upbraid her about her use of unacceptable language (there's some real dissonance here as well: today the subject is considered by some to be too sensitive even to joke about, leading to the line being cut by the BBC in 2013 rebroadcasts):
23rd Nov '16 10:03:51 AM isolato
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* An in-universe CrossesTheLineTwice example from ''Series/FawltyTowers'' is the classic dialogue where the elderly Major (who is slightly senile and blissfully unaware of the ''faux pas'' he's committing) is getting nostalgic about a girlfriend who he brought to a cricket match at Lords. He recalled he had to upbraid her about her use of unacceptable language (there's some real dissonance here as well: today the subject is considered by some to be too sensitive even to joke about, leading to the line being cut by the BBC in 2013 rebroadcasts):

to:

* An in-universe [[DeliberateValuesDissonace in-universe]] CrossesTheLineTwice example from ''Series/FawltyTowers'' is the classic dialogue where the elderly Major (who is slightly senile and blissfully unaware of the ''faux pas'' he's committing) is getting nostalgic about a girlfriend who he brought to a cricket match at Lords. He recalled he had to upbraid her about her use of unacceptable language (there's some real dissonance here as well: today the subject is considered by some to be too sensitive even to joke about, leading to the line being cut by the BBC in 2013 rebroadcasts):
11th Nov '16 4:32:34 PM HighCrate
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** Jon Pertwee-era episodes had an occasional undercurrent of antifeminism, containing StrawFeminist characters and having the Doctor put them in their place. The writers and actors were generally at least feminist-sympathetic (Elisabeth Sladen in particular likes to soften the worst of the Doctor's manhandling and verbal abuse by giggling at him in such a way as to make it look like consensual teasing), but few were able to resist poking fun at perceived AcceptableTargets, and [[DependingOnTheWriter some writers]] made it clear in their scripts that they don't know what feminism actually is, assuming it's about women being in charge or men being inferior. The Tom Baker era eased up on this a lot, due to fewer Earth-bound settings, a new GirlsNeedRoleModels attitude taking over, and because Tom disliked playing TallDarkAndSnarky and adlibbed his way out of his nastier scripted lines - but there's still moments. The scene in "The Ark in Space" where the Doctor bellows sexist insults at Sarah in order to snap her out of a panic is particularly difficult to watch - Tom Baker has often expressed discomfort and embarrassment about playing the scene, and even that was heavily toned down from the scripted version, which was longer and meaner.

to:

** Jon Pertwee-era episodes had an occasional undercurrent of antifeminism, containing StrawFeminist characters and having the Doctor put them in their place. The writers and actors were generally at least feminist-sympathetic (Elisabeth Sladen in particular likes to soften the worst of the Doctor's manhandling and verbal abuse by giggling at him in such a way as to make it look like consensual teasing), but few were able to resist poking fun at perceived AcceptableTargets, and [[DependingOnTheWriter some writers]] made it clear in their scripts that they don't know what feminism actually is, assuming it's about women being in charge or men being inferior. The Tom Baker era eased up on this a lot, due to fewer Earth-bound settings, a new GirlsNeedRoleModels attitude taking over, settings and because Tom disliked playing TallDarkAndSnarky and adlibbed his way out of his nastier scripted lines - but there's still moments. The scene in "The Ark in Space" where the Doctor bellows sexist insults at Sarah in order to snap her out of a panic is particularly difficult to watch - Tom Baker has often expressed discomfort and embarrassment about playing the scene, and even that was heavily toned down from the scripted version, which was longer and meaner.
14th Oct '16 4:48:17 AM sotnosen95
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** Many AcceptableTargets of the time included mocking of Doña Clotilde because she is (or looks like she is) a senior citizen and call her a witch because of that, mocking people because of their physical appearances, particularly Señor Barriga’s and Ñoño’s obesity, but basically any “ugly” physical trait (Don Ramon’s thinness, Chilindrinas's size, Quico’s chigs, etc.) would earn the character a humiliating nickname. For today’s standards that will be considered very disrespectful to the adults and bullying among the kids (notice that basically all of Chespirito’s sketch characters rely on mocking physical appearances at some point, including Chapulin, Chompiras and Dr. Chapatin, but doing it among adults probably has lesser impact).
** Physical violence as a way to correct the kids, particularly used by Don Ramon who practically harm all of the children in La Vecindad in some way, including spanking his own daughter and giving bonking his surrogate son Chavo on the head, and all of this is PlayedForLaughs! Granted, he is the only adult doing this, and even Señor Barriga and Profesor Jirafales (frequent victims of the kid’s slapstick violence) don’t do it and in fact reprehend Don Ramon for doing it. Still, even though physical punishment for kids is still common in some parts of the world, the practice has fallen into disuse and is socially unacceptable in the most progressive areas, so in modern times it's unthinkable for a comedy to show it as "funny".
** Don Ramon is often the victim of beatings and/or humiliating punishments by Doña Florinda, most of them undeserved. This was played for laughs back in the days ([[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale when the concept of a man beaten by a woman was, well, funny]]). Today many modern audiences take pity towards Don Ramon.
** Homophobic jokes. Many jokes in the show cast homosexuality in a negative light and implying that someone is gay was an insult. In one episode Don Ramón and Profesor Jirafales are mistaken for homosexuals (actually Don Ramon was educating Jirafales on how to win over a woman), and when Don Ramon came closer to El Chavo (an eight-year-old kid, in universe) Chavo's reactions are of fear and disgust, even violently avoiding Don Ramon’s touch. Meanwhile, Doña Florinda violently breaks up with Jirafales and the rest of Vecindad reacts similarly with anger. Also, Don Ramon’s CatchPhrase “Yo le voy al Necaxa” (I support the Necaxa) is a reference to the fact that he is not gay (fans of the Necaxa's rival team, the Puebla, were considered “gay”).

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** Many AcceptableTargets of the time included mocking of Doña Clotilde because she is (or looks like she is) a senior citizen and call her a witch because of that, mocking people because of their physical appearances, particularly Señor Barriga’s Barriga's and Ñoño’s Ñoño's obesity, but basically any “ugly” "ugly" physical trait (Don Ramon’s thinness, Chilindrinas's size, Quico’s chigs, etc.) would earn the character a humiliating nickname. For today’s today's standards that will be considered very disrespectful to the adults and bullying among the kids (notice that basically all of Chespirito’s Chespirito's sketch characters rely on mocking physical appearances at some point, including Chapulin, Chompiras and Dr. Chapatin, but doing it among adults probably has lesser impact).
** Physical violence as a way to correct the kids, particularly used by Don Ramon who practically harm all of the children in La Vecindad in some way, including spanking his own daughter and giving bonking his surrogate son Chavo on the head, and all of this is PlayedForLaughs! Granted, he is the only adult doing this, and even Señor Barriga and Profesor Jirafales (frequent victims of the kid’s kid's slapstick violence) don’t don't do it and in fact reprehend Don Ramon for doing it. Still, even though physical punishment for kids is still common in some parts of the world, the practice has fallen into disuse and is socially unacceptable in the most progressive areas, so in modern times it's unthinkable for a comedy to show it as "funny".
** Don Ramon is often the victim of beatings and/or humiliating punishments by Doña Florinda, most of them undeserved. This was played for laughs back in the days ([[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale when the concept of a man beaten by a woman was, well, funny]]). Today many modern audiences take pity towards Don Ramon.
** Homophobic jokes. Many jokes in the show cast homosexuality in a negative light and implying that someone is gay was an insult. In one episode Don Ramón and Profesor Jirafales are mistaken for homosexuals (actually Don Ramon was educating Jirafales on how to win over a woman), and when Don Ramon came closer to El Chavo (an eight-year-old kid, in universe) Chavo's reactions are of fear and disgust, even violently avoiding Don Ramon’s touch. Meanwhile, Doña Florinda violently breaks up with Jirafales and the rest of Vecindad reacts similarly with anger. Also, Don Ramon’s CatchPhrase “Yo le voy al Necaxa” (I support the Necaxa) is a reference to the fact that he is not gay (fans of the Necaxa's rival team, the Puebla, were considered “gay”).
13th Oct '16 2:45:45 PM Midna
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': In the second episode of Series 3, the gang is illicitly burying a person. Felicity takes a handful of dirt and tosses it on top of the coffin. Upon spotting the confusion on everyone else's faces, she explains that it's a Jewish custom. The scene falls flat for British audiences because the mainstream British funerary custom is for the closest people to the deceased to toss the first handfuls of soil onto the coffin before the grave is filled in. In Britain, Felicity's act therefore does not stand out as unusual but the behaviour of the characters creates a dissonance between what a British audience would expect to see at a funeral and what the show's creators seem to think an American audience would expect to see.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': In the second episode of Series Season 3, the gang is illicitly burying a person. Felicity takes a handful of dirt and tosses it on top of the coffin. Upon spotting the confusion on everyone else's faces, she explains that it's a Jewish custom. The scene falls flat for British audiences because the mainstream British funerary custom is for the closest people to the deceased to toss the first handfuls of soil onto the coffin before the grave is filled in. In Britain, Felicity's act therefore does not stand out as unusual unusual, but the behaviour of the characters creates a dissonance between what a British audience would expect to see at a funeral and what the show's creators seem to think an American audience would expect to see.



** ''The A-Team'' has many ethnic stereotypes, mainly found in the form of the bad guys (usually either loud, raucous, stupid Hispanic bandits in Latin America or New York-ish gangsters in L. A.) and some of the A-Team's disguises. Hannibal's [[ContinuityNod most referenced]] comic disguise is a ChineseLaunderer (who even appeared in the opening credits of the first season), and in another episode he us and Murdock once had to disguise himself as a Native American warrior, complete with whooping. While ethnic stereotypes may not be eliminated from media, such blatant examples would never show up on TV today, except in parody.

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** ''The A-Team'' has There are many ethnic stereotypes, stereotypes on the show, mainly found in the form of the bad guys (usually either loud, raucous, stupid Hispanic bandits in Latin America or New York-ish gangsters in L. A.) and some of the A-Team's disguises. Hannibal's [[ContinuityNod most referenced]] comic disguise is a ChineseLaunderer (who even appeared in the opening credits of the first season), and in another episode he us and Murdock once had to disguise himself as a Native American warrior, complete with whooping. While ethnic stereotypes may not be eliminated from media, such blatant examples would never show up on TV today, except in parody.



* The ''Series/{{Batman}}'' episode "Nora Clavicle and the Ladies Crime Club" comes off as quite anti-feminist when watching it today. The titular villain is a StrawFeminist [[DoesNotLikeMen in the extreme]], who replaces the cops of Gotham City with women, who are depicted as totally inept [[note]] They care more about their makeup, recipes, and shopping than actually solving crimes. [[/note]] and her plan revolves around using EekAMouse played straight. Although both Batgirl and Nora herself are depicted as capable, the other females are not. And the dialogue of several of the characters, Commissioner Gordon & Chief O'Hara especially, comes off as misogynistic; the show could get a pass due to it being [[{{Camp}} campy]] and therefore not meant to be taken seriously, but it's still a little cringe-worthy to watch.

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* The ''Series/{{Batman}}'' episode "Nora Clavicle and the Ladies Crime Club" comes off as quite anti-feminist when watching it today. The titular villain is a StrawFeminist [[DoesNotLikeMen in the extreme]], who replaces the cops of Gotham City with women, who are depicted as totally inept [[note]] They care more about their makeup, recipes, and shopping than actually solving crimes. [[/note]] and her plan revolves around using EekAMouse played straight. Although both Batgirl and Nora herself are depicted as capable, the other females are not. And the dialogue of several of the characters, Commissioner Gordon & Chief O'Hara especially, comes off as misogynistic; the show could get a pass due to it being [[{{Camp}} campy]] and therefore not meant to be taken seriously, but it's still a little cringe-worthy cringey to watch.



*** Hell the way Batman and Robin themselves talked to Batgirl sometimes could be seen this way, with them repeatedly telling her to 'leave the crime fighting to the men', sometimes not even thanking her for saving their lives but chiding her for being late, and the fact that SHE was often the one to get knocked out first in fights or get captured.

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*** Hell Hell, the way Batman and Robin themselves talked to Batgirl sometimes could be seen this way, with them repeatedly telling her to 'leave "leave the crime fighting to the men', men", sometimes not even thanking her for saving their lives but chiding her for being late, and the fact that SHE late. She was also often the one to get knocked out first in fights or get captured.



** The show has an [[http://www.hulu.com/watch/9225/barney-miller-rape episode]] where a woman comes into the police station distraught and says she's been raped. When it turns out that it was her husband, it's treated as a big joke and she ''learns her lesson'' that she should put out. Words cannot describe how cringeworthy this is now.

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** The show has an [[http://www.hulu.com/watch/9225/barney-miller-rape episode]] where a woman comes into the police station distraught and says she's been raped. When it turns out that it was her husband, it's treated as a big joke and she ''learns her lesson'' that she should put out. Words cannot describe how cringeworthy cringe-inducing this is now.



** The show contained a lot of casual sexism, even as the show tried to be progressive in other areas (depicting Willie Mays as a warlock for example). Darrin and Larry are often rather chauvinist. In one instance, even Endora is convinced that Darrin is having an affair because his current client happens to be an attractive business''woman'', and presumably she could not imagine why he would wine and dine her the way he would a male client.

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** The show contained There was a lot of casual sexism, even as the show tried to be progressive in other areas (depicting Willie Mays as a warlock for example). Darrin and Larry are often rather chauvinist. In one instance, even Endora is convinced that Darrin is having an affair because his current client happens to be an attractive business''woman'', and presumably she could not imagine why he would wine and dine her the way he would a male client.



** The way [[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale the sexual coercion and assault of male characters]] is treated. When Faith switches bodies with Buffy and [[RapeByFraud has sex with Riley]], it's Buffy (not Riley) who is supposedly the victim. Though Faith attempting to rape and suffocate Xander is taken extremely seriously.

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** The way [[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale the sexual coercion and assault of male characters]] is treated. When Faith switches bodies with Buffy and [[RapeByFraud has sex with Riley]], it's Buffy (not Riley) who is supposedly the victim. Though Faith attempting to rape and suffocate Xander is taken extremely seriously.seriously, though.



* ''Series/{{Carrusel}}'': David gives up his pet turtle so that a turtle soup can be made in order to cure Fermin from his illness. Carrusel took place in Mexico in 1989-1990. Not only sacrificing a pet turtle would have been unacceptable in the USA back then (and in the present day), but someone suggesting turtle soup as a cure to an illness would have at the very least raised a lot of eyebrows.
** Also, all but one of the female characters in ''Series/{{Carrusel}}'' were afraid of mice. The girl who was not, Valeria, was seen as gutsy and adventurous overall. In the USA, by 1989-1990, it would have been likelier to just have one individual female be murophobic, and the murophobia being seen as an irrational sign of weakness.
* ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho'', probably one of the most popular and iconic TV shows in all Latin America, dubbed to several languages and exported to many countries, is full of this. Produced in the 70s, many jokes and situations will be considered very inappropriate for modern standards.
** Many AcceptableTargets of the time included mocking of Doña Clotilde because she is (or looks like she is) a senior citizen and call her witch because of that, mocking of people because of their physical appearances particularly Señor Barriga’s and Ñoño’s obesity, but basically any “ugly” physical trait (Don Ramon’s thinness, Chilindrinas size, Quico’s chigs, etc.) would earn the character a humiliating nickname. For today’s standards that will be considered very disrespectful to the adults and bullying among the kids (notice that basically all of Chespirito’s sketch characters rely on mocking physical looks at some point, including Chapulin, Chompiras and Dr. Chapatin, but doing it among adults probably has lesser impact).
** Physical violence as a way to correct the kids, particularly used by Don Ramon who practically harm all of the children in La Vecindad some way, including spanking his own daughter and giving bumps in the head to his surrogate son Chavo, and all of this is PlayedForLaughs! Granted, he is the only adult doing that, and even Señor Barriga and Profesor Jirafales (frequent victims of the kid’s slapstick violence) don’t do it and even reprehend Don Ramon for doing it. Still, even when physical punishment for kids is still common in some parts of Latin America the practice have fallen in disuse and is socially unacceptable in the most progressive areas, so it will be unthinkable for a comedy to show it as “funny” in modern time.
** Don Ramon is often the victim of beatings and/or humiliating punishments by Doña Florinda, most of them undeserved. This was play for laughs back in the days ([[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale when the concept of a man beaten by a woman was, well, funny]]), today many modern audiences feel petty towards Don Ramon.
** Homophobic jokes. Many jokes in the show was about showing homosexuality as something bad and implying that someone is gay as something insulting. In one episode Don Ramón and Profesor Jirafales are mistaken for homosexuals (actually Don Ramon was educating Jirafales in how to win over a woman) and when Don Ramon came closer to El Chavo (an eight-year-old kid, in universe) Chavo reactions are of fear and disgust, even violently avoiding Don Ramon’s touch. Meanwhile Doña Florinda violently breaks with Jirafales and the rest of Vecindad reacts similary with anger. Also, Don Ramon’s CatchPhrase “Yo le voy al Necaxa” (I support the Necaxa) is a reference to the fact that he is not gay (fans of the rival team of the Necaxa, the Puebla, were considered “gay”).
*** In his defense, Chespirito did change many of this in latter seasons, as for example, many of the violence like Botija slapping Chompiras as punishment or Doña Florinda slapping Don Jaimito (Don Ramon’s SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute) were omitted, the jokes about physical appearances were downplayed and, although until his dead he was strongly oppose to same-sex marriage, the show became much more respectful toward gay people.
** All the females in the show were afraid of mice - even tough Dona Florinda and tomboy Chilindrina. By the 1970s, in the USA, this was no longer the norm - as evidenced by an episode of the Brady Bunch, where Cindy and Emma are clearly not afraid of mice. But in Mexico it was still common thought at the time that all women were afraid of mice simply because of their gender.

to:

* ''Series/{{Carrusel}}'': ''Series/{{Carrusel}}'':
**
David gives up his pet turtle so that a turtle soup can be made in order to cure Fermin from his illness. Carrusel took place in Mexico in 1989-1990. Not only would sacrificing a pet turtle would have been unacceptable in the USA back then (and in the present day), but someone suggesting turtle soup as a cure to an illness would have at the very least raised a lot of eyebrows.
** Also, all All but one of the female characters in ''Series/{{Carrusel}}'' were afraid of mice. The girl who was not, Valeria, was seen as gutsy and adventurous overall. In the USA, by 1989-1990, it would have been likelier to just have one individual female be murophobic, and the murophobia being seen as an irrational sign of weakness.
* ''Series/ElChavoDelOcho'', probably one of the most popular and iconic TV shows in all Latin America, dubbed to into several languages and exported to many countries, is full of this. Produced in the 70s, many jokes and situations will be considered very inappropriate for modern standards.
** Many AcceptableTargets of the time included mocking of Doña Clotilde because she is (or looks like she is) a senior citizen and call her a witch because of that, mocking of people because of their physical appearances appearances, particularly Señor Barriga’s and Ñoño’s obesity, but basically any “ugly” physical trait (Don Ramon’s thinness, Chilindrinas Chilindrinas's size, Quico’s chigs, etc.) would earn the character a humiliating nickname. For today’s standards that will be considered very disrespectful to the adults and bullying among the kids (notice that basically all of Chespirito’s sketch characters rely on mocking physical looks appearances at some point, including Chapulin, Chompiras and Dr. Chapatin, but doing it among adults probably has lesser impact).
** Physical violence as a way to correct the kids, particularly used by Don Ramon who practically harm all of the children in La Vecindad in some way, including spanking his own daughter and giving bumps in the head to bonking his surrogate son Chavo, Chavo on the head, and all of this is PlayedForLaughs! Granted, he is the only adult doing that, this, and even Señor Barriga and Profesor Jirafales (frequent victims of the kid’s slapstick violence) don’t do it and even in fact reprehend Don Ramon for doing it. Still, even when though physical punishment for kids is still common in some parts of Latin America the world, the practice have has fallen in into disuse and is socially unacceptable in the most progressive areas, so it will be in modern times it's unthinkable for a comedy to show it as “funny” in modern time.
"funny".
** Don Ramon is often the victim of beatings and/or humiliating punishments by Doña Florinda, most of them undeserved. This was play played for laughs back in the days ([[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale when the concept of a man beaten by a woman was, well, funny]]), today funny]]). Today many modern audiences feel petty take pity towards Don Ramon.
** Homophobic jokes. Many jokes in the show was about showing cast homosexuality as something bad in a negative light and implying that someone is gay as something insulting. was an insult. In one episode Don Ramón and Profesor Jirafales are mistaken for homosexuals (actually Don Ramon was educating Jirafales in on how to win over a woman) woman), and when Don Ramon came closer to El Chavo (an eight-year-old kid, in universe) Chavo Chavo's reactions are of fear and disgust, even violently avoiding Don Ramon’s touch. Meanwhile Meanwhile, Doña Florinda violently breaks up with Jirafales and the rest of Vecindad reacts similary similarly with anger. Also, Don Ramon’s CatchPhrase “Yo le voy al Necaxa” (I support the Necaxa) is a reference to the fact that he is not gay (fans of the Necaxa's rival team of the Necaxa, team, the Puebla, were considered “gay”).
*** In his defense, Chespirito did change many of this in latter seasons, as for example, many seasons. For example a lot of the violence like Botija slapping Chompiras as punishment or Doña Florinda slapping Don Jaimito (Don Ramon’s SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute) were omitted, was taken out, the jokes about physical appearances were downplayed and, although until his dead death he was strongly oppose opposed to same-sex marriage, the show became much more respectful toward gay people.
** All the females in the show were afraid of mice - even tough Dona Florinda and tomboy Chilindrina. By the 1970s, in the USA, this was no longer the norm - as evidenced by an episode of the Brady Bunch, where Cindy and Emma are clearly not afraid of mice. But in In Mexico it was still common commonly thought at the time that all women were afraid of mice simply because of their gender.
10th Oct '16 1:43:15 PM Wyldchyld
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* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': In the second episode of Series 3, the gang is illicitly burying a person. Felicity takes a handful of dirt and tosses it on top of the coffin. Upon spotting the confusion on everyone else's faces, she explains that it's a Jewish custom. The scene falls flat for British audiences because the mainstream British funerary custom is for the closest people to the deceased to toss the first handfuls of soil onto the coffin before the grave is filled in. In Britain, it's therefore not associated with any individual culture and instead singles out the US as having different funerary customs to the British audience.

to:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': In the second episode of Series 3, the gang is illicitly burying a person. Felicity takes a handful of dirt and tosses it on top of the coffin. Upon spotting the confusion on everyone else's faces, she explains that it's a Jewish custom. The scene falls flat for British audiences because the mainstream British funerary custom is for the closest people to the deceased to toss the first handfuls of soil onto the coffin before the grave is filled in. In Britain, it's Felicity's act therefore does not associated with any individual culture and instead singles stand out as unusual but the US as having different funerary customs to behaviour of the characters creates a dissonance between what a British audience.audience would expect to see at a funeral and what the show's creators seem to think an American audience would expect to see.
10th Oct '16 1:40:37 PM Wyldchyld
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Arrow}}'': In the second episode of Series 3, the gang is illicitly burying a person. Felicity takes a handful of dirt and tosses it on top of the coffin. Upon spotting the confusion on everyone else's faces, she explains that it's a Jewish custom. The scene falls flat for British audiences because the mainstream British funerary custom is for the closest people to the deceased to toss the first handfuls of soil onto the coffin before the grave is filled in. In Britain, it's therefore not associated with any individual culture and instead singles out the US as having different funerary customs to the British audience.
25th Sep '16 10:43:09 AM TotalDramaRox97
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Added DiffLines:

** One episode had Feeny scheduling 3 exams on the same day in order to get people studying harder. The class stresses out and start studying to borderline burnout (bar Cory and Shawn who procrastinate). Mr. Turner and the ids try to get him to spread the dates out a little bit so its not such a stress on them. In the end, they learn Feeny was right to put the test so close together because now they know the material rather than just memorizing it for the test. While the aesop of having to learn something rather than just remember it from the test is good, Feeny's actions of putting the tests so close together ages very poorly as in recent years stress levels, burnouts, and self harm incidents related to schoolwork has increased exponentially in high school students and studies have proven this type of stress is detrimental to their mental healh.
17th Sep '16 10:32:01 PM Furienna
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** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that would seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory. Up to and including [[spoiler: atttempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]

to:

** The show presents an uncomfortably realistic view of the morality and ethics of warfare that would seem objectionable to audience members. Almost all of the main characters are shown doing underhanded deeds in the name of victory. Up to and including [[spoiler: atttempted attempted genocide on the part of the Federation.]]
17th Sep '16 10:23:52 PM Furienna
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* ''Series/{{QI}}'', a British panel show, had an episode discussing a man from Japan who survived both bombings - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTaqBnNLUU a man who took a train from Hiroshima to Nagasaki just in time for the second blast]]. Most Brits wouldn't have thought twice about it. Interesting figures from even the grisliest chapters of history are routinely discussed, lampooned, and milked for laughs on the show, all in the name of being interesting. To British people, it's actually quite cosy comedy, and the clip no more harmful than anything else they've broadcast. Some Japanese media networks, however, disagreed, and the very existence of such a conversation - not broadcast in Japan, incidentally - was reported as an abomination, as it broke a cultural taboo. To some of the people of Japan, the subject's off-limits to the whole universe. To the UK, it's just quite interesting. It should, however, be pointed out that there are plenty of people from Japan commenting on that video that they don't see what the fuss is about.

to:

* ''Series/{{QI}}'', a British panel show, had an episode discussing a man from Japan who survived both bombings - [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnTaqBnNLUU a man who took a train from Hiroshima to Nagasaki just in time for the second blast]]. Most Brits wouldn't have thought twice about it. Interesting figures from even the grisliest chapters of history are routinely discussed, lampooned, and milked for laughs on the show, all in the name of being interesting. To British people, it's actually quite cosy comedy, and the clip no more harmful than anything else they've broadcast. Some Japanese media networks, networks disagreed however, disagreed, and the very existence of such a conversation - not broadcast in Japan, incidentally - was reported as an abomination, as it broke a cultural taboo. To some of the people of Japan, the subject's off-limits to the whole universe. To the UK, it's just quite interesting. It should, however, be pointed out that there are plenty of people from Japan commenting on that video that they don't see what the fuss is about.
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