History ValuesDissonance / ComicBooks

15th Jun '16 2:02:21 AM morenohijazo
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* ''ComicBook/ZipiYZape'': A lot of stories show the twins receiving CorporalPunishment for their pranks. Keep in mind that most of that stories were written in the Spain of the 1940s and 1950s...

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* ''ComicBook/ZipiYZape'': A lot of stories show the twins receiving CorporalPunishment for their pranks. Keep in mind that most of that stories were written in the Spain of the 1940s and 1950s... Nowadays, YOU GO TO JAIL for this kind of punishments. The only reason the old comics still get away with this (sort of) these days is because it's always PlayedForLaughs.
29th May '16 6:46:19 PM HamburgerTime
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* In ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'', the first Silk Spectre not only forgiving The Comedian for [[AttemptedRape trying to rape her]], but having at least one consensual encounter with him later in life that resulted in her daughter's birth, can come across as awkward to modern readers. The Comedian in general, who in addition to the attempted rape was also a war criminal and multiple murderer, would likely be portrayed not nearly as sympathetically were he created today.
12th May '16 1:33:14 PM PrincessGwen
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* There's a bit of discussion on Tumblr and 4chan's /co/ boards on how Harvey Comics' "Little Lotta" character, who's entire personality is more or less "hahaha, she's so fat", will never get an animated adaption due to how relevant body-shaming and self-image issues have become.

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* There's a bit of discussion on Tumblr and 4chan's /co/ boards on how Harvey Comics' "Little Lotta" character, who's whose entire personality is more or less "hahaha, she's so fat", will never get an animated adaption adaptation due to how relevant body-shaming and self-image issues have become.
1st May '16 7:07:04 PM Kid
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** There's also the reason behind using a deal with the devil to separate Spider-Man and Mary Jane; Joe Quesada wanted them broken up, but believed divorcing them would send a bad message and so used magic to remove the marriage from existence. For those who don't think divorce is a bad thing when you have suitable reason for it (which is a decent number of people nowadays), that makes the decision to use magic devil-deals ridiculous. Especially considering that most of Spider-Man's long-established supporting characters of roughly his own age-group were already divorced or widowed before ''One More Day''[[note]]Cleanly divorced: Randy Robertson (who is a few years younger than Peter Parker) from Amanda, and Debra from Mr. Whitman. Quasi-divorced (not married, but went through a very painful separation): Flash Thompson and Sha Shan. Widowed: Betty Brant Leeds (but not before her husband walked out on her because of her (second!) adulterous affair with Flash) and Liz Allan Osborn.[[/note]] To cap it all off, the issue immediately following ''One More Day'' revealed that Harry Osborn was alive and now a triple divorcé, having apparently married two more women after getting a divorce from his former widow Liz.

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** There's also the reason behind using a deal with the devil to separate Spider-Man and Mary Jane; Joe Quesada wanted them broken up, but believed divorcing them would send a bad message and so used magic to remove the marriage from existence. For those who don't think divorce is a bad thing when you have suitable reason for it (which is a decent number of people nowadays), that makes the decision to use magic devil-deals ridiculous. Especially considering that most of Spider-Man's long-established supporting characters of roughly his own age-group were already divorced or widowed before ''One More Day''[[note]]Cleanly divorced: Randy Robertson (who is a few years younger than Peter Parker) from Amanda, and Debra from Mr. Whitman. Quasi-divorced (not married, but went through a very painful separation): Flash Thompson and Sha Shan. Widowed: Betty Brant Leeds (but not before her husband walked out on her because of her (second!) adulterous affair with Flash) and Liz Allan Osborn.[[/note]] Osborn[[/note]]. To cap it all off, the issue immediately following ''One More Day'' revealed that Harry Osborn was alive and now a triple divorcé, having apparently married two more women after getting a divorce from his former widow Liz.
1st May '16 7:03:30 PM Kid
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** The story ''Asterix and the Secret Weapon'' (La rose et la glaive) had a female bard, Bravura, come to the village, and introducing feminism to its women, who cause the men to leave the village in protest of their unfeminine ways. The main plot deals with female legionaries being introduced to fight the Gauls, because Gaulish gallantry insists they can't fight women. In the end, though the women of the village are prepared to fight, Asterix suggests they defeat the female legionaries by turning the village into a combination shopping center/spa, where the women can get mani/pedicures, get their hair done, and buy new clothes. In the end, the story ends with the men coming back and the women happily going back to their roles as housewives. Bizarrely, this comic was written in 1991, at a point where everyone should have known better. Even more bizarrely, most critical outrage was focused on a scene where Asterix punches Bravura, saying this would normalize violence against women, even though the context was completely different to domestic violence (it was in reaction to the ''second time'' Bravura had sexually harassed him publically, using her [[TinyGuyHugeGirl size difference]] to manhandle him and completely ignoring him asking her to stop - and he immediately felt horrible about hitting her, ''and'' almost all the other characters treat him like crap for the rest of the story as a result of what he did) and and the comics rely on silly violent slapstick constantly.

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** The story ''Asterix and the Secret Weapon'' (La rose et la glaive) had a female bard, Bravura, come to the village, and introducing feminism to its women, who cause the men to leave the village in protest of their unfeminine ways. The main plot deals with female legionaries being introduced to fight the Gauls, because Gaulish gallantry insists they can't fight women. In the end, though the women of the village are prepared to fight, Asterix suggests they defeat the female legionaries by turning the village into a combination shopping center/spa, where the women can get mani/pedicures, get their hair done, and buy new clothes. In the end, the story ends with the men coming back and the women happily going back to their roles as housewives. Bizarrely, this comic was written in 1991, at a point where everyone should have known better. Even more bizarrely, most critical outrage was focused on a scene where Asterix punches Bravura, saying this would normalize violence against women, even though the context was completely different to domestic violence (it was in reaction to the ''second time'' Bravura had sexually harassed him publically, using her [[TinyGuyHugeGirl size difference]] to manhandle him and completely ignoring him asking her to stop - and he immediately felt horrible about hitting her, ''and'' almost all the other characters treat him like crap for the rest of the story as a result of what he did) and and the comics rely on silly violent slapstick constantly.
28th Feb '16 7:27:33 PM nombretomado
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** CaptainAmerica's sidekick Lemar Hoskins briefly [[AffirmativeActionLegacy took up the mantle of Bucky]], Cap's [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] sidekick. When it was pointed out that the term "Buck" was once used as a derogatory term for black men, Lemar changed his CodeName to Battlestar.

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** CaptainAmerica's ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's sidekick Lemar Hoskins briefly [[AffirmativeActionLegacy took up the mantle of Bucky]], Cap's [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] sidekick. When it was pointed out that the term "Buck" was once used as a derogatory term for black men, Lemar changed his CodeName to Battlestar.



* Early ComicBook/{{X-Men}} comics have some inevitable casual sexism that can be jarring to the modern reader, all the males (including Xavier) spend much of their time making crude remarks about Jean Grey and in one early issue the maid is ill so it falls to Jean to make everyone dinner (nobody questions this, least of all Jean).

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* Early ComicBook/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/XMen comics have some inevitable casual sexism that can be jarring to the modern reader, all the males (including Xavier) spend much of their time making crude remarks about Jean Grey and in one early issue the maid is ill so it falls to Jean to make everyone dinner (nobody questions this, least of all Jean).
28th Feb '16 7:27:03 PM nombretomado
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* {{Ultimate|Marvel}} CaptainAmerica is another in-story example. In order to maintain his UsefulNotes/WorldWarII origin story for stories in the 1970s and beyond, the original Cap was said to have been frozen in an iceberg and thawed out years later. The Ultimate version goes into depth about the kind of culture shock that would happen if a man, frozen in the 1940s, actually woke up in the 2000s.

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* {{Ultimate|Marvel}} CaptainAmerica ComicBook/CaptainAmerica is another in-story example. In order to maintain his UsefulNotes/WorldWarII origin story for stories in the 1970s and beyond, the original Cap was said to have been frozen in an iceberg and thawed out years later. The Ultimate version goes into depth about the kind of culture shock that would happen if a man, frozen in the 1940s, actually woke up in the 2000s.
7th Feb '16 10:48:52 AM ironicusername
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Added DiffLines:

* There's a bit of discussion on Tumblr and 4chan's /co/ boards on how Harvey Comics' "Little Lotta" character, who's entire personality is more or less "hahaha, she's so fat", will never get an animated adaption due to how relevant body-shaming and self-image issues have become.
6th Jan '16 1:43:53 PM hydrix
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* ''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes'':
** Album #125 ''Vrouwen komen van Mars'' (women are from Mars) has in-universe ValuesDissonance when the main characters travel to an album so old that it has become a holy grail among comic book collectors called ''De avonturen van snijboon en zoon'' through a machine that transports them there.

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* ''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes'':
**
''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes'': Album #125 ''Vrouwen komen van Mars'' (women are from Mars) has in-universe ValuesDissonance when the main characters travel to an album so old that it has become a holy grail among comic book collectors called ''De avonturen van snijboon en zoon'' through a machine that transports them there.
20th Dec '15 6:17:58 PM nombretomado
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* Shortly after Supergirl's introduction, there's a ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' story in which (for typically contrived SilverAge reasons) he has to pretend to be engaged. So, he spends a good part of the story making kissy-face with the mysterious new superheroine Mighty Maid. At the end of the story it's revealed she's Supergirl in disguise, and thus Supes has been making out with his ''15-year-old first cousin.'' (A later story makes it clear that this is not Kryptonian-Earth values dissonance; first cousins couldn't marry on Krypton.)

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* Shortly after Supergirl's introduction, there's a ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' story in which (for typically contrived SilverAge [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] reasons) he has to pretend to be engaged. So, he spends a good part of the story making kissy-face with the mysterious new superheroine Mighty Maid. At the end of the story it's revealed she's Supergirl in disguise, and thus Supes has been making out with his ''15-year-old first cousin.'' (A later story makes it clear that this is not Kryptonian-Earth values dissonance; first cousins couldn't marry on Krypton.)



* The dissonance in comics is mocked in the videogame ''VideoGame/ComicJumperTheAdventuresOfCaptainSmiley.'' When he travels into the SilverAge, he is immediately paired with a ching chongey Chinese stereotype and put up against a feminist villain. Even Captain Smiley's sidekick Star, who is a complete {{Jerkass}} throughout the game, [[EvenEvilHasStandards is offended]]. The game also points out how UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode forbade swearing, but allowed ethnic stereotypes.

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* The dissonance in comics is mocked in the videogame ''VideoGame/ComicJumperTheAdventuresOfCaptainSmiley.'' When he travels into the SilverAge, UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|of Comic Books}}, he is immediately paired with a ching chongey Chinese stereotype and put up against a feminist villain. Even Captain Smiley's sidekick Star, who is a complete {{Jerkass}} throughout the game, [[EvenEvilHasStandards is offended]]. The game also points out how UsefulNotes/TheComicsCode forbade swearing, but allowed ethnic stereotypes.
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