History UsefulNotes / WashingtonDC

29th Jan '16 6:29:23 PM dmcreif
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), the largest airport in the area and one of the busiest in the country, and a major travel hub for United Airlines. Infamous for being a long, long haul from downtown (25 miles from the White House, through what has since become the highly-populated edge city of Tyson's Corner), for having an equally long access road reserved especially for it, and for not having any sort of public transportation (though Metrobus has since set up a proper shuttle line that serves it while the Metro extension is being built). You ''will'' get a ticket on the access road if you're not going to the airport for something; that said, "something" can be going to the Fedex terminal or picking someone up, not just boarding a flight. Otherwise, from the Beltway westward, you're expected to use the Dulles Toll Road and pay the tolls. Dulles was also infamous for its odd "shuttle lounges", crosses between buses and Jetways that, originally, could drive right up to the side of a plane and allow you to board directly. As the airport got busier, though, the lounges became a liability as they were small, cramped and required a slow docking process when arriving at the terminal. A new underground peoplemover (similar to the ones in use at other large airports) has mostly replaced them, although they continue to be used to connect Concourse D (not yet served by the rail line) to Concourse A and the main terminal. The building housing Concourses C and D is supposedly "temporary;" that said, [[DevelopmentHell they've been working on the "permanent" replacement since 1983 and not even preliminary designs have been approved]]. The most striking architectural feature of Dulles is its RaygunGothic main terminal building, which was designed by Eero Saarinen (the same guy responsible for the old TWA Flight Center at JFK) and built in 1961.
to:
** Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), the largest airport in the area and one of the busiest in the country, and a major travel hub for United Airlines. Infamous for being a long, long haul from downtown (25 miles from the White House, through what has since become the highly-populated edge city of Tyson's Corner), for having an equally long access road reserved especially for it, and for not having any sort of public transportation (though Metrobus has since set up a proper shuttle line that serves it while the Metro extension is being built). You ''will'' get a ticket on the access road if you're not going to the airport for something; that said, "something" can be going to the Fedex terminal or picking someone up, not just boarding a flight. Otherwise, from the Beltway westward, you're expected to use the Dulles Toll Road and pay the tolls. Dulles was also infamous for its odd "shuttle lounges", crosses between buses and Jetways that, originally, could drive right up to the side of a plane and allow you to board directly. As the airport got busier, though, the lounges became a liability as they were small, cramped and required a slow docking process when arriving at the terminal. A new underground peoplemover (similar to the ones in use at other large airports) has mostly replaced them, although they continue to be used to connect Concourse D (not yet served by the rail line) to Concourse A and the main terminal. The building housing Concourses C and D is supposedly "temporary;" that said, [[DevelopmentHell they've been working on the "permanent" replacement since 1983 and not even preliminary designs have been approved]]. The most striking architectural feature of Dulles is its RaygunGothic main terminal building, which was designed by Eero Saarinen (the same guy responsible for the old TWA Flight Center at JFK) and built in 1961.
29th Jan '16 6:28:12 PM dmcreif
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) is the closest to town; just like the Pentagon, it's directly across the river in Arlington, VA. It used to be just "Washington National Airport", but was renamed by Congress in TheNineties (the name change was unpopular in certain circles because of Reagan's breaking of an air traffic controllers' strike in TheEighties). It's also the only airport in the DC area with direct access to Metrorail, though as noted above, this will be changing eventually. This is the airport of choice for Congresspeople entering and leaving town (indeed, it's seen as one of their perks), but also has a limited number of flights available due to noise concerns and the difficult approach to the runway, which requires avoiding skyscrapers in Rosslyn and Crystal City while trying ''not'' to crash into the Potomac and avoid heavily restricted airspace nearby. As such, it commands higher ticket prices and isn't quite as busy as the outlying airports. Also, it's strictly a ''national'' airport; it can only originate or receive flights that are headed to or from US destinations, meaning international flights will require a transfer.[[note]] With a few exceptions—the airport has flights to UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}}, UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, Ottawa, and [[UsefulNotes/TheBahamas Nassau]]. Because these cities' airports have U.S. customs and immigration preclearance facilities, they are treated as US destinations. (This means that theoretically, flights to and from UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}} and Shannon Airports in UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}, which also have these facilities, could also come here, but various other considerations have prevented this.)[[/note]] Or you could just go to: ** Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), the largest airport in the area and one of the busiest in the country. Infamous for being a long, long haul from downtown (25 miles from the White House, through what has since become a highly-populated edge city), for having an equally long access road reserved especially for it, and for not having any sort of public transportation (though Metrobus has since set up a proper shuttle line that serves it while the Metrorail extension is being built). You ''will'' get a ticket on the access road if you're not going to the airport for something; that said, "something" can be going to the Fedex terminal or picking someone up, not just boarding a flight. Otherwise, from the Beltway westward, you're expected to use the Dulles Toll Road and pay the tolls. Dulles was also infamous for its odd "shuttle lounges", crosses between buses and Jetways that, originally, could drive right up to the side of a plane and allow you to board directly. As the airport got busier, though, the lounges became a liability as they were small, cramped and required a slow docking process when arriving at the terminal. A new light-rail system (similar to the ones in use at other large airports) has mostly replaced them, although they continue to be used to connect Concourse D (not served by the rail line) to Concourse A and the main terminal. The building housing Concourses C and D is supposedly "temporary;" that said, [[DevelopmentHell they've been working on the "permanent" replacement since 1983 and not even preliminary designs have been approved]]. The most striking architectural feature of Dulles is its RaygunGothic main terminal building, which was designed by Eero Saarinen (the same guy responsible for the old TWA Flight Center at JFK) and built in 1961. ** And finally, there's Baltimore/Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI), which is actually closer to Baltimore than DC but is still popular with DC residents. It's not as busy as Dulles or as restricted as National, meaning flights are often cheap enough that the drive (even longer than the one to Dulles, especially from Virginia) is WorthIt. It's also accessible from MARC and Baltimore's light-rail system; like Dulles, Metrobus also runs a dedicated shuttle to BWI, originating from the Greenbelt Metrorail station. Also, just like [[UsefulNotes/LosAngeles LAX]], almost everyone calls it by its call sign than its full name. Even the government, sometimes: Amtrak announcements (yes, it stops at BWI) in some cases (e.g. at the Wilmington, DE train station) just call it "BWI Airport."
to:
** Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) is the closest to town; just town, and a hub for American Airlines. Just like the Pentagon, it's directly across the river in Arlington, VA. It used to be just "Washington National Airport", but was renamed by Congress in TheNineties (the name change was unpopular in certain circles because of Reagan's breaking of an air traffic controllers' strike in TheEighties). It's also the only airport in the DC area with direct access to Metrorail, though as noted above, this will be changing eventually.once the Dulles extension of the Silver Line opens. This is the airport of choice for Congresspeople entering and leaving town (indeed, it's seen as one of their perks), but also has a limited number of flights available due to noise concerns and the difficult approach to the runway, which requires avoiding skyscrapers in Rosslyn and Crystal City while trying ''not'' to crash into the Potomac and avoid heavily restricted airspace nearby. As such, it commands higher ticket prices and isn't quite as busy as the outlying airports. Also, it's strictly a ''national'' airport; it can only originate or receive flights that are headed to or from US destinations, meaning international flights will require a transfer.must use BWI or Dulles.[[note]] With a few exceptions—the airport has flights to UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}}, UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, Ottawa, and [[UsefulNotes/TheBahamas Nassau]]. Because these cities' airports have U.S. customs and immigration preclearance facilities, they are treated as US destinations. (This means that theoretically, flights to and from UsefulNotes/{{Dublin}} and Shannon Airports in UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}}, which also have these facilities, could also come here, but various other considerations have prevented this.)[[/note]] Or you could just go to: ** Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD), the largest airport in the area and one of the busiest in the country. country, and a major travel hub for United Airlines. Infamous for being a long, long haul from downtown (25 miles from the White House, through what has since become a the highly-populated edge city), city of Tyson's Corner), for having an equally long access road reserved especially for it, and for not having any sort of public transportation (though Metrobus has since set up a proper shuttle line that serves it while the Metrorail Metro extension is being built). You ''will'' get a ticket on the access road if you're not going to the airport for something; that said, "something" can be going to the Fedex terminal or picking someone up, not just boarding a flight. Otherwise, from the Beltway westward, you're expected to use the Dulles Toll Road and pay the tolls. Dulles was also infamous for its odd "shuttle lounges", crosses between buses and Jetways that, originally, could drive right up to the side of a plane and allow you to board directly. As the airport got busier, though, the lounges became a liability as they were small, cramped and required a slow docking process when arriving at the terminal. A new light-rail system underground peoplemover (similar to the ones in use at other large airports) has mostly replaced them, although they continue to be used to connect Concourse D (not yet served by the rail line) to Concourse A and the main terminal. The building housing Concourses C and D is supposedly "temporary;" that said, [[DevelopmentHell they've been working on the "permanent" replacement since 1983 and not even preliminary designs have been approved]]. The most striking architectural feature of Dulles is its RaygunGothic main terminal building, which was designed by Eero Saarinen (the same guy responsible for the old TWA Flight Center at JFK) and built in 1961. ** And finally, there's Baltimore/Washington International-Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI), which is actually closer to Baltimore than DC but is still popular with DC residents. It's not as busy as Dulles or as restricted as National, meaning flights are often cheap enough that the drive (even longer than the one to Dulles, especially from Virginia) is WorthIt. It's also accessible from MARC and Baltimore's light-rail system; like Dulles, Metrobus also runs a dedicated shuttle to BWI, originating from the Greenbelt Metrorail station. Also, just like [[UsefulNotes/LosAngeles LAX]], almost everyone calls it by its call sign than its full name. Even the government, sometimes: Amtrak announcements (yes, it stops at BWI) in some cases (e.g. at the Wilmington, DE train station) just call it "BWI Airport." " BWI functions as a focus city for Southwest Airlines.
28th Nov '15 3:02:02 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message
->''First in war. First in peace. [[TakeThat Last in the]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} National League]] - wait, that's now Philadelphia.''
to:
->''First ->''"First in war. First in peace. [[TakeThat Last in the]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} National League]] - wait, that's now Philadelphia.'' "''

* ''BurnAfterReading''
to:
* ''BurnAfterReading''''Film/BurnAfterReading''
19th Nov '15 5:31:55 AM tuppence
Is there an issue? Send a Message
->''First in war. First in peace. [[TakeThat Last in the]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} National League]].''
to:
->''First in war. First in peace. [[TakeThat Last in the]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} National League]].League]] - wait, that's now Philadelphia.''

The capital of [[UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates The United States of America]], Washington, District of Columbia, (colloquially D.C. or ''The District'') is home to the U.S. federal government. Well, most of it. The land was originally taken from Maryland and Virginia in 1790. The Virginia part was returned in 1846 as what is now Arlington County and the City of Alexandria, which are still part of the same urban area. For people in FlyoverCountry it is often considered to be a [[WretchedHive Wretched Hive Of Scum And Villainy]], due to its high crime and reported corruption on the local and federal level. A lot of people who live in the metropolitan area agree.
to:
The capital of [[UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates The United States of America]], Washington, District of Columbia, (colloquially D.C. or ''The District'') is home to the U.S. federal government. Well, most of it. The land was originally taken from Maryland and Virginia in 1790. The Virginia part was returned in 1846 as what is now Arlington County and the City of Alexandria, which are still part of the same urban area. For people in FlyoverCountry it is often considered to be a [[WretchedHive Wretched Hive Of Scum And Villainy]], due to its high crime and reported corruption on the local and federal level. A lot of people who live in the metropolitan area agree. agree. The rest think the flyover states should stop sending us their scum and villainy (Congress? Does not consist of DC natives.)
14th Nov '15 1:51:05 PM DeisTheAlcano
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Washington is infamous for its {{Long Hot Summer}}s and notorious for its plain-dress, anti-fashion sentiment. Tourists are notorious for their flamboyant yet weather-appropriate Safari attire, such as fishing caps, cargo shorts, and fanny packs. Dress appropriately. Note for tourists: If you don't want to get run over, [[BerserkButton stand to the right]] on escalators.
to:
Washington is infamous for its {{Long Hot Summer}}s [[HeatWave long hot summers]] and notorious for its plain-dress, anti-fashion sentiment. Tourists are notorious for their flamboyant yet weather-appropriate Safari attire, such as fishing caps, cargo shorts, and fanny packs. Dress appropriately. Note for tourists: If you don't want to get run over, [[BerserkButton stand to the right]] on escalators.

*** Quite famous for its Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (properly known as the Tomb of the Unknowns) which currently holds remains of three unknown soldiers: one from each World War and one from Korea. It also held a soldier from the Vietnam War until his remains were positively identified in the 90s and his body was given its own burial. The guards of the Tomb, known as Sentinels, are known for their '''extremely''' precise adherence to procedure, especially in the Changing of the Guards ceremony. The mat they walk on during their patrols at the tomb actually has heel prints worn into it because the Sentinels walk the same steps '''every time.''' The Changing of the Guard is quite a sight to behold. The Sentinels are known for remaining at the tomb no matter the conditions, and not even hurricanes have forced them from their post.[[labelnote:NB]] Their orders in cases of extreme weather are basically to withdraw to a safer location if they believe they will come to harm otherwise. This is left to the judgement of the sentinel on duty. So far, none of the conditions they’ve faced have been judged sufficiently perilous.[[/labelnote]] Serving as one of the Sentinels is one of the highest honors a member of the US Army can have. Oh, and a word of advice? Show some respect when you're at the tomb. The Sentinels do not take kindly to people disrespecting those buried there.
to:
*** Quite famous for its Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (properly known as the Tomb of the Unknowns) which currently holds remains of three unknown soldiers: one from each World War and one from Korea. It also held a soldier from the Vietnam War until his remains were positively identified in the 90s and his body was given its own burial. The guards of the Tomb, known as Sentinels, are known for their '''extremely''' precise adherence to procedure, especially in the Changing of the Guards ceremony. The mat they walk on during their patrols at the tomb actually has heel prints worn into it because the Sentinels walk the same steps '''every time.''' The Changing of the Guard is quite a sight to behold. The Sentinels are known for remaining at the tomb no matter the conditions, and not even hurricanes have forced them from their post.[[labelnote:NB]] Their orders in cases of extreme weather are basically to withdraw to a safer location if they believe they will come to harm otherwise. This is left to the judgement of the sentinel on duty. So far, none of the conditions they’ve they’ve faced have been judged sufficiently perilous.[[/labelnote]] Serving as one of the Sentinels is one of the highest honors a member of the US Army can have. Oh, and a word of advice? Show some respect when you're at the tomb. The Sentinels do not take kindly to people disrespecting those buried there.
16th Oct '15 8:33:44 AM Kuzla3
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''VideoGame/NewDynamicEnglish'' the radio show takes place in Washington DC, given that Voice of America is based there. Kathy and Larry lives here, while Max and Elizabeth lives in Virginia. Max's wife Karen works at a start-up company in Maryland.
to:
* ''VideoGame/NewDynamicEnglish'' the radio show ''Radio/NewDynamicEnglish'' takes place in Washington DC, given that Voice of America is based there. Kathy and Larry lives live here, while Max and Elizabeth lives live in Virginia. Max's wife Karen works at a start-up company in Maryland.
14th Oct '15 9:23:36 AM PhysicalStamina
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Locals typically refer to the District of Columbia proper, as opposed to the suburbs, as "the District." Locals who are native to D.C. and haven't lived in bigger cities often refer to it as "the city." "Washington" means the metropolitan area.[[note]]"The DMV" ("D" for DC, "M" for Maryland, and "V" for Virginia) is a more slang-ish term to mean the same thing.[[/note]] "D.C." can mean either. Ignoring this usage is a good way to expose yourself as a newcomer. DC itself is surrounded by a circumferential freeway called I-495, commonly referred to as "The Beltway". Many feel that [[RealityWarper reality gets distorted]] by the road.[[note]]"The Beltway" (or "The Beltway Press") is also a metonym for the American political media, i.e. those news reporters who focus on American politics -- even when most of them are actually headquartered in New York City.[[/note]] Also, don't drive on it during rush hour.
to:
Locals typically refer to the District of Columbia proper, as opposed to the suburbs, as "the District." Locals who are native to D.C. and haven't lived in bigger cities often refer to it as "the city." "Washington" means the metropolitan area.[[note]]"The DMV" ("D" Colloquially, the metro area is known as "the DMV";[[note]]not to be confused with ''that'' DMV[[/note]] the "D" stands for DC, D.C., the "M" for Maryland, Maryland (specifically the Montgomery and Prince George's Counties), and the "V" for Virginia) is a more slang-ish term Virginia (referring to mean the same thing.[[/note]] Arlington and Fairfax Counties, and the city of Alexandria that sits between them). "D.C." can mean either. Ignoring this usage is a good way to expose yourself as a newcomer. DC itself is surrounded by a circumferential freeway called I-495, commonly referred to as "The Beltway". Many feel that [[RealityWarper reality gets distorted]] by the road.[[note]]"The Beltway" (or "The Beltway Press") is also a metonym for the American political media, i.e. those news reporters who focus on American politics -- even when most of them are actually headquartered in New York City.[[/note]] Also, don't drive on it during rush hour.
11th Aug '15 6:21:49 PM PhysicalStamina
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Union Station: It's big. [[TrainStationGoodbye It's a train station]]. It's also a shopping mall. It's where you go to catch the train to [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity That Other City]] (which train can also take you to [[UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} the ones]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} in between]], or [[UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} another big one far away]], all [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express really fast]]). Also where you go to take the slower train to take you home to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MARC_Train Maryland]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Railroad_Express Virginia]]. Think Grand Central Station (or Penn Station, or, um, [[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Union Station]]) and you get the idea.
to:
* Union Station: It's big. [[TrainStationGoodbye It's a train station]]. It's also a shopping mall. It's where you go to catch the train to [[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity That Other City]] (which train can also take you to [[UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} the ones]] [[UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} in between]], or [[UsefulNotes/{{Boston}} another big one far away]], all [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acela_Express really fast]]). Also where you go to take the slower train to take you home to [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MARC_Train Maryland]] or [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_Railroad_Express org/wiki/Virginia_Railway_Express Virginia]]. Think Grand Central Station (or Penn Station, or, um, [[UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Union Station]]) and you get the idea.
31st Jul '15 2:23:55 PM phoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The Holocaust Memorial Museum. ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Rotating exhibits on WorldWar2 and various aspects of NaziGermany, plus a large permanent exhibit that can best be described as a [[TearJerker self-guided, solemn tour through Hell.]] An optional aspect of said tour is to take a small dossier representing a real victim which allows the bearer to learn about said individual's fate, which rarely has a happy ending. Initially, this was part of the tour, but was made optional after visitors were overwhelmed by the experience.
to:
* The Holocaust Memorial Museum. ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin. Rotating exhibits on WorldWar2 and various aspects of NaziGermany, UsefulNotes/NaziGermany, plus a large permanent exhibit that can best be described as a [[TearJerker self-guided, solemn tour through Hell.]] An optional aspect of said tour is to take a small dossier representing a real victim which allows the bearer to learn about said individual's fate, which rarely has a happy ending. Initially, this was part of the tour, but was made optional after visitors were overwhelmed by the experience.
30th Jul '15 7:46:47 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty: ModernWarfare 2'' has major sections of the game set in a war-torn Washington, DC.
to:
* ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty: ModernWarfare 2'' VideoGame/ModernWarfare2'' has major sections of the game set in a war-torn Washington, DC.
This list shows the last 10 events of 145. Show all.