History UsefulNotes / Ukraine

28th Mar '18 11:25:06 AM Breakermorrant
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* ''Film/TheAsthenicSyndrome'' was made and set in Odessa as well as many other films by Creator/KiraMuratova.
27th Mar '18 4:14:09 PM Jormungar
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Really, the only time that Ukraine and Russian can really agree on something is when some foreigners are trying to kill them both. During the Middle Ages this applied to the Mongols, and later the Poles, and finally of course to the Germans. WWII was a time of extreme hardship for Slavs in general, with Poland, Ukraine and Belarus (the three Slav states located between Russia and Germany) suffering the highest casualty rates of any other combatant.

to:

Really, the only time that Ukraine and Russian can really agree on something is when some foreigners are foreigner is trying to kill them both. During the Middle Ages this applied to the Mongols, and later the Poles, and finally of course to the Germans. WWII was a time of extreme hardship for Slavs in general, with Poland, Ukraine and Belarus (the three Slav states located between Russia and Germany) suffering the highest casualty rates of any other combatant.
27th Mar '18 4:08:44 PM Jormungar
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Ukraine as a state draws its history all the way back from the Kievan Rus'. The Kievan Rus' was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavic tribes. Ukraine, Belarus and Russia all claim descent from it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

to:

Ukraine as a state draws its history all the way back from the Kievan Rus'. The Kievan Rus' was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavic tribes. Ukraine, Belarus and Russia all claim descent from it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to the 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.
27th Mar '18 4:06:07 PM Jormungar
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There are widespread misconceptions about the meaning of the country's name. The root of the word Ukraine is "krai", and "edge" is indeed one of its meanings in Ukrainian (alongside with simply "land"). However, the prefix "u" changes the meaning of the word to "homeland", "inland", "our own land", etc. The prefix indicates that the speaker refers to the object as to something they are inside of, something that surrounds them. Thus, it wouldn't make sense for the speaker to mean "borderland" when they say "Ukraine", as they are not referring to something far away, at the border, but rather their immediate area. Basically it depends on the point of view. For example, Poland sees Ukraine being at their eastern border, so, to them, this country is the borderland. To make it '''even more simple''': it's the difference between "this land'", and "that land". You wouldn't say "that land" about the land you're standing on.

So, where all this confusion is coming from? First off, in Ukrainian language, the word "окраїна" ("okraina") is also present. Now, this is the word that actually means "borderland". It has the same root as the country's name, but it has a different prefix, "o" instead of "u". This new prefix changes the meaning of the word to "borderland". Simply speaking, it's "that land", as opposed to "this land". Since the two words look and sound similar, it's not surprising that many foreigners confuse them.

However, there is another reason for the confusion. As explained earlier, the land of Ukraine being "this land" or "that land" depends on the point of view. Pretty much every empire that conquered Ukrainian lands tried to assimilate its populace. One of the keys to achieving such goal is to destroy the very idea of the conquered even considering their own sovereignty. Thus, it is vital to refer to the conquered as to something that is the inseparable part of the empire. Hence the notion of translating the word "Ukraine" as "borderland" (of the empire) that continues to this day. Combine this with ignorance of most people everywhere, even inside Ukraine, and it all results in the wrong translation prevailing over the correct one.

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the Rus (and actually far beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Rus was an ancient Ukrainian state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavic (essentially Ancient Ukrainian) tribes. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

The Rus and its splinters formed the last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, [[UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth Lithuanians, Poles]], [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austrians]], and [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia Russians]]. Even [[UsefulNotes/TheCityStateEra Italians]] and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea. There was, however, a period of progressively declining autonomy in 1649-1783.

to:

There are widespread misconceptions about the meaning of the country's name. The root of the word Ukraine is "krai", and "edge" is indeed one of its meanings in Ukrainian (alongside with simply "land"). However, the prefix "u" changes the meaning of the word to "homeland", "inland", "our own land", etc. The prefix indicates that the speaker refers to the object as to something they are inside of, something that surrounds them. Thus, it wouldn't make sense for the speaker to mean "borderland" when they say "Ukraine", as they are not referring to something far away, at the border, but rather their immediate area. Basically it depends on the point of view. For example, Poland sees Ukraine being at their eastern border, so, to them, this country is the borderland. To make it '''even more simple''': it's the difference between "this land'", and "that land". You wouldn't say "that land" about the land you're standing on.

So, where all this confusion is coming from? First off, in Ukrainian language, the word "окраїна" ("okraina") is also present. Now, this is the word that actually means "borderland". It has the same root as the country's name, but it has a different prefix, "o" instead of "u". This new prefix changes the meaning of the word to "borderland". Simply speaking, it's "that land", as opposed to "this land". Since the two words look and sound similar, it's not surprising that many foreigners confuse them.

However, there is another reason for the confusion. As explained earlier, the land of Ukraine being "this land" or "that land" depends on the point of view. Pretty much every empire that conquered Ukrainian lands tried to assimilate its populace. One of the keys to achieving such goal is to destroy the very idea of the conquered even considering their own sovereignty. Thus, it is vital to refer to the conquered as to something that is the inseparable part of the empire. Hence the notion of translating
Traditionally the word "Ukraine" as "borderland" (of the empire) was translated to mean, "Borderland." However some modern Ukrainian scholars claim that continues to this day. Combine this with ignorance of most people everywhere, even inside Ukraine, it should be translated simply as "the Country," or more poetically "the Homeland." This is because the Slavic word ''krai'' can mean both "edge" and it "region." This can be a sensitive subject for some Ukrainians who consider the etymology "Borderland" to be the result of Russian imperialism and an attempt to delegitimize their nation. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement And that's all results in the wrong translation prevailing over the correct one.

we'll say about that.]]

Ukraine as a state draws its history all the way back from the Rus (and actually far beyond, alas with way hazier record). Kievan Rus'. The Rus Kievan Rus' was an ancient Ukrainian state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavic (essentially Ancient Ukrainian) tribes.tribes. Ukraine, Belarus and Russia all claim descent from it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

The Rus Kievan Rus' and its splinters formed the last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, [[UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth Lithuanians, Poles]], [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austrians]], and [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia Russians]]. Even [[UsefulNotes/TheCityStateEra Italians]] and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea. There was, however, a period of progressively declining autonomy in 1649-1783.



Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and close political and cultural ties. The recent unpleasantness is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is the question of "historical legitimacy." For instance, Moscow claims (albeit groundlessly) to be the direct successor of the Rus. [[/note]] While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. Another issue is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor Holodomor ("death by hunger")]], a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.

to:

Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and Despite historically close political and cultural ties. ties, Ukraine was never Russified to the same extent as Belarus (where Belarusian is by now only commonly spoken by 10% of the population). The recent unpleasantness war is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is starting with who can claim the question of "historical legitimacy." For instance, Moscow claims (albeit groundlessly) to be the direct successor mantle of the Rus. [[/note]] old Kievan Rus'. While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. Another issue is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor Holodomor ("death by hunger")]], a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.



However, while many Ukrainians object to being called Russian, there are in fact a large number of people in the east of the country who are ethnically Russian. Even more people speak Russian as a mother language (the hotbed of the current separatism, Donetsk and Luhansk Oblasts, are more than 50% Russian speaking). This doesn't necessarily mean they want to be part of Russia, though. Historically, eastern Ukraine only became significantly populated after large-scale clearances and plantations were conducted in the 18th century, and by that time, it was under control of the Russian Empire, so Russian influence held firmly. Before that, it was WildWilderness sporadically settled by Tatars. The same holds even true for Crimea, where ''90%'' of the population exclusively speak Russian. At the same time, the Tatar influence is also more entrenched on the peninsula (hence the Crimean Tatars).

Now we come to the issue of "the Ukraine vs Ukraine." Obviously Russia and Ukraine don't have this English grammar problem, but they have their own version of it which involves the prepositions "на" (pronounced "na") and "в" (pronounced "v"). In Russian and Ukrainian, the preposition "na" is used to refer to regions or areas, while "v" is used to refer to proper nouns or definite locations. Until independence it was considered correct to refer to Ukraine using "na," but now many Ukrainians have switched to "v." Russians, however, have stubbornly continued on using "na." This is a problem, because to Ukrainians using "the" and "na" when referring to Ukraine implies it's not a "real" country.

Another controversy is the spelling of the capital. "Kiev" is the romanization of the ''Russian'' spelling, while "Kyiv" is the Ukrainian spelling. Since independence, Ukrainians have made it a point, even ''passing a law,'' that English-speakers should write it as "Kyiv." Accordingly most political organizations, such as the US government and the United Nations, spell it as "Kyiv" on official documents, but the old spelling of "Kiev" remains in wide colloquial use among English-speakers. To decide which is the right one, one needs to understand how these versions came into existence. The name of the city in question is simply the possessive form of Kyi, the legendary founder of the city. In Ukrainian, the possessive form of Kyi is Kyiv, but in Russian it's Kiev (and in Polish it's Kijow). The Russian version prevails because the name was popularly transcribed in the English-speaking world when Ukraine was still a part of Russia.

It all is basically a quarrel between two kindred nations, pretty much of the same kind as the one between England and Ireland. Russian imperialist hardliners see Ukraine as a part of "Greater Russia" that was "forcefully taken away", and disregard Ukrainian language and cultural identity as "made up" in order to "undermine Russia". Ukrainian nationalist hardliners insist that the two nations are "completely unrelated", justifying it with racist notions that Russians are "wild" and "genetically servile" in contrast to "civilized" and "freedom-loving" Ukrainians. And of course, there's the everlasting debate on who is the true heir to Kievan Rus' - a medieval Slavic state that broke into Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. A lot of nationalist pseudohistory, conspiracy theories and downright crackpottery on all sides stem from this.

Really, the only time that Ukraine and Russian can agree and understand each other unanimously is when they are subjugated by "distant foreigners" who want to wipe them off the map. During the Middle Ages, this applied to the Mongols, but by the 20th century, [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Nazi "Slavs-exterminator" Germany]] had firmly taken over. WWII is the time of extreme hardship for Ukrainians and East Slavs in general, what with the entire country being utterly trashed and turned upside down. But even then a significant LesCollaborateurs who aspired for a truly independent Ukraine existed, especially in the west. Most were [[ReassignedToAntarctica shipped elsewhere]] after the war ended; notably, the entire Crimean Tatar nation, despite only a few figuring out in the collaboration, were dumped to Central Asia. They were given permission to return after some 45 years.

The relations of Poland and Ukraine are also marred with controversy. Poles, in general, have a supportive view of their southeastern neighbors (eg. Poland strongly supported Ukrainians in their 2014 semi-revolution and co-hosted the Euro 2012 with them), and supported the rise of Ukraine to independence in the early 1990s; the relations between the two countries are however strongly embittered by the UsefulNotes/VolhynianSlaughter of the 1940s, courtesy of Nazi collaborators, and its aftermath.

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However, while many Ukrainians object to being called Russian, there are in fact a large number of people in the east of the country who are ethnically Russian. Even more people speak Russian as a mother language (the hotbed of the current separatism, Donetsk and Luhansk Oblasts, are more than 50% Russian speaking). This doesn't necessarily mean they want to be part of Russia, though. Historically, eastern Ukraine only became significantly populated after large-scale clearances and plantations were conducted in the 18th century, and by that time, it was under control of the Russian Empire, so Russian influence held firmly. Before that, it was WildWilderness sporadically settled by Tatars. The same holds even true for Crimea, where ''90%'' 90% of the population exclusively speak Russian. At the same time, the Tatar influence is also more entrenched on the peninsula (hence the Crimean Tatars).

Now we come to Regarding the issue of "the Ukraine vs Ukraine." Obviously Russia and Ukraine don't have this English grammar problem, but they have their own version of it which involves the prepositions "на" (pronounced "na") and "в" (pronounced "v"). In Russian and Ukrainian, the preposition "na" is used to refer to regions or areas, while "v" is used to refer to proper nouns or definite locations. Until independence it was considered correct to refer to Ukraine using "na," but now many Ukrainians have switched to "v." Russians, however, have stubbornly continued on using "na." This is a problem, because to Ukrainians using "the" and "na" when referring to this signifies that the speaker doesn't consider Ukraine implies it's not a "real" country.

Another controversy is the spelling of the capital. "Kiev" is the romanization of the ''Russian'' spelling, while "Kyiv" is the Ukrainian spelling.spelling (due to the use of slightly different alphabets). Since independence, Ukrainians have made it a point, even ''passing a law,'' that English-speakers should write it as "Kyiv." Accordingly most political organizations, such as the US government and the United Nations, spell it as "Kyiv" on official documents, but the old spelling of "Kiev" remains in wide colloquial use among English-speakers. To decide which is

Emotions can run high when discussing
the right one, one needs to understand how these versions came into existence. The name of the city in question is simply the possessive form of Kyi, the legendary founder of the city. In Ukrainian, the possessive form of Kyi is Kyiv, but in history between Russia and Ukraine. At worst Russian it's Kiev (and in Polish it's Kijow). The Russian version prevails because the name was popularly transcribed in the English-speaking world when Ukraine was still a part of Russia.

It all is basically a quarrel between two kindred nations, pretty much of the same kind as the one between England and Ireland. Russian imperialist hardliners
nationalists see Ukraine as a part of "Greater Russia" that Russia which is not and never was "forcefully taken away", and disregard its own state, while Ukrainian language and cultural identity as "made up" in order to "undermine Russia". Ukrainian nationalist hardliners insist that the two nations are "completely unrelated", justifying it with racist notions that Russians are "wild" and "genetically servile" in contrast to "civilized" and "freedom-loving" Ukrainians. And of course, there's the everlasting debate on who is the true heir to Kievan Rus' - a medieval Slavic state that broke into Russia, nationalists see Ukraine as completely unrelated and Belarus. A lot of nationalist pseudohistory, conspiracy theories and downright crackpottery on all sides stem from this.

indeed culturally superior to Russians. This is a debate which will probably never be settled.

Really, the only time that Ukraine and Russian can really agree and understand each other unanimously on something is when they some foreigners are subjugated by "distant foreigners" who want trying to wipe kill them off the map. both. During the Middle Ages, Ages this applied to the Mongols, but by and later the 20th century, [[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Nazi "Slavs-exterminator" Germany]] had firmly taken over. Poles, and finally of course to the Germans. WWII is the was a time of extreme hardship for Ukrainians and East Slavs in general, what with the entire country being utterly trashed and turned upside down. But even then a significant LesCollaborateurs who aspired for a truly independent Poland, Ukraine existed, especially in the west. Most were [[ReassignedToAntarctica shipped elsewhere]] after the war ended; notably, the entire Crimean Tatar nation, despite only a few figuring out in the collaboration, were dumped to Central Asia. They were given permission to return after some 45 years.

The relations of Poland
and Ukraine are also marred with controversy. Poles, in general, have a supportive view of their southeastern neighbors (eg. Poland strongly supported Ukrainians in their 2014 semi-revolution and co-hosted the Euro 2012 with them), and supported the rise of Ukraine to independence in the early 1990s; the relations Belarus (the three Slav states located between Russia and Germany) suffering the two countries are however strongly embittered by the UsefulNotes/VolhynianSlaughter highest casualty rates of the 1940s, courtesy of Nazi collaborators, and its aftermath.
any other combatant.
26th Mar '18 1:35:13 PM MariiaByz
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Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

The Kievan Rus and its splinters formed the first and last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, [[UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth Lithuanians, Poles]], [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austrians]], and [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia Russians]]. Even [[UsefulNotes/TheCityStateEra Italians]] and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea. There was, however, a period of progressively declining autonomy in 1649-1783.

As you can imagine, this makes modern Ukraine a very interesting place. Ukraine has been a divided land for a long time. When Russia came to rule all the East Slavs, it considered itself to be carrying on the legacy of the Kievan Rus - uniting all the Slavic people. As far as Russia was concerned, these people were all "Russian," split into three main groups: Great Russia (modern Russia), White Russia (modern Belarus), and Little Russia (modern Ukraine). They went so far as to deny that Belarusian and Ukrainian were separate languages, considering them merely rustic "dialects" of Russian.

Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never ''entirely'' gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and extremely close cultural ties. The recent unpleasantness is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is the question of "historical legitimacy." Moscow's claim to be the successor of the Kievan Rus was never completely accepted in Kiev. Indeed, the centuries-old Ukrainian term "Moskal" to refer to a Russian person is considered derogatory. [[note]]There's an old Soviet joke: One Ukrainian says to another that Yuri Gagarin has gone into space. The other Ukrainian responds that unless the Moskali plan to ''stay there,'' he's not interested.[[/note]] While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. Another issue is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor Holodomor ("death by hunger")]], a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.

The problem is even bigger in Western Ukraine. While Eastern Ukraine was part of Russia for many centuries, Western Ukraine had only been ruled by Moscow since about the start of the 19th century. Until then it had been ruled mostly by the UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth. This makes Western Ukraine very culturally distinct from the rest of Ukraine, it being considered generally more "European" in everything from architecture to religion. This divide is dramatically illustrated by typical Ukrainian voting results, with the country being split exactly down the middle: the east voting for the pro-Russia candidate and the west voting for the pro-Europe candidate.

to:

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus Rus (and actually far beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Kievan Rus was an ancient Ukrainian state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it.Slavic (essentially Ancient Ukrainian) tribes. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

The Kievan Rus and its splinters formed the first and last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, [[UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth Lithuanians, Poles]], [[UsefulNotes/TheSoundOfMartialMusic Austrians]], and [[UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia Russians]]. Even [[UsefulNotes/TheCityStateEra Italians]] and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea. There was, however, a period of progressively declining autonomy in 1649-1783.

As you can imagine, this makes modern Ukraine a very interesting place. Ukraine has been a divided land for a long time. When Russia came to rule all the East Slavs, it considered itself to be carrying on the legacy of the Kievan Rus - uniting all the Slavic people. As far as Russia was concerned, these people were all "Russian," split into three main groups: Great Russia (modern Russia), White Russia (modern Belarus), and Little Russia (modern Ukraine). They went so far as to deny that Belarusian and Ukrainian were separate languages, considering them merely rustic "dialects" of Russian.

Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never ''entirely'' gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and extremely close political and cultural ties. The recent unpleasantness is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is the question of "historical legitimacy." Moscow's claim For instance, Moscow claims (albeit groundlessly) to be the direct successor of the Kievan Rus was never completely accepted in Kiev. Indeed, the centuries-old Ukrainian term "Moskal" to refer to a Russian person is considered derogatory. [[note]]There's an old Soviet joke: One Ukrainian says to another that Yuri Gagarin has gone into space. The other Ukrainian responds that unless the Moskali plan to ''stay there,'' he's not interested.Rus. [[/note]] While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. Another issue is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor Holodomor ("death by hunger")]], a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.

The problem is even bigger in Western Ukraine. While Eastern Ukraine was part of Russia for many centuries, Western Ukraine had only been ruled by Moscow since about the start of the 19th century. Until then it had been ruled mostly by the UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth. This makes Western Ukraine very culturally distinct from the rest of Ukraine, it being considered generally more "European" in everything - from architecture to religion. This divide is dramatically illustrated by typical Ukrainian voting results, with the country being split exactly down the middle: the east voting for the pro-Russia candidate and the west voting for the pro-Europe candidate.



* This all takes a very sad turn, since Ukrainians, along with Russians and Belorussians, have a common ancestor and they are/were formally regarded as three sibling nations(''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' also knows it and likes to joke about it). In the long run, it achieved almost MemeticMutation of confrontation, as Russians perceive Ukrainians as MySisterIsOffLimits, and Ukrainians accuse Russians of being self-styled AloofBigBrother. Nevertheless, despite the rich history of national disputes and SiblingRivalry, many people of both nations believe that Ukrainians and Russians should reconcile, for their common past and blood ties.
18th Mar '18 4:52:43 AM Saveelich
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/KatherynWinnick is of Ukrainian descent and speaks Ukrainian as her first language.
13th Feb '18 1:29:53 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* The {{serial killer}}s known as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dnepropetrovsk_maniacs "The Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs"]], of [[MemeticMutation 3Guys1Hammer]] infamy.

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* The {{serial killer}}s known as [[https://en.the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dnepropetrovsk_maniacs "The Dnepropetrovsk Maniacs"]], maniacs]]", of [[MemeticMutation [[ShockSite 3Guys1Hammer]] infamy.
1st Feb '18 10:50:43 AM Smeagol17
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* This all takes a very sad turn, since Ukrainians, along with Russians and Belorussians, have a common ancestor and they are formally will be a three sibling (''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' also knows it and likes to joke about it). In the long run, it achieves almost MemeticMutation of confrontation, as Russians perceive Ukrainians as MySisterIsOffLimits, and Ukrainians accuse Russians of being self-styled AloofBigBrother. Nevertheless, despite the rich history of national disputes and SiblingRivalry, many people of both nations believe that Ukrainians and Russians should reconcile, for their common past and blood ties.

to:

* This all takes a very sad turn, since Ukrainians, along with Russians and Belorussians, have a common ancestor and they are are/were formally will be a regarded as three sibling (''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' nations(''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' also knows it and likes to joke about it). In the long run, it achieves achieved almost MemeticMutation of confrontation, as Russians perceive Ukrainians as MySisterIsOffLimits, and Ukrainians accuse Russians of being self-styled AloofBigBrother. Nevertheless, despite the rich history of national disputes and SiblingRivalry, many people of both nations believe that Ukrainians and Russians should reconcile, for their common past and blood ties.
1st Feb '18 10:48:50 AM Smeagol17
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natalia_Poklonskaya Natalia Poklonskaya]]. Currently she's the Prosecutor General of the pro-Russian Crimean government presently in power, but you probably [[BestKnownForTheFanService know her better]] as the latest [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff out-of-left-field]] [[CrushFilter infatuation]] of [[{{Main/Otaku}} Japanese online culture]], and [[MemeticMutation the internet in general]] and all.

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natalia_Poklonskaya Natalia Poklonskaya]]. Currently she's She was the Prosecutor General of the pro-Russian Crimean government presently in power, before her election to Russian Parlament, but you probably [[BestKnownForTheFanService know her better]] as the latest [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff out-of-left-field]] [[CrushFilter infatuation]] of [[{{Main/Otaku}} Japanese online culture]], and [[MemeticMutation the internet in general]] and all.



* Viktor Yushchenko, the country's former President until his epic defeat in the 2010 election. Him of the pockmarked face, which was the result of attempted poisoning.

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* Viktor Yushchenko, the country's former President until his epic defeat in the 2010 election. Him of the pockmarked face, which was the result of alledged attempted poisoning.
18th Jan '18 9:54:33 PM JackTheHammer
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[[AC:Anime & Manga:]]
* There's a [[CoolBigSis sweet]] and tearful MoeAnthropomorphism of Ukraine in ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia''.
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[[AC:Anime & Manga:]]
* There's a [[CoolBigSis sweet]] and tearful MoeAnthropomorphism of Ukraine in ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia''.

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[[AC:Anime & Manga:]]
* There's a [[CoolBigSis sweet]] and tearful MoeAnthropomorphism Episode 2 of ''Series/TheBrave'' is set in 2017 eastern Ukraine in ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia''.as the SOG team searches for a CIA agent who is being hunted by Ukrainian rebels and their Russian handlers.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Ukraine