History UsefulNotes / Ukraine

22nd Jul '17 10:45:28 AM JustTroper
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Basically what it comes down to is whether you consider Ukraine and Belarus legitimate nations with full rights to self-determination, or simply regions and subgroups of a "Greater Russia" that have temporarily fallen away due to historical accident and western plotting. Vladimir Putin is said to have told George Bush that Ukraine "isn't even a state." Many Russians are genuinely puzzled and saddened that Ukrainians would want to be their own country, and this frustrates many Ukrainians.

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Basically what it comes down to It all is whether you consider basically a quarrel between two kindred nations, pretty much of the same kind as the one between England and Ireland. Russian imperialist hardliners see Ukraine and Belarus legitimate nations with full rights to self-determination, or simply regions and subgroups as a part of a "Greater Russia" that have temporarily fallen away due to historical accident was "forcefully taken away", and western plotting. Vladimir Putin is said disregard Ukrainian language and cultural identity as "made up" in order to have told George Bush "undermine Russia". Ukrainian nationalist hardliners insist that Ukraine "isn't even a state." Many the two nations are "completely unrelated", justifying it with racist notions that Russians are genuinely puzzled "wild" and saddened "genetically servile" in contrast to "civilized" and "freedom-loving" Ukrainians. And of course, there's the everlasting debate on who is the true heir to Kievan Rus' - a medieval Slavic state that Ukrainians would want to be their own country, broke into Russia, Ukraine and this frustrates many Ukrainians.
Belarus. A lot of nationalist pseudohistory, conspiracy theories and downright crackpottery on both sides stem from this.
8th Jul '17 4:39:25 PM nombretomado
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A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty. Oh, and "quieten" here means that the front line didn't move significantly in either direction, but the combat itself never ceased. Every day there are reports of losses, shootings, assaults, etc.

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A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty. Oh, and "quieten" here means that the front line didn't move significantly in either direction, but the combat itself never ceased. Every day there are reports of losses, shootings, assaults, etc.
3rd May '17 5:56:55 AM Maplewood
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Added DiffLines:

The relations of Poland and Ukraine are also marred with controversy. Poles, in general, have a supportive view of their southeastern neighbors (eg. Poland strongly supported Ukrainians in their 2014 semi-revolution and co-hosted the Euro 2012 with them), and supported the rise of Ukraine to independence in the early 1990s; the relations between the two countries are however strongly embittered by the UsefulNotes/VolhynianSlaughter of the 1940s and its aftermath.
27th Apr '17 11:21:23 PM pepsimax
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* Susana Alimivna Jamaladinova (better known as Music/{{Jamala}}), winner of the 2016 Series/EurovisionSongContest for Ukraine.



* Singer Ruslana Stepanivna Lyzhychko, aka [[StageName Ruslana]].

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* Singer Ruslana Stepanivna Lyzhychko, aka Lyzhychko (aka [[StageName Ruslana]].Ruslana]]), winner of the 2004 Series/EurovisionSongContest for Ukraine.
2nd Apr '17 11:11:17 AM Saveelich
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* One shouldn't forget UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev, architect of ''zastoi'' ("peaceful co-existence and resource economics") came from Dnipro (Dnepropetrovsk). He was also totally bros with UsefulNotes/RichardNixon.

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* One shouldn't forget UsefulNotes/LeonidBrezhnev, architect of ''zastoi'' ("peaceful co-existence and resource economics") came from Dnipro (Dnepropetrovsk). He was also totally bros with UsefulNotes/RichardNixon.
5th Mar '17 3:10:09 PM Saveelich
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/StevenSpielberg's paternal grandparents were Jewish immigrants from Ukraine who settled in Cincinnati in the 1900s.
24th Feb '17 2:12:18 PM GlitteringFlowers
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* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev, who led the entire Soviet Union after Stalin's death. While not Ukrainian, he (among other things) inadvertently laid the ground for the current situation in Crimea, by taking it from Russian Soviet Republic and giving it to the Ukrainian Soviet Republic. This no doubt seemed to Khrushchev like a more logical geographical fit, seeing as Crimea is actually connected by land to Ukraine and not to Russia, but whether it was a proper ''cultural'' fit is a completely separate issue and much more complicated.

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* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev, who led the entire Soviet Union after Stalin's death. While not Ukrainian, Ukrainian (he was from Kursk Oblast, near the Russia/Ukraine border), he (among other things) inadvertently laid the ground for the current situation in Crimea, by taking it from Russian Soviet Republic and giving it to the Ukrainian Soviet Republic. This no doubt seemed to Khrushchev like a more logical geographical fit, seeing as Crimea is actually connected by land to Ukraine and not to Russia, but whether it was a proper ''cultural'' fit is a completely separate issue and much more complicated.
24th Feb '17 2:07:45 PM GlitteringFlowers
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Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never ''entirely'' gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and extremely close cultural ties. The recent unpleasantness is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is the question of "historical legitimacy." Moscow's claim to be the successor of the Kievan Rus was never completely accepted in Kiev. Indeed, the centuries-old Ukrainian term "Moskal" to refer to a Russian person is considered derogatory. [[note]]There's an old Soviet joke: One Ukrainian says to another that Yuri Gagarin has gone into space. The other Ukrainian responds that unless the Moskali plan to ''stay there,'' he's not interested.[[/note]] While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. However while many Ukrainians object to being called Russian, there are in fact a large number of people in the east of the country, especially in the Crimea peninsula, who are Russian-speaking and ethnically Russian (this doesn't necessarily mean they want to be part of Russia, though). Another issue is the Holodomor ("death by hunger"), a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.

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Unlike the situation with Belarus, which has been largely Russified (Belarusian is only commonly used by 10% of the population), Russia and Ukraine have never ''entirely'' gotten along, despite protestations to the contrary from both sides and extremely close cultural ties. The recent unpleasantness is only the latest in a string of grievances going back centuries, not least of which is the question of "historical legitimacy." Moscow's claim to be the successor of the Kievan Rus was never completely accepted in Kiev. Indeed, the centuries-old Ukrainian term "Moskal" to refer to a Russian person is considered derogatory. [[note]]There's an old Soviet joke: One Ukrainian says to another that Yuri Gagarin has gone into space. The other Ukrainian responds that unless the Moskali plan to ''stay there,'' he's not interested.[[/note]] While Eastern Ukraine was ruled by Russia for many centuries and the Tsars attempted to impress on them the idea of being part of an All-Russian Brotherhood, many Ukrainians never quite shook the feeling that they were being ruled by a foreign power. However while many Ukrainians object to being called Russian, there are in fact a large number of people in the east of the country, especially in the Crimea peninsula, who are Russian-speaking and ethnically Russian (this doesn't necessarily mean they want to be part of Russia, though). Another issue is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor Holodomor ("death by hunger"), hunger")]], a famine which lasted from 1932-33 due to Soviet crop seizures and agricultural policies, killing around 4 million Ukrainians. Many Ukrainians consider this little less than a Soviet holocaust, while many Russians claim the famine was due to factors outside of human control.
20th Feb '17 3:01:56 PM Saveelich
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Before Crimea was annexed by Russia, the Russians used to lease a naval base there in Sevastopol. The Ukrainian parliament used to have one brawl per year (literally, with fists flying and things being thrown) over whether to let them stay. The Ukrainian parliament usually has additional brawls each year over other issues; it's that kind of government. Now that Russia controls the entire peninsula, it's a moot point.

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Before Crimea was annexed by Russia, the Russians used to lease a naval base there in Sevastopol. The Ukrainian parliament used to have one brawl per year (literally, (a ''[[BloodOnTheDebateFloor literal brawl]]'', with fists flying and things being thrown) over whether to let them stay. The Ukrainian parliament usually has additional brawls each year over other issues; it's that kind of government. Now that Russia controls the entire peninsula, it's a moot point.
10th Feb '17 8:40:06 PM Saveelich
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* Wladimir Korolenko, a short story writer, journalist, human rights activist and humanitarian.

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* Wladimir Korolenko, a short story writer, journalist, human rights {{Human Rights|Issues}} activist and humanitarian.
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