History UsefulNotes / Ukraine

25th Nov '16 8:48:43 AM JustTroper
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'''TL;DR version''': it's Russia's fault.

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it (although Russians are ethically not Slavs). Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

to:

'''TL;DR version''': it's Russia's fault.

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it (although Russians are ethically not Slavs).it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.



A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters (or regular Russian military) took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war (or Russian invasion) broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty. Oh, and "quieten" here means that the front line didn't move significantly in either direction, but the combat itself never ceased. Every day there are reports of losses, shootings, assaults, etc.

to:

A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters (or regular Russian military) took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war (or Russian invasion) broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty. Oh, and "quieten" here means that the front line didn't move significantly in either direction, but the combat itself never ceased. Every day there are reports of losses, shootings, assaults, etc.



During Soviet times, Soviet planners wanted to prevent ''any'' one region from establishing totally independent arms production, and a lot of defence and aerospace plants (such as Antonov and Yangel) ended up in Ukraine. When the USSR collapsed, the Russian Federation found itself in the unenviable position of having the vendors of many of its equipment and weapons systems in a foreign country and often they weren't very cooperative. Ukraine is sitting on top of a lot of old Soviet industrial bases, needless to say. Also for a while they inherited all the nuclear weapons and delivery vehicles the Soviets had stationed in Ukraine, but they decided to give them up, as did Belarus and Kazakhstan, which had found themselves in similar positions. Now, because of that, none of them have the means to really stand up to Russia.

to:

During Soviet times, Soviet planners wanted to prevent ''any'' one region from establishing totally independent arms production, and a lot of defence and aerospace plants (such as Antonov and Yangel) ended up in Ukraine. When the USSR collapsed, the Russian Federation found itself in the unenviable position of having the vendors of many of its equipment and weapons systems in a foreign country and often they weren't very cooperative. Ukraine is sitting on top of a lot of old Soviet industrial bases, needless to say. Also for a while they inherited all the nuclear weapons and delivery vehicles the Soviets had stationed in Ukraine, but they decided to give them up, as did Belarus and Kazakhstan, which had found themselves in similar positions. Now, because of that, none of them have the means to really stand up to Russia.
positions.
15th Nov '16 4:53:19 AM Saveelich
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Makhno Nestor Makhno]], leader of Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine (an anarcho-communist army named after him, Makhnovshchina) during the 1917-1921 Ukrainian War of Independence, which was a part of the Russian Civil War. Initially on the Bolsheviks' side until 1919, they ended up fighting them and ''[[MeleeATrois everyone else]]''. Bolsheviks prevailed and Makhno fled, dying in Paris in 1934.

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Makhno Nestor Makhno]], leader of the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine (an anarcho-communist army army) named "Makhnovshchina" after him, Makhnovshchina) him during the 1917-1921 Ukrainian War of Independence, which was a part of the Russian Civil War. Initially on the Bolsheviks' side until 1919, they ended up fighting them and ''[[MeleeATrois everyone else]]''. Bolsheviks prevailed and Makhno fled, dying in Paris in 1934.
1st Nov '16 6:32:51 PM Saveelich
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* The Klitschko brothers, Vitali and Wladimir, heavyweight boxers and very well known ones in that sport -- Vitali currently holds the WBC belt, Wladimir the IBF, WBO, IBO and Ring Magazine ones. Vitali became a politician, taking a seat in Parliament, and was a major leader of the Euromaidan, and briefly ran for president in 2014 before withdrawing and endorsing chocolate baron Petro Poroshenko for the post.

to:

* The Klitschko brothers, Vitali and Wladimir, heavyweight boxers and very well known ones in that sport -- Vitali currently holds the WBC belt, Wladimir the IBF, WBO, IBO and Ring Magazine ones. Vitali became a politician, taking a seat in Parliament, and was a major leader of the Euromaidan, and briefly ran for president in 2014 before withdrawing and endorsing chocolate baron Petro Poroshenko for the post.


Added DiffLines:

* Petro Poroshenko, the current president (since 2014), an oligarch owning several lucrative manufacturing businesses such as Roshen Confectionery Corporation (which earned him the nickname "Chocolate King"), several financial assets and a TV channel.
1st Nov '16 6:19:00 PM Saveelich
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* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev, who led the entire Soviet Union after Stalin's death. While not Ukrainian, he (among other things) inadvertently laid the ground for the current situation in Crimea, by taking it from Russian Soviet Republic and giving it to the Ukrainian Soviet Republic. This no doubt seemed to Khrushchev like a more logical geographical fit, seeing as Crimea is actually connected by land to Ukraine and not to Russia, but whether it was a proper ''cultural'' fit is a completely separate issue and much more complicated.



* UsefulNotes/NikitaKhrushchev, who led the entire Soviet Union after Stalin's death. While not Ukrainian, he (among other things) inadvertently laid the ground for the current situation in Crimea, by taking it from Russian Soviet Republic and giving it to the Ukrainian Soviet Republic. This no doubt seemed to Khrushchev like a more logical geographical fit, seeing as Crimea is actually connected by land to Ukraine and not to Russia, but whether it was a proper ''cultural'' fit is a completely separate issue and much more complicated.
21st Oct '16 9:58:25 AM MarkLungo
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'''Ukraine''' (''Україна'', pronounced ''oo-kra-yee-na'' in Ukrainian) is a state that declared its independence in 1991, after the collapse of [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn Soviet Union]].

Before that, it was under Russian and, even earlier, Polish rule, and most famous for its hard-to-pronounce [[{{Cossacks}} Cossack]] Host, the Zaporozhians. For reasons that'll be explained later, "''the'' Ukraine" is nowadays considered to be incorrect and even offensive. Ukrainians prefer their country to be called simply "Ukraine".

to:

'''Ukraine''' (''Україна'', pronounced ''oo-kra-yee-na'' in Ukrainian) is a state that declared its independence in 1991, after the collapse of [[UsefulNotes/SovietRussiaUkraineAndSoOn the Soviet Union]].

Before that, it was under Russian and, even earlier, Polish [[UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} Polish]] rule, and most famous for its hard-to-pronounce [[{{Cossacks}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Cossacks}} Cossack]] Host, the Zaporozhians. For reasons that'll be explained later, "''the'' Ukraine" is nowadays considered to be incorrect and even offensive. Ukrainians prefer their country to be called simply "Ukraine".
9th Oct '16 6:30:17 AM Virake
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A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty.

to:

A notable recent event was the 2004 Orange Revolution, where peaceful demonstrations forced the re-run of a questionable election and changed the government from pro-Russian to pro-Western (later elections changed it back, but were more peaceful). Another event of note was Ukraine holding the Euro-2012 football championship, along with Poland, and preparations for the event were painstakingly made. The most notable event in Ukraine of the 2010s so far has been the semi-violent[[note]]By which we mean, there was shooting, but nothing resembling military operations, and the old leadership wasn't gunned down[[/note]] revolution of 2014 which overthrew the pro-Russian President Viktor Yanukovych; this episode is called the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euromaidan Euromaidan]], i.e. "Europe Square" (because the triggering event was Yanukovych rejecting a deal with the EuropeanUnion to take a deal with the Russians). In response, Russia annexed Crimea and started stirring up trouble in Eastern Ukraine; TheOtherWiki has dubbed this [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_Crimean_crisis the Crimean Crisis]]. For its part, Crimea seems indifferent or possibly happy to be part of Russia (except for the Crimean Tatars)[[note]]Due to Stalin-era ethnic cleansing and population transfers, the overwhelming majority of Crimea's population are the children and grandchildren of Russian transplants anyway.[[/note]], while most surveys say that Eastern Ukraine is indifferent or possibly happy to remain a (prickly) part of Ukraine (protesters aside). Or rather they ''were''. After protesters (or regular Russian military) took over several regions of Eastern Ukraine, a full on civil war (or Russian invasion) broke out, that only seems to have quieten with the current Minsk treaty.
treaty. Oh, and "quieten" here means that the front line didn't move significantly in either direction, but the combat itself never ceased. Every day there are reports of losses, shootings, assaults, etc.



During Soviet times, Soviet planners wanted to prevent ''any'' one region from establishing totally independent arms production, and a lot of defence and aerospace plants (such as Antonov and Yangel) ended up in Ukraine. When the USSR collapsed, the Russian Federation found itself in the unenviable position of having the vendors of many of its equipment and weapons systems in a foreign country and often they weren't very cooperative. Ukraine is sitting on top of a lot of old Soviet industrial bases, needless to say. Also for a while they inherited all the nuclear weapons and delivery vehicles the Soviets had stationed in Ukraine, but they decided to give them up, as did Belarus and Kazakhstan, which had found themselves in similar positions.

to:

During Soviet times, Soviet planners wanted to prevent ''any'' one region from establishing totally independent arms production, and a lot of defence and aerospace plants (such as Antonov and Yangel) ended up in Ukraine. When the USSR collapsed, the Russian Federation found itself in the unenviable position of having the vendors of many of its equipment and weapons systems in a foreign country and often they weren't very cooperative. Ukraine is sitting on top of a lot of old Soviet industrial bases, needless to say. Also for a while they inherited all the nuclear weapons and delivery vehicles the Soviets had stationed in Ukraine, but they decided to give them up, as did Belarus and Kazakhstan, which had found themselves in similar positions.
positions. Now, because of that, none of them have the means to really stand up to Russia.
9th Oct '16 6:12:53 AM Virake
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Another debatable translation is that of the name of Ukraine's capital city. The prevailing translation is Kiev, with the alternative being Kyiv. To decide which is the right one, we need to understand how these versions came into existence. While Slavic languages have many things in common, they also have many differences. One of such differences is the possessive form of the noun. The name of the city in question is simply that, and the different versions of it come from different Slavic languages. The city's legendary founder is knyaz Kyi. In Ukrainian, the possessive form of Kyi is Kyiv, but in Russian it's Kiev. Russian version prevails because Russia conquered Ukraine and tried to assimilate it, which included the ban of Ukrainian language and enforcement of Russian.



Another controversy is the spelling of the capital. "Kiev" is the romanization of the ''Russian'' spelling, while "Kyiv" is the Ukrainian spelling. Since independence, Ukrainians have made it a point, even ''passing a law,'' that English-speakers should write it as "Kyiv." Accordingly most political organizations, such as the US government and the United Nations, spell it as "Kyiv" on official documents, but the old spelling of "Kiev" remains in wide colloquial use among English-speakers.

to:

Another controversy is the spelling of the capital. "Kiev" is the romanization of the ''Russian'' spelling, while "Kyiv" is the Ukrainian spelling. Since independence, Ukrainians have made it a point, even ''passing a law,'' that English-speakers should write it as "Kyiv." Accordingly most political organizations, such as the US government and the United Nations, spell it as "Kyiv" on official documents, but the old spelling of "Kiev" remains in wide colloquial use among English-speakers. \n To decide which is the right one, one needs to understand how these versions came into existence. The name of the city in question is simply the possessive form of Kyi, the legendary founder of the city. In Ukrainian, the possessive form of Kyi is Kyiv, but in Russian it's Kiev (and in Polish it's Kijow). Russian version prevails, possibly, because Russia conquered Ukraine and tried to assimilate it, which included the ban of Ukrainian language and enforcement of Russian (hence the change of names).
9th Oct '16 6:03:08 AM Virake
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The Kievan Rus and its splinters formed the first and last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, Austrians, Poles, Russians, and Lithuanians. Even Italians and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea.

to:

The Kievan Rus and its splinters formed the first and last "Ukrainian" state for a long, long time. In fact, for the next 700 years from the 13th century all the way up to the end of the 20th century, there was little that could conceivably be called a "Ukrainian state," with Ukrainian land being variously ruled by Tatars, Austrians, Poles, Russians, and Lithuanians. Even Italians and Turks had a go at ruling Crimea. \n There was, however, a period of progressively declining autonomy in 1649-1783.
9th Oct '16 5:57:59 AM Virake
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Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it (although Russians are ethically not Slavs). Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

to:

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond).beyond, alas with way hazier record). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it (although Russians are ethically not Slavs). Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.
9th Oct '16 5:56:06 AM Virake
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus. The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it. Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.

to:

Another debatable translation is that of the name of Ukraine's capital city. The prevailing translation is Kiev, with the alternative being Kyiv. To decide which is the right one, we need to understand how these versions came into existence. While Slavic languages have many things in common, they also have many differences. One of such differences is the possessive form of the noun. The name of the city in question is simply that, and the different versions of it come from different Slavic languages. The city's legendary founder is knyaz Kyi. In Ukrainian, the possessive form of Kyi is Kyiv, but in Russian it's Kiev. Russian version prevails because Russia conquered Ukraine and tried to assimilate it, which included the ban of Ukrainian language and enforcement of Russian.

Ukraine draws its history all the way back from the UsefulNotes/KievanRus. UsefulNotes/KievanRus (and beyond). The Kievan Rus was an ancient state, and the first to unify the Eastern Slavs - therefore Russia, Ukraine, and Belarus all claim descent from it.it (although Russians are ethically not Slavs). Unsurprisingly, its capital was based in Kiev. The state was united for approximately 300 years from the late 9th century to 12th century, when it fractured into various quarreling principalities. This left them easy prey for the Mongol Empire, which easily conquered the East Slavs and made them vassals for almost 300 years.
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