History UsefulNotes / UNIX

15th May '16 11:28:02 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There are also several forks of the official Linux kernel, and other UNIX-style systems, being used on high-end electronic devices and smartphones, as well as in networking gear like Ethernet switches and routers, and in many embedded devices. For example: Apple's [=iOS=], used on the [=iPhone=], [=iPod=] Touch, and [=iPad=], contains code from the Darwin base of UsefulNotes/MacOS X. Google's Android operating system, [=iOS=]'s main competitor, contains a fork of the Linux kernel at its core. Also, Sony has confirmed that the PlayStation4's OS is in fact a customized version of [=FreeBSD=]. Several home routers also run Linux: either by default, or modded by way of [=DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato=]. Linux even powers a number of Creator/MidwayGames' slot and gambling machines, and some arcade game manufacturers (ie Creator/NamcoBandai with their VideoGame/WanganMidnight series starting from [=WMMT4=]) prefer Linux to Windows Embedded due to the practically nonexistent licensing costs.

to:

There are also several forks of the official Linux kernel, and other UNIX-style systems, being used on high-end electronic devices and smartphones, as well as in networking gear like Ethernet switches and routers, and in many embedded devices. For example: Apple's [=iOS=], used on the [=iPhone=], [=iPod=] Touch, and [=iPad=], contains code from the Darwin base of UsefulNotes/MacOS X. Google's Android operating system, [=iOS=]'s main competitor, contains a fork of the Linux kernel at its core. Also, Sony has confirmed that the PlayStation4's UsefulNotes/PlayStation4's OS is in fact a customized version of [=FreeBSD=]. Several home routers also run Linux: either by default, or modded by way of [=DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato=]. Linux even powers a number of Creator/MidwayGames' slot and gambling machines, and some arcade game manufacturers (ie Creator/NamcoBandai with their VideoGame/WanganMidnight series starting from [=WMMT4=]) prefer Linux to Windows Embedded due to the practically nonexistent licensing costs.
1st May '16 5:45:58 PM dmeagher13
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Now, in 2013, UNIX and its clones and derivatives are more popular than ever. Apple decided to open-source the kernel and user tools for Darwin (the basis of Mac OS X), and even Solaris (one of the last bastions of old-school commercial UNIX) has since been opened up- just to close again after Sun was bought up by Oracle, which caused much of the community to fork the last open release into the ''illumos'' project (and the official distro ''[=OpenIndiana=]'').

to:

Now, in 2013, UNIX and its clones and derivatives are more popular than ever. Apple decided to open-source the kernel and user tools for Darwin (the basis of Mac OS X), X and [=iOS=]), and even Solaris (one of the last bastions of old-school commercial UNIX) has since been opened up- just to close again after Sun was bought up by Oracle, which caused much of the community to fork the last open release into the ''illumos'' project (and the official distro ''[=OpenIndiana=]'').
1st May '16 5:27:32 PM dmeagher13
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Not long after the first edition of UNIX was published inside Bell Labs, Ken and Dennis started work on making the system portable. In the early 1970s, this was a big deal, since almost all [=OSes=] up to that point had been written specifically for the machine they were going to run on. The idea was to write most of the kernel in a higher-level language that could be "compiled" into code for different machines, then add small bits of machine-dependent code where needed to handle things like interrupts and memory. The language Dennis invented for the project was called "C"[[note]]actually a major rehash of Ken's "B", which added features to avoid depending on the size of the system word and generally make it easier to use[[/note]], and after he and Brian Kernighan published a book on it, it became a hit outside Bell Labs and even outside the UNIX community (in fact, it's highly likely the Web browser you're reading this in has C or C++[[note]]a conservative rehash of C which adds some more features such as object-oriented classes[[/note]] code in it).

to:

Not long after the first edition of UNIX was published inside Bell Labs, Ken and Dennis started work on making the system portable. In the early 1970s, this was a big deal, since almost all [=OSes=] up to that point had been written specifically for the machine they were going to run on. The idea was to write most of the kernel in a higher-level language that could be "compiled" into code for different machines, then add small bits of machine-dependent code where needed to handle things like interrupts and memory. The language Dennis invented for the project was called "C"[[note]]actually [[UsefulNotes/TheCLanguage "C"]][[note]]actually a major rehash of Ken's "B", which added features to avoid depending on the size of the system word and generally make it easier to use[[/note]], and after he and Brian Kernighan published a book on it, it became a hit outside Bell Labs and even outside the UNIX community (in fact, it's highly likely the Web browser you're reading this in has C or C++[[note]]a conservative rehash of C which adds some more features such as object-oriented classes[[/note]] code in it).
27th Sep '15 12:58:31 PM Taxi-Pizzatime
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

Yet another spin on the Ubuntu/Debian architecture is [[http://lxle.net LXLE]]. It is currently lesser-known than the aforementioned Ubuntu, but is gaining fame for its light-weight system requirements, and therefore gaining position on '''distrowatch'''. At the same time, it is intended to be highly functional right out of the box, designed to surpass even Lubuntu (another light-weight variant Ubuntu). LXLE is developed with dusty-old PC machines in mind.
21st Sep '15 12:39:58 PM GastonRabbit
Is there an issue? Send a Message


UNIX was once considered unfriendly, terse and somewhat elitist, requiring expensive licensing and large, expensive minicomputers to run; now, almost all of UNIX's source code is freely licensed[[labelnote:much longer explanation]]BSD variants are licensed under "BSD licenses" (these generally omit the "advertising clause", which requires attribution in advertising: Berkeley have rescinded theirs, and such clauses prove GPL-incompatible and generally impractical).

to:

UNIX was once considered unfriendly, terse and somewhat elitist, requiring expensive licensing and large, expensive minicomputers to run; now, almost all of UNIX's source code is freely licensed[[labelnote:much longer explanation]]BSD variants are licensed under "BSD licenses" (these generally omit clause 3, the "advertising clause", which requires attribution in advertising: advertising -- Berkeley have rescinded theirs, and such clauses prove GPL-incompatible and generally impractical).
impractical). The fourth clause (third in the three-clause variant), which forbids the use of the author's name for promotional purposes, is also frequently dropped, mainly due to the fact that copyright law generally does not give users permission to use the author's name in that way to begin with. [=FreeBSD=] and [=NetBSD=] use the two-clause form for new code ([=OpenBSD=] uses the similar ISC license instead) and either form without the advertising clause is GPL-compatible.



Unlike the licensing of the first two, the GPL prohibits use in proprietary software, as opposed to how BSD does not require derivatives to use the same license (merely requiring preservation of copyright notices and attribution) and [=OpenSolaris=] allows combining with code with another license.[[/labelnote]] and UNIX derivatives can be found on things as small as a smart phone [[note]]the two most major smart phone [=OSes=] -- Apple iOS and Google Android-- are UNIX variants (Android is based on Linux (but not GNU), whereas iOS is based on Apple's Darwin which is based on BSD and on [=NeXT=]'s XNU), and there are oddball phones and tablets that run more-or-less straight Linux[[/note]], or as large as an IBM mainframe. It's also probably the only OS that came into existence specifically because a bored programmer wanted to play a game.

to:

Unlike the licensing of the first two, the GPL prohibits use in proprietary software, as opposed to how BSD does not require derivatives to use the same license (merely requiring preservation of copyright notices and attribution) and [=OpenSolaris=] allows combining with code with another license.[[/labelnote]] and UNIX derivatives can be found on things as small as a smart phone [[note]]the two most major smart phone [=OSes=] -- Apple iOS and Google Android-- Android -- are UNIX variants (Android is based on Linux (but not GNU), whereas iOS is based on Apple's Darwin which is based on BSD and on [=NeXT=]'s XNU), and there are oddball phones and tablets that run more-or-less straight Linux[[/note]], or as large as an IBM mainframe. It's also probably the only OS that came into existence specifically because a bored programmer wanted to play a game.



Once Unix was ported to C, Bell Labs started allowing researchers at universities to study its insides. Since the Bell System was still a regulated monopoly at the time, and thus couldn't sell computers or [=OSes=], Bell Labs would give university computer science departments access to the UNIX source code for the cost of duplication once they signed a non-disclosure agreement. UNIX became very popular in operating systems classes after this. The lecture notes of one Australian computer science professor, John Lions of the University of New South Wales, were compiled into a book (''Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition, with Source Code'', aka the ''Lions Book'') and became a widely-bootlegged underground publication and [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes circulated]] for years this way due to both the Bell System's licensing strictures and the later UNIX Wars (see below);[[note]]sometimes described as "samizdat", a Russian loanword denoting underground copying and sharing of suppressed literature[[/note]] it was, finally, legally published in book form 20 years later, in 1996.

to:

Once Unix was ported to C, Bell Labs started allowing researchers at universities to study its insides. Since the Bell System was still a regulated monopoly at the time, and thus couldn't sell computers or [=OSes=], Bell Labs would give university computer science departments access to the UNIX source code for the cost of duplication once they signed a non-disclosure agreement. UNIX became very popular in operating systems classes after this. The lecture notes of one Australian computer science professor, John Lions of the University of New South Wales, were compiled into a book (''Lions' Commentary on UNIX 6th Edition, with Source Code'', aka the ''Lions Book'') and became a widely-bootlegged widely bootlegged underground publication and [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes circulated]] for years this way due to both the Bell System's licensing strictures and the later UNIX Wars (see below);[[note]]sometimes described as "samizdat", a Russian loanword denoting underground copying and sharing of suppressed literature[[/note]] it was, finally, legally published in book form 20 years later, in 1996.



In 1991, a programmer in Helsinki, Finland, named Linus Torvalds, who was inspired by MINIX [[note]]and would later have a famous debate on {{Usenet}} with its creator, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, on the merits of microkernels vs. Linux's older "monolithic" design[[/note]] posted his intent to build a "little" UNIX clone ([[HilariousInHindsight which he intended to be "just a hobby" and "nothing big like GNU"]]) to Usenet, with some of the work already done. Others agreed to help, and by 1992 ''Linux'', as it was dubbed by one of Linus's helpers,[[note]]Linus had suggested "Freax", pronounced "freaks", but it didn't catch on[[/note]] was maturing quickly. Linus made the important decision to put the Linux kernel under the same license as GNU's tools and utilities, making it attractive to developers who appreciated GNU's stance. With commercial UNIX still expensive, and BSD's future unclear, Linux grew quickly, and by 1995 had reached version 1.0; already, there were several vendors offering "distributions" ("distros" for short), or fully-usable [=OSes=] based around Linus's kernel and GNU at that time.[[note]]These distros are typically called "Linux operating systems" (and not altogether ''inaccurately'', being operating systems that incorporate the Linux kernel), much to the dismay of GNU partisans who tend to insist upon the term "GNU/Linux" - which, while being accurate for the distros which incorporate GNU, hasn't really caught on, and is sometimes countered with the response that GNU isn't the only notable userspace/non-kernel component of the OS.[[/note]] Some of them, like Linspire, SLS and AV Linux, came and went, others such as Slackware, Red Hat (later splitting into Fedora and the commercial RHEL), [=SuSE=], and Debian lived on, and new distros appear on the scene periodically, more on this later.

to:

In 1991, a programmer in Helsinki, Finland, named Linus Torvalds, who was inspired by MINIX [[note]]and would later have a famous debate on {{Usenet}} with its creator, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, on the merits of microkernels vs. Linux's older "monolithic" design[[/note]] posted his intent to build a "little" UNIX clone ([[HilariousInHindsight which he intended to be "just a hobby" and "nothing big like GNU"]]) to Usenet, with some of the work already done. Others agreed to help, and by 1992 ''Linux'', as it was dubbed by one of Linus's helpers,[[note]]Linus had suggested "Freax", pronounced "freaks", but it didn't catch on[[/note]] was maturing quickly. Linus made the important decision to put the Linux kernel under the same license as GNU's tools and utilities, making it attractive to developers who appreciated GNU's stance. With commercial UNIX still expensive, and BSD's future unclear, Linux grew quickly, and by 1995 had reached version 1.0; already, there were several vendors offering "distributions" ("distros" for short), or fully-usable fully usable [=OSes=] based around Linus's kernel and GNU at that time.[[note]]These distros are typically called "Linux operating systems" (and not altogether ''inaccurately'', being operating systems that incorporate the Linux kernel), much to the dismay of GNU partisans who tend to insist upon the term "GNU/Linux" - which, while being accurate for the distros which incorporate GNU, hasn't really caught on, and is sometimes countered with the response that GNU isn't the only notable userspace/non-kernel component of the OS.[[/note]] Some of them, like Linspire, SLS and AV Linux, came and went, others such as Slackware, Red Hat (later splitting into Fedora and the commercial RHEL), [=SuSE=], and Debian lived on, and new distros appear on the scene periodically, more on this later.
9th Sep '15 2:37:15 PM HarJIT-EGS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There are also several forks of the official Linux kernel being used on high-end electronic devices and smartphones, as well as in networking gear like Ethernet switches and routers, and in many embedded devices. For example: Apple's [=iOS=], used on the [=iPhone=], [=iPod=] Touch, and [=iPad=], contains code from the Darwin base of UsefulNotes/MacOS X. Google's Android operating system, [=iOS=]'s main competitor, contains a fork of the Linux kernel at its core. Also, Sony has confirmed that the PlayStation4's OS is in fact a customized version of [=FreeBSD=]. Several home routers also run Linux: either by default, or modded by way of [=DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato=]. Linux even powers a number of Creator/MidwayGames' slot and gambling machines, and some arcade game manufacturers (ie Creator/NamcoBandai with their VideoGame/WanganMidnight series starting from [=WMMT4=]) prefer Linux to Windows Embedded due to the practically nonexistent licensing costs.

to:

There are also several forks of the official Linux kernel kernel, and other UNIX-style systems, being used on high-end electronic devices and smartphones, as well as in networking gear like Ethernet switches and routers, and in many embedded devices. For example: Apple's [=iOS=], used on the [=iPhone=], [=iPod=] Touch, and [=iPad=], contains code from the Darwin base of UsefulNotes/MacOS X. Google's Android operating system, [=iOS=]'s main competitor, contains a fork of the Linux kernel at its core. Also, Sony has confirmed that the PlayStation4's OS is in fact a customized version of [=FreeBSD=]. Several home routers also run Linux: either by default, or modded by way of [=DD-WRT, OpenWRT or Tomato=]. Linux even powers a number of Creator/MidwayGames' slot and gambling machines, and some arcade game manufacturers (ie Creator/NamcoBandai with their VideoGame/WanganMidnight series starting from [=WMMT4=]) prefer Linux to Windows Embedded due to the practically nonexistent licensing costs.
9th Sep '15 2:23:11 PM HarJIT-EGS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


At around the same time, a researcher at MIT's AI Lab named Richard Stallman decided he was fed up with companies founded by ex-AI-lab-members (such as Symbolics), which often built upon AI lab software and were expected to be used by the AI lab, "hoarding" their innovations and preventing sharing of code.[[note]]For more information on this, see the biography "Free as in Freedom".[[/note]] His main concerns were that, once the source to various parts of an OS were "nonfree" or made unavailable, fixing or improving on them was impossible (or, at least, extremely difficult), and that this could lead to monopoly behavior and rip communities apart (such as Symbolics and the AI lab, which had lost many talented personnel). This was hastened by the death of the AI lab's own operating system, ITS (a sort-of cousin to UNIX--ITS and Multics were both derived from the early operating system CTSS, but seen as more elegant yet less portable), the abandonment of the AI lab by his friends, and the "locking up" of their successors, the Lisp Machines. He envisioned a complete operating system where all of the parts were "free software" (in analogy with "free speech")[[note]]not to be confused with free-of-charge software which isn't necessarily free in this sense[[/note]] and could be modified and/or shared with others at will, but with the caveat that the programming code for the changes had to be shared as well.[[note]] he initially considered a system based on Lisp, similar to Genera, the Symbolics OS, but concluded that the stock hardware of the day could not handle such a system, so he turned to the less demanding C as his system language[[/note]] He called his vision "GNU", a RecursiveAcronym for "GNU's Not UNIX!", posted a manifesto describing his intentions to Usenet in 1983, and created the Free Software Foundation to oversee the effort. By 1990, the FSF would have most of the parts of GNU ready, including a compiler, utilities, libraries and such, but no kernel to run the system under.

to:

At around the same time, a researcher at MIT's AI Lab named Richard Stallman decided he was fed up with companies founded by ex-AI-lab-members (such as Symbolics), which often built upon AI lab software and were expected to be used by the AI lab, "hoarding" their innovations and preventing sharing of code.[[note]]For more information on this, see the biography "Free as in Freedom".[[/note]] His main concerns were that, once the source to various parts of an OS were "nonfree" or made unavailable, fixing or improving on them was impossible (or, at least, extremely difficult), and that this could lead to monopoly behavior and rip communities apart (such as Symbolics and the AI lab, which had lost many talented personnel). This was hastened by the death of the AI lab's own operating system, ITS (a sort-of cousin to UNIX--ITS and Multics were both derived from the early operating system CTSS, but seen as more elegant yet less portable), the abandonment of the AI lab by his friends, and the "locking up" of their successors, the Lisp Machines. He envisioned a complete operating system where all of the parts were "free software" (in analogy with "free speech")[[note]]not to be confused with free-of-charge software which isn't necessarily free in this sense[[/note]] and could be modified and/or shared with others at will, but with the caveat that the programming code for the changes had to be shared as well.[[note]] he [[note]]he initially considered a system based on Lisp, similar to Genera, the Symbolics OS, but concluded that the stock hardware of the day could not handle such a system, so he turned to the less demanding C as his system language[[/note]] He called his vision "GNU", a RecursiveAcronym for "GNU's Not UNIX!", posted a manifesto describing his intentions to Usenet in 1983, and created the Free Software Foundation to oversee the effort. By 1990, the FSF would have most of the parts of GNU ready, including a compiler, utilities, libraries and such, but no kernel to run the system under.



!The UNIX Wars; Linux and the [=BSDs=] appear

to:

!The UNIX Wars; Linux and the unencumbered [=BSDs=] appear



In 1991, a programmer in Helsinki, Finland, named Linus Torvalds, who was inspired by MINIX [[note]]and would later have a famous debate on {{Usenet}} with its creator, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, on the merits of microkernels vs. Linux's older "monolithic" design[[/note]] posted his intent to build a "little" UNIX clone ([[HilariousInHindsight which he intended to be "just a hobby" and "nothing big like GNU"]]) to Usenet, with some of the work already done. Others agreed to help, and by 1992 ''Linux'', as it was dubbed by one of Linus's helpers,[[note]]Linus had suggested "Freax", pronounced "freaks", but it didn't catch on[[/note]] was maturing quickly. Linus made the important decision to put the Linux kernel under the same license as GNU's tools and utilities, making it attractive to developers who appreciated GNU's stance. With commercial UNIX still expensive, and BSD's future unclear, Linux grew quickly, and by 1995 had reached version 1.0; already, there were several vendors offering "distributions" ("distros" for short), or fully-usable [=OSes=] based around Linus's kernel and GNU at that time.[[note]]These distros are typically called "Linux operating systems" (and not altogether ''inaccurately'', being operating systems that incorporate the Linux kernel), much to the dismay of GNU partisans who tend to insist upon the term "GNU/Linux" - which, while being accurate for the distros which incorporate GNU, hasn't really caught on, and is sometimes countered with the response that GNU isn't the only notable userspace/non-kernel component of the OS.[[/note]] Some of them, like Linspire, SLS and AV Linux, came and went, others such as Slackware, Red Hat (later splitting into Fedora and the commercial RHEL), [=SuSE=], and Debian lived on, and new distros appear on the scene periodically. [[note]]As of 2013, a spinoff of UK-based Ubuntu, Mint, is the most popular distro. Ubuntu was #1 for a few years after it was introduced, however it slipped from the #1 pedestal after making some decisions that were unpopular with the Linux community (the Unity desktop manager and integrated Amazon search being the two most cited offenders, though the decision to push Mir instead of Wayland as an X11 replacement was a big one with developers) and earning the ire of the Free Software Foundation for "becoming too proprietary" (though they did eventually [[https://www.fsf.org/news/canonical-updated-licensing-terms come to an agreement]] over previous problems with the relationship between Ubuntu's EULA and the OS's free components).[[/note]]

to:

In 1991, a programmer in Helsinki, Finland, named Linus Torvalds, who was inspired by MINIX [[note]]and would later have a famous debate on {{Usenet}} with its creator, Andrew S. Tanenbaum, on the merits of microkernels vs. Linux's older "monolithic" design[[/note]] posted his intent to build a "little" UNIX clone ([[HilariousInHindsight which he intended to be "just a hobby" and "nothing big like GNU"]]) to Usenet, with some of the work already done. Others agreed to help, and by 1992 ''Linux'', as it was dubbed by one of Linus's helpers,[[note]]Linus had suggested "Freax", pronounced "freaks", but it didn't catch on[[/note]] was maturing quickly. Linus made the important decision to put the Linux kernel under the same license as GNU's tools and utilities, making it attractive to developers who appreciated GNU's stance. With commercial UNIX still expensive, and BSD's future unclear, Linux grew quickly, and by 1995 had reached version 1.0; already, there were several vendors offering "distributions" ("distros" for short), or fully-usable [=OSes=] based around Linus's kernel and GNU at that time.[[note]]These distros are typically called "Linux operating systems" (and not altogether ''inaccurately'', being operating systems that incorporate the Linux kernel), much to the dismay of GNU partisans who tend to insist upon the term "GNU/Linux" - which, while being accurate for the distros which incorporate GNU, hasn't really caught on, and is sometimes countered with the response that GNU isn't the only notable userspace/non-kernel component of the OS.[[/note]] Some of them, like Linspire, SLS and AV Linux, came and went, others such as Slackware, Red Hat (later splitting into Fedora and the commercial RHEL), [=SuSE=], and Debian lived on, and new distros appear on the scene periodically. [[note]]As of 2013, a spinoff of UK-based Ubuntu, Mint, is the most popular distro. Ubuntu was #1 for a few years after it was introduced, however it slipped from the #1 pedestal after making some decisions that were unpopular with the Linux community (the Unity desktop manager and integrated Amazon search being the two most cited offenders, though the decision to push Mir instead of Wayland as an X11 replacement was a big one with developers) and earning the ire of the Free Software Foundation for "becoming too proprietary" (though they did eventually [[https://www.fsf.org/news/canonical-updated-licensing-terms come to an agreement]] over previous problems with the relationship between Ubuntu's EULA and the OS's free components).[[/note]]
periodically, more on this later.



Ubuntu, a distribution of Linux, is quite popular with computer-savvy people who appreciate its ease of use and its excellent hardware support, and is even starting to dent the average userdom, despite rankling some users with some recent unpopular moves. On the other hand, those users offended by Ubuntu's "overcommercialization" remained loyal to Linux, with most moving on to Linux Mint (which is based on Ubuntu), or on to other distros at worst.

to:

Ubuntu, a distribution of Linux, Linux and spin-off from Debian, is quite popular with computer-savvy people who appreciate its ease of use and its excellent hardware support, and is even starting to dent the average userdom, despite rankling some users with some recent unpopular moves. Ubuntu was #1 for a few years after it was introduced, however it slipped from the #1 pedestal after making some decisions that were unpopular with the Linux community (the Unity desktop manager and integrated Amazon search being the two most cited offenders, though the decision to push Mir instead of Wayland as an X11 replacement was a big one with developers) and earning the ire of the Free Software Foundation for "becoming too proprietary" (though they did eventually [[https://www.fsf.org/news/canonical-updated-licensing-terms come to an agreement]] over previous problems with the relationship between Ubuntu's EULA and the OS's free components).

On the other hand, those users offended by Ubuntu's "overcommercialization" remained loyal to Linux, with most moving on to Linux Mint (which is based on Ubuntu), or on to other distros at worst.worst. As of 2013, Mint is the most popular distro.
8th Sep '15 2:24:48 PM HarJIT-EGS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found, for example, in the Lions Book. Interestingly, this means that the V6 code in the earlier [=BSDs=] is actually now under a BSD license.

to:

UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found, for example, in the Lions Book. Interestingly, this means that the V6 and 32/V code in the earlier [=BSDs=] is actually now under a BSD license.
19th Aug '15 5:09:18 AM HarJIT-EGS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found, for example, in the Lions Book. Interestingly, this means that the V6 code in the earlier BSDs is actually now under a BSD license.

to:

UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found, for example, in the Lions Book. Interestingly, this means that the V6 code in the earlier BSDs [=BSDs=] is actually now under a BSD license.
19th Aug '15 5:08:48 AM HarJIT-EGS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found in the Lions Book.

to:

UNIX/32V and its predecessors (including V6 and V7) have been usable under the original BSD license (with intact advertising clause regarding Caldera International) since January 2002 by anyone who can get hold of them; the source code for V6 can be found found, for example, in the Lions Book.
Book. Interestingly, this means that the V6 code in the earlier BSDs is actually now under a BSD license.
This list shows the last 10 events of 86. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.UNIX