History UsefulNotes / TsarTsarAutocrats

19th Oct '15 11:12:49 AM aurora369
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go. After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go.go, except for the fact that he was backed by the Swedes rather than the Polish. After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.
2nd Aug '15 1:23:47 AM Specialist290
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* ''Feodor II'' (1605). Boris Godunov's son and heir didn't rule for even one year. A pretender emerged, who claimed to be the miraculously survived prince Dmitri, and the people weren't afraid to riot agaist a child Tsar.
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* ''Feodor II'' (1605). Boris Godunov's son and heir didn't rule for even one year. A pretender emerged, who claimed to be the miraculously survived prince Dmitri, and the people weren't afraid to riot agaist against a child Tsar.

* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go.
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go. \n After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.
11th Jul '15 12:08:02 AM aurora369
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* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court.
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* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court. She had no legitimate children, and chose a distantly related nephew from a German house of Holstein-Gottorp as her heir; because of that, the Romanovs after her should be more properly described as House Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov. The first of them was the aforementioned nephew...
10th Jul '15 12:09:43 PM Specialist290
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius II'' (pretender, 1607-1609). You thought Pseudo-Demetrius was safely dead? Close but no cigar. Soon afterwards, another pretender appeared, who claimed to be both the original Dmitri and the Dmitri whom they cremated and shot from a cannon. Apparently, the early XVII century Russians believed in miracles, but there were people who believed him. Including Marina Mniszech, who pretended to recognize this pretender as her husband. This fraud notably failed to conquer Moscow, but he set up shop in a close-by village of Tushino (today it's a borough of Moscow), giving the second Pseudo-Demetrius a nickname of "the Felon of Tushino" from Vasily's loyalists.
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius II'' (pretender, 1607-1609). You thought Pseudo-Demetrius was safely dead? Close but no cigar. Soon afterwards, another pretender appeared, who claimed to be both the original Dmitri [[RefugeInAudacity and the Dmitri whom they cremated and shot from a cannon.cannon]]. Apparently, the early XVII century Russians believed in miracles, but there were people who believed him. Including Marina Mniszech, who pretended to recognize this pretender as her husband. This fraud notably failed to conquer Moscow, but he set up shop in a close-by village of Tushino (today it's a borough of Moscow), giving the second Pseudo-Demetrius a nickname of "the Felon of Tushino" from Vasily's loyalists.
27th May '15 1:10:16 AM aurora369
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* ''Boris'' (1598-1605). When Feodor died with no heir, and Ivan IV's third son Dmitri (Demetrius) died in a mysterious accident involving a game with knives (a whole forest of EpilepticTrees grew out of this, and three pretenders emerged from that forest later), the Godunovs ended up the most influential family, and the head of the house, Boris Godunov, crowned himself the new Tsar. If this would happen in a less troubled time, he would become a good ruler; he was both intelligent, sane and kind. However, years spent as Feodor's closest advisor gave him a reputation of a ManipulativeBastard, and famines of the worst kind happened during his reign. The people saw this as an ill omen and started to whisper about Boris being an usurper. They did not openly rise against him, but when he died...
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* ''Boris'' (1598-1605). When Feodor died with no heir, and Ivan IV's third son Dmitri (Demetrius) died in a mysterious accident involving a game with knives (a whole forest of EpilepticTrees grew out of this, and three pretenders emerged from that forest later), the Godunovs Godunovs, nobles descending from a Russified Tatar clan, ended up the most influential family, and the head of the house, Boris Godunov, crowned himself the new Tsar. If this would happen in a less troubled time, he would become a good ruler; he was both intelligent, sane and kind. However, years spent as Feodor's closest advisor gave him a reputation of a ManipulativeBastard, and famines of the worst kind happened during his reign. The people saw this as an ill omen and started to whisper about Boris being an usurper. They did not openly rise against him, but when he died...
30th Jan '15 1:14:13 AM Koveras
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* ''Peter III'' (1761-1762). A strange man, a fan of table-top war games, a lover of the Prussian order - this Tsar was named a madman, an eccentric, a misunderstood reformer by various historians. Right now we realize he was just a typical [[OneOfUs geek]], brilliant yet socially awkward. Oh, and he is also the source of inspiration for the famous ''TheElderScrolls'' Mad Emperor, Pelagius. He was soon overthrown by his wife...
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* ''Peter III'' (1761-1762). A strange man, a fan of table-top war games, a lover of the Prussian order - this Tsar was named a madman, an eccentric, a misunderstood reformer by various historians. Right now we realize he was just a typical [[OneOfUs geek]], brilliant yet socially awkward. Oh, and he is also the source of inspiration for the famous ''TheElderScrolls'' ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' Mad Emperor, Pelagius. He was soon overthrown by his wife...
9th Dec '14 3:19:00 AM Patachou
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While UsefulNotes/GensecsPremiersAndPresidentsOhMy lists the republican Russian leaders, this article, a companion to TsaristRussia, is a listing of all Russian monarchs from the early Muscovite period to the Revolution of 1917.
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While UsefulNotes/GensecsPremiersAndPresidentsOhMy UsefulNotes/RussianHeadsOfState lists the republican Russian leaders, this article, a companion to TsaristRussia, is a listing of all Russian monarchs from the early Muscovite period to the Revolution of 1917.
7th Nov '14 4:15:21 AM Patachou
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* ''Ivan V'' (1682-1696, co-regent with PeterTheGreat). Feodor's much simpler brother, Ivan was happy to let his younger brother Peter and his older sister Sophia have their way. * ''[[PeterTheGreat Peter I the Great]]'' (1682-1725, the first Emperor of Russia). THE Emperor of Russia, enough said. He was obsessed with the idea of making Russia a proper European power, and didn't stop at the costs. After winning a battle for political dominance with his half-sister Sophia, he triumphed as the undisputed leader of Russia and immediately leaved for an embassy to Europe, to learn the ways of the West. After returning, he forced the Western ways on all Russia, dismissed the Boyar class, created an absolutist regime and proclaimed Russia a formal Empire.
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* ''Ivan V'' (1682-1696, co-regent with PeterTheGreat).UsefulNotes/PeterTheGreat). Feodor's much simpler brother, Ivan was happy to let his younger brother Peter and his older sister Sophia have their way. * ''[[PeterTheGreat ''[[UsefulNotes/PeterTheGreat Peter I the Great]]'' (1682-1725, the first Emperor of Russia). THE Emperor of Russia, enough said. He was obsessed with the idea of making Russia a proper European power, and didn't stop at the costs. After winning a battle for political dominance with his half-sister Sophia, he triumphed as the undisputed leader of Russia and immediately leaved for an embassy to Europe, to learn the ways of the West. After returning, he forced the Western ways on all Russia, dismissed the Boyar class, created an absolutist regime and proclaimed Russia a formal Empire.

* ''Ivan VI'' (1740-1741, infant, with Princess Anna Leopoldovna as regent). This Emperor of Russia was ill-fated. At age one, he was deposed by Peter the Great's daughter Elizabeth and put into prison. He grew up in prison and later was killed by an officer of CatherineTheGreat.
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* ''Ivan VI'' (1740-1741, infant, with Princess Anna Leopoldovna as regent). This Emperor of Russia was ill-fated. At age one, he was deposed by Peter the Great's daughter Elizabeth and put into prison. He grew up in prison and later was killed by an officer of CatherineTheGreat.UsefulNotes/CatherineTheGreat.

* ''[[CatherineTheGreat Catherine II the Great]]'' (1762-1796). In the West, she's famous for banging a horse. The Bolsheviks, happy to support any libel against Tsarism, gladly propagated that rumor. But no credible modern historian believes that myth. She, a German princess, a Romanov by marriage, a Lutheran by birth and a Russian Orthodox by conversion, is one of the most famous Russian rulers. It's true that she had a lot of [[RightHandHottie lovers]], but this did not hamper her talent as a statesperson. She was mildly liberal, willing to promote the ideals of the Enlightenment if it didn't disrupt the society. * ''Paul I'' (1796-1801). Another crowned fanboy, Paul was the son of Peter III and CatherineTheGreat. He was a fan of medieval knightly romances, built castles all over Russia and challenged the other European monarchs to duels. His ideas of running the country were too much for certain nobles, who concocted a plot and killed Paul in his own castle. One important legacy of Paul the First was his succession law, which was semi-Salic and virtually removed any woman's chance to inherit the Russian throne.
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* ''[[CatherineTheGreat ''[[UsefulNotes/CatherineTheGreat Catherine II the Great]]'' (1762-1796). In the West, she's famous for banging a horse. The Bolsheviks, happy to support any libel against Tsarism, gladly propagated that rumor. But no credible modern historian believes that myth. She, a German princess, a Romanov by marriage, a Lutheran by birth and a Russian Orthodox by conversion, is one of the most famous Russian rulers. It's true that she had a lot of [[RightHandHottie lovers]], but this did not hamper her talent as a statesperson. She was mildly liberal, willing to promote the ideals of the Enlightenment if it didn't disrupt the society. * ''Paul I'' (1796-1801). Another crowned fanboy, Paul was the son of Peter III and CatherineTheGreat.UsefulNotes/CatherineTheGreat. He was a fan of medieval knightly romances, built castles all over Russia and challenged the other European monarchs to duels. His ideas of running the country were too much for certain nobles, who concocted a plot and killed Paul in his own castle. One important legacy of Paul the First was his succession law, which was semi-Salic and virtually removed any woman's chance to inherit the Russian throne.

20th Oct '14 1:59:43 PM aurora369
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* ''Nicholas II the Bloody'' (or the Martyr, or the Spineless, depending [[BrokenBase on who you ask]]) (1894-1917). The guy about whom opinions differ. Ask communists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings of how bloody and reactionary he was. Ask monarchists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings on how perfect he was. What remains as hard fact is that he was waek-willed and not very smart, which led to RomanovsAndRevolutions. [[/folder]]
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* ''Nicholas II the Bloody'' (or the Martyr, or the Spineless, depending [[BrokenBase on who you ask]]) (1894-1917). The guy about whom opinions differ. Ask communists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings of how bloody and reactionary he was. Ask monarchists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings on how perfect he was. What remains as hard fact is that he was waek-willed weak-willed and not very smart, which led to RomanovsAndRevolutions. [[/folder]]
20th Oct '14 1:59:04 PM aurora369
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* [[CatherineTheGreat Catherine II the Great]] (1762-1796). In the West, she's famous for banging a horse. The Bolsheviks, happy to support any libel against Tsarism, gladly propagated that rumor. But no credible modern historian believes that myth. She, a German princess, a Romanov by marriage, a Lutheran by birth and a Russian Orthodox by conversion, is one of the most famous Russian rulers. It's true that she had a lot of [[RightHandHottie lovers]], but this did not hamper her talent as a statesperson. She was mildly liberal, willing to promote the ideals of the Enlightenment if it didn't disrupt the society. * Paul I (1796-1801). Another crowned fanboy, Paul was the son of Peter III and CatherineTheGreat. He was a fan of medieval knightly romances, built castles all over Russia and challenged the other European monarchs to duels. His ideas of running the country were too much for certain nobles, who concocted a plot and killed Paul in his own castle. One important legacy of Paul the First was his succession law, which was semi-Salic and virtually removed any woman's chance to inherit the Russian throne. * Alexander I the Blessed (1801-1825). A day before he succeeded his father Paul, he said: "My reign will be the same as my grandma's". And he kept true to his word: his reign was also mildly liberal but not much threatening to the remnants of the Russian feudalism. One important thing he did was to allow land-owners to give their serfs freedom. The other important achievement of his was presiding over the army that defeated Napoleon Bonaparte. # Nicholas I (1825-1855) # Alexander II the Liberator (1855-1881) # Alexander III the Peacemaker (1881-1894) # Nicholas II the Bloody (or the Martyr, or the Spineless, depending [[BrokenBase on who you ask]]) (1894-1917)
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* [[CatherineTheGreat ''[[CatherineTheGreat Catherine II the Great]] Great]]'' (1762-1796). In the West, she's famous for banging a horse. The Bolsheviks, happy to support any libel against Tsarism, gladly propagated that rumor. But no credible modern historian believes that myth. She, a German princess, a Romanov by marriage, a Lutheran by birth and a Russian Orthodox by conversion, is one of the most famous Russian rulers. It's true that she had a lot of [[RightHandHottie lovers]], but this did not hamper her talent as a statesperson. She was mildly liberal, willing to promote the ideals of the Enlightenment if it didn't disrupt the society. * Paul I ''Paul I'' (1796-1801). Another crowned fanboy, Paul was the son of Peter III and CatherineTheGreat. He was a fan of medieval knightly romances, built castles all over Russia and challenged the other European monarchs to duels. His ideas of running the country were too much for certain nobles, who concocted a plot and killed Paul in his own castle. One important legacy of Paul the First was his succession law, which was semi-Salic and virtually removed any woman's chance to inherit the Russian throne. * Alexander I ''Alexander I'' the Blessed (1801-1825). A day before he succeeded his father Paul, he said: "My reign will be the same as my grandma's". And he kept true to his word: his reign was also mildly liberal but not much threatening to the remnants of the Russian feudalism. One important thing he did was to allow land-owners to give their serfs freedom. The other important achievement of his was presiding over the army that defeated Napoleon Bonaparte. # Nicholas I (1825-1855) # Alexander * ''Nicholas I'' (1825-1855). Known in Russia under the not so much flattering monker of "Nicholas Sticks" (Nikolay Palkin), after his fondness for military corporeal punishments. This Tsar was a conservative, changing the pro-Enlightenment political landscape typical of his predecessor to a reactionary one. The Russian army's loss during the Crimean War was perceived by him as a personal defeat, which drove him through a MoraleEventHorizon and led to his death. * ''Alexander II the Liberator (1855-1881) # Alexander Liberator'' (1855-1881). The liberal Tsar who abolished serfdom (essentially slavery at the time). He was a contemporary of Abraham Lincoln and justifiedly felt a kindred spirit in him, which led to him supporting the Northern war effort in the USA. However, his reforms weren't radical enough for a group of anti-capitalist revolutionaries who sent an assassin to kill him. * ''Alexander III the Peacemaker (1881-1894) # Nicholas Peacemaker'' (1881-1894). Another clone of Alexis the Serene and Ivan the Great. This Tsar was very conservative; if only he had the chance to support the CSA, he would do so. But he was merely a tsesarevich (crown prince) at the time. He was another one of the "proceed slowly, with a straight face" tsars, and also a raging alcoholic. His age is remembered as the last stable age of Imperial Russia. * ''Nicholas II the Bloody Bloody'' (or the Martyr, or the Spineless, depending [[BrokenBase on who you ask]]) (1894-1917) (1894-1917). The guy about whom opinions differ. Ask communists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings of how bloody and reactionary he was. Ask monarchists, and you will hear a lot of ramblings on how perfect he was. What remains as hard fact is that he was waek-willed and not very smart, which led to RomanovsAndRevolutions.
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