History UsefulNotes / TsarTsarAutocrats

22nd Oct '17 9:37:39 AM Pyromania101
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* Grand Princess ''Elena Glinskaya'' (1533-1547, regent for her son Ivan IV).

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* Grand Princess ''Elena Glinskaya'' (1533-1547, regent for her son Ivan IV). The aforementioned second wife. Rumored to have been poisoned by the boyars.
22nd Oct '17 9:36:27 AM Pyromania101
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* ''Vasily III'' (1505-1533). He continued basically everything his father started.

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* ''Vasily III'' (1505-1533). He continued basically everything his father started. He caused quite a scandal when he annulled his first marriage due to his wife's infertility and married a girl young enough to be his daughter. The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem issued a chilling prophecy in response to this: "You will have a wicked son. Your states will be prey to terror and tears. Rivers of blood will flow. Your cities will be devoured in flames." He was right.
25th Aug '17 6:29:35 PM nombretomado
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* ''Wladyslaw Waza'' (pretender, 1610-1613). When Vasily IV died without an heir, the Russians were totally puzzled who their next Tsar might be. The Poles exploited that weakness and directed an invasion force into Russia, to put their prince, the future King of Poland Wladyslaw IV Waza as Russia's next Tsar. A group of high-born Boyars, the Semiboyarschina (The Rule of Seven Boyars) accepted that claim and let Wladyslaw march into Moscow. The Semiboyarschina had a ZeroPercentApprovalRating in the rest of Russia, and later became a Russian byword for "false authority pandering to foreign conquerors" (to the point of that the much latter community of [[TheNewRussia 1990s]] [[CorruptCorporateExecutive oligarchs]] received the unflattering nickname of "Semibankirschina" [ the rule of seven bankers ] on account of their pandering to the USA).

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* ''Wladyslaw Waza'' (pretender, 1610-1613). When Vasily IV died without an heir, the Russians were totally puzzled who their next Tsar might be. The Poles exploited that weakness and directed an invasion force into Russia, to put their prince, the future King of Poland Wladyslaw IV Waza as Russia's next Tsar. A group of high-born Boyars, the Semiboyarschina (The Rule of Seven Boyars) accepted that claim and let Wladyslaw march into Moscow. The Semiboyarschina had a ZeroPercentApprovalRating in the rest of Russia, and later became a Russian byword for "false authority pandering to foreign conquerors" (to the point of that the much latter community of [[TheNewRussia [[UsefulNotes/TheNewRussia 1990s]] [[CorruptCorporateExecutive oligarchs]] received the unflattering nickname of "Semibankirschina" [ the rule of seven bankers ] on account of their pandering to the USA).
16th May '17 9:49:48 AM nombretomado
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While UsefulNotes/RussianHeadsOfState lists the republican Russian leaders, this article, a companion to TsaristRussia, is a listing of all Russian monarchs from the early Muscovite period to the Revolution of 1917.

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While UsefulNotes/RussianHeadsOfState lists the republican Russian leaders, this article, a companion to TsaristRussia, UsefulNotes/TsaristRussia, is a listing of all Russian monarchs from the early Muscovite period to the Revolution of 1917.
15th Jul '16 7:38:03 PM Teakay
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* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court. She had no legitimate children, and chose a distantly related nephew from a German house of Holstein-Gottorp as her heir; because of that, the Romanovs after her should be more properly described as House Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov. The first of them was the aforementioned nephew...

to:

* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court. She had no legitimate children, and chose a distantly related nephew from a but her sister had married into the German house of Holstein-Gottorp and she chose the resulting nephew as her heir; because of that, the Romanovs after her should be more properly described as House Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov. The first of them was the aforementioned nephew...
10th Mar '16 8:33:42 AM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

-> ''Revolutionaries knew quite well that the autocratic Empire, with its hangmen, its pogroms, its finery, its famines, its Siberian jails and ancient iniquity, could never survive the war.''
-->-- '''Victor Serge''', ''Memoirs of a Revolutionary''
19th Oct '15 11:12:49 AM aurora369
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go. After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.

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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go.go, except for the fact that he was backed by the Swedes rather than the Polish. After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.
2nd Aug '15 1:23:47 AM Specialist290
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* ''Feodor II'' (1605). Boris Godunov's son and heir didn't rule for even one year. A pretender emerged, who claimed to be the miraculously survived prince Dmitri, and the people weren't afraid to riot agaist a child Tsar.


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* ''Feodor II'' (1605). Boris Godunov's son and heir didn't rule for even one year. A pretender emerged, who claimed to be the miraculously survived prince Dmitri, and the people weren't afraid to riot agaist against a child Tsar.




* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go.

to:

* ''Pseudo-Demetrius III'' (pretender, 1611-1612). This pretender was fairly unremarkable as far as the Pseudo-Demetrii go. \n After his death the Russian Orthodox Church got a bit tired of people claiming to be miraculously-restored dead princes: They canonized the original Prince Dmitri and declared that any further impostors would be excommunicated.
11th Jul '15 12:08:02 AM aurora369
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* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court.

to:

* ''Elizabeth'' (1741-1761). Better known as the precursor to Catherine the Great, she was just as welcoming to lovers but much less talented in politics. She became famous for the merriment and sex-fest that happened in her court. She had no legitimate children, and chose a distantly related nephew from a German house of Holstein-Gottorp as her heir; because of that, the Romanovs after her should be more properly described as House Holstein-Gottorp-Romanov. The first of them was the aforementioned nephew...
10th Jul '15 12:09:43 PM Specialist290
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* ''Pseudo-Demetrius II'' (pretender, 1607-1609). You thought Pseudo-Demetrius was safely dead? Close but no cigar. Soon afterwards, another pretender appeared, who claimed to be both the original Dmitri and the Dmitri whom they cremated and shot from a cannon. Apparently, the early XVII century Russians believed in miracles, but there were people who believed him. Including Marina Mniszech, who pretended to recognize this pretender as her husband. This fraud notably failed to conquer Moscow, but he set up shop in a close-by village of Tushino (today it's a borough of Moscow), giving the second Pseudo-Demetrius a nickname of "the Felon of Tushino" from Vasily's loyalists.

to:

* ''Pseudo-Demetrius II'' (pretender, 1607-1609). You thought Pseudo-Demetrius was safely dead? Close but no cigar. Soon afterwards, another pretender appeared, who claimed to be both the original Dmitri [[RefugeInAudacity and the Dmitri whom they cremated and shot from a cannon.cannon]]. Apparently, the early XVII century Russians believed in miracles, but there were people who believed him. Including Marina Mniszech, who pretended to recognize this pretender as her husband. This fraud notably failed to conquer Moscow, but he set up shop in a close-by village of Tushino (today it's a borough of Moscow), giving the second Pseudo-Demetrius a nickname of "the Felon of Tushino" from Vasily's loyalists.
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