History UsefulNotes / TorontoSubway

21st Mar '16 7:55:44 AM 20person
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* The system has it's own font, which is called... wait for it.... [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Subway_(typeface) Toronto Subway]]. It is used in several stations and, as of 2013, the TTC has begun to use it on all new signs and construction.

to:

* The system has it's own font, which is called... wait for it.... [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Subway_(typeface) Toronto Subway]]. It is used in several stations and, as of 2013, the TTC has begun to use it on all new signs and construction.construction.
* When the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Edward_Viaduct Prince Edward Viaduct]] was built across the Don Valley in the 1910s, the designer included a lower deck on the bridge in anticipation of a hypothetical future subway, an expensive and controversial move at the time. This ended up saving millions of dollars when the Bloor-Danforth line was built in the 60s, as they could build the subway on the existing lower deck instead of having to build a new bridge or route the line around the valley.
21st Mar '16 7:38:10 AM 20person
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* '''Line 1 Yonge-University''': Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, the Yonge-University Line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughan is to be opened near the end of 2017. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock. It is also the first part of the sytem to receive underground Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Still often referred to by locals as the "Yonge-University-Spadina line".

to:

* '''Line 1 Yonge-University''': Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, the Yonge-University Line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughan is to be opened near the end of 2017.2017 [[DevelopmentHell (hopefully)]]. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock. It is also the first part of the sytem to receive underground Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Still often referred to by locals as the "Yonge-University-Spadina line".
21st Mar '16 7:31:10 AM 20person
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* '''Line 1 Yonge-University''': Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, the Yonge-University Line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughan is to be opened in 2016. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock. It is also the first part of the sytem to receive underground Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Still often referred to by locals as the "Yonge-University-Spadina line".

to:

* '''Line 1 Yonge-University''': Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, the Yonge-University Line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughan is to be opened in 2016.near the end of 2017. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock. It is also the first part of the sytem to receive underground Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Still often referred to by locals as the "Yonge-University-Spadina line".
31st Jan '16 6:00:38 PM RA0808
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* The system has it's own font, which is called... wait for it.... Toronto Subway Font. It is used in most, if not all, stations.

to:

* The system has it's own font, which is called... wait for it.... [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Subway_(typeface) Toronto Subway Font. Subway]]. It is used in most, if not all, stations.several stations and, as of 2013, the TTC has begun to use it on all new signs and construction.
31st Jan '16 5:57:07 PM RA0808
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* '''Line 2 Bloor-Danforth''': Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, the Bloor-Danforth line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. Coloured green on the system map. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Every now and then there's talk of extending it west to Mississauga, but as of 2013, its extension is going to be the replacement of...

* '''Line 3 Scarborough''': Unlike the other currently built lines, the Scarborough Line is an above-ground light rail system rather than a true heavy-rail subway. It was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gauge and different means of propulsion. Coloured blue on the map. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. Still often referred to by locals by its original name: "Scarborough RT" (Rapid Transit). As noted, in September 2013, the City Council voted to replace it with an extension to the Bloor-Danforth Line.

to:

* '''Line 2 Bloor-Danforth''': Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, the Bloor-Danforth line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. Coloured green on the system map. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Every now and then there's talk of extending it west to Mississauga, but as of 2013, its extension is was going to be the replacement of...

* '''Line 3 Scarborough''': Unlike the other currently built lines, the Scarborough Line is an above-ground light rail system rather than a true heavy-rail subway. It was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gauge and different means of propulsion. Coloured blue on the map. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. Still often referred to by locals by its original name: "Scarborough RT" (Rapid Transit). As noted, in September 2013, the Toronto City Council under Mayor Rob Ford (yes that Rob Ford) voted to replace it with an extension to the Bloor-Danforth Line.
Line. However in 2015, after concerns were raised by the City Planner about how well a new subway would work in conjunction with new mayor John Tory's "SmartTrack" surface rail plan, the plan was again changed to extending the Bloor Line by one stop and building an eastern extension to the Line 5 Eglinton Crosstown currently under construction (see below).
25th Aug '15 8:22:52 PM RA0808
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* Yonge-University-Spadina Line: Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, this line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughn is to be opened in 2016. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock.

* Bloor-Danforth Line: Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, this line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. Coloured green on the system map. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Every now and then there's talk of extending it west to Mississauga, but as of 2013, its extension is going to be the replacement of...

* Scarborough RT: A bit off an odd subway line, the Scarborough RT was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gauge and different means of propulsion. Coloured blue on the map. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. As noted, in September 2013, the City Council voted to replace it with an extension to the Bloor-Danforth Line.

* Sheppard Line: The newest line in the system (opened in 2003) as well as the shortest and least used, the Sheppard Line services the growing Sheppard Avenue corridor in North York. There aren't many interesting things to say about this line, though, besides the fact that it is close to fully underground. Coloured purple on the system map.

Intersting facts about the subway include:

to:

* Yonge-University-Spadina Line: '''Line 1 Yonge-University''': Shaped like a U and coloured yellow on the system map, this line the Yonge-University Line is the oldest in the system (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughn Vaughan is to be opened in 2016. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock.

stock. It is also the first part of the sytem to receive underground Wi-Fi and cell phone service. Still often referred to by locals as the "Yonge-University-Spadina line".

* Bloor-Danforth Line: '''Line 2 Bloor-Danforth''': Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, this the Bloor-Danforth line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. Coloured green on the system map. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Every now and then there's talk of extending it west to Mississauga, but as of 2013, its extension is going to be the replacement of...

* Scarborough RT: A bit off an odd subway line, '''Line 3 Scarborough''': Unlike the other currently built lines, the Scarborough RT Line is an above-ground light rail system rather than a true heavy-rail subway. It was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gauge and different means of propulsion. Coloured blue on the map. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. Still often referred to by locals by its original name: "Scarborough RT" (Rapid Transit). As noted, in September 2013, the City Council voted to replace it with an extension to the Bloor-Danforth Line.

Line.

* Sheppard Line: '''Line 4 Sheppard''': The newest line in the system (opened in 2003) as well as the shortest and least used, 2003), the Sheppard Line services the growing Sheppard Avenue corridor in North York.York. The shortest and least used line in the system, it is sometimes derisively referred to as the "[[PunnyName Sheppard Stubway]]" or "subway to nowhere". There aren't many interesting things to say about this line, though, besides the fact that it is close to fully underground. Coloured purple on the system map.

Intersting * '''Line 5 Eglinton Crosstown''': Currently under construction and expected to open in the early 2020s, the Eglinton Crosstown line will run east-west through the northern part of Toronto. Like the Scarborough line it will be a light rail system rather than a true subway, though it will run underground for approximately half of its length.

Interesting
facts about the subway include:



14th Oct '14 8:58:55 AM karstovich2
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* Yonge-University-Spadina Line: Shaped like a U and colored yellow on the system map, this line is the oldest in the system (wtih the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughn is to be opened in 2016.

* Bloor-Danforth Line: Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, this line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Currently, the line has no extensions planned.

* Scarborough RT: A bit off an odd subway line, the Scarborough RT was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gague and different means of propolusion. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. However, the line is to be demolished and replaced with streetcars after the Pan American Games in 2015.
** As of September 2013, it's going to be a subway. That's likely not going to be the last of it.

* Sheppard Line: The newest line in the system (opened in 2003) as well as the shortest and least used, the Sheppard Line services the growing Sheppard Avenue corridor in North York. There aren't many interesting things to say about this line, though, besides the fact that it is close to fully underground.

to:

* Yonge-University-Spadina Line: Shaped like a U and colored coloured yellow on the system map, this line is the oldest in the system (wtih (with the Eglington-Union stretch opening in 1954) as well as the most heavily used. Currently, an extension into the suburb of Vaughn is to be opened in 2016.

2016. Since 2011, it has been run with the rather marvelous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toronto_Rocket Toronto Rocket]] rolling stock.

* Bloor-Danforth Line: Covering an east-west axis about 2 to 3 kilometers inland from Lake Ontario, this line is the second oldest, second buisiest and second longest in the system. Coloured green on the system map. The first portions of it opened in 1966 after being in the planning stages for several years. Currently, Every now and then there's talk of extending it west to Mississauga, but as of 2013, its extension is going to be the line has no extensions planned.

replacement of...

* Scarborough RT: A bit off an odd subway line, the Scarborough RT was opened in 1986 and runs through the district of (you guessed it) Scarborough. The line, unlike the rest of the system, uses different rolling stock, different track gague gauge and different means of propolusion.propulsion. Coloured blue on the map. It was originally going to be a streetcar line, but politics turned it into what it is today. However, the line is to be demolished and replaced with streetcars after the Pan American Games As noted, in 2015.
** As of
September 2013, it's going to be a subway. That's likely not going to be the last of it.

City Council voted to replace it with an extension to the Bloor-Danforth Line.

* Sheppard Line: The newest line in the system (opened in 2003) as well as the shortest and least used, the Sheppard Line services the growing Sheppard Avenue corridor in North York. There aren't many interesting things to say about this line, though, besides the fact that it is close to fully underground.
underground. Coloured purple on the system map.
27th Aug '14 9:58:49 PM HeyMama555
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Added DiffLines:

-->[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m18Qhy1EdLk&t=0m15s *Ding-Dang-Dong* "Please stand clear of the doors"]]
25th Mar '14 8:08:17 PM flaminghomer
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to:

** As of September 2013, it's going to be a subway. That's likely not going to be the last of it.
25th Oct '13 12:03:29 PM Voodoo
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to:

**There is another Toronto subway station with an extra level that was never used. When the Queen Street subway station was built, it was originally planned to interchange with an underground streetcar line that would be built along Queen Street downtown, and the station for this line was “roughed in” below the existing Queen Street station on the Yonge line. The subterranean streetcar line was never built, and thus the lower level has never been occupied.
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