History UsefulNotes / TheTroubles

12th Jan '16 2:58:24 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has the subject mentioned in reference to Sean Cassidy's backstory, in which his wife was killed in an IRA bombing and explained as why the Death Eaters' attacks weren't really noticed. It is acknowledged to be a touchy subject and presented fairly neutrally with Hermione mostly explaining the historic facts of the matter to Harry - who knows the basics - and Ron - who doesn't, and the focus is on the general devastation on both sides, with no moral judgement being made on either side, the tone being tilted towards WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. It is also accurately noted that the violence didn't completely end with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has the subject mentioned in reference to Sean Cassidy's backstory, in which his pregnant wife was killed in an IRA bombing (resulting in his devastation of the cell responsible) and explained as why the Death Eaters' attacks weren't really noticed. noticed by the muggle populace. It is acknowledged to be a touchy subject and presented fairly neutrally with Hermione mostly explaining the historic facts of the matter to Harry - who knows the basics - and Ron - who doesn't, and the doesn't. The focus is on the general devastation on both sides, with no moral judgement being made on either side, and the tone being tilted towards WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. It is also accurately noted that the violence didn't completely end with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.
25th Nov '15 12:41:06 AM MasoTey
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* One of the Literature/MalkoLinge novels (''Furie Belfast''/''The Belfast Connection'') uses the Troubles as a backdrop.
9th Nov '15 7:08:45 AM LtFedora
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* For the Film/JamesBond film ''{{Film/Skyfall}}'', this is part of the backstory for Gareth Mallory [[spoiler: (the new M)]], who was a Lt. Colonel in the SAS and survived getting tortured by the IRA.
1st Nov '15 1:03:21 AM MasoTey
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* The Music/{{U2}} song, "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" from their album ''Music/{{War}}. The most famous live performance of it is on ''Music/RattleAndHum'' when Bono denounced the Irish-Americans who ignorantly cheered the bloody partisan violence in Ireland.
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* The Music/{{U2}} song, "Sunday, Bloody Sunday" from their album ''Music/{{War}}.''Music/{{War}}''. The most famous live performance of it is on ''Music/RattleAndHum'' when Bono denounced the Irish-Americans who ignorantly cheered the bloody partisan violence in Ireland.
16th Oct '15 3:39:38 PM nombretomado
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* The line, "And maniacs don't blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] ''Music/TheFinalCut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club in December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
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* The line, "And maniacs don't blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] Music/PinkFloyd's ''Music/TheFinalCut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club in December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
27th Sep '15 6:38:32 PM DavidDelony
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* The line, "And maniacs don't blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] ''The Final Cut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club 1n December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
to:
* The line, "And maniacs don't blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] ''The Final Cut'' ''Music/TheFinalCut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club 1n in December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
27th Sep '15 6:37:40 PM DavidDelony
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* The line, "And maniacs down blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] ''The Final Cut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club 1n December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
to:
* The line, "And maniacs down don't blow holes in bandsmen by remote control" on the track "The Gunner's Dream" from [[PinkFloyd Pink Floyd's]] ''The Final Cut'' is a reference to the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Droppin_Well_bombing Droppin Well bombing]], where a small explosive device placed in a dance club 1n December 1982 by Irish National Liberation Army members in Northern Ireland was detonated, killing 11 British soldiers and six civilians.
22nd Sep '15 2:29:07 AM zero5889
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In both Ireland (both sides) and England, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked down the street holding the wrong flag. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colors on bunting and painted on their kerbs. Lasting between 1969 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and even occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was the Catholics vs. the Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.
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In both Ireland (both sides) and England, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked down the street holding the wrong flag. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colors colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs. Lasting between 1969 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and even occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was the Catholics vs. the Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern ireland Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.

Of course, while London ''did'' commit actions it shouldn't be proud of, the conflict was hardly as black-and-white as some would rather have it, and is more or less like a real-life case of GreyAndGrayMorality (Britain was only responsible for 10% of the total casualties, compared to the republican and loyalist militias' 60% and 30%, respectively). Even when the media in recent years increasingly cast the IRA in a darker light, being a stock source of WesternTerrorists, it is wise to remember that both sides equally have a fair share of blood on their hands. It should also be noted that only 36% of the IRA's victims were civilians, compared to the British Army's 51% and the UDA's 85%.
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Of course, while London ''did'' commit actions it shouldn't be proud of, the conflict was hardly as black-and-white as some would rather have it, and is more or less like a real-life case of GreyAndGrayMorality (Britain (on one hand, the British Army was only responsible for 10% of the total casualties, compared to the republican republicans' and loyalist militias' loyalists' 60% and 30%, respectively). Even when respectively; on the other hand, only 36% of fatalities by republicans are civilians, compared to the Army's 51% and the loyalists' 85%), and even with the media in recent years increasingly cast recently casting the IRA in a darker light, being a stock source of WesternTerrorists, it is wise to remember that both sides equally have a fair share of blood on their hands. It should also be noted that only 36% of the IRA's victims were civilians, compared to the British Army's 51% and the UDA's 85%. hands.
24th Aug '15 8:27:08 AM Ahearne
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Of course, there are other titles: "Loyalists" are sometimes called "Unionists" or "Royalists", and the Republicans as "Nationalists". The terms are pretty ambiguous, particularly the "Loyalist" title, while "Royalist" implies fealty to the House of Saxe-Coburg Gotha/Windsor (which the Irish Free State had). On the other hand, it's not uncommon for someone to become a "Republican Unionist" (i.e., desirous of democratic rule from a republican Britain), or an Ulster Nationalist (i.e., desirous of an independent Ulster), which does exist.[[note]]At one point (before about 1919--well before "the Troubles" but within its background) it was totally consistent to be a "Royalist Nationalist" (desiring an independent united Ireland under a monarchy headed by the House of Saxe-Coburg Gotha/Windsor; this was what the Irish Parliamentary Party wanted).[[/note]] Yes, this really is one of ''those'' conflicts, happening right around the corner.
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Of course, there are other titles: "Loyalists" are sometimes called "Unionists" or "Royalists", and the Republicans as "Nationalists". The terms are pretty ambiguous, particularly the "Loyalist" title, while "Royalist" implies fealty to the House of Saxe-Coburg Gotha/Windsor (which the Irish Free State had). On the other hand, it's not uncommon for someone to become a "Republican Unionist" (i.e., desirous of democratic rule from a republican Britain), or an Ulster Nationalist (i.e., desirous of an independent Ulster), which does exist.[[note]]At one point (before about 1919--well before "the Troubles" but within its background) it was totally consistent to be a "Royalist Nationalist" (desiring an independent united Ireland under a monarchy headed by the House of Saxe-Coburg Gotha/Windsor; this was what the Irish Parliamentary Party wanted). There was also a small minority of nationalists who wanted to restore a descendent of the Irish High Kings to the throne.[[/note]] Yes, this really is one of ''those'' conflicts, happening right around the corner.
24th Aug '15 8:25:45 AM Ahearne
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Once again, there isn't much evidence to this myth
The Troubles are pretty much over now, with the IRA having effectively ceased to function, although there are still occasional flareups, and sectarian violence, largely unrelated to the conflict, still rears its ugly head. The legacy remains, though -- a recent proposal by a commission to pay the nearest relatives of ''all'' casualties a compensation of 12,000 led to outrage. Also, a lot of former IRA men are now involved in drug rings, partly because smuggling guns during that period turned out to be rather good training for drug running (which they also got into at the time as a source of funds).
to:
The Troubles are pretty much over now, with the IRA having effectively ceased to function, although there are still occasional flareups, and sectarian violence, largely unrelated to the conflict, still rears its ugly head. The legacy remains, though -- a recent proposal by a commission to pay the nearest relatives of ''all'' casualties a compensation of 12,000 led to outrage. Also, a lot of former IRA men are now involved in drug rings, partly because smuggling guns during that period turned out to be rather good training for drug running (which they also got into at the time as a source of funds). running.
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