History UsefulNotes / TheTroubles

18th Sep '17 2:55:14 AM Tightwire
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In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walkinh down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.

to:

In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walkinh walking down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; flag or no flag, you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.
18th Sep '17 2:54:26 AM Tightwire
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In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked down the street holding the wrong flag. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.

to:

In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked for walkinh down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.
8th Sep '17 6:09:04 AM LentilSandEater
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Lasting between 1968 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.

to:

Lasting between 1968 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded remarked on by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.
9th Aug '17 7:32:49 PM PaulA
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* Creator/DianaWynneJones story "Dogsbody" was set during the very peak of The Troubles, with a small Irish girl called Kathleen being the daughter of an imprisoned Loyalist terrorist. During the story, her father escaped prison, and was subsequently murdered by Republicans. Her father however played no role in the story besides his death.

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* Creator/DianaWynneJones story "Dogsbody" was Creator/DianaWynneJones's novel ''Literature/{{Dogsbody}}'' is set during the very peak of The Troubles, with a small Irish girl called Kathleen being the daughter of an imprisoned Loyalist terrorist. During the story, her father escaped escapes prison, and was is subsequently murdered by Republicans. Her father however played plays no role in the story besides his death.
23rd Jul '17 3:12:04 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, in the third of his semi-autobiographical short story collections, ''[[Literature/McAuslan The Sheikh and the Dustbin]]'', adds a postscript concerning later meetings with his former commanding colonel, forty years on from their post-war soldiering in 1947-48. This extraordinary old man, a prisoner of the Japanese for most of WW2, in ''his early eighties'' donned Army uniform and a flak jacket and went out onto the streets of Belfast with a patrol from the Gordon Highlanders, to get an idea of the difficulties presented to the young soldiers of his old regiment in a new age...

to:

* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, in the third of his semi-autobiographical short story collections, ''[[Literature/McAuslan The Sheikh and the Dustbin]]'', adds a postscript concerning later meetings with his former commanding colonel, forty years on from their post-war soldiering in 1947-48. This extraordinary old man, a prisoner of the Japanese for most of WW2, [=WW2=], in ''his early eighties'' donned Army uniform and a flak jacket and went out onto the streets of Belfast with a patrol from the Gordon Highlanders, to get an idea of the difficulties presented to the young soldiers of his old regiment in a new age...
23rd Jun '17 9:25:40 AM DrOO7
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Series/LawAndOrderUK'' offers the briefest reference to the long-running tension between the British and the Irish when DS Matt Devlin, who is of Irish descent, mentions being called "Mick" during his rookie years.
21st Jun '17 4:42:38 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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In 1969, the Catholics formed an active civil rights movement, partly inspired by [[CivilRightsMovement that which occurred years earlier]] just across UsefulNotes/ThePond. At the same time, a loyalist [[BrotherhoodOfFunnyHats fraternal order]] called "Apprentice Boys of Derry" planned a counter-march [[{{Troll}} on the same day and route as that by the civil rights activists]]. This went as well as expected -- the latter, ordered not to march, [[{{Determinator}} marched anyway]], and were attacked by loyalist police. There followed some of the most shocking scenes of PoliceBrutality ever seen in the UK, especially from [[TheDreaded the infamous B-Specials]], an unpaid and part-time adjunct to the regular police force. Enraged, the Catholics went into hyperdrive, marching and protesting... and being attacked again and again. In response, and likely due to prodding from an indignant London, Belfast promised wide reforms... which led to even more loyalist belligerence. At the beginning of August, there was a serious three-way riot between both sides and the police in the center of Belfast. MP J. Enoch "Rivers of Blood" Powell even suggested deporting the entire Catholic population to the Republic. Appalled, Wilson and then Home Secretary UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan took the decision (without consulting the Cabinet) to send in the British Army to restore order in return for the abolition of the B-Specials and serious reform. It is a myth that they were not aware of the dangers (they estimated that it would take at least a decade before they pulled out), and some historians have called the decision to send in the Army "Jim Callaghan's finest hour."

to:

In 1969, the Catholics formed an active civil rights movement, partly inspired by [[CivilRightsMovement [[UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement that which occurred years earlier]] just across UsefulNotes/ThePond. At the same time, a loyalist [[BrotherhoodOfFunnyHats fraternal order]] called "Apprentice Boys of Derry" planned a counter-march [[{{Troll}} on the same day and route as that by the civil rights activists]]. This went as well as expected -- the latter, ordered not to march, [[{{Determinator}} marched anyway]], and were attacked by loyalist police. There followed some of the most shocking scenes of PoliceBrutality ever seen in the UK, especially from [[TheDreaded the infamous B-Specials]], an unpaid and part-time adjunct to the regular police force. Enraged, the Catholics went into hyperdrive, marching and protesting... and being attacked again and again. In response, and likely due to prodding from an indignant London, Belfast promised wide reforms... which led to even more loyalist belligerence. At the beginning of August, there was a serious three-way riot between both sides and the police in the center of Belfast. MP J. Enoch "Rivers of Blood" Powell even suggested deporting the entire Catholic population to the Republic. Appalled, Wilson and then Home Secretary UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan took the decision (without consulting the Cabinet) to send in the British Army to restore order in return for the abolition of the B-Specials and serious reform. It is a myth that they were not aware of the dangers (they estimated that it would take at least a decade before they pulled out), and some historians have called the decision to send in the Army "Jim Callaghan's finest hour."
21st Jun '17 3:54:07 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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The Troubles has its roots in UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution. At the end of the aforementioned war, the United Kingdom decided to divide Ireland between an independent state for the predominantly Roman Catholic south and a constituency of the Union for the six Protestant-dominated counties to the north, even as this proved unpopular to either side, which wanted ''the entirety of Ireland'' for their respective political entities. For the next forty years, the loyalists alone ruled Northern Ireland, while the Catholic minority was largely excluded from public life by snobbery, poverty and bigotry. The Union government, happy to be finally shorn of TheIrishQuestion, washed its hands of the affair, and this system persisted for years.

to:

The Troubles has its roots in UsefulNotes/TheIrishRevolution. At the end of the aforementioned war, the United Kingdom decided to divide Ireland between an independent state for the predominantly Roman Catholic south and a constituency of the Union for the six Protestant-dominated counties to the north, even as this proved unpopular to either side, which wanted ''the entirety of Ireland'' for their respective political entities. For the next forty years, the loyalists alone ruled Northern Ireland, while the Catholic minority was largely excluded from public life by snobbery, poverty and bigotry. The Union government, happy to be finally shorn of TheIrishQuestion, UsefulNotes/TheIrishQuestion, washed its hands of the affair, and this system persisted for years.
21st Jun '17 11:47:23 AM SantosLHalper
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* The infamously badly-researched ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "If It's Doomsday, This Must Be Belfast". Dialogue example: "[[CriticalResearchFailure Fenian Prods]]". Look it up on Website/YouTube. For obvious reasons anyone who grew up during The Troubles finds it ''[[SoBadItsGood amazing]]''.

to:

* The infamously badly-researched ''WesternAnimation/CaptainPlanetAndThePlaneteers'' episode "If It's Doomsday, This Must Be Belfast". Dialogue example: a Catholic saying "[[CriticalResearchFailure Fenian Prods]]". Look it up on Website/YouTube. For obvious reasons anyone who grew up during The Troubles finds it ''[[SoBadItsGood amazing]]''.
19th Jun '17 1:55:11 PM bt8257
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Lasting between 1969 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.

to:

Lasting between 1969 1968 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.
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