History UsefulNotes / TheTroubles

11th Dec '17 5:42:17 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Often, a heroic character explicitly belonging to one side will decry the excesses of his comrades and/or leave in disgust after they [[EveryoneHasStandards went]] [[NotWhatISignedOnFor too]] [[RageBreakingPoint far]] (expect this to involve [[HarmfulToMinors deaths of children]], a [[TruthInTelevision tragically all-too-common result of tactics used by both sides]]). Purely villainous groups of terrorists are often said to belong to some fictional ultra-violent RenegadeSplinterFaction, in an attempt to avoid political controversy.

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Often, a heroic character explicitly belonging to one side will decry the excesses of his comrades and/or leave in disgust after they [[EveryoneHasStandards went]] [[NotWhatISignedOnFor too]] [[RageBreakingPoint far]] (expect this to involve [[HarmfulToMinors deaths of children]], a [[TruthInTelevision [[WouldHurtAChild tragically all-too-common result of tactics used by both sides]]). Purely villainous groups of terrorists are often said to belong to some fictional ultra-violent RenegadeSplinterFaction, in an attempt to avoid political controversy.
11th Dec '17 5:41:23 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walking down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, flag or no flag, you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.

to:

In Ireland (both sides) ([[UsefulNotes/{{Ireland}} both]] [[UsefulNotes/NorthernIreland sides]]) and the United Kingdom, UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walking down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, flag or no flag, you could be beaten by men goons with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.
9th Oct '17 8:28:42 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has the subject mentioned in reference to Sean Cassidy's backstory, in which his pregnant wife was killed in an IRA bombing (resulting in his devastation of the cell responsible) and explained as why the Death Eaters' attacks weren't really noticed by the muggle populace. It is acknowledged to be a touchy subject and presented fairly neutrally with Hermione mostly explaining the historic facts of the matter to Harry - who knows the basics - and Ron - who doesn't. The focus is on the general devastation on both sides, with no moral judgement being made on either side, and the tone being tilted towards WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. It is also accurately noted that the violence didn't completely end with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.

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* ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'' has the subject mentioned in reference to Sean Cassidy's backstory, in which his pregnant wife was killed in an IRA bombing (resulting in his devastation of the cell responsible) and explained as why the Death Eaters' attacks weren't really noticed by the muggle populace. populace - or at least, could be explained away. It is acknowledged to be a touchy subject in the narrative and presented fairly neutrally with Hermione mostly explaining the historic facts of the matter to Harry - who knows the basics - and Ron - who doesn't. The It's handled rather carefully, with [[Creator/NimbusLlewelyn the author]] noting that his mother grew up in Belfast during the Troubles and almost never talks about it for damn good reason, and the focus is on the general devastation on both sides, with no moral judgement being made on either side, and side. In general, the tone being is tilted towards WhatASenselessWasteOfHumanLife. It is also accurately noted that the violence didn't completely end with the Good Friday Agreement of 1998.



* Jack Higgins (of ''The Eagle has Landed'' fame) loves to use the Troubles (and the preceding 50 years of hostility) as background and motivation for his antiheroes. He favors cynically disillusioned IRA gunmen, but doesn't limit himself.

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* Jack Higgins (of ''The Eagle has Landed'' fame) loves to use the Troubles (and the preceding 50 years of hostility) as background and motivation for his antiheroes. He favors favours cynically disillusioned IRA gunmen, but doesn't limit himself.
9th Oct '17 4:50:00 AM karstovich2
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Violence increased through TheSeventies and TheEighties, with IRA bombings and shootouts with the British being a common feature. Faced with escalating violence, crackdowns became more severe -- tanks were used to occupy free Derry, while elements of security forces colluded with loyalists. Many of the controversial features of TheWarOnTerror -- the renditions, the torture, detention without trial, and the like -- saw their bloody precursors here. Gradually, both sides became more extreme. Some branches of the IRA now began to target civilians on the British mainland, and loyalists, aided by a branch of MI5 known as the FRU began a pogrom, killing random Catholic civilians in retaliation for attacks by IRA partisans. Riots were common, and a Berlin-style system of walls and checkpoints was enforced in Belfast and Derry to keep the feuding communities apart. The IRA became ever more brazen, killing Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, war hero and mentor to Prince Charles, on his yacht off the coast of County Sligo in 1979 (and it's something of a ShootTheShaggyDog story -- Mountbatten was ''favorable'' to the Irish cause), and nearly doing in UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher, then in Brighton for a 1984 Tory convention (though with five deaths).

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Violence increased through TheSeventies and TheEighties, with IRA bombings and shootouts with the British being a common feature. Faced with escalating violence, crackdowns became more severe -- tanks were used to occupy free Derry, while elements of security forces colluded with loyalists. Many of the controversial features of TheWarOnTerror -- the renditions, the torture, detention without trial, and the like -- saw their bloody precursors here. Gradually, both sides became more extreme. Some branches of the IRA now began to target civilians on the British mainland, and loyalists, aided by a branch of MI5 known as the FRU began a pogrom, killing random Catholic civilians in retaliation for attacks by IRA partisans. Riots were common, and a Berlin-style system of walls and checkpoints was enforced in Belfast and Derry to keep the feuding communities apart. The IRA became ever more brazen, killing Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, naval war hero and mentor to (and great-uncle of) Prince Charles, on his yacht off the coast of County Sligo in 1979 (and it's something of a ShootTheShaggyDog story -- Mountbatten was ''favorable'' to the Irish cause), and nearly doing in UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher, then in Brighton for a 1984 Tory convention (though with five deaths).
24th Sep '17 5:32:10 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/TheCryingGame''. [[ComeForTheXStayForTheY Come for The Troubles]], stay for AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame. Or vice versa.

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* ''Film/TheCryingGame''. [[ComeForTheXStayForTheY [[JustForFun/ComeForTheXStayForTheY Come for The Troubles]], stay for AllThereIsToKnowAboutTheCryingGame. Or vice versa.
18th Sep '17 2:55:14 AM Tightwire
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In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walkinh down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.

to:

In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot for walkinh walking down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; flag or no flag, you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.
18th Sep '17 2:54:26 AM Tightwire
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In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked down the street holding the wrong flag. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.

to:

In Ireland (both sides) and the United Kingdom, it is considered extremely offensive, when using this term, to ''not'' speak of it with a capital "T". You say "the troubles", they say '''the Troubles'''. At its peak, you could get shot at if you walked for walkinh down the street holding the wrong flag. Hell, never mind the flag; you could be beaten by men with crowbars just for getting on a bus. We're not kidding. And there are still many parts of Northern Ireland that blatantly display either the Union Jack or the Irish Tricolour, and have its colours on bunting and painted on their kerbs.
8th Sep '17 6:09:04 AM LentilSandEater
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Lasting between 1968 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.

to:

Lasting between 1968 and 1998, the Troubles refers to a period of low-intensity but constant war in Northern Ireland, which sometimes overflowed into Great Britain, the Republic of Ireland, and occasionally continental Europe. This was a time when the Irish Republicans, mostly Roman Catholic and of native Irish descent, fought paramilitary Ulster Loyalists, mostly Protestant (i.e., Church of Ireland, Presbyterian and Methodist) and descended from British colonists, and the armed forces of the British government, over which country Northern Ireland should belong to, with the former favoring the Republic of Ireland and the latter the United Kingdom. (The actual citizenry and armed forces of the Republic of Ireland mostly stayed out of it.) The fact that it was Catholics vs. Protestants is lampshaded remarked on by Creator/TomClancy in one of the ''Jack Ryan'' novels by noting that "Northern Ireland is one of the safest places to be a Jew." Despite that though any divisions between Protestants and Catholics had hardly anything to do with the Troubles apart from which side you were likely to find them.
9th Aug '17 7:32:49 PM PaulA
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* Creator/DianaWynneJones story "Dogsbody" was set during the very peak of The Troubles, with a small Irish girl called Kathleen being the daughter of an imprisoned Loyalist terrorist. During the story, her father escaped prison, and was subsequently murdered by Republicans. Her father however played no role in the story besides his death.

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* Creator/DianaWynneJones story "Dogsbody" was Creator/DianaWynneJones's novel ''Literature/{{Dogsbody}}'' is set during the very peak of The Troubles, with a small Irish girl called Kathleen being the daughter of an imprisoned Loyalist terrorist. During the story, her father escaped escapes prison, and was is subsequently murdered by Republicans. Her father however played plays no role in the story besides his death.
23rd Jul '17 3:12:04 PM nombretomado
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* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, in the third of his semi-autobiographical short story collections, ''[[Literature/McAuslan The Sheikh and the Dustbin]]'', adds a postscript concerning later meetings with his former commanding colonel, forty years on from their post-war soldiering in 1947-48. This extraordinary old man, a prisoner of the Japanese for most of WW2, in ''his early eighties'' donned Army uniform and a flak jacket and went out onto the streets of Belfast with a patrol from the Gordon Highlanders, to get an idea of the difficulties presented to the young soldiers of his old regiment in a new age...

to:

* Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser, in the third of his semi-autobiographical short story collections, ''[[Literature/McAuslan The Sheikh and the Dustbin]]'', adds a postscript concerning later meetings with his former commanding colonel, forty years on from their post-war soldiering in 1947-48. This extraordinary old man, a prisoner of the Japanese for most of WW2, [=WW2=], in ''his early eighties'' donned Army uniform and a flak jacket and went out onto the streets of Belfast with a patrol from the Gordon Highlanders, to get an idea of the difficulties presented to the young soldiers of his old regiment in a new age...
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