History UsefulNotes / TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland

30th Jan '18 3:28:58 PM LtFedora
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* '''Lübeck:''' Formerly the Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck, its old town was largely destroyed in one of the Royal Air Forces's first major air raids in World War II. Lübeck was [[JustTheFirstCitizen "Primus inter pares"]] (first among equals) in the Hanseatic League of medieval Baltic seaport cities and got filthily rich during that time - something which is still evidenced by its old town and a beautiful Hanse museum that was opened in TheNewTens. Childhood home of writing brothers Heinrich and Thomas Mann, and residence of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass until his death. Already saddled with a reputation of a DyingTown by the time of the Mann brothers (Buddenbrooks is best understood with the slow decline of Lübeck from one the richest cities in the world to a backwater in mind), Lübeck took several hits in the years afterwards. First it was stripped of its Free and Hanseatic city state (within Germany) status by ThoseWackyNazis, then it was bombed by the Allies - even though Hitler hated the town - and after the war the border between East and West Germany was right at the outskirts of town, actually annexing some minor suburbs to the East. Still, Lübeck managed to scrape by more or less and actually restored much of its beautiful old town - until TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, when not only did Lübeck lose an extra subsidy for being so close to the "iron curtain", it also had to compete with East German towns that were ''now'' getting subsidies instead. Add to that a total collapse of shipbuilding (one of the major industries up to that point) and you now have a beautiful town that lives on its glorious past and tourism but has not much besides that.

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* '''Lübeck:''' Formerly the Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck, its old town was largely destroyed in one of the Royal Air Forces's Force's first major air raids in World War II. Lübeck was [[JustTheFirstCitizen "Primus inter pares"]] (first among equals) in the Hanseatic League of medieval Baltic seaport cities and got filthily rich during that time - something which is still evidenced by its old town and a beautiful Hanse museum that was opened in TheNewTens. Childhood home of writing brothers Heinrich and Thomas Mann, and residence of Nobel Prize winner Günter Grass until his death. Already saddled with a reputation of a DyingTown by the time of the Mann brothers (Buddenbrooks is best understood with the slow decline of Lübeck from one the richest cities in the world to a backwater in mind), Lübeck took several hits in the years afterwards. First it was stripped of its Free and Hanseatic city state (within Germany) status by ThoseWackyNazis, then it was bombed by the Allies - even though Hitler hated the town - and after the war the border between East and West Germany was right at the outskirts of town, actually annexing some minor suburbs to the East. Still, Lübeck managed to scrape by more or less and actually restored much of its beautiful old town - until TheGreatPoliticsMessUp, when not only did Lübeck lose an extra subsidy for being so close to the "iron curtain", it also had to compete with East German towns that were ''now'' getting subsidies instead. Add to that a total collapse of shipbuilding (one of the major industries up to that point) and you now have a beautiful town that lives on its glorious past and tourism but has not much besides that.
15th Jan '18 12:55:33 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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Many of the current German states are very different from their namesakes as they existed in the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany Imperial]] and/or [[UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic Weimar]] eras, when UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} made up most of Germany. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Allies first broke up Prussia into smaller units, then merged small states to larger continuous units within the four zones of occupation. (If you go back to before the 19th century, you'll need a bigger scorecard: there were ''[[UsefulNotes/AllTheLittleGermanies hundreds]]'' of tiny principalities and duchies, almost all of which were for practical purposes completely independent autocracies.[[note]]There were a few dozen cities that were run on old-style republican lines. By the end of the Napoleonic wars only four were left: Frankfurt, Lübeck, Berlin and Hamburg[[/note]])

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Many of the current German states are very different from their namesakes as they existed in the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany Imperial]] and/or [[UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic Weimar]] eras, when UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} made up most of Germany. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Allies first broke up Prussia into smaller units, then merged small states to larger continuous units within the four zones of occupation. (If you go back to before the 19th century, you'll need a bigger scorecard: there were ''[[UsefulNotes/AllTheLittleGermanies hundreds]]'' of tiny principalities and duchies, almost all of which were for practical purposes completely independent autocracies.[[note]]There were a few dozen cities that were run on old-style republican lines. By the end of the Napoleonic wars wars, only four were left: Frankfurt, Lübeck, Berlin and Hamburg[[/note]])
Hamburg.[[/note]])
24th Nov '17 10:11:03 AM nombretomado
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Formerly in EastGermany, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern [[note]]although Vorpommern has always been translated as "Western Pomerania", the more accurate name would be '''Hither Pomerania''' or '''Cispomerania''', both were formerly used as variant names in English[[/note]] is the result of the merger between the former Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, along with majority of western half of the Prussian province of Pomerania. "Majority" is the keyword here, since the historically Western Pomeranian cities of Stettin, Swinemünde, and Pölitz were given to Poland after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and were promptly renamed Szczecin, Świnoujście, and Police, respectively.

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Formerly in EastGermany, UsefulNotes/EastGermany, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern [[note]]although Vorpommern has always been translated as "Western Pomerania", the more accurate name would be '''Hither Pomerania''' or '''Cispomerania''', both were formerly used as variant names in English[[/note]] is the result of the merger between the former Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, along with majority of western half of the Prussian province of Pomerania. "Majority" is the keyword here, since the historically Western Pomeranian cities of Stettin, Swinemünde, and Pölitz were given to Poland after UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and were promptly renamed Szczecin, Świnoujście, and Police, respectively.
1st Sep '17 4:07:49 PM nombretomado
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Many of the current German states are very different from their namesakes as they existed in the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany Imperial]] and/or [[UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic Weimar]] eras, when UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} made up most of Germany. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Allies first broke up Prussia into smaller units, then merged small states to larger continuous units within the four zones of occupation. (If you go back to before the 19th century, you'll need a bigger scorecard: there were ''[[AllTheLittleGermanies hundreds]]'' of tiny principalities and duchies, almost all of which were for practical purposes completely independent autocracies.[[note]]There were a few dozen cities that were run on old-style republican lines. By the end of the Napoleonic wars only four were left: Frankfurt, Lübeck, Berlin and Hamburg[[/note]])

to:

Many of the current German states are very different from their namesakes as they existed in the [[UsefulNotes/ImperialGermany Imperial]] and/or [[UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic Weimar]] eras, when UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} made up most of Germany. After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, the Allies first broke up Prussia into smaller units, then merged small states to larger continuous units within the four zones of occupation. (If you go back to before the 19th century, you'll need a bigger scorecard: there were ''[[AllTheLittleGermanies ''[[UsefulNotes/AllTheLittleGermanies hundreds]]'' of tiny principalities and duchies, almost all of which were for practical purposes completely independent autocracies.[[note]]There were a few dozen cities that were run on old-style republican lines. By the end of the Napoleonic wars only four were left: Frankfurt, Lübeck, Berlin and Hamburg[[/note]])
22nd Apr '17 12:59:09 PM Kamikashi
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* '''Köln (Cologne):''' The largest city in the state, and whose English (originally French) name is the namesake of the perfume (the city still produces Eau de Cologne). Köln is famous for its carnival, intense rivalry with Düsseldorf, a large gay population and, above all, its cathedral, which largely survived Allied bombing at the end of World War II (most likely because the bombers used its tall twin spires for navigation), and home to what is claimed to be the bones of the ThreeWiseMen, enshrined in a gilded box behind the high altar. The city has its own dialect, Kölsch, which shares the same name as that of a local beer (thus jokes that Kölsch is the only language one can drink). ''[[Series/AlarmFuerCobra11 Alarm für Cobra 11]]'' is set in and around Köln, and is the host of the [=GamesCom=], the successor of the Leipziger Games Convention. Köln is also home to Konrad Adenauer, first [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor of West Germany]], who served as mayor during the UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic.

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* '''Köln (Cologne):''' The largest city in the state, and whose English (originally French) name is the namesake of the perfume (the city still produces Eau de Cologne). Köln is famous for its carnival, intense rivalry with Düsseldorf, a large gay population and, above all, its cathedral, which largely survived Allied bombing at the end of World War II (most likely because the bombers used its tall twin spires for navigation), and home to what is claimed to be the bones of the ThreeWiseMen, enshrined in a gilded box behind the high altar. It is home to several institutions of higher education, including one of the largest universities in Europe, the Universität zu Köln (University of Cologne), which at times sports about 60,000 students alone. The city has its own dialect, Kölsch, which shares the same name as that of a local beer (thus jokes that Kölsch is the only language one can drink). ''[[Series/AlarmFuerCobra11 Alarm für Cobra 11]]'' is set in and around Köln, and is the host of the [=GamesCom=], the successor of the Leipziger Games Convention. Köln is also home to Konrad Adenauer, first [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor of West Germany]], who served as mayor during the UsefulNotes/WeimarRepublic.
8th Mar '17 7:28:10 PM nlpnt
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* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of the Volkswagen plant - the city's original name being literally just ''Stadt des KDF-Wagens bei Fallersleben''[[note]]City of the Strength-Through-Joy-Car near Fallersleben[[/note]]. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is VW and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem

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* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of the Volkswagen plant - the city's original name being literally just ''Stadt des KDF-Wagens bei Fallersleben''[[note]]City of the Strength-Through-Joy-Car near Fallersleben[[/note]]. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is VW - German carspotters consider any non-VW product with a WOB license plate worthy of a picture - and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem
26th Jan '17 1:44:39 PM SmoCro
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The Rhineland part of North-Rhine-Westphalia consists of the former territories of various minor duchies and counties, the larger part of Electorate and Archbishopric of Cologne, and the former Free Imperial Cities of Cologne and Aachen. A lot of people in the Rhineland and Westphalia like to stress that their mentality is different from the [[UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} Prussian]] one and that they only became part of that state in 1815. This does not apply as much to those parts of the state that had been part of the monarchy since before the Margraviate of Brandenburg became the Kingdom of Prussia, e. g. the area around Wesel on the Lower Rhine and the counties of Mark (with Bochum) and Ravensberg (Bielefeld).

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The Rhineland part of North-Rhine-Westphalia consists of the former territories of various minor duchies and counties, the larger part of Electorate and Archbishopric of Cologne, and the former Free Imperial Cities of Cologne and Aachen. A lot of people in the Rhineland and Westphalia like to stress that their mentality is different from the [[UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}} Prussian]] one and that they only became part of that state in 1815. This does not apply as much to those parts of the state that had been part of the monarchy since before the Margraviate of Brandenburg became the Kingdom of Prussia, e. g. the area around Wesel on the Lower Rhine and the counties of Mark (with Bochum) and Ravensberg (Bielefeld).Minden-Ravensberg (Most of what is today the Northern part of Ostwestfalen, Bielefeld, Herford, Minden-Lübbecke).
21st Dec '16 5:11:39 PM jeez
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* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of the Volkswagen plant - the city's original name being literally just ''Stadt des KDF-Wagens bei Fallersleben''[[note]]City of the Strength-Though-Joy-Car near Fallersleben[[/note]]. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is VW and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem

to:

* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of the Volkswagen plant - the city's original name being literally just ''Stadt des KDF-Wagens bei Fallersleben''[[note]]City of the Strength-Though-Joy-Car Strength-Through-Joy-Car near Fallersleben[[/note]]. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is VW and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem
21st Dec '16 5:11:06 PM jeez
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* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of a car company. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is the car company and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem

to:

* '''Wolfsburg:''' One of the youngest cities of Germany, founded only in the 1930s to house the workers of a car company. the Volkswagen plant - the city's original name being literally just ''Stadt des KDF-Wagens bei Fallersleben''[[note]]City of the Strength-Though-Joy-Car near Fallersleben[[/note]]. To this day the only thing most people associate the place with is the car company VW and in a way it is still a company with a city in it and not the other way round. Fallersleben, a now annexed suburb is also the home of Hoffman von Fallersleben (no, not [[BlueBlood that kind of von]]) who wrote the German national anthem
21st Dec '16 4:59:55 PM jeez
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* '''Heidelberg:''' Home of the oldest university in the country, Heidelberg was the capital of the Palatinate until the French burnt it down in one of Louis XIV's wars. The town is also strongly associated with the 19th-century image of boisterous German student life, thanks in large part to Wilhelm Meyer-Foerster's play ''Alt-Heidelberg'' (which was adapted into the operetta ''The Student Prince''). Popular with American tourists.

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* '''Heidelberg:''' Home of the oldest university in the country, Heidelberg was the capital of the Palatinate until the French burnt it down in one of Louis XIV's wars. The town is also strongly associated with the 19th-century image of boisterous German student life, thanks in large part to Wilhelm Meyer-Foerster's play ''Alt-Heidelberg'' (which was adapted into the operetta ''The Student Prince''). Popular with American tourists.tourists and servicemen, at least in part because the town hosted the US Army, Europe HQ until 2013.
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