History UsefulNotes / TheRomanEmpire

30th Sep '17 5:44:44 PM SonofAkatosh
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A peacemaker who pulled back from several areas conquered by Trajan. Traveled around the empire, and built the eponymous wall in Britain. Known for vehemently supporting Greek culture, almost to a bizarre degree. He is also remembered by Jews for being the Emperor who brutally crushed the Bar Kochba revolt, renaming Jerusalem Aelia Capitolina and generally making things harder for them. His reign was obscure with relatively few historical depictions. One exception is Marguerite Yourcenar's classic ''Memoirs of Hadrian''. Had a male favorite deified after said favorite died young (sources disagree as to whether it was an accident, illness, murder, human sacrifice or some combination thereof). One of the emperors called gay most often by modern commenters

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A peacemaker who pulled back from several areas conquered by Trajan. Traveled around the empire, and built the eponymous wall in Britain. Known for vehemently supporting Greek culture, almost to a bizarre degree. He is also remembered by Jews for being the Emperor who brutally crushed the Bar Kochba revolt, renaming Jerusalem Aelia Capitolina and generally making things harder for them. His reign was obscure with relatively few historical depictions. One exception is Marguerite Yourcenar's classic ''Memoirs of Hadrian''. Had a male favorite deified after said favorite died young (sources disagree as to whether it was an accident, illness, murder, human sacrifice or some combination thereof). One of the emperors called gay most often by modern commenters
commentators



Famous for doing nothing at all besides ruling competently for 22 years. In fact, unlike Trajan and the other warrior-emperors that would follow him, Antonius Pius probably never left Italy on campaign and fought his wars entirely through intermediaries in the field. Rumour has it that he also received a delegation from the Han Dynasty in China during his reign. Also built a second wall in Britain (after some victories he managed) which was soon abandoned. He probably the cognomen Pius because he deified Hadrian and pardoned some Senators which Hadrian had sentenced to death.

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Famous for doing nothing at all besides ruling competently for 22 years. In fact, unlike Trajan and the other warrior-emperors that would follow him, Antonius Pius probably never left Italy on campaign and fought his wars entirely through intermediaries in the field. Rumour has it that he also received sent a delegation from to the Han Dynasty in China during his reign.reign (Well him or Hadrian). Also built a second wall in Britain (after some victories he managed) which was soon abandoned. He probably received the cognomen Pius because he deified Hadrian and pardoned in exchange for pardoning some Senators which Hadrian had sentenced to death.
30th Sep '17 5:37:51 PM SonofAkatosh
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(For Emperors of the Eastern Empire after the Western's fall, see UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire)

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(For Emperors of the Eastern Empire after the Western's Western Empire's fall, see UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire)
30th Sep '17 5:28:47 PM nombretomado
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(For Emperors of the Eastern Empire after the Western's fall, see ByzantineEmpire)

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(For Emperors of the Eastern Empire after the Western's fall, see ByzantineEmpire)UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire)
22nd Sep '17 11:48:36 AM fgenzo159
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* TheRepublic (from ''res publica'', "[government is a] public affair")

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* TheRepublic (from ''res publica'', "[government is a] public affair")
20th Sep '17 1:29:30 PM SSJMagus
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In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles such as "Emperor" (derived from the Latin word ''imperator'', a title given to victorious generals) and later Kaiser and Tsar (both derived from the word Caesar) were adopted by later European rulers. One of the Pope's titles, ''Pontifex Maximus'' (chief priest) was originally held by the head of the college of priests in ancient Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise named his Kingdom the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire" in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor Roman nor an empire.

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In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles such as "Emperor" (derived from the Latin word ''imperator'', a title given to victorious generals) generals but eventually reserved solely for the ruler of the Empire) and later Kaiser and Tsar (both derived from the word Caesar) were adopted by later European rulers. One of the Pope's titles, ''Pontifex Maximus'' (chief priest) was originally held by the head of the college of priests in ancient Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise named his Kingdom the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire" in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor Roman nor an empire. \n The title of ''dominus'' ("master", instituted as an imperial title by Diocletian) led to the Portuguese honorific "Dom" and the Spanish and Italian "Don", and in a roundabout way also spawned the English honorific "Sir".



A true MagnificentBastard who reorganized the empire and appointed three other co-emperors, creating what is called the tetrarchy. Declared himself a GodEmperor, marking the point when the emperor's authority was absolute in theory as well as in fact. Persecuted the Christians, because he considered them a threat to Rome's stability. After he felt he had done all he wanted to do, he retired to the countryside and became a gardener. He lived long enough to see the collapse of the Tetrarchy.

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A true MagnificentBastard who reorganized the empire and appointed three other co-emperors, creating what is called the tetrarchy. Declared himself a GodEmperor, marking the point when the emperor's authority was absolute in theory as well as in fact. Insisted on being referred to as ''dominus'' ("master"), traditionally the way slaves addressed their masters, with the implication being that '''all people''' were slaves to Diocletian. Persecuted the Christians, because he considered them a threat to Rome's stability. After he felt he had done all he wanted to do, he retired to the countryside and became a gardener. He lived long enough to see the collapse of the Tetrarchy.
29th Aug '17 5:21:06 AM Aurelian
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In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles originating from the Roman era, such as "Emperor" and later "Kaiser" (or as it is called in Russia, Tsar), were made and codified by Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise named his Kingdom the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire" in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor roman nor empire.

to:

In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles originating from the Roman era, such as "Emperor" (derived from the Latin word ''imperator'', a title given to victorious generals) and later "Kaiser" (or as it is called in Russia, Tsar), Kaiser and Tsar (both derived from the word Caesar) were made and codified adopted by later European rulers. One of the Pope's titles, ''Pontifex Maximus'' (chief priest) was originally held by the head of the college of priests in ancient Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise named his Kingdom the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire" in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor roman Roman nor an empire.
28th Aug '17 9:44:17 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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!![[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]](27 BC - 14 AD)

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!![[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]](27 Augustus]] (27 BC - 14 AD)
14th Aug '17 11:32:42 AM FordPrefect
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In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles originating from the Roman era, such as "Emperor" and later "Kaiser" (or as it is called in Russia, Tsar) was made and codified by Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise names his Kingdom, the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire," in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor roman nor empire.

For Western Europe as a whole, the Roman Republic and the Empire, were seen as their {{Precursors}}. Settlements built by the Romans became the cities known today as UsefulNotes/{{London}} and UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. They built roads and other infrastructure projects, a lot of which still exist today, and of course they crushed, defeated, colonized and assimilated the original tribes who inhabited there. As important as it was during its height, it became positively legendary after its decline, seen even in the medieval era, with NostalgiaFilter, and that nostalgia to a large extent continues to colour our perceptions of this era well into the 20th and 21st Century.

to:

In the West, the key successor organization of Rome until the Early Modern Era was the Roman Catholic Church, the world's oldest running institution, and the only one existing today to actually trace its origin to the Roman era. As important as the Empire was when it was alive, in its death it became valuable intellectual real estate, with many great families and other nobility claiming origins (real or imagined) from the Roman era. Titles originating from the Roman era, such as "Emperor" and later "Kaiser" (or as it is called in Russia, Tsar) was Tsar), were made and codified by Rome. A famous example is the Frankish King UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} who was granted the title of Emperor by the Church and he likewise names named his Kingdom, Kingdom the "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire," "UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire" in 800 AD, despite the fact that his Empire (as Creator/{{Voltaire}} put it) was neither holy nor roman nor empire.

For Western Europe as a whole, the Roman Republic and the Empire, Empire were seen as their {{Precursors}}. Settlements built by the Romans became the cities known today as UsefulNotes/{{London}} and UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. They built roads and other infrastructure projects, a lot of which still exist today, and of course they crushed, defeated, colonized and assimilated the original tribes who inhabited lived there. As important as it was during its height, it became positively legendary after its decline, seen decline - even in the medieval era, era - with NostalgiaFilter, and that nostalgia to a large extent continues to colour our perceptions of this era well into the 20th and 21st Century.
14th Aug '17 11:16:09 AM FordPrefect
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Rome, as city and empire, continued to exist for quite a long time, even [[TheArtifact after Rome stopped being the capital of the Empire]] in 286 AD, when Diocletian after dividing the Western and Eastern Empires, nominated Mediolanum (Milan) as the capital. Milan in turn was replaced by Ravenna in the final century of the Empire. But by the end of the 3rd century it had gotten so unwieldy that it needed co-emperors to handle everything; in 395, not long after Constantine embraced UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}}, the empire split into the Eastern and Western halves[[note]]which had happened earlier as part of the general power balance/power struggle within the Empire at large; contemporaries apparently still saw it as one empire with two emperors, it just so happened that the administrative split became more permanent[[/note]]. The Eastern side, which medieval to modern historians re-named the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire for convenience[[note]]the Empire called ''itself'' Roman until its fall, despite being quite Hellenic[[/note]], toiled on almost a thousand years longer, until Ottoman Turks captured Constantinople in 1453. In popular consciousness and in the eyes of most historians, the Roman Empire is largely the beginning, decline and fall of the Western Empire. Officially it collapsed in 476, ushering in (supposedly) TheDarkAges and TheMiddleAges.

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Rome, as city and empire, continued to exist for quite a long time, even [[TheArtifact after Rome stopped being the capital of the Empire]] in 286 AD, when Diocletian after dividing divided the Western and Eastern Empires, Empires and nominated Mediolanum (Milan) as the capital. Milan in turn was replaced by Ravenna in the final century of the Empire. But by the end of the 3rd century it had gotten so unwieldy that it needed co-emperors to handle everything; in 395, not long after Constantine embraced UsefulNotes/{{Christianity}}, the empire split into the Eastern and Western halves[[note]]which had happened earlier as part of the general power balance/power struggle within the Empire at large; contemporaries apparently still saw it as one empire with two emperors, it just so happened that the administrative split became more permanent[[/note]]. The Eastern side, which medieval to modern historians re-named the UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire for convenience[[note]]the Empire called ''itself'' Roman until its fall, despite being quite Hellenic[[/note]], toiled on almost a thousand years longer, until Ottoman Turks captured Constantinople in 1453. In popular consciousness and in the eyes of most historians, the Roman Empire is largely the beginning, decline and fall of the Western Empire. Officially it collapsed in 476, ushering in (supposedly) TheDarkAges and TheMiddleAges.
14th Aug '17 11:14:15 AM FordPrefect
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At its peak the Empire stretched from the Atlantic to the Tigris, and from the Highlands of Scotland to the deserts of North Africa. Its territorial extent covered [[http://www.roman-empire.net/maps/empire/extent/rome-modern-day-nations.html the following contemporary nations]] and the entire Mediterranean which the Romans called "Mare Nostrum" ([[BadassBoast Our Sea]]). Within Europe, it failed to penetrate north into the German speaking lands as well as Scandinavia, the Baltic coasts and Russia. In Asia, it never quite got further than the Levant, with its advance blocked by the Persian Empires (Parthians and Sassanids), a conflict [[ForeverWar that lasted 683 years]][[note]]It still holds the record for the longest protracted conflict in history[[/note]] which despite several storied successes proved to be insurmountable for the Romans, and would provide it with its most humiliating defeats, including the capture of the Roman Emperor Valerian (who died in captivity with the Romans claiming murder and the Persians fervently denying), with another Emperor, Julian, being killed in a skirmish on Persian soil, leading his successor to negotiate a peace on very humiliating terms in exchange for safe passage.

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At its peak the Empire stretched from the Atlantic to the Tigris, and from the Highlands of Scotland to the deserts of North Africa. Its territorial extent covered [[http://www.roman-empire.net/maps/empire/extent/rome-modern-day-nations.html the following dozens of contemporary nations]] and the entire Mediterranean which the Romans called "Mare Nostrum" ([[BadassBoast Our Sea]]). Within Europe, it failed to penetrate north into the German speaking lands as well as Scandinavia, the Baltic coasts and Russia. In Asia, it never quite got further than the Levant, with its advance blocked by the Persian Empires (Parthians and Sassanids), a conflict [[ForeverWar that lasted 683 years]][[note]]It still holds the record for the longest protracted conflict in history[[/note]] which despite several storied successes proved to be insurmountable for the Romans, and would provide it with its most humiliating defeats, including the capture of the Roman Emperor Valerian (who died in captivity with the Romans claiming murder and the Persians fervently denying), with another Emperor, Julian, being killed in a skirmish on Persian soil, leading his successor to negotiate a peace on very humiliating terms in exchange for safe passage.
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