History UsefulNotes / TheOughts

23rd Sep '16 10:24:55 PM nombretomado
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* The dominant strains of popular music for much of the decade were GlamRap (see above) and [[ContemporaryRAndB contemporary R&B]] (Music/{{Beyonce}}, Music/{{Rihanna}} and Music/{{Usher}} being among the bigger names). Dance pop spent most of the Oughts out of the spotlight with [[ContractualPurity an increasingly troubled]] BritneySpears carrying its torch, until around 2008-09, when Music/LadyGaga and {{Kesha}} (and a post-CareerResurrection Britney) revived the genre and put it back on the charts.

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* The dominant strains of popular music for much of the decade were GlamRap (see above) and [[ContemporaryRAndB contemporary R&B]] (Music/{{Beyonce}}, Music/{{Rihanna}} and Music/{{Usher}} being among the bigger names). Dance pop spent most of the Oughts out of the spotlight with [[ContractualPurity an increasingly troubled]] BritneySpears Music/BritneySpears carrying its torch, until around 2008-09, when Music/LadyGaga and {{Kesha}} Music/{{Kesha}} (and a post-CareerResurrection Britney) revived the genre and put it back on the charts.
20th Sep '16 6:27:07 PM DavidDelony
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** Whilst CD sales never ''quite'' managed to fade to zero, the audio cassette pretty much ''did'' completely die the death during the decade. Up until maybe 2001 or so, it was still possible to find cassette versions of popular music alongside their corresponding CD releases - by the end of the decade, one would have good luck finding even blank tapes. As digital audio players became ever-cheaper and had increasingly high capacities, it simply wasn't worth having the medium around as a portable music format when you could store the equivalent of dozens (if not hundreds) of tapes in a device smaller than your average tape Walkman, and without the disadvantages of background hiss or your tapes getting chewed up. Unlike vinyl, which provides much better quality and durability than cassettes, retro appeal wasn't enough to save them.

to:

** Whilst CD sales never ''quite'' managed to fade to zero, the audio cassette pretty much ''did'' completely die the death during the decade. Up until maybe 2001 or so, it was still possible to find cassette versions of popular music alongside their corresponding CD releases - by the end of the decade, one would have good luck finding even blank tapes. CD players had already become standard equipment in new cards by the start of the decade, negating one advantage cassettes had enjoyed: portability. As digital audio players became ever-cheaper and had increasingly high capacities, it simply wasn't worth having the medium around as a portable music format when you could store the equivalent of dozens (if not hundreds) of tapes in a device smaller than your average tape Walkman, and without the disadvantages of background hiss or your tapes getting chewed up. Unlike vinyl, which provides much better quality and durability than cassettes, retro appeal wasn't enough to save them.
21st Aug '16 1:13:33 PM nombretomado
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* ProfessionalWrestling reached heights of popularity unknown since TheEighties, with the DarkerAndEdgier "AttitudeEra" passing away and the Wrestling/{{WWE}} (the only wrestling promotion left in North America during the first half of this decade) once again starting to appeal primarily to family audiences and children in what became known as the "[[LighterAndSofter PG Era]]". Wrestling/JohnCena (who made it officially cool to be PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy) was ''the'' wrestling star of the decade, becoming both the most recognizable pro wrestler since HulkHogan and the most controversial one since StoneColdSteveAustin. Other ring luminaries of the Oughts included [[JohnBradshawLayfield John "Bradshaw" Layfield]], BrockLesnar (who became the youngest WWE Champion in history before going on to equal success in UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts), {{Batista}}, and "The Rated-R Superstar," {{Edge}}.

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* ProfessionalWrestling reached heights of popularity unknown since TheEighties, with the DarkerAndEdgier "AttitudeEra" passing away and the Wrestling/{{WWE}} (the only wrestling promotion left in North America during the first half of this decade) once again starting to appeal primarily to family audiences and children in what became known as the "[[LighterAndSofter PG Era]]". Wrestling/JohnCena (who made it officially cool to be PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy) was ''the'' wrestling star of the decade, becoming both the most recognizable pro wrestler since HulkHogan and the most controversial one since StoneColdSteveAustin. Other ring luminaries of the Oughts included [[JohnBradshawLayfield John "Bradshaw" Layfield]], BrockLesnar (who became the youngest WWE Champion in history before going on to equal success in UsefulNotes/MixedMartialArts), {{Batista}}, and "The Rated-R Superstar," {{Edge}}.Wrestling/{{Edge}}.
23rd Jul '16 9:10:11 PM Kadorhal
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* In '''2002''', the new decade saw a new country become a free, independent nation. EastTimor broke free of UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}}'s oppressive rule[[note]]This is part of the 1998 Reformation movement, which transformed the government into a democratic one. The Indonesian pretty much let them go, no-questions-asked-no-compensations-demanded, as they see the control of East Timor as part of the despicable military hegemony.[[/note]] and became the world's youngest Asian democracy.

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* In '''2002''', the new decade saw a new country become a free, independent nation. EastTimor broke free of UsefulNotes/{{Indonesia}}'s oppressive rule[[note]]This is part of the 1998 Reformation movement, which transformed the government into a democratic one. The Indonesian Indonesians pretty much let them go, no-questions-asked-no-compensations-demanded, as they see the control of East Timor as part of the despicable military hegemony.[[/note]] and became the world's youngest Asian democracy.



* It was a bit of mournful decade for literature, with the 2000s seeing the deaths of Creator/DouglasAdams, Creator/DavidGemmell, Creator/LSpragueDeCamp and many others. In 2007, Creator/TerryPratchett was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer's.
* The NancyDrew and HardyBoys franchises both hit their 80th anniversaries in this decade, the Hardys in 2007, Nancy in 2010. Both original series were retired, and replaced with more contemporary updates. ''Nancy Drew: Girl Detective'' and ''Hardy Boys: Undercover Brothers'' were unveiled in 2004 and 2005, and have breathed new life into the characters. NancyDrew has also been going on as a very successful PC game franchise, revealing its twenty-fourth title, ''The Captive Curse'' in 2011.
* The ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, while starting in the late '90s, reached the apex of its popularity in the early '00s. It proved so popular that in 2000, the ''New York Times'' bestseller list was split into adults' and children's sections due to how the first three ''Potter'' books were so thoroughly dominating the list. Starting in 2001, [[Film/HarryPotter the film adaptations]] proved themselves to be solid bankable blockbusters for WarnerBros, becoming the highest-grossing film series in history. The books are often credited with nearly single-handedly restoring children's interest in reading at the dawn of the digital age, as well as both creating a boom in new fantasy and children's literature and renewed interest in older fantasy novels, such as ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' (both of which also received successful film adaptations).
* Starting in 2005, the ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' series became, in many ways, the DistaffCounterpart to ''Literature/HarryPotter''. It turned into a pop culture sensation, especially once the movies started coming out late in the decade. Like ''Potter'' before it, it sparked interest in various literary genres, this time YoungAdult novels and books based around [[OurMonstersAreDifferent paranormal creatures]] (vampires, werewolves, etc.). In addition, it took the romanticization of vampires that began with AnneRice and ''Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}}'' and brought it to new heights, leaving an impact on vampire lore almost as great as ''{{Dracula}}''. For this reason ([[CanonSue and]] [[StalkingIsLove many]] [[UnfortunateImplications others]]), the series has proven to be ''very'' [[LoveItOrHateIt polarizing]], with both an enormous fandom and an even larger {{hatedom}}.
* Though ''Literature/HarryPotter'' and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' dominated the scene, this decade was overall an excellent one for children and young adults' literature; in addition to the two above, ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' (2005), ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'' (2007), ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' (2001), ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' (2008) and more proved to be extremely popular franchises (the lattermost series eventually ascended to "phenomenon" status in TheNewTens.)

to:

* It was a bit of mournful decade for literature, with the 2000s seeing the deaths of Creator/DouglasAdams, Creator/DavidGemmell, Creator/LSpragueDeCamp and many others. In 2007, Creator/TerryPratchett was diagnosed with a rare form of Alzheimer's.
Alzheimer's, that would ultimately result in his death halfway through the next decade.
* The NancyDrew Franchise/NancyDrew and HardyBoys Literature/TheHardyBoys franchises both hit their 80th anniversaries in this decade, the Hardys in 2007, Nancy in 2010. Both original series were retired, and replaced with more contemporary updates. ''Nancy Drew: Girl Detective'' and ''Hardy Boys: Undercover Brothers'' were unveiled in 2004 and 2005, and have breathed new life into the characters. NancyDrew Nancy Drew has also been going on as a very successful PC game franchise, revealing its twenty-fourth title, ''The Captive Curse'' in 2011.
* The ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series, while starting in the late '90s, reached the apex of its popularity in the early '00s. It proved so popular that in 2000, the ''New York Times'' bestseller list was split into adults' and children's sections due to how the first three ''Potter'' books were so thoroughly dominating the list. Starting in 2001, [[Film/HarryPotter the film adaptations]] proved themselves to be solid bankable blockbusters for WarnerBros, Creator/WarnerBros, becoming the highest-grossing film series in history. The books are often credited with nearly single-handedly restoring children's interest in reading at the dawn of the digital age, as well as both creating a boom in new fantasy and children's literature and renewed interest in older fantasy novels, such as ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'' and ''TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'' (both of which also received successful film adaptations).
* Starting in 2005, the ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' series became, in many ways, the DistaffCounterpart to ''Literature/HarryPotter''.''Harry Potter''. It turned into a pop culture sensation, especially once the movies started coming out late in the decade. Like ''Potter'' before it, it sparked interest in various literary genres, this time YoungAdult novels and books based around [[OurMonstersAreDifferent paranormal creatures]] (vampires, werewolves, etc.). In addition, it took the romanticization of vampires that began with AnneRice Creator/AnneRice and ''Series/{{Buffy|TheVampireSlayer}}'' and brought it to new heights, leaving an impact on vampire lore almost as great as ''{{Dracula}}''. For this reason ([[CanonSue and]] [[StalkingIsLove many]] [[UnfortunateImplications others]]), the series has proven to be ''very'' [[LoveItOrHateIt polarizing]], with both an enormous fandom and an even larger {{hatedom}}.
* Though ''Literature/HarryPotter'' ''Harry Potter'' and ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' ''Twilight'' dominated the scene, this decade was overall an excellent one for children and young adults' literature; in addition to the two above, ''Literature/PercyJacksonAndTheOlympians'' (2005), ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'' (2007), ''Literature/ArtemisFowl'' (2001), ''Literature/TheHungerGames'' (2008) and more proved to be extremely popular franchises (the lattermost series eventually ascended to "phenomenon" status in TheNewTens.)
TheNewTens).



* {{Post-grunge}} continued to dominate modern rock radio, but quickly became the new HairMetal. {{Music/Nickelback}} became the band that everyone listened to but refused to admit to it. {{Grunge}} holdouts Music/PearlJam somehow became the next GratefulDead, and one of PostGrunge's few critical darlings, Music/FooFighters, becomes one of the biggest pure rock bands in the world.

to:

* {{Post-grunge}} PostGrunge continued to dominate modern rock radio, but quickly became the new HairMetal. {{Music/Nickelback}} became the band that everyone listened to but refused to admit to it. {{Grunge}} holdouts Music/PearlJam somehow became the next GratefulDead, and one of PostGrunge's few critical darlings, Music/FooFighters, becomes one of the biggest pure rock bands in the world.



** Whilst CD sales never ''quite'' managed to fade to zero, the audio cassette pretty much ''did'' completely die the death during the decade. Up until maybe 2001 or so, it was still possible to find cassette versions of popular music alongside their corresponding CD releases- by the end of the decade, one would have good luck finding even blank tapes. As digital audio players became ever-cheaper and had increasingly high capacities, it simply wasn't worth having the medium around as a portable music format when you could store the equivalent of dozens (if not hundreds) of tapes in a device smaller than your average tape Walkman, and without the disadvantages of background hiss or your tapes getting chewed up. Unlike vinyl, which provides much better quality and durability than cassettes, retro appeal wasn't enough to save them.

to:

** Whilst CD sales never ''quite'' managed to fade to zero, the audio cassette pretty much ''did'' completely die the death during the decade. Up until maybe 2001 or so, it was still possible to find cassette versions of popular music alongside their corresponding CD releases- releases - by the end of the decade, one would have good luck finding even blank tapes. As digital audio players became ever-cheaper and had increasingly high capacities, it simply wasn't worth having the medium around as a portable music format when you could store the equivalent of dozens (if not hundreds) of tapes in a device smaller than your average tape Walkman, and without the disadvantages of background hiss or your tapes getting chewed up. Unlike vinyl, which provides much better quality and durability than cassettes, retro appeal wasn't enough to save them.



* The concept of video games being child's play started to slowly change for a number of reasons. The big one was that many children who grew up playing video games were aging into teenagers and young adults, causing game developers to tailor their products accordingly. The RatedMForMoney trope started proliferating as a result; most of the biggest-selling games of the decade, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', were rated M. This, combined with the success of sports games like ''VideoGame/MaddenNFL'', caused a lot of young adults (particularly [[MostGamersAreMale young men]]) who hadn't been gamers before to get into gaming. Later in the decade, the rise of the Creator/{{Nintendo}} {{Wii}} and {{casual video game}}s expanded the market in completely new directions, bringing in legions of parents, women, old people, and others who weren't the traditional demographic for interactive entertainment.
** While the first Massively Multiplayer Online Games showed up towards the end of the Nineties, 2004 saw the launch of the ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which would develop into a gaming juggernaut and define the concept of the [=MMOG=], ultimately drawing in millions of players. Multiplayer gaming in general blossomed across most genres, with ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}'' becoming the definitive online First Person Shooter in 2000. Video games finally began turning into a social phenomenon as well as a source of entertainment, creating worldwide communities of gamers and fandoms.

to:

* The concept of video games being child's play started to slowly change for a number of reasons. The big one was that many children who grew up playing video games were aging into teenagers and young adults, causing game developers to tailor their products accordingly. The RatedMForMoney trope started proliferating as a result; most of the biggest-selling games of the decade, like ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'', ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' and ''VideoGame/ModernWarfare'', were rated M. This, combined with the success of sports games like ''VideoGame/MaddenNFL'', caused a lot of young adults (particularly [[MostGamersAreMale young men]]) who hadn't been gamers before to get into gaming. Later in the decade, the rise of the Creator/{{Nintendo}} {{Wii}} UsefulNotes/{{Wii}} and {{casual video game}}s expanded the market in completely new directions, bringing in legions of parents, women, old people, and others who weren't the traditional demographic for interactive entertainment.
** While the first Massively Multiplayer Online Games showed up towards the end of the Nineties, 2004 saw the launch of the ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', which would develop into a gaming juggernaut and define the concept of the [=MMOG=], MMOG, ultimately drawing in millions of players. Multiplayer gaming in general blossomed across most genres, with ''VideoGame/{{Counter-Strike}}'' ''VideoGame/CounterStrike'' becoming the definitive online First Person Shooter FirstPersonShooter in 2000. Video games finally began turning into a social phenomenon as well as a source of entertainment, creating worldwide communities of gamers and fandoms.



* For the first time since TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983, there is a successful Western-developed console in the form of Microsoft's {{Xbox}}, whose popularity has particularly been boosted by the Franchise/{{Halo}} franchise.

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* For the first time since TheGreatVideoGameCrashOf1983, there is a successful Western-developed console in the form of Microsoft's {{Xbox}}, UsefulNotes/{{Xbox}}, whose popularity has particularly been boosted by the Franchise/{{Halo}} franchise.



* Much like what is demonstrated in the Music section above, DigitalDistribution has also taken off in the video game industry as well. Considering the success of UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} for PC and XboxLive for the original Xbox, {{the seventh generation of console|VideoGames}}s started having their own online services while the PC experienced a growth in the digital market that total sales eventually surpassed that of retail sales on the platform.

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* Much like what is demonstrated in the Music section above, DigitalDistribution has also taken off in the video game industry as well. Considering the success of UsefulNotes/{{Steam}} for PC and XboxLive UsefulNotes/XboxLiveArcade for the original Xbox, {{the seventh generation of console|VideoGames}}s started having their own online services while the PC experienced a growth in the digital market that total sales eventually surpassed that of retail sales on the platform.



* During the first several years of the decade, there was a deluge of World War II-themed first person shooters. It got to a point that gaming publications started making jokes like "by this point in time, the average video gamer has killed more Nazis than the entire Russian army." But in 2007 the release of ''Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare'' would herald the end of the era of the WWII shooter and usher in the era of the modern military shooter, which continues to this day.

to:

* During the first several years of the decade, there was a deluge of World War II-themed first person shooters. It got to a point that gaming publications started making jokes like "by this point in time, the average video gamer has killed more Nazis than the entire Russian army." But in 2007 2007, the release of ''Call of Duty ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty 4: Modern Warfare'' would herald the end of the era of the WWII shooter and usher in the era of the modern military shooter, which continues to this day.



* This age was not the best time for TV animation, especially compared to the [[TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation previous decade.]] whilst there were a few bright spots like WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb and WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender, overall the popularity of cartoons on TV took a sharp decline, taking the quality along with it, with CartoonNetwork[[note]]after the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_Boston_bomb_scare Boston bomb scare]][[/note]] trying to move away from cartoons briefly [[NetworkDecay with CN Real.]]

to:

* This age was not the best time for TV animation, especially compared to the [[TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation previous decade.]] whilst there were a few bright spots like WesternAnimation/PhineasAndFerb and WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender, overall the popularity of cartoons on TV took a sharp decline, taking the quality along with it, with CartoonNetwork[[note]]after Creator/CartoonNetwork[[note]]after the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2007_Boston_bomb_scare Boston bomb scare]][[/note]] trying to move away from cartoons briefly [[NetworkDecay with CN Real.]]



* Anime continued to find even more of a fanbase throughout this decade, helped in no small part by the evolution of English dubbing. As for popular series, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' declined (though still held steady ratings and survived the entire decade) and was soon joined by the likes of ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', ''Franchise/YuGiOh'', and ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist''. Anime's popularity began to decline toward the end of the decade, however, for a number of reasons, ranging from an ever-greater focus in Japan on the [[{{Otaku}} otaku]] market to generalized over-saturation as well as the rise of LightNovel Adapatations thanks to Yamakan. Meanwhile, traditional revenue continued to decline in the face of ever-more-popular internet options. After the anime boom's end in America, the only anime that still reached mainstream attention were ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and the films of Creator/StudioGhibli.

to:

* Anime continued to find even more of a fanbase throughout this decade, helped in no small part by the evolution of English dubbing. As for popular series, ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' declined (though still held steady ratings and survived the entire decade) and was soon joined by the likes of ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', ''Franchise/YuGiOh'', and ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist''. Anime's popularity began to decline toward the end of the decade, however, for a number of reasons, ranging from an ever-greater focus in Japan on the [[{{Otaku}} otaku]] {{Otaku}} market to generalized over-saturation as well as the rise of LightNovel Adapatations thanks to Yamakan. Meanwhile, traditional revenue continued to decline in the face of ever-more-popular internet options. After the anime boom's end in America, the only anime that still reached mainstream attention were ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' ''Pokémon'' and the films of Creator/StudioGhibli.



* In the US, JanetJackson's "WardrobeMalfunction" at the SuperBowl halftime show in 2004 led to a period of increased {{Moral Guardians}}hip of TV, radio, and film, especially with regards to [[SexIsEvil sexual content]]. This resulted in the aforementioned MPAA backlash. HowardStern and OpieAndAnthony were forced to move to satellite radio to continue broadcasting uncensored, other shock jocks saw their careers torpedoed, and for a few years it became much more difficult to broadcast risque material. Meanwhile, the rest of the world (as well as many Americans) laughed at the US for being so hung-up on sex.\\

to:

* In the US, JanetJackson's "WardrobeMalfunction" at the SuperBowl halftime show in 2004 led to a period of increased {{Moral Guardians}}hip of TV, radio, and film, especially with regards to [[SexIsEvil sexual content]]. This resulted in the aforementioned MPAA backlash. HowardStern Creator/HowardStern and OpieAndAnthony Radio/OpieAndAnthony were forced to move to satellite radio to continue broadcasting uncensored, other shock jocks saw their careers torpedoed, and for a few years it became much more difficult to broadcast risque material. Meanwhile, the rest of the world (as well as many Americans) laughed at the US for being so hung-up on sex.\\



In hindsight, this may have been the JumpTheShark moment for America's MoralGuardians, showcasing the disconnect between them and a society that was becoming increasingly accepting of sexual content. It's telling that, just five years later, they proved to be impotent at putting up much of a challenge to {{MTV}}'s ''JerseyShore''. Perhaps the clearest sign of how the tide had turned was when, in 2011, Music/NickiMinaj had a very similar malfunction while performing on ''Good Morning America'', having one of her breasts fall out of her top while she was dancing on stage.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that a pop star as outwardly sexualized as Nicki Minaj was able to perform on ''Good Morning America'' in the first place.[[/note]] The usual guardians tried to drum up an outrage over it, but it seemed like the majority of people responded with a very simple "meh."

to:

In hindsight, this may have been the JumpTheShark moment for America's MoralGuardians, showcasing the disconnect between them and a society that was becoming increasingly accepting of sexual content. It's telling that, just five years later, they proved to be impotent at putting up much of a challenge to {{MTV}}'s ''JerseyShore''.''Series/JerseyShore''. Perhaps the clearest sign of how the tide had turned was when, in 2011, Music/NickiMinaj had a very similar malfunction while performing on ''Good Morning America'', having one of her breasts fall out of her top while she was dancing on stage.[[note]]To say nothing of the fact that a pop star as outwardly sexualized as Nicki Minaj was able to perform on ''Good Morning America'' in the first place.[[/note]] The usual guardians tried to drum up an outrage over it, but it seemed like the majority of people responded with a very simple "meh."
14th Jul '16 1:46:08 PM bowserbros
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Added DiffLines:

* On May 24, 2002, Creator/{{Nintendo}} president Creator/HiroshiYamauchi retired after a 53-year tenure, less than a year after the release of the UsefulNotes/NintendoGamecube. Yamauchi later became the chairman of Nintendo's board of directors, before permanently retiring from the company on June 29, 2005, citing his age. Creator/SatoruIwata, the head of Nintendo's Corporate Planning Division, succeeded Yamauchi as president, and implemented a "blue ocean" strategy for the company where commercial success would be sought by providing innovative new products rather than directly battling competitors (this was a direct contrast from Yamauchi's attitude about Nintendo's products, particularly in regards to the cartridge-based Nintendo 64 and the minidisc-based Gamecube, both of which saw heavy criticism for their use of inferior storage media for the sake of profit). He would put this strategy into acting with the release of the Nintendo DS, which incorporated both touchscreen and dual-screen technology, in 2004 and the release of the Nintendo Wii two years later.
21st Jun '16 1:00:40 PM gewunomox
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* Starting from 2001, Heavy Metal entered something of a second Golden Age. NuMetal finally died an ugly death as new (or just newly-recognised) acts like Arch Enemy and KillswitchEngage completely outclassed them for talent, listenability and sheer heaviness. Killswitch went on to [[TropeCodifier codify]] the {{Metalcore}} genre, which eventually became the new [[TheScrappy scrappy]] genre in turn. Young bands like Trivium took a page from [[ProgressiveRock prog’s]] book and made high-level musicianship cool again, with epic overblown guitar wankery becoming not just called for by fans, but furiously demanded. Music/{{Dragonforce}} took this new attitude UpToEleven and their song "Through The Fire And The Flames" became the ''second'' hardest song ever to appear in ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' (screw you, {{Buckethead}}).

to:

* Starting from 2001, Heavy Metal entered something of a second Golden Age. NuMetal finally died an ugly death as new (or just newly-recognised) acts like Arch Enemy and KillswitchEngage completely outclassed them for talent, listenability and sheer heaviness. Killswitch went on to [[TropeCodifier codify]] the {{Metalcore}} genre, which eventually became the new [[TheScrappy scrappy]] genre in turn. Young bands like Trivium took a page from [[ProgressiveRock prog’s]] book and made high-level musicianship cool again, with epic overblown guitar wankery becoming not just called for by fans, but furiously demanded. Music/{{Dragonforce}} took this new attitude UpToEleven and their song "Through The Fire And The Flames" became the ''second'' hardest song ever to appear in ''VideoGame/GuitarHero'' (screw you, {{Buckethead}}).Music/{{Buckethead}}).
12th Jun '16 4:07:16 PM nombretomado
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* After musical theater had a rough go of it in TheNineties, ''Film/TheProducers'' was a Broadway megahit that revived audiences' tastes for fun musical comedies, sparking a long line of [[ScreenToStageAdaptation screen-to-stage adaptations]] trading on often-well-known properties and LampshadeHanging of musical theater conventions: ''Theatre/ThoroughlyModernMillie'', ''Hairspray'', ''Theatre/{{Spamalot}}'', etc. The similarly lighthearted JukeboxMusical genre also exploded in popularity in North America, a trend spearheaded by the import ''Theatre/MammaMia''. However, the decade's most-enduring hit turned out to be ''Theatre/{{Wicked}}'', an extravagant variant on ''TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' (based on a popular novel) that attracted a fanbase not seen since the days of ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera''.

to:

* After musical theater had a rough go of it in TheNineties, ''Film/TheProducers'' was a Broadway megahit that revived audiences' tastes for fun musical comedies, sparking a long line of [[ScreenToStageAdaptation screen-to-stage adaptations]] trading on often-well-known properties and LampshadeHanging of musical theater conventions: ''Theatre/ThoroughlyModernMillie'', ''Hairspray'', ''Theatre/{{Spamalot}}'', etc. The similarly lighthearted JukeboxMusical genre also exploded in popularity in North America, a trend spearheaded by the import ''Theatre/MammaMia''. However, the decade's most-enduring hit turned out to be ''Theatre/{{Wicked}}'', an extravagant variant on ''TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' (based on a popular novel) that attracted a fanbase not seen since the days of ''Theatre/ThePhantomOfTheOpera''.
19th May '16 9:48:58 PM nombretomado
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* The fairly standard motoring show ''TopGear'' was rebooted into its current magazine/challenge/three men goofing around format in 2002, giving us the team of James May, Richard Hammond and Jeremy Clarkson. The show receives many accolades and 350 million viewers worldwide.
* The "single camera, on-location, laugh track-free" sitcom becomes commonplace on both sides of the Atlantic thanks to the success of shows like ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'', ''Series/StrangersWithCandy'', ''{{Spaced}}'' and ''Series/TheLarrySandersShow'' at the end of the last decade. These shows, including ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'', ''TheOffice'' (both versions), ''[[Series/ThirtyRock 30 Rock]]'', ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'', ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'', ''PeepShow'', ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'', ''FlightOfTheConchords'', ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm'', ''Series/ModernFamily'', and ''Series/{{Community}}'' (the last two, premiering in 2009, means this may last far into TheNewTens) aren't all ratings hits, but they are often beloved by television critics and a small passionate fanbase. Some wind up being canceled by [[TheFireflyEffect networks who weren't willing to give them a fighting chance]], although many - despite their poor ratings - are [[AdoredByTheNetwork as loved by the network]] as they are by their fanbase and are kept on long after a show with its ratings should have been canceled.

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* The fairly standard motoring show ''TopGear'' ''Series/TopGear'' was rebooted into its current magazine/challenge/three men goofing around format in 2002, giving us the team of James May, Richard Hammond and Jeremy Clarkson. The show receives many accolades and 350 million viewers worldwide.
* The "single camera, on-location, laugh track-free" sitcom becomes commonplace on both sides of the Atlantic thanks to the success of shows like ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'', ''Series/StrangersWithCandy'', ''{{Spaced}}'' and ''Series/TheLarrySandersShow'' at the end of the last decade. These shows, including ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'', ''TheOffice'' (both versions), ''[[Series/ThirtyRock 30 Rock]]'', ''Series/MyNameIsEarl'', ''Series/{{Scrubs}}'', ''PeepShow'', ''Series/PeepShow'', ''Series/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphia'', ''FlightOfTheConchords'', ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm'', ''Series/ModernFamily'', and ''Series/{{Community}}'' (the last two, premiering in 2009, means this may last far into TheNewTens) aren't all ratings hits, but they are often beloved by television critics and a small passionate fanbase. Some wind up being canceled by [[TheFireflyEffect networks who weren't willing to give them a fighting chance]], although many - despite their poor ratings - are [[AdoredByTheNetwork as loved by the network]] as they are by their fanbase and are kept on long after a show with its ratings should have been canceled.
15th May '16 8:00:19 AM TheLyniezian
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* The "Big Four" networks were constantly in a state of flux. While Creator/{{NBC}} held on at the beginning of the decade, after the end of ''Series/{{Friends}}'', they started to slip towards the bottom. Creator/{{CBS}} had a couple of hits in ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', ''Series/{{CSI}}'' and ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', which propelled them back to the top, where they remained for most of the decade. Creator/{{ABC}} languished in low ratings in the first half of the decade, then the premieres of ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' and ''Series/{{Lost}}'' gave them the footing they needed to claw their way out of the basement. Finally, Creator/{{FOX}} stumbled upon a little show named ''Series/AmericanIdol'' that would go on to launch several careers and would become the decade's highest-rated show (it could be expected to pull in about 30 million on a bad night). The other two broadcast networks (Creator/{{UPN}} and Creator/{{The WB}}) [[Creator/TheCW merged]] in the middle of the decade, but that didn't really help either of them.

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* The "Big Four" US networks were constantly in a state of flux. While Creator/{{NBC}} held on at the beginning of the decade, after the end of ''Series/{{Friends}}'', they started to slip towards the bottom. Creator/{{CBS}} had a couple of hits in ''Series/EverybodyLovesRaymond'', ''Series/{{CSI}}'' and ''Series/{{NCIS}}'', which propelled them back to the top, where they remained for most of the decade. Creator/{{ABC}} languished in low ratings in the first half of the decade, then the premieres of ''Series/DesperateHousewives'' and ''Series/{{Lost}}'' gave them the footing they needed to claw their way out of the basement. Finally, Creator/{{FOX}} stumbled upon a little show named ''Series/AmericanIdol'' that would go on to launch several careers and would become the decade's highest-rated show (it could be expected to pull in about 30 million on a bad night). The other two broadcast networks (Creator/{{UPN}} and Creator/{{The WB}}) [[Creator/TheCW merged]] in the middle of the decade, but that didn't really help either of them.
27th Apr '16 1:59:58 AM erforce
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The 2000s also bore witness to the Great Horror Movie {{Remake}} Trend, with [[Film/TheTexasChainsawMassacre2003 seemingly]] [[Film/{{Halloween 2007}} every]] [[Film/TheFog notable]] [[Film/DawnOfTheDead2004 70s]] [[Film/TheWickerMan and]] [[Film/PromNight2008 80s]] [[Film/TheAmityvilleHorror2005 fright]] [[Film/TheOmen2006 flick]] [[Film/MyBloodyValentine3D getting]] [[Film/WhenAStrangerCalls a]] [[Film/TheHillsHaveEyes remake]] [[Film/TheHitcher at]] [[Film/BlackChristmas2006 some]] [[Film/ItsAlive point]] [[Film/AprilFoolsDay during]] [[Film/DayOfTheDead2008 the]] [[Film/FridayThe13th2009 decade]].

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The 2000s also bore witness to the Great Horror Movie {{Remake}} Trend, with [[Film/TheTexasChainsawMassacre2003 seemingly]] [[Film/{{Halloween 2007}} every]] [[Film/TheFog notable]] [[Film/DawnOfTheDead2004 70s]] [[Film/TheWickerMan and]] [[Film/PromNight2008 80s]] [[Film/TheAmityvilleHorror2005 fright]] [[Film/TheOmen2006 flick]] [[Film/MyBloodyValentine3D getting]] [[Film/WhenAStrangerCalls a]] [[Film/TheHillsHaveEyes [[Film/TheHillsHaveEyes2006 remake]] [[Film/TheHitcher at]] [[Film/BlackChristmas2006 some]] [[Film/ItsAlive point]] [[Film/AprilFoolsDay during]] [[Film/DayOfTheDead2008 the]] [[Film/FridayThe13th2009 decade]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 390. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheOughts