History UsefulNotes / TheMafia

27th May '16 1:08:57 PM Njein
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The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really exposed the La Cosa Nostra into the public eye (The Apalachin meeting was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become the Boss of all Bosses. The meeting was exposed by the New York State Police, and more than 60 mobsters were caught. Genovese was never forgiven by many of his fellow bosses for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for presumably trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959). Then, in 1963, a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passing of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped the FBI in building cases against mobsters and their families.

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The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really exposed confirmed the existence of La Cosa Nostra into in the public eye United States (The Apalachin meeting was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become the Boss of all Bosses. The meeting was exposed by the New York State Police, and more than 60 mobsters were caught. Genovese was never forgiven by many of his fellow bosses for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for presumably trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959). Then, in 1963, a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passing of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped the FBI in building cases against mobsters and their families.



* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. Arguably the oldest of the New York families, as the Morello crime family, eventually coming under the control of Morello lieutenant Giuseppe Masseria. The family was reorganized under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of Masseria (he was very greedy, and known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, notably the Castellamarese gang in Brooklyn, which was led by Salvatore Maranzano in the 1920s; this led to a bloody turf war, that claimed at least 200+ lives on both sides, between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both Masseria and Maranzano being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia). He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss of the family. He later ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the situation in New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. In 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings; Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence why he became the first "rat". Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island and Queens. Began as a splinter group of the Morello family, taking over its rackets in the Bronx. It was something of the Franz Ferdinand of the Castellammarese War, as Masseria's attempt to violently replace the family's boss ended up throwing the rest of the family under the sway of Maranzano and starting open conflict between the two groups. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

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* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. Arguably the oldest of the New York families, as the Morello crime family, eventually coming under the control of Morello lieutenant Giuseppe Masseria. The family was reorganized under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of Masseria (he was very greedy, and known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, notably the Castellamarese gang in Brooklyn, which was led by Salvatore Maranzano in the 1920s; this led to a bloody turf war, that claimed at least 200+ lives on both sides, between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both Masseria and Maranzano being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia). He Genovese, with the sufficient backing of Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese, ordered a hit on Costello in May of 1957; Costello manages to survive the hit (thanks to the gunman's unintentional warning, he managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering get away with only a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) scalp wound) and took over as boss of the family. He later steps down to avoid further bloodshed. Later that year, Genovese ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the situation bloodletting that's going on in New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses (notably Gambino and Lucchese, who switched sides and supported Costello, Luciano and Lansky) had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. In 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings; Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence why he became the first "rat". Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island and Queens. Began as a splinter group of the Morello family, taking over its rackets in the Bronx. It was something of the Franz Ferdinand of the Castellammarese War, as Masseria's attempt to violently replace the family's boss ended up throwing the rest of the family under the sway of Maranzano and starting open conflict between the two groups. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their respective families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, daughter in 1962, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred took place - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
27th May '16 12:48:22 AM SuperLurkerGuy
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* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, ineffectual and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses. He was later gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family in 1972, but he spent much of his reign while imprisoned (he used a series of acting bosses and ruling panels, and groomed his son to take over). The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle (and still runs the family from behind bars), the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), it is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's high media profile and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, attempted assassinations by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano; ironically, Vincent Gigante himself did an "off-the-books" attempted murder on Frank Costello in 1957), and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by the 1990s, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking three previous attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was very greedy, and known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, notably the Castellamarese gang in Brooklyn, which was led by Salvatore Maranzano in the 1920s; this led to a bloody turf war, that claimed at least 200+ lives on both sides, between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both Masseria and Maranzano being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia). He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss of the family. He later ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the situation in New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. In 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings; Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence why he became the first "rat". Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

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* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, ineffectual and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. Originally a small and fairly-well organized gang of Sicilian mafiosi hailing from the town of Villabate. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses. He was later gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family in 1972, but he spent much of his reign while imprisoned (he used a series of acting bosses and ruling panels, and groomed his son to take over). The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle (and still runs the family from behind bars), the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), it is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's high media profile and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family was had its origins in the large Brooklyn wing of the Morello crime family, which eventually split off into its own family. The family first run by came to prominence under the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, attempted assassinations by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano; ironically, Vincent Gigante himself did an "off-the-books" attempted murder on Frank Costello in 1957), and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by the 1990s, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking three previous attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. Arguably the oldest of the New York families, as the Morello crime family, eventually coming under the control of Morello lieutenant Giuseppe Masseria. The family was established reorganized under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was very greedy, and known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, notably the Castellamarese gang in Brooklyn, which was led by Salvatore Maranzano in the 1920s; this led to a bloody turf war, that claimed at least 200+ lives on both sides, between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both Masseria and Maranzano being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia). He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss of the family. He later ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the situation in New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. In 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings; Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence why he became the first "rat". Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island and Queens. Began as a splinter group of the Morello family, taking over its rackets in the Bronx. It was something of the Franz Ferdinand of the Castellammarese War, as Masseria's attempt to violently replace the family's boss ended up throwing the rest of the family under the sway of Maranzano and starting open conflict between the two groups. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
26th May '16 10:29:41 AM Njein
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* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), it is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's high media profile and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, attempted assassinations by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano; ironically, Vincent Gigante himself did an "off-the-books" attempted murder on Frank Costello in 1957), and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by the 1990s, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking three previous attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.

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* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), it is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's high media profile and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, attempted assassinations by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano; ironically, Vincent Gigante himself did an "off-the-books" attempted murder on Frank Costello in 1957), and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by the 1990s, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking three previous attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.



* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in Brooklyn, Long Island and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

to:

* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from the Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
26th May '16 10:07:35 AM Njein
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* '''Capo di tutti i capi''' - the Boss of all Bosses in a particular area. More a media title than anything of significance in the American or Sicilian Mob; crime family bosses are ''peers'' and don't pay tribute to or take orders from each other. The only boss to ever claim this title for himself was [[BigBadWannabe Salvatore Maranzano]] after [[WonTheWarLostThePeace "winning"]] the Castellammarese War in 1931, and he got to enjoy it for less than six months before his nominal [[TheStarscream second-in-command]] [[MagnificentBastard Lucky Luciano]] and his fellow Young Turks [[DeadlyEuphemism retired]] the title, and [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Maranzano along with it]]. An older term, ''capo consigliere'', denoted the first among equals of the New York bosses, who would arbitrate disputes between families, this went by the wayside during the Castellamarese War and was never reestablished afterwards.
* '''The Commission''': Luciano's answer to the ''capo di tutti i capi'' title. Originally consisted of the five New York bosses, the boss of the Buffalo family, and UsefulNotes/AlCapone, with [[TheManBehindTheMan substantial input]] from "associates" such as Meyer Lansky. Later pared down to just the Five Families (with the Bonnano family thrown out of the Commission in the 1970s and 1980s due to their disunity, the fact that they almost inducted an undercover FBI agent and excessive drug dealing since the 1950s), with Chicago doing its own thing, but it still has a seat on the Commission; the idea worked so well that the Sicilian Mafia was encouraged to form a similar body. Contrary to popular belief, the Commission does not "rule" the Mafia (see above re: bosses, orders, and tribute), it's intended to be a body for settling disputes that might otherwise lead to violations of "honor" and all-out war--think more of a UnitedNations of the Underworld rather than a King of the Mafia (or even a Parliament of the Mafia). Though the bosses used to meet more frequently, greater law enforcement scrutiny after the Commission case in the 1980s and an increasing number of informants, notably Sammy the Bull Gravano, have forced the Commission underground, and the families now send lower-level members such as capos to discuss business and resolve disputes.

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* '''Capo di tutti i capi''' - the Boss of all Bosses in a particular area. More a media title than anything of significance in the American or Sicilian Mob; crime family bosses are seen as ''peers'' and don't pay tribute to or take orders from each other. The only boss to ever claim this title for himself was [[BigBadWannabe Salvatore Maranzano]] after [[WonTheWarLostThePeace "winning"]] the Castellammarese War in 1931, and he got to enjoy it for less than six months before his months. Before long, Maranzano's nominal [[TheStarscream second-in-command]] [[MagnificentBastard Lucky Luciano]] and his fellow Young Turks thought [[ItsAllAboutMe Maranzano]] was much [[EntitledBastard greedier and power-hungry than they thought originally]], and they decided to [[DeadlyEuphemism retired]] retire]] the title, and [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder Maranzano along with it]]. An older term, ''capo consigliere'', denoted the first among equals of the New York bosses, who would arbitrate disputes between families, this went by the wayside during the Castellamarese Castellammarese War and was never reestablished afterwards.
* '''The Commission''': Luciano's answer to the ''capo di tutti i capi'' title. Originally consisted of the five bosses of the Five Families in New York bosses, York, the boss of the Buffalo family, and UsefulNotes/AlCapone, with [[TheManBehindTheMan substantial input]] from "associates" such as Meyer Lansky. Later pared down to just the Five Families (with the Bonnano family thrown out of the Commission in the 1970s and 1980s due to their disunity, the fact that they almost inducted an undercover FBI agent and excessive drug dealing since the 1950s), with Chicago doing its own thing, but it still has a seat on the Commission; the idea worked so well that the Sicilian Mafia was encouraged to form a similar body. The Commission is headed by a nominal Chairman, who was not seen as the '''capo di tutti i capi''' as law enforcement claimed it to be; in the mob, crime bosses are viewed as equals (regardless of size, structure, power or age), and having one boss reign supreme over the others runs contrary to this idea. Luciano became the first Chairman of the Mafia Commission after establishing it in 1931. Contrary to popular belief, the Commission does not "rule" the Mafia (see above re: bosses, orders, and tribute), it's intended to be a body for settling disputes that might otherwise lead to violations of "honor" and all-out war--think turf wars--think more of a UnitedNations of the Underworld rather than a King of the Mafia (or even a Parliament of the Mafia).Mafia). Only the Commission can approve a new boss before he could take over officially, allow who can become a made man and who can't, and vote on issues (such as the narcotics trade) that might require inter-family cooperation. Though the bosses used to meet more frequently, greater law enforcement scrutiny after the Commission case in the 1980s and an increasing number of informants, notably Sammy the Bull Gravano, have forced the Commission underground, and the families now send lower-level members such as capos to discuss business and resolve disputes.
24th May '16 6:18:07 PM Njein
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However, things did not go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring, and he formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing in drug trafficking, and it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction believed that it was a lucrative business, while the anti-drug trafficking faction thought drugs were bad for business and would attract law enforcement. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had capos and soldiers that were actively dealing in drugs, and even set up Montreal as an outpost for importing heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a ban on narcotics trafficking imposed in the 1950s, many families dealt drugs on the sly to avoid any heat from the law, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and allowed it as long as no made man was caught by the FBI for dealing drugs.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really exposed the La Cosa Nostra into the public eye (The Apalachin meeting was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become the Boss of all Bosses. The meeting was exposed by the New York State Police, and more than 60 mobsters were caught. Genovese was never forgiven by many of his fellow bosses for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for presumably trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959). Then, in 1963, a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passing of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped the FBI in building cases against mobsters.

By the 1980s, the federal government was able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case, and an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls them) was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti and other bosses in the 1990s; another notable example was Joe Massino, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on homeland security), the American Mafia remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs in order to avoid FBI attention.

to:

However, things did not go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring, and he formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing in drug trafficking, and it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction believed that it was a lucrative business, while the anti-drug trafficking faction thought drugs were bad for business and would attract law enforcement. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had capos and soldiers crews that were actively dealing in drugs, and even set up Montreal as an outpost for importing heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a ban on narcotics trafficking imposed in the 1950s, many families dealt drugs on the sly to avoid any heat from the law, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and allowed tolerated it as long as no made man was caught by the FBI for dealing drugs.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really exposed the La Cosa Nostra into the public eye (The Apalachin meeting was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become the Boss of all Bosses. The meeting was exposed by the New York State Police, and more than 60 mobsters were caught. Genovese was never forgiven by many of his fellow bosses for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for presumably trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959). Then, in 1963, a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passing of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped the FBI in building cases against mobsters.mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the federal government was able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case, and an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls them) was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti Gotti, Vincent Gigante and other bosses in the 1990s; another notable example was Joe Massino, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005.2005. Phil Leonetti, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters flipping. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on homeland security), the American Mafia remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs in order to avoid FBI attention.



* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern and western Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, and New Jersey (the family once had a crew in Montreal before it broke off to become its own group; it also had another crew in Tucson until Joe Bonanno's retirement in the 1960s); the family still has a "Zip" faction. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellamarese War), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. Bonanno even forged ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Maggaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family)However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino and Lucchese) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffectual to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement; several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black also ended up dead); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges and are struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern and western Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, New Jersey, Florida and New Jersey Canada (the family once had a crew in Montreal before it broke off to become its own group; it also had another crew in Tucson Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's retirement in the 1960s); the family still also has a "Zip" faction. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellamarese War), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Salvatore Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Maggaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family)However, family). But, Bonanno had bigger ambitions and sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino of his rivals (notably Gambino and Lucchese) in the 1960s; however, this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli then faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffectual to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement; several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black also ended up dead); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges and are struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath.
23rd May '16 6:11:07 PM Njein
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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern and western Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, and New Jersey (the family once had a crew in Montreal before it broke off to become its own group; it also had another crew in Tucson until Joe Bonanno's retirement in the 1960s); the family still has a "Zip" faction. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellamarese War), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese and Magaddino) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffective to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.
* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, incompetent and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses and was gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family, but he spent much of his time as boss while imprisoned. The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle, the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably South Brooklyn and the Brooklyn docks), Queens and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had another crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" crew (the crew is known as the Cherry Hill Gambinos). in Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by 1992, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and New England, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida. Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello. He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss; he also ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the goings-on of New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge; he continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester and New Jersey, with smaller factions in Brooklyn and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese expanded the family's hold on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from either the Bronx or the East Harlem factions). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting, but never worked on it. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia) were on the Lucchese payroll for several years. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern and western Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, and New Jersey (the family once had a crew in Montreal before it broke off to become its own group; it also had another crew in Tucson until Joe Bonanno's retirement in the 1960s); the family still has a "Zip" faction. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellamarese War), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno even forged ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Maggaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family)However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese (Gambino and Magaddino) Lucchese) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffective ineffectual to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement); enforcement; several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black also ended up dead); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.
colleauges and are struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath.
* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, incompetent ineffectual and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses and bosses. He was later gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family, family in 1972, but he spent much of his time as boss reign while imprisoned.imprisoned (he used a series of acting bosses and ruling panels, and groomed his son to take over). The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle, battle (and still runs the family from behind bars), the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably South Brooklyn Bay Ridge, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had another a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" crew faction (the crew is known as the Cherry Hill Gambinos). in Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family it is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's high media profile and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, attempted assassinations by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano; ironically, Vincent Gigante himself did an "off-the-books" attempted murder on Frank Costello in 1957), and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by 1992, the 1990s, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life, life in 1992 after ducking three previous attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and New England, Connecticut, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida.Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was very greedy, and known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially notably the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, in Brooklyn, which was led by Sal Maranzano; Salvatore Maranzano in the 1920s; this led to a bloody turf war war, that claimed at least 200+ lives on both sides, between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses Masseria and Maranzano being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello. Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia). He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss; he also boss of the family. He later ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the goings-on of situation in New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge; charge. In 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings; Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence why he became the first "rat". Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester Westchester, New England and New Jersey, with smaller factions in Brooklyn Brooklyn, Long Island and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese expanded continued to maintain the family's hold grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from either the Bronx or the East Harlem factions). Bronx-East Harlem-Westchester faction). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys in the family to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting, meeting and pay a hefty tribute, but never worked on it. went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia) Mafia, but could never become a made man as he was a police officer) were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years.years, working as contract killers. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
23rd May '16 5:25:48 PM Njein
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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families, this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese and Magaddino) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffective to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.
* '''Colombo crime family''' - Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, incompetent and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses and was gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family, but he spent much of his time as boss while imprisoned. The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle, the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by 1992, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello. He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss; he also ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the goings-on of New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge; he continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese expanded the family's hold on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers. They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting, but never worked on it. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia) were on the Lucchese payroll for several years. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern and western Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, and New Jersey (the family once had a crew in Montreal before it broke off to become its own group; it also had another crew in Tucson until Joe Bonanno's retirement in the 1960s); the family still has a "Zip" faction. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families, Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellamarese War), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese and Magaddino) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffective to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.
* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants, incompetent and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s. The crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family. But, he was known to be miserly and greedy, and his tightfisted attitude led to the first family war. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo with violent tendencies; the war ended with Profaci's death and Gallo's imprisonment. Joe Colombo took over the family in 1963 after exposing Bonanno's plan to assassinate several bosses on the Commission; with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name to Colombo. However, he was too publicity friendly (as Colombo claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italians), much to the dismay of his fellow bosses and was gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. Carmine Persico took over the family, but he spent much of his time as boss while imprisoned. The family would split again in the 1990s when Victor Orena, a dissatisfied capo, tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle, the Colombos have been weakened because of informants and government crackdowns in the 2000s.
* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in Brooklyn (notably South Brooklyn and the Brooklyn docks), Queens and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had another crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" crew (the crew is known as the Cherry Hill Gambinos). in Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by 1992, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey and New England, with smaller crews in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida. Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello. He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss; he also ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the goings-on of New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge; he continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).
* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx, East Harlem, Westchester and New Jersey, with smaller factions in Brooklyn and Queens. Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese expanded the family's hold on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers.traffickers (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; the previous bosses usually came from either the Bronx or the East Harlem factions). They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting, but never worked on it. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia) were on the Lucchese payroll for several years. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
22nd May '16 7:09:19 PM Njein
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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families, this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese and Magaddino) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and he was permanently shelved to Tucson in 1968. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker, attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s. Joe Massino took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing this, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families, this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family founder Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. However, Bonanno sought to become the boss of bosses by eliminating several rival bosses (Gambino, Lucchese and Magaddino) in the 1960s; this plot was exposed and he was permanently shelved the family faced an internal war, which ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were forced to Tucson "retire" (to be put on the shelf permanently) in 1968. 1968 to Tuscon, Arizona. The family's troubles (it was known to have a string of ineffectual bosses in the 1970s), did not end as Carmine Galante, a former underboss and known drug trafficker, trafficker (the Bonannos were very notorious for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Joe Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to take control. control of the family. Rastelli faced another challenge from three of his capos, who thought he was ineffective to run the family; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by Sonny Black Napolitano and Joe Massino. The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s. 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was infiltrated by Joe Massino Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement); this in fact, worked to their favor as they were the only family to avoid indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, allowing them to quietly rebuild its power base. Joe Massino, Rastelli's protege and underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium.millennium; he even expanded into Wall Street scams and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men flipped, and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; Massino then faced the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was traced to him. Fearing this, the death sentence, he became the first official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after Massino flipped against his former mob colleauges.





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\n* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Widely reckoned as the most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, Tommy Lucchese to do business with the other families, notably with the Genovese, Bonanno, Colombo and Gambino families. Gagliano died in 1951, and names Lucchese as his successor before dying. Lucchese expanded the family's hold on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio and Vincent Impellitteri. Lucchese also backed Vito Genovese and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their families, but built a closer relationship with Gambino after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter, and in return, gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK). Lucchese died in 1967, and was replaced by Tony "Ducks" Corallo, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Corallo later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies occurred - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named Victor Amuso and Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso as the new boss and underboss in 1987; this proved to be one of the biggest succession mistakes, as Amuso and Casso were known to be violent hitmen and drug traffickers. They ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death (this caused ''actual'' wiseguys to flip because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the whacking of the New Jersey faction when they failed to show up for a meeting, but never worked on it. Both were captured in 1993, and Casso decided to flip in 1994, revealing that two NYPD officers (Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa; Eppolito even had relatives in the Mafia) were on the Lucchese payroll for several years. Both cops were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
22nd May '16 6:31:10 PM Njein
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* '''Genovese crime family''' - Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello.

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* '''Genovese crime family''' - Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello.
Costello. He managed to force Costello into retirement by ordering a hit on him in 1957 (it was alleged the shooter was Vincent Gigante, Genovese's protege) and took over as boss; he also ordered a hit on Albert Anastasia and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the goings-on of New York. This meeting proved to be a disaster, and the other bosses had him falsely implicated on a drug charge; he continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. The family then used a series of ruling panels and "dummy" bosses to masquerade the real boss (who was Phil "Cockeyed Phil" Lombardo, and was extremely reclusive); Vincent Gigante became the boss in 1981 by promoting "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by pretending to be insane; this ruse worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and it is unknown who has taken over the family (it is implied the family now uses ruling panels of capos to manage its daily affairs).

22nd May '16 6:21:36 PM Njein
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* '''Gambino crime family''' - Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions. Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, John Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985.

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* '''Gambino crime family''' - Once the biggest crime family (under Carlo Gambino's reign), this family is now a former shell of itself due to John Gotti's imprisonment in 1992. The family was first run by the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss Albert Anastasia. Anastasia took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers, and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to haunt him, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese). Carlo Gambino, the family's namesake, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family. Prior to his death in 1976, Gambino named his cousin Paul Castellano as boss over his underboss, Neil Dellacroce; splitting the family into two factions. factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street and was a flunky of Gambino). Dellacroce managed to keep the peace between his protege, John Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985.
1985; at this point, Gotti ordered a hit on Castellano (he was killed outside Sparks Steak House) and took over as boss. His reign was marred by indictments, and was too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo; by 1992, Sammy Gravano, tired of his antics, decided to cooperate with the FBI. Gotti was imprisoned for life, and died of cancer in 2002; his brother Peter took over as boss, but he too was imprisoned for life. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.
* '''Genovese crime family''' - Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still regarded as the strongest of the Five Families. The family was established under Lucky Luciano, who took over the boss's mantle after ordering the death of his predecessor Joe Masseria (he was known for his heavy-handed attempts to shake down other Italian gangs, especially the Castellamarese gang of Williamsburg, which was led by Sal Maranzano; this led to a bloody turf war between 1928 and 1931 and ended with both bosses being killed off by the Young Turks, led by Luciano). Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "going to the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring and was deported to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixed; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was desperate to go legitimate. He was faced with a growing threat from Vito Genovese, who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello.
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