History UsefulNotes / TheMafia

30th Jul '16 7:38:23 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* big earner: someone who makes a lot of money for the Family. A LOT of money.



* burn: to murder; synonyms: break an egg, clip, do a piece of work, hit, ice, pop, put out a contract on, whack, knock off, bump off, rubout.

to:

* burn: to murder; synonyms: break an egg, clip, do a piece of work, hit, ice, pop, put out a contract on, whack, knock off, bump off, rubout.rub out.



* crank/junk: Euphemism for narcotics, especially heroin.

to:

* crank/junk: crank/junk business: Euphemism for narcotics, narcotics/drug trafficking, especially heroin.



* earner: someone whose expertise is making money for the Family.

to:

* earner: someone whose expertise is making money for the Family. Someone who brings in a lot to the Family is considered to be a good/big earner.
* eat alone: to keep for one's self; to be greedy.



* heavy: to be armed with a weapon, packed up.



* joint, the: prison; synonyms: the can, the pen, go away to college.

to:

* joint, the: prison; synonyms: the can, the pen, go away to college.college, doing time.



* made: to be sworn into La Cosa Nostra; synonyms: to be "straightened out," to get your button.

to:

* made: to be sworn into La Cosa Nostra; synonyms: to be "straightened out," to get your button.button, get inducted.



* mattresses, hitting the, taking to the: going to war with a rival Family or gang.

to:

* mattresses, hitting the, taking to the, going to the: going to war with a rival Family or gang.



* message job: placing the bullet in someone's body such that a specific message is sent to that person's crew or family;

to:

* message job: placing the bullet in someone's body such that a specific message is sent to that person's crew or family;family



* on the pad: Designation for a law enforcement officer who is paid by the underworld to ignore certain criminal activity.

to:

* on the pad: Designation for a law enforcement officer who is paid by the underworld to ignore and turn a blind eye to certain criminal activity.



* one-way ride: Euphemism for an execution method, where the victim is taken to a remote location and is killed off

to:

* one-way ride: Euphemism for an execution method, where the victim is taken to a remote location and is killed offoff.



* shakedown: to blackmail, muscle in or try to get money from someone; also to give someone a scare.

to:

* shakedown: to blackmail, muscle in in, extort or try to get money from someone; also to give someone a scare.


Added DiffLines:

* sleeping with the fishes: To be killed and have one's body disposed of in the sea or other body of water.
30th Jul '16 7:22:53 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* borgata: a crime Family; brugad. Sometimes used to describe a crew or faction within a Family
* boss: the head of the crime Family; he is the only one who gives permission to "whack" or "make" someone, and he makes money from all Family operations; synonyms: don, chairman.
* Boss of Bosses; Capo di tutti capi: While no one proclaims himself the Boss of Bosses anymore, the press awards this title to whomever they feel is the boss of the strongest of the five Families of New York, who is also said to preside over Commission meetings.

to:

* borgata: a crime Family; brugad. Sometimes used to describe a crew or faction within a Family
* boss: the head of the crime Family; he is the only one who gives permission to "whack" or "make" someone, and he makes money from all Family operations; synonyms: don, chairman.
* Boss of Bosses; Capo di tutti capi: While no one proclaims himself the Boss of Bosses anymore, the press awards this title to whomever they feel is the boss of the strongest of the five Families of New York, who is also said to preside over Commission meetings.
Family.



* capo: ranking member of a Family who heads a crew (or group) of soldiers; a skipper, short for capodecina.



* come in: To go see the boss when summoned.

to:

* come in: To go see the boss when summoned.summoned without question.



* contract: a murder assignment.

to:

* contract: contract/piece of work: a murder assignment.



* crank/junk: Euphemism for narcotics.

to:

* crank/junk: Euphemism for narcotics.narcotics, especially heroin.



* iron out: To straighten out things, especially disputes, beefs and vendettas before they spiral out of control.



* rat: a member who violates Omerta; synonyms: squealer, canary, snitch, stool pigeon, yellow dog.
* sit-down: a meeting with the Family administration to settle disputes.

to:

* rat: a member who violates Omerta; synonyms: squealer, informant, canary, snitch, stool pigeon, yellow dog.
dog, ''pentito'', tell-tale.
* sit-down: sit-down/table: a meeting with the Family administration or with other Families to settle disputes.



* shy: the interest charged on loans by loansharks.



* vig: the interest payment on a loan from a loanshark (short for "vigorish"). Synonym: juice.

to:

* vig: the interest payment on a loan from a loanshark (short for "vigorish"). Synonym: juice.juice, vig.
30th Jul '16 7:11:14 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

!!Mob Lingo:

The American Mafia has a unique lexicon. Its collection of slang has been building for more than a century. Many of its words have entered mainstream language.

[[folder:Mobster Speak]]
* administration: the upper-level, three-man power structure of an organized crime Family, composed of the boss, underboss, and consigliere.
* associate: an almost-there; someone who works with and for wiseguys, but who hasn't been sworn in as a member of the Family.
* babania: Heroin, as in dealing. Lucrative but risky for mob insiders because if they're busted, long prison terms might compel them to cut a deal and squeal.
* babbo: A dope, idiot, useless underling.
* beef: a complaint or disagreement within the organization, usually discussed during a sit-down with higher-ups in the Family.
* big earner: someone who makes a lot of money for the Family. A LOT of money.
* books, the: euphemism for membership in the Family, since nothing is ever written down. When there is an availability (when someone dies), the books are "opened." When no one is being "made," the books are "closed."
* borgata: a crime Family; brugad. Sometimes used to describe a crew or faction within a Family
* boss: the head of the crime Family; he is the only one who gives permission to "whack" or "make" someone, and he makes money from all Family operations; synonyms: don, chairman.
* Boss of Bosses; Capo di tutti capi: While no one proclaims himself the Boss of Bosses anymore, the press awards this title to whomever they feel is the boss of the strongest of the five Families of New York, who is also said to preside over Commission meetings.
* broken: demoted in rank; "knocked down."
* brugad: a crime family; borgata.
* burn: to murder; synonyms: break an egg, clip, do a piece of work, hit, ice, pop, put out a contract on, whack, knock off, bump off, rubout.
* button: a "made" member of the Mafia; soldier, wiseguy, goodfella, Man of Honor.
* cafone/gavone: a phony or embarrassment to himself and others; "gavone" (slang pronunciation)
* capo: ranking member of a Family who heads a crew (or group) of soldiers; a skipper, short for capodecina.
* cement shoes/cement overcoat: Fictional method of disposing bodies in a body of water, hoping that someone will not find the body.
* chased: to be banished from the Mafia and barred from associating or doing business with any made members. The punishment is merciful in that the offender is spared death.
* cleaning: taking the necessary steps (driving around, stopping in various locations) to avoid being followed.
* clock: to keep track of someone's movements and activities.
* comare: a Mafia mistress; "goumada" (slang pronunciation).
* come in: To go see the boss when summoned.
* compare: crony, close pal, buddy. Literally, "godfather" in Italian.
* contract: a murder assignment.
* Cosa Nostra: Italian for "this thing of ours," a mob family, the Mafia.
* crank/junk: Euphemism for narcotics.
* crew: a group of soldiers that takes orders from a capo.
* cugine: a young toughguy looking to be made.
* earner: someone whose expertise is making money for the Family.
* empty suit: someone with nothing to offer who tries to hang around with mobsters.
* enforcer/muscle: a person who threatens, maims, or kills someone who doesn't cooperate with Family rules or deals.
* fence: someone with worldwide outlets to liquidate swag.
* friend of mine: introduction of a third person who is not a member of the Family but who can be vouched for by a Family member.
* friend of ours: introduction of one made member to another.
* get a place ready: To find a burial site.
* gift: A bribe, sometimes for a juror.
* give a pass: To grant a reprieve from being whacked.
* going: About to be whacked.
* going south: stealing, passing money under the table, going on the lam.
* goombah, goomba, gumba: Sicilian slang for the Italian compare; plural: goombata
* hard-on with a suitcase: mob lawyer; feminine: half a hard-on with a suitcase.
* hot place: a location suspected of being the target of law enforcement or surveillance.
* joint, the: prison; synonyms: the can, the pen, go away to college.
* loanshark: someone who lends mob money at an exorbitant interest rate; a shylock.
* made: to be sworn into La Cosa Nostra; synonyms: to be "straightened out," to get your button.
* make a marriage: to bring two parties together for legitimate or illegitimate Family issues.
* mattresses, hitting the, taking to the: going to war with a rival Family or gang.
* meat eater: a corrupt cop (not exclusively mobspeak).
* message job: placing the bullet in someone's body such that a specific message is sent to that person's crew or family;
* Mustache Petes: Old fashioned or older generation Mafiosi.
* nut, the: mobspeak for "the bottom line"; also the gross profit figure.
* Omerta: the code of silence and one of the premier vows taken when being sworn into the Family. Violation is punishable by death.
* off the record/books: an action taken without the knowledge or approval of the Family.
* on the record/books: an action sanctioned by the Family.
* on the carpet: The situation that occurs when a made guy's performance is harshly criticized by his superior.
* on the lam: Moving secretly. Indicted mobsters, in an effort to avoid arrest, might go "on the lam," changing their address, moving secretly from place to place.
* on the pad: Designation for a law enforcement officer who is paid by the underworld to ignore certain criminal activity.
* on the spot: Set up for assassination.
* one-way ride: Euphemism for an execution method, where the victim is taken to a remote location and is killed off
* piece: a gun.
* pinched/picked up: arrested.
* problem: A liability, someone likely to be whacked.
* rat: a member who violates Omerta; synonyms: squealer, canary, snitch, stool pigeon, yellow dog.
* sit-down: a meeting with the Family administration to settle disputes.
* shakedown: to blackmail, muscle in or try to get money from someone; also to give someone a scare.
* shy: the interest charged on loans by loansharks.
* shylockbusiness: the business of loansharking.
* skim: Tax-free gambling profits, as in the money taken that is not reported to the IRS.
* stand-up guy: someone who refuses to rat out the Family no matter what the pressure, offer, or threat.
* swag: stolen goods, also an acronym for "stolen without a gun."
* tax: to take a percentage of someone's earnings.
* through the eye: a message job through the eye to say "We're watching you!"
* through the mouth: a message job through the mouth to indicate that someone WAS a rat.
* vig: the interest payment on a loan from a loanshark (short for "vigorish"). Synonym: juice.
* vouch for: to personally guarantee--with one's life--the reputation of someone dealing with the Family.
* walk talk, take a walk: to conduct a sensitive discussion while striding up and down the block to avoid being overheard on those pesky eavesdropping devices.
* waste management/garbage business: euphemism for organized crime.
* Young Turks: Younger, less traditional generation of Mafiosi. Less likely to live by the old rules.
* Zips: Derogatory term used by American mobsters for their imported Sicilian Mafiosi cousins.
[[/folder]]
26th Jul '16 1:55:28 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the Young Turks in the 1920s, trying to hijack their rivals' trucks containing alcohol.

to:

* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the Young Turks in the 1920s, trying 1920s. Even Paul Castellano began his mob career in the 1930s by holding up a haberdasher; despite being asked to hijack their rivals' trucks containing alcohol.
identify his accomplices, he refused to so (and served a three-month stint as a result of his refusal to rat out), earning the respect of mobsters.
26th Jul '16 1:29:03 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when bosses are free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this tactic since the 1970s and have been [[BaitAndSwitchBoss playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement]] using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy bosses" (usually high-ranking capos) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the ''de facto'' boss in ''all but name'', especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a lower-profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.)

to:

* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when bosses are free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this tactic since the 1970s and have been [[BaitAndSwitchBoss playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement]] using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy bosses" (usually high-ranking capos) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the [[TheAllegedBoss ''de facto'' facto'']] [[TheManBehindTheMan boss in ''all but name'', name'']], especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a lower-profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.)



* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the boss of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing where the orders are actually coming from]].

to:

* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the boss of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing where the orders are actually coming from]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has approx. 50 made men in its New Jersey faction, appoints a capo to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crew prior to becoming boss.
25th Jul '16 10:19:17 AM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in southern and western Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Bath Beach, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under [[TheChessmaster Carlo Gambino's]] reign, it had around 400 made men, but the family membership has since dipped to approx. 225-250 made men), it is now a former shell of itself due to [[ItsAllAboutMe John Gotti's high media profile]] and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family had its origins in the large Brooklyn wing of the Morello crime family, which eventually split off into its own family. It first came to prominence under the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss [[DragonWithAnAgenda Albert]] [[TheStarscream Anastasia]] (the relationship between Anastasia and the Mangano brothers was an uneasy one from the start). Anastasia later took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers in 1951 (Phil's body was found in a swamp in Brooklyn, while Vincent vanished without a trace), and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to bite him (as his rival [[BigBadWannabe Vito Genovese]] would use his violent past against him - [[AxCrazy Anastasia]] had murdered his own boss without the Commission's approval), and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by [[BigBadDuumvirate Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese]]). [[TheStarscream Carlo Gambino]], the family's namesake and Anastasia's underboss, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks [[VillainousFriendship to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family]]; he later became the Mafia's '''de facto''' [[TheChessmaster boss of all bosses]] as the other bosses in New York were facing various troubles, such as illness, internal warfare and legal problems. But Gambino's biggest mistake (prior to his death in 1976) was naming his cousin Paul Castellano as his successor over his underboss, [[TheDragon Neil Dellacroce]] (who was the most likely candidate for succeeding Gambino, but was imprisoned at the time for tax evasion); splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by [[MookLieutenant John Gotti]], believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street, and was seen as a yes-man for Gambino despite being a big earner for the family). Though he disapproved of Gambino's choice of picking his cousin as boss, Dellacroce still managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985. After Dellacroce's death from cancer, Castellano was gunned down outside Sparks Steak House a few weeks later; the hit was ordered by Gotti, who was reportedly angry that Castellano was a no-show at his mentor Dellacroce's funeral. Gotti took over as boss following Castellano's assassination, but his reign as boss was marred by frequent indictments, assassination attempts by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano), and was [[ItsAllAboutMe too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo.]] By the early 1990s, [[DragonWithAnAgenda Sammy Gravano (his underboss)]], [[DefectorFromDecadence fed up]] with Gotti's antics, [[TheStoolPigeon decided to]] [[TheInformant cooperate with the FBI.]] Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking several attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and subsequently died of cancer 10 years later; his brother Peter took over as boss in 2002, but he too was imprisoned for life, and still runs the family from behind bars. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.

to:

* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in southern and western Brooklyn (notably Bay Ridge, Bath Beach, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (especially Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under [[TheChessmaster Carlo Gambino's]] reign, it had around 400 made men, but the family membership has since dipped to approx. 225-250 made men), it is now a former shell of itself due to [[ItsAllAboutMe John Gotti's high media profile]] and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family had its origins in the large Brooklyn wing of the Morello crime family, which eventually split off into its own family. It first came to prominence under the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss [[DragonWithAnAgenda Albert]] [[TheStarscream Anastasia]] (the relationship between Anastasia and the Mangano brothers was an uneasy one from the start). Anastasia later took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers in 1951 (Phil's body was found in a swamp in Brooklyn, while Vincent vanished without a trace), and was known to be a ruthless boss (thanks to his prior experience as the head of Murder, Inc. in the 1930s). However, his past would come back to bite him (as his rival [[BigBadWannabe Vito Genovese]] would use his violent past against him - [[AxCrazy Anastasia]] had murdered his own boss without the Commission's approval), and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 (orchestrated by [[BigBadDuumvirate Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese]]). [[TheStarscream Carlo Gambino]], the family's namesake and Anastasia's underboss, took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks [[VillainousFriendship to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family]]; he later became the Mafia's '''de facto''' [[TheChessmaster boss of all bosses]] as the other bosses in New York were facing various troubles, such as illness, internal warfare and legal problems. But Gambino's biggest mistake (prior to his death in 1976) was naming his cousin Paul Castellano as his successor over his underboss, [[TheDragon Neil Dellacroce]] (who was the most likely candidate for succeeding Gambino, but was imprisoned at the time for tax evasion); splitting the family into two factions (the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by [[MookLieutenant John Gotti]], believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street, and was seen as a yes-man [[YesMan yes-man]] for Gambino despite being a big earner for the family). Though he disapproved of Gambino's choice of picking his cousin as boss, Dellacroce still managed to keep the peace between his protege, Gotti, and Castellano for the next 9 years until his death in 1985. After Dellacroce's death from cancer, Castellano was gunned down outside Sparks Steak House a few weeks later; the hit was ordered by Gotti, who was reportedly angry that Castellano was a no-show at his mentor Dellacroce's funeral. Gotti took over as boss following Castellano's assassination, but his reign as boss was marred by frequent indictments, assassination attempts by rival families (notably the Genovese and Lucchese families, whose bosses were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano), and was [[ItsAllAboutMe too publicity-hungry like Joe Colombo.]] By the early 1990s, [[DragonWithAnAgenda Sammy Gravano (his underboss)]], [[DefectorFromDecadence fed up]] with Gotti's antics, [[TheStoolPigeon decided to]] [[TheInformant cooperate with the FBI.]] Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking several attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and subsequently died of cancer 10 years later; his brother Peter took over as boss in 2002, but he too was imprisoned for life, and still runs the family from behind bars. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.



* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street/East Harlem, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx (primarily in Morris Park, Pelham Bay and Arthur Avenue), Westchester, northern New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews and factions in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still the strongest and biggest of the Five Families (the family size has varied from 300 to 450 made men). The oldest of the New York families, it was known as the Morello crime family and eventually came under the control of Morello capo [[BadBoss Giuseppe "Joe the Boss" Masseria]], who had a penchant for violence and was notoriously greedy. His heavy-handed attempts to strong arm and control the other Italian gangs, especially the Williamsburg-based Castellammarese gang, led to a bloody turf war in 1928; the Castellammarese War, as it was known, claimed at least 150+ lives and dragged on until Masseria was gunned down at a Coney Island restaurant in 1931. Sal Maranzano, now the nominal victor of this turf war, [[ItsAllAboutMe immediately wasted no time into reorganizing the Five Families under his control by declaring himself the boss of bosses;]] the Young Turks, led by an upstart gangster named [[MagnificentBastard Charles]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda "Lucky" Luciano]](the Young Turks were a younger generation of Americanized mafiosi, and were swayed by Maranzano into fighting for him), realized that Maranzano was much [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem greedier]] [[ItsAllAboutMe than they thought.]] So, they decided that the boss of all bosses had to go, and Luciano takes over in September of 1931 after Maranzano was eliminated. With the old guard (Mustache Petes, as they were called) of mobsters out of the way, Luciano can now consolidate his own power. Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission (and becoming its 1st chairman) to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "hitting the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring in 1937 and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was craving to go legitimate. But he was faced with a growing threat from [[DragonWithAnAgenda Vito Genovese]], who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia and William "Willie Moore" Moretti). Genovese, with the sufficient backing of [[CoDragons Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese]], then ordered a hit on Costello in May of 1957; Costello manages to survive the hit (thanks to the gunman's unintentional warning, he managed to get away with only a scalp wound) and steps down to avoid further bloodshed. Later that year, Genovese ordered a hit on [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia]] and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the bloodletting that's going on in New York since the attempted hit on Costello earlier that year. The Apalachin Meeting proved to be a big debacle as it exposed the LCN to law enforcement, media and public scrutiny, and the other bosses (notably [[TheStarscream Gambino and Lucchese,]] who switched sides and supported Costello, Luciano and Lansky) had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. Later, in 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named [[TheStoolPigeon Joe Valachi]] became the first made man to [[TheInformant flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings;]] Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence his reason to cooperate with federal authorities. Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. Though the family was run by a series of acting bosses and ruling panels after Genovese's death, Phil "Benny Squint" Lombardo (the family's street boss since 1962) was regarded as the [[TheChessmaster ''de facto'' boss and had the final say in family matters, especially after 1969.]] Ill health forces Lombardo to step down and name [[DragonAscendant Vincent "Chin" Gigante]] (the alleged gunman behind the Costello hit) as his successor in 1981; Gigante later names [[TheManBehindTheMan Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss]]. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by [[ObfuscatingDisability feigning]] [[ObfuscatingInsanity insanity]] and [[ObfuscatingStupidity pretending to have a low IQ]]; this feigned insanity fooled law enforcement for years and worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and since his death, it is implied the family now uses a ruling panel of capos to manage its daily affairs and to avoid FBI attention.

to:

* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street/East Harlem, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx (primarily in Morris Park, Pelham Bay and Arthur Avenue), Westchester, northern New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews and factions in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still the strongest and biggest of the Five Families (the family size has varied from 300 to 450 made men). The oldest of the New York families, it was known as the Morello crime family and eventually came under the control of Morello capo [[BadBoss Giuseppe "Joe the Boss" Masseria]], who had a penchant for violence and was notoriously greedy. His heavy-handed attempts to strong arm and control the other Italian gangs, especially the Williamsburg-based Castellammarese gang, led to a bloody turf war in 1928; the Castellammarese War, as it was known, claimed at least 150+ lives and dragged on until Masseria was gunned down at a Coney Island restaurant in 1931. Sal Maranzano, [[BigBadWannabe Salvatore]] [[EntitledBastard Maranzano]], now the nominal victor of this turf war, [[ItsAllAboutMe immediately wasted no time into reorganizing the Five Families under his control by declaring himself the boss of bosses;]] the Young Turks, led by an upstart gangster named [[MagnificentBastard Charles]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda "Lucky" Luciano]](the Young Turks were a younger generation of Americanized mafiosi, and were swayed by Maranzano into fighting for him), realized that Maranzano was much [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem greedier]] [[ItsAllAboutMe than they thought.]] So, they decided that the boss of all bosses had to go, and Luciano takes over in September of 1931 after Maranzano was eliminated. With the old guard (Mustache Petes, as they were called) of mobsters out of the way, Luciano can now consolidate his own power. Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission (and becoming its 1st chairman) to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "hitting the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring in 1937 and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was craving to go legitimate. But he was faced with a growing threat from [[DragonWithAnAgenda Vito Genovese]], who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia and William "Willie Moore" Moretti). Genovese, with the sufficient backing of [[CoDragons Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese]], then ordered a hit on Costello in May of 1957; Costello manages to survive the hit (thanks to the gunman's unintentional warning, he managed to get away with only a scalp wound) and steps down to avoid further bloodshed. Later that year, Genovese ordered a hit on [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia]] and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the bloodletting that's going on in New York since the attempted hit on Costello earlier that year. The Apalachin Meeting proved to be a big debacle as it exposed the LCN to law enforcement, media and public scrutiny, and the other bosses (notably [[TheStarscream Gambino and Lucchese,]] who switched sides and supported Costello, Luciano and Lansky) had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. Later, in 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named [[TheStoolPigeon Joe Valachi]] became the first made man to [[TheInformant flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings;]] Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence his reason to cooperate with federal authorities. Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels) until his death in 1969. Though the family was run by a series of acting bosses and ruling panels after Genovese's death, Phil "Benny Squint" Lombardo (the family's street boss since 1962) was regarded as the [[TheChessmaster ''de facto'' boss and and]] [[TheAllegedBoss had the final say in family matters, especially after 1969.]] Ill health forces Lombardo to step down and name [[DragonAscendant Vincent "Chin" Gigante]] (the alleged gunman behind the Costello hit) as his successor in 1981; Gigante [[TheAllegedBoss Gigante]] later names [[TheManBehindTheMan Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss]]. He further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by [[ObfuscatingDisability feigning]] [[ObfuscatingInsanity insanity]] and [[ObfuscatingStupidity pretending to have a low IQ]]; this feigned insanity fooled law enforcement for years and worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and since his death, it is implied the family now uses a ruling panel of capos to manage its daily affairs and to avoid FBI attention.
25th Jul '16 6:31:06 AM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The American Mafia began with loosely-knit protection gangs known as ''Black Hands,'' taking orders from emigrated Sicilian mafiosi. Charles "Lucky" Luciano, both a member of the Sicilian Mafia (under Joe Masseria) and a graduate of the infamous Italian-American Five Points Gang, drew members from other parts of Italy (or rather other parts of ''Little'' Italy) under his umbrella, knocked off the old hats (known in the day as "Mustache Petes"), and reorganized the American Mafia along territorial lines. Each city in the country was given to one family, except for New York, which famously got five. This structure, along with the "Commission" (an executive body designed for resolving disputes, which included at its inception the Five Families, the boss from Buffalo, and Chicago boss Al Capone, and at times included other families such as Philadelphia and Detroit; the modern "Commission" now consists the five New York City Bosses and the Chicago Outfit) is generally believed to have held up today, despite heavy law enforcement pressure. Modern-day candidates for "made guys" must be "of Italian descent," which can mean varying things according to which family is making the decision; some families, such as the Chicago Outfit, do not heavily stress the "made guy" role and do a lot of business with associates of non-Italian ethnicity (indeed, the "Chicago Outfit" was originally a coalition of many ethnic gangs, including Irish, Italians, Jews, and Poles, under the leadership of Al Capone's predecessor Johnny Torrio, who all agreed not to interfere with the other gangs' bootlegging operations; the Italians, being the most organized and having connections to the massive operations in New York, were merely first among equals); other families such as the Bonanno family of New York have substantial "zip" (imported Sicilian mafiosi) crews and are more stringent in regards to who they do business with.

to:

The American Mafia began with loosely-knit protection gangs known as ''Black Hands,'' taking orders from emigrated Sicilian mafiosi. Charles "Lucky" Luciano, both a member of the Sicilian Mafia (under Joe Masseria) and a graduate of the infamous Italian-American Five Points Gang, drew members from other parts of Italy (or rather other parts of ''Little'' Italy) under his umbrella, knocked off the old hats (known in the day as "Mustache Petes"), and reorganized the American Mafia along territorial lines. Each city in the country was given to one family, except for New York, which famously got five. This structure, along with the "Commission" (an executive body designed for resolving disputes, which included at its inception the Five Families, the boss from Buffalo, and Chicago boss Al Capone, and at times included other families such as Philadelphia and Detroit; the modern "Commission" now consists the five New York City Bosses and the Chicago Outfit) is generally believed to have held up today, despite heavy law enforcement pressure. Modern-day candidates for "made guys" must be "of Italian descent," which can mean varying things according to which family is making the decision; some families, such as the Chicago Outfit, do not heavily stress the "made guy" role and do a lot of business with associates of non-Italian ethnicity (indeed, the "Chicago Outfit" was originally a coalition of many ethnic gangs, including Irish, Italians, Jews, and Poles, under the leadership of Al Capone's predecessor Johnny Torrio, who all agreed not to interfere with the other gangs' bootlegging operations; the Italians, being the most organized and having connections to the massive operations in New York, were merely first among equals); other families families, such as the Bonanno family of New York have substantial "zip" (imported Sicilian mafiosi) crews factions and are more stringent in regards to who they do business with.



The American Mafia started out as street-level gangsters, originating as Black Hand loansharks and extortion rings in the early 1900s. The Five Points Gang became notorious in the 1910s and 1920s, and with the advent of Prohibition, many mafiosi became bootleggers thanks to a nationwide ban on alcohol sales. However, this also led to numerous gangland and turf wars, especially in New York and Chicago; in Chicacgo, Al Capone was duking it out with Bugs Moran. The New York war (known as the Castellammarese War because one of the warring factions came from Castellammare del Golfo, a small town in Sicily, and later became the Bonanno family) was different because it ultimately changed the course of the Mafia forever. The war began when Joe "the Boss" Masseria, head of the Morello (later Genovese) crime family began to shake down the other Italian gangs, enroach on their bootlegging rackets and coerce them to pay a hefty tribute ("street tax") to him, especially the Brooklyn-based Castellammarese Clan, which was led by Salvatore "Little Caesar" Maranzano. Soon enough, both sides went to war in 1929, with Masseria having a slight advantage in terms of manpower; the Castellammarese gang, however, was much more cohesive thanks to its military-style hierarchy and Maranzano's charismatic leadership. However, as the war dragged on, a new faction of younger, Americanized Italian mobsters emerged on both sides - the Young Turks. Led by an upstart gangster named Charles "Lucky" Luciano, they believed that the two Old World bosses (aka Mustache Petes) were too old-fashioned and were to be eliminated. First, Masseria was taken out in a Coney Island restaurant in April of 1931, allowing Maranzano to be the nominal victor; [[BigBadWannabe he became too power hungry]] by [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem declaring himself boss of all bosses]] at a meeting in upstate New York, rankling many of the Young Turks. They decided Maranzano had to go, and Luciano sent hitmen disguised as tax agents (Maranzano was facing a potential IRS audit like Capone, and was to be indicted on tax evasion charges) to Maranzano's office at the Helmsley Building in September of 1931 and eliminate Maranzano (despite putting up a fight, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath he was garroted, stabbed and shot multiple times]]).

to:

The American Mafia started out as street-level gangsters, originating as Black Hand loansharks and extortion rings in the early 1900s. The Five Points Gang became notorious in the 1910s and 1920s, and with the advent of Prohibition, many mafiosi became bootleggers thanks to a nationwide ban on alcohol sales. However, this also led to numerous gangland and turf wars, especially in New York and Chicago; in Chicacgo, Al Capone was duking it out with Bugs Moran. The New York war (known as the Castellammarese War because one of the warring factions came from Castellammare del Golfo, a small town in Sicily, and later became the Bonanno family) was different because it ultimately changed the course of the Mafia forever. The war began when Joe "the Boss" Masseria, head of the Morello (later Genovese) crime family began to shake down the other Italian gangs, enroach on their bootlegging rackets and coerce them to pay a hefty tribute ("street tax") to him, especially the Brooklyn-based Castellammarese Clan, which was led by Salvatore "Little Caesar" Maranzano. Soon enough, both sides went to war in 1929, with Masseria having a slight advantage in terms of manpower; the Castellammarese gang, however, was much more cohesive thanks to its military-style hierarchy and Maranzano's charismatic leadership. However, as the war dragged on, a new faction of younger, Americanized Italian mobsters emerged on both sides - the Young Turks. Led by an upstart gangster named Charles "Lucky" Luciano, they believed that the two Old World bosses (aka Mustache Petes) were too old-fashioned and were to be eliminated. First, To do this however, Luciano had to secretly eliminate his own boss in order to make peace with Maranzano. So Masseria was taken out in a Coney Island restaurant in April of 1931, allowing Maranzano to be the nominal victor; [[BigBadWannabe he became too power hungry]] by [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem declaring himself boss of all bosses]] at a meeting in upstate New York, rankling many of the Young Turks. They Turks, and [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal he made with Luciano]]. The Young Turks decided Maranzano had to go, and Luciano sent hitmen disguised as tax agents (Maranzano was facing a potential IRS audit like Capone, Capone before him, and was to be indicted on tax evasion charges) to Maranzano's office at the Helmsley Building in September of 1931 and eliminate Maranzano (despite putting up a fight, [[CruelAndUnusualDeath he was garroted, stabbed and shot multiple times]]).



The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really confirmed the existence of La Cosa Nostra in the United States. The meeting in Apalachin was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses.]] Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the federal government was able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed the Mafia with nothing but contempt). Also, with many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and other bosses in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on homeland security since 9/11), the American Mafia remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs in order to avoid FBI attention.

to:

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really confirmed the existence of La Cosa Nostra in the United States. The meeting in Apalachin was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses.Bosses by eliminating]] [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano {now Gambino) family in October of 1957.]] Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the federal government was able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed the Mafia with nothing but contempt). Also, with many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and other bosses in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on homeland security terrorism since 9/11), the American Mafia remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs in order to avoid FBI attention.



The Mafia does love to get their hands dirty in any illegitimate activities, from construction to garbage hauling to labor racketeering to murder-for-hire

to:

The Mafia does love to get their hands dirty in any illegitimate activities, from construction to garbage hauling to labor racketeering to murder-for-hire
murder-for-hire.
23rd Jul '16 6:27:15 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:White-collar crimes]]

to:

[[folder:White-collar crimes]]Crimes]]



[[folder:Blue-collar crimes]]

to:

[[folder:Blue-collar crimes]]Crimes]]



[[folder:Mafia Ranks]]

to:

[[folder:Mafia [[folder:Overall Ranks]]



[[folder: Ranks within each family]]

to:

[[folder: Ranks within each family]]Within Each Family]]
23rd Jul '16 6:25:47 PM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message



In each family:
* '''Capofamiglia/Representante''' (Boss) - Crime boss of a particular family. "Don" is an honorific, not a title: in today's Italy it's reserved to ''priests''. Since Mafia families in Sicily are more numerous and smaller than those in the United States, the title is not as distinguished, although the boss still has paramount authority within his region. "Hits" on individuals under his family's protection are at the sole discretion of the boss, and the boss also decides who is allowed to become a formal member of the family ("opening the books" is a term used by the Cosa Nostra to induct new members into a family). Much of the boss's duties consist of settling disputes (holding "sit-downs") between family members and other crime families, relaying orders down the line to the soldiers, and receiving a tribute from the family's captains (and rarely, soldiers and associates serving directly under him). He can also promote or demote ("knock down" or "break") family members at will. Murdering (or attempting to murder) an official boss is a big no-no in the Mafia, as the Commission would order the usurper's death for killing his own boss without explicit permission (only the Commission can authorize a hit on a boss).
* '''Capobastone/Sottocapo/Vicecapo''' - The Underboss is the second in command of a mafia family and usually inherits the Boss title if the official boss is unavailable (death, prison, on the lam, etc.). The underboss's power varies: some are mere figureheads, while others could be very influential, sometimes running a faction within the family or in rare cases, being the ''de facto'' or effective head of the family even if the official boss is free. The former types are often "knocked down" (demoted), or "whacked" (take a guess) when their patron is no longer guiding their fortunes or if they fall out of favor with the boss. Will collect tribute from most of the family's captains (some, known as "king's men" have the honor of handing theirs directly to the boss), taking a hefty cut before passing it up, and may be in charge of larger rackets requiring citywide coordination (for example, sports betting, which requires bookies across an urban area to hedge each other's bets to collect profit with minimum risk). It should be noted that ''Capobastone'' is used mainly within the 'Ndrangheta, though.

to:

\nIn [[/folder]]

[[folder: Ranks within
each family:
family]]
* '''Capofamiglia/Representante''' (Boss) - Crime boss of a particular family. "Don" is an honorific, not a title: in today's Italy it's reserved to ''priests''. Since Mafia families in Sicily are more numerous and smaller than those in the United States, the title is not as distinguished, although the boss still has paramount authority within his region. "Hits" on individuals under his family's protection are at the sole discretion of the boss, and the boss also decides who is allowed to become a formal member of the family ("opening the books" is a term used by the Cosa Nostra to induct new members into a family). Much of the boss's other duties consist of include settling disputes (holding "sit-downs") between family members and other crime families, relaying orders down the line to the soldiers, and chain of command, receiving a tribute from the family's captains capos (and rarely, soldiers and associates serving directly under him). He can also him) and promote or demote ("knock down" or "break") family members at will. Murdering (or attempting to murder) an official boss is a big no-no in the Mafia, as the Commission would order the usurper's death for killing his own boss without explicit permission (only the Commission can authorize a hit on a boss).
* '''Capobastone/Sottocapo/Vicecapo''' '''Capobastone/Sottocapo''' - The Underboss is the second in command of a mafia family and usually inherits the Boss title if the official boss is unavailable (death, prison, on the lam, etc.). The underboss's power varies: some are mere figureheads, while others could be very influential, sometimes running a faction within the family or in rare cases, being the ''de facto'' or effective head of the family even if the official boss is free. The former types are often "knocked down" (demoted), or "whacked" (take a guess) when their patron is no longer guiding their fortunes or if they fall out of favor with the boss. Will collect tribute from most of the family's captains (some, known as "king's men" have the honor of handing theirs directly to the boss), taking a hefty cut before passing it up, and may be in charge of larger rackets requiring citywide coordination (for example, sports betting, which requires bookies across an urban area to hedge each other's bets to collect profit with minimum risk). It should be noted that ''Capobastone'' is used mainly within the 'Ndrangheta, though.



* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the boss of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired or just wants to lay low.

to:

* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the boss of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired or just semi-retired, wants to lay low.low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing where the orders are actually coming from]].



** Note: At one time, one had to be a full-blooded Italian to be a full member of the American Mafia, but the rules seem to have become a touch more flexible as time went on. Despite this, some of the Mafia families may be more stringent than others as to who they want to induct.

to:

** Note: At one time, one had to be a full-blooded Italian to be a full member of the American Mafia, but the rules seem to have become a touch more flexible loosened as time went on. Despite this, this flexibility, some of the Mafia families may be more stringent than others as to who they want to induct.
20th Jul '16 10:15:01 AM Njein
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (its manpower has hovered between 150 and 200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellammarese War; the familys disorderly behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family namesake Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano (he came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s), who fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar; Joe Masseria (the boss of the Genovese family and a very greedy man) soon noticed him, saw Maranzano as a growing threat to his power, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese gang's bootlegging rackets. Maranzano resisted, and this led to a turf war that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, [[BigBad Maranzano]] declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses aka the king of the underworld]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity The power went into his head,]] and he too was eliminated by Luciano in late 1931, who sent hitmen to his office posing as IRS agents (Maranzano was facing an IRS audit like Al Capone before him, and using this info, Luciano makes a move before Maranzano gets him). With Maranzano eliminated, [[DragonAscendant his protege and ambitious underboss Joe Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major drug trafficker despite denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe Bonanno]] had bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Gambino and Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s; however, this plot was exposed when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]] (a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman) [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder told about Bonanno's plot to Gambino and the rest of the Commission.]] Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964 (at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena). The Commission replaced him with one of his capos, Gaspar DiGregorio, but DiGregorio's position as boss was not acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an internal war that only ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were banished to Tucson, Arizona in 1968. The family's troubles (it was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s) did not end as [[AxCrazy Carmine Galante]], a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher (the Bonannos were infamous for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become the boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to regain control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too ineffectual to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement; several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned); by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. However, being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the [[NotSoHarmlessVillain Bonannos']] favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder mobsters flipping to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership to between 150 and 170 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon flipped]] (especially [[NobleTopEnforcer Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him; but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship becomes starts to become shaky to the point that Massino wants to eliminate him, and this becomes the ultimate catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003), and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; the penalty was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was linked to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005.]] Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleauges and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath.

to:

* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (especially Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), Queens (especially Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, South Brooklyn, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (its manpower has hovered between 150 and 200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak stemming from the Castellammarese War; the familys family's disorderly behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), this crime family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn (including family namesake Joe Bonanno, who took over after Maranzano's death in 1931); the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano (he came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s), who fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar; Joe Masseria (the boss of the Genovese family and a very greedy man) soon noticed him, saw Maranzano as a growing threat to his power, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese gang's bootlegging rackets. Maranzano resisted, and this led to a turf war that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, [[BigBad Maranzano]] declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses aka the king of the underworld]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity The power went into his head,]] and he too was eliminated by Luciano in late 1931, who sent hitmen to his office posing as IRS agents (Maranzano was facing an IRS audit like Al Capone before him, and using this info, Luciano makes a move before Maranzano gets him). With Maranzano eliminated, [[DragonAscendant his protege and ambitious underboss Joe Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major drug trafficker despite denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe Bonanno]] had bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Gambino and Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s; however, this plot was exposed when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]] (a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman) [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder told about Bonanno's plot to Gambino and the rest of the Commission.]] Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964 (at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena). The Commission replaced him with one of his capos, Gaspar DiGregorio, but DiGregorio's position as boss was not acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an internal war that only ended when Bonanno and his son Bill were banished to Tucson, Arizona in 1968. The family's troubles (it was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s) did not end as [[AxCrazy Carmine Galante]], a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher (the Bonannos were infamous for dealing drugs since the 1950s, when Bonanno sent Galante to Montreal so that they could import heroin into the United States from Bonanno's contacts in Sicily), attempted to become the boss but he was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip Rastelli to regain control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too ineffectual to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death; they too were eliminated by Rastelli loyalists led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] The Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made), however, did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission for most of the 1980s (Sonny Black Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement; several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned); by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. However, being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the [[NotSoHarmlessVillain Bonannos']] favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder mobsters flipping to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's underboss, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership to between 150 and 170 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud. However, several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon flipped]] (especially [[NobleTopEnforcer Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him; but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship becomes starts to become shaky to the point that Massino wants to eliminate him, and this becomes the ultimate catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003), and he faced a lengthy prison sentence; the penalty was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders was linked to him. Fearing the death sentence, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn state's evidence in 2005.]] Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleauges and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath.
This list shows the last 10 events of 148. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheMafia