History UsefulNotes / TheMafia

16th Dec '17 9:34:14 PM Njein
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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough, the power went into his head,]] and Maranzano decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a potential tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. While Bonanno claimed that he was picked up by the Buffalo mob, it certainly was a BlatantLie, as most of his henchmen and fellow bosses such as Ray Patriarca, Sam [=DeCavalcante=], Angelo Bruno and Joe Colombo were caught off-guard by his kidnapping stunt. Also, many of his henchmen were angry that he took off and became AWOL. The Commission responded by replacing him with Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, AZ in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough, the power went into his head,]] and Maranzano decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a potential tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. While Bonanno claimed that he was picked up by the Buffalo mob, it certainly was a BlatantLie, BlatantLies, as most of his henchmen and fellow bosses such as Ray Patriarca, Sam [=DeCavalcante=], Angelo Bruno and Joe Colombo were caught off-guard by his kidnapping stunt. Also, many of his henchmen were angry that he took off and became AWOL. The Commission responded by replacing him with Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, AZ in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.
16th Dec '17 9:27:39 PM Njein
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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough, the power went into his head,]] and Maranzano decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a potential tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. The Commission replaced him and installed Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] as boss in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, Arizona in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.

to:

* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough, the power went into his head,]] and Maranzano decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a potential tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. While Bonanno claimed that he was picked up by the Buffalo mob, it certainly was a BlatantLie, as most of his henchmen and fellow bosses such as Ray Patriarca, Sam [=DeCavalcante=], Angelo Bruno and Joe Colombo were caught off-guard by his kidnapping stunt. Also, many of his henchmen were angry that he took off and became AWOL. The Commission replaced responded by replacing him and installed with Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] as boss in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, Arizona AZ in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.
15th Dec '17 1:58:11 PM Njein
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A gun and a knife are put in front of the inductee, with the boss asking the would-be member if he would use these to defend his fellow members in times of trouble - the inductee has to say yes. The sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint, then the picture is placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint". Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.

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A gun and a knife are put in front of the inductee, with the boss asking the would-be member if he would use these to defend his fellow members in times of trouble - the inductee has to say yes. The sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint, then the picture is placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint".saint", asking the inductee to recite this vow, known as Omertà. Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.



* Omerta: the code of silence and one of the premier vows taken when being sworn into the Family. Violation is punishable by death.

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* Omerta: Omertà: the code of silence and one of the premier vows taken when being sworn into the Family. Violation of this is usually punishable by death.
15th Dec '17 1:51:52 PM Njein
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Both Mafias (and similar Italian groups such as the Camorra,[[note]]From Naples. Amusingly (unless you live in Naples), they actually ''are'' in the [[Series/TheSopranos waste-management business]]; the mismanagement of municipal waste collection under Camorra-linked contractors has been [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples_waste_management_issue an ongoing issue in the city]].[[/note]] Sacra Corona Unita,[[note]]From Puglia, the "heel" and "Achilles' tendon" of the Italian "boot". The name means "United Sacred Crown."[[/note]] and the 'Ndrangheta[[note]]From Calabria, the "toe" of the "boot", particularly noted for its thuggishness, rusticity, and ludicrous influence since the early 1990s. Seriously, although their reputation is more or less "stupid, violent country bumpkins," ''this'' is the most powerful gang in all Italy--largely on account of their extreme measures taken to ensure that their members are indoctrinated young and extreme penalties for becoming a ''pentito''.[[/note]]) generally operate in the same manner: collection of protection money, "street taxes" on independent criminals, union racketeering, out-and-out larceny, and gambling make up most of the income, with drug money and prostitution being big moneymakers for some parts of the family. Each "rank" within the Mafia taxes the one below it (fixed sums for capos, a percentage for soldiers and associates); money only goes from downstream to upstream. Despite the law of ''omertà'' and considerable sanctions for speaking to law enforcement, a number of mafiosi in both countries (and one boss, Joe Massino) have turned state's evidence/become a ''pentito'' (Italian term for the same thing) to save themselves from long prison terms.

As a bit of a sidebar, different families have different reputations, accurate or not. These are particularly strong with the non-New York mob (the New York mob being seen as the "vanilla" Mafia): the Detroit Partnership is noted for its brutality and its connections with the unions (that whole Teamsters/Jimmy Hoffa business? Detroit), the Philly Mob is known for being totally violent and dysfunctional (especially under Nicodemo Scarfo, who ran it like an iron-fisted tyrannical dictator), the Tampa Mafia for its complex relationship with Cubans and longing for the halcyon days of the '50s (when the Cubans were in Cuba as partners instead of being in Miami [[TheCartel as rivals]]), the Los Angeles mob is often seen as weak and incompetent (nicknamed the "Mickey Mouse Mafia"), the Chicago Outfit is inextricably linked in the public imagination to bootlegging and Al Capone, etc. The New York and Chicago mobs (particularly the latter) are often seen as having influence beyond their region. New York families have strong influence in Montreal, New Jersey, and Philadelphia--often playing kingmaker in these outfits (see, e.g.: Philip "The Chicken Man" Testa--you know [[Music/BruceSpringsteen the one they blew up in Philly last night]]--whose death was the result of tensions between pro- and anti-New York factions in the Philly mob; see also [[Series/TheSopranos the most famous depiction of a non-New York, non-Chicago American Mafia outfit]]). Meanwhile, Chicago has traditionally controlled everything west of it.

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Both Mafias (and similar Italian groups such as the Camorra,[[note]]From Naples. Amusingly (unless you live in Naples), they actually ''are'' in the [[Series/TheSopranos waste-management business]]; the mismanagement of municipal waste collection under Camorra-linked contractors has been [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naples_waste_management_issue an ongoing issue in the city]].[[/note]] Sacra Corona Unita,[[note]]From Puglia, the "heel" and "Achilles' tendon" of the Italian "boot". The name means "United Sacred Crown."[[/note]] and the 'Ndrangheta[[note]]From Calabria, the "toe" of the "boot", particularly noted for its thuggishness, rusticity, and ludicrous influence since the early 1990s. Seriously, although their reputation is more or less "stupid, violent country bumpkins," ''this'' is the most powerful gang in all Italy--largely Italy — largely on account of their extreme measures taken to ensure that their members are indoctrinated young and extreme penalties for becoming a ''pentito''.[[/note]]) generally operate in the same manner: collection of protection money, "street taxes" on independent criminals, union racketeering, out-and-out larceny, and gambling make up most of the income, with drug money and prostitution being big moneymakers for some parts of the family. Each "rank" within the Mafia taxes the one below it (fixed sums for capos, a percentage for soldiers and associates); money only goes from downstream to upstream. Despite the law of ''omertà'' and considerable sanctions for speaking to law enforcement, a number of mafiosi in both countries (and one boss, Joe Massino) have turned state's evidence/become a ''pentito'' (Italian term for the same thing) to save themselves from long prison terms.

As a bit of a sidebar, different families have different reputations, accurate or not. These are particularly strong with the non-New York mob (the New York mob being seen as the "vanilla" Mafia): the Detroit Partnership is noted for its brutality and its connections with the unions (that whole Teamsters/Jimmy Hoffa business? Detroit), the Philly Mob is known for being totally violent and dysfunctional (especially under Nicodemo Scarfo, who ran it like an iron-fisted tyrannical dictator), the Tampa Mafia for its complex relationship with Cubans and longing for the halcyon days of the '50s (when the Cubans were in Cuba as partners instead of being in Miami [[TheCartel as rivals]]), the Los Angeles mob is often seen as weak and incompetent (nicknamed the "Mickey Mouse Mafia"), the Chicago Outfit is inextricably linked in the public imagination to bootlegging and Al Capone, etc. The New York and Chicago mobs (particularly the latter) are often seen as having influence beyond their region. New York families have strong influence in Montreal, New Jersey, and Philadelphia--often Philadelphia — often playing kingmaker in these outfits (see, e.g.: Philip "The Chicken Man" Testa--you Testa—you know [[Music/BruceSpringsteen the one they blew up in Philly last night]]--whose night]]— whose death was the result of tensions between pro- and anti-New York factions in the Philly mob; see also [[Series/TheSopranos the most famous depiction of a non-New York, non-Chicago American Mafia outfit]]). Meanwhile, Chicago has traditionally controlled everything west of it.



* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia -- in fact, the early mob families always had illegal numbers running operations. From card games and numbers running to sports betting, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.

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* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia -- in fact, the early mob families always had illegal numbers running operations. From card games and numbers running to sports betting, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.



The Mafia solicits specific people for membership -- one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become a made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy can never become an official member, thought that rule has oftentimes been flouted for corrupt cops.

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The Mafia solicits specific people for membership -- one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become a made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy can never become an official member, thought that rule has oftentimes been flouted for corrupt cops.



Made men are the only ones who can rise through the ranks of the Mafia, from soldier to capo, consigliere, underboss, and boss. There is another obstacle -- all potential inductees have to be considered ''and'' approved by the Mafia Commission. During the Castellammarese War, Mafia families would often recruit new members in large numbers; as they could not be recognized by the other families, they easily approached the rival capos and [[DeadlyEuphemism rubbed them out]]. To put a stop to this, all families were now required to give a list of prospective members to the Commission. It was circulated among the other families and eliminated the risk of not being recognized, and also gave the opportunity of removing any inductee which some other family had a problem with. If such an inductee were to become a made man, individual disagreements between him and any other member could easily spark turf wars.

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Made men are the only ones who can rise through the ranks of the Mafia, from soldier to capo, consigliere, underboss, and boss. There is another obstacle -- all potential inductees have to be considered ''and'' approved by the Mafia Commission. During the Castellammarese War, Mafia families would often recruit new members in large numbers; as they could not be recognized by the other families, they easily approached the rival capos and [[DeadlyEuphemism rubbed them out]]. To put a stop to this, all families were now required to give a list of prospective members to the Commission. It was circulated among the other families and eliminated the risk of not being recognized, and also gave the opportunity of removing any inductee which some other family had a problem with. If such an inductee were to become a made man, individual disagreements between him and any other member could easily spark turf wars.



To become made, a potential recruit would first have to be sponsored by an officially made man, generally a capo or soldier. The associate must have at least two sponsors (prior to the Donnie Brasco scandal, only one sponsor was needed), one of whom must have known him for some time. The sponsor knows the associate and vouches for his reliability and abilities. Although a capo or other senior member will determine the prospective member's credibility, ultimately it's at the boss's discretion as to who may become made.

When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a [[CovertGroup closed and secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history)]], that the [[ResignationsNotAccepted only way out is in a box]], and that [[LoyalToThePosition this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family]].

A gun and a knife are put in front of the inductee, with the boss asking the would-be member if he would use these to defend his fellow members - the inductee has to say yes. The mobster's sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint and the picture placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint". Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.

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To become made, a potential recruit would first have to be sponsored by an officially made man, generally a capo or soldier. The associate must have at least two sponsors (prior to the Donnie Brasco scandal, only one sponsor was needed), one of whom must have known him for some time. The sponsor knows sponsors know the associate and vouches vouch for his reliability and abilities. Although a capo or other senior member will determine the prospective member's prospect's credibility, ultimately it's at the boss's discretion as to who may become made.

When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private and secluded place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a [[CovertGroup closed and secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history)]], that the [[ResignationsNotAccepted only way out is in a box]], and that [[LoyalToThePosition this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family]].

A gun and a knife are put in front of the inductee, with the boss asking the would-be member if he would use these to defend his fellow members in times of trouble - the inductee has to say yes. The mobster's sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint and saint, then the picture is placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint". Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.



** Names of proposed members, and the deceased members they replace, must be circulated to the other families, who have two weeks to lodge an objection — for example, the candidate is an informer or the candidate is an associate of another family.

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** Names of proposed members, made men, and the deceased members they will replace, must be circulated to the other families, who have two weeks some time to lodge an objection — for example, the candidate is an informer or the candidate is an associate of another family.



* Whenever they're called in by their superiors, they must [[UndyingLoyalty oblige without reservation]] -- even if their wife's about to give birth, or their parents are dying on their deathbed. They must always put La Cosa Nostra before everything, and they must always put La Cosa Nostra first, including their own family.

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* Whenever they're called in by their superiors, they must [[UndyingLoyalty oblige without reservation]] -- even if their wife's about to give birth, or their parents are dying on their deathbed. They must always put La Cosa Nostra before everything, and they must always put La Cosa Nostra first, including their own family.



* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in southern and western Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bath Beach, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey, California and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under [[TheChessmaster Carlo Gambino's]] reign, it had around 450 made men, but that has since dipped to approx. 225-250 made men in the 1990s), it is now a former shell of itself due to [[ItsAllAboutMe John Gotti's media antics]] and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family had its origins in the large Brooklyn faction of the Morello (now Genovese) crime family, and broke off into its own family. It first came to prominence under the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss [[DragonWithAnAgenda Albert]] [[TheStarscream Anastasia]], but the relationship between Anastasia and the Mangano brothers was an uneasy one from the start. Anastasia later took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers in 1951 (Phil's body was found in a swamp in Brooklyn, while Vincent vanished without a trace), and was known to be a ruthless boss, thanks to his prior experience as the head of MurderInc in the 1930s. However, Anastasia's past would come back to bite him, as he had murdered his own boss without the Commission's approval, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 orchestrated by [[BigBadDuumvirate Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese]]. [[TheStarscream Carlo Gambino]], [[DragonWithAnAgenda the family's namesake and Anastasia's underboss]], later took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks [[VillainousFriendship to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family]], and both of them would further solidify this alliance into a relationship when Gambino's son Thomas married one of Lucchese's daughters in 1962. Gambino eventually became the Mafia's '''de facto''' [[TheChessmaster boss of all bosses]] as the other families in New York and elsewhere were facing various troubles, such as illness (for the Lucchese family), internal warfare (within the Bonanno and Colombo families) and legal problems (within the Genovese family and Chicago Outfit). But before his death in 1976, Gambino made his biggest mistake by naming his cousin Paul Castellano as his heir and successor over his underboss [[TheDragon Neil Dellacroce]], who was the most likely candidate for succeeding Gambino, but was imprisoned at the time for tax evasion, effectively splitting the family into two factions; the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, Dellacroce's protege, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street, and was seen as a pampered [[YesMan yes-man]] who inherited the position simply because of his blood ties to Gambino despite being a big earner for the family. Though he disapproved of Gambino's choice of picking his cousin as boss, Dellacroce still managed to keep the peace between the two factions for the next 9 years until his death from cancer in 1985. But despite this, there were simmering tensions between Gotti and Castellano, as the latter became increasingly greedy; Castellano even began to demand a 15% tribute (instead of the usual 10%) in some cases, and though there was an unofficial "ban" placed by Gambino, who ordered his men not to get caught dealing drugs, this was often flouted as even Castellano often turned a blind eye to this "ban" by accepting drug payments from several of his capos, including the Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi), and from the Gotti and Roy [=DeMeo=] crews. By this time, the federal government was initiating a crackdown on organized crime, especially the Mafia -- it was spearheaded by Rudolph Giuliani, an aggressive US Attorney who saw the mob with nothing but contempt -- and began to actively target the Five Families' leadership, with Castellano topping the list because he was the Mafia Commission's chairman at the time. By 1985, Castellano was in a slew of problems, ranging from legal pressure from the federal government, personal problems with his family (after they found out about his affair with his maid) and dissension among the ranks within the Gambinos, especially from the Dellacroce/blue-collar faction. After Dellacroce's death from cancer in December 1985, Castellano was gunned down outside Sparks Steak House a few weeks later on the orders of Gotti, who was reportedly angry that Castellano was a no-show at his mentor Dellacroce's funeral (other reasons included Castellano's greed, the prospect of Castellano ratting out his henchmen and bosses in the wake of the Commission case because he often badmouthed them, and a fear that he might kill Gotti in a dispute over the family's unofficial "ban" on drug dealing). Gotti took over following Castellano's assassination, but his tenure as boss was marred by frequent indictments (as he was under intense FBI scrutiny since the 1970s), assassination attempts by rivals who were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano, and [[ItsAllAboutMe his media-hungry profile.]] By the early 1990s, [[NotWhatISignedOnFor Sammy Gravano (his underboss)]], [[DefectorFromDecadence fed up]] with Gotti's antics, [[TheStoolPigeon decided to]] [[TheInformant cooperate with the FBI.]] Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking several attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and subsequently died of cancer 10 years later; his brother Peter took over as boss in 2002, but he too was imprisoned for life, and still runs the family from behind bars. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.

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* '''Gambino crime family''' - Big presence in southern and western Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bath Beach, Gravesend, Bensonhurst and the Brooklyn docks), Queens (Howard Beach, the Rockaways and JFK Airport), Long Island and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New England, New Jersey, California and Florida (the family once had a crew based in Baltimore until the 1990s); the family also has a big "Zip" faction (the Cherry Hill Gambinos). Once the biggest crime family (under [[TheChessmaster Carlo Gambino's]] reign, it had around 450 made men, but that has since dipped to approx. 225-250 made men in the 1990s), it is now a former shell of itself due to [[ItsAllAboutMe John Gotti's media antics]] and subsequent imprisonment in 1992. The family had its origins in the large Brooklyn faction of the Morello (now Genovese) crime family, and broke off into its own family. It first came to prominence under the Mangano brothers (Phil and Vincent), who held an iron fist over the Brooklyn waterfront, thanks to their underboss [[DragonWithAnAgenda Albert]] [[TheStarscream Anastasia]], but the relationship between Anastasia and the Mangano brothers was an uneasy one from the start. Anastasia later took over as boss after eliminating the Mangano brothers in 1951 (Phil's body was found in a swamp in Brooklyn, while Vincent vanished without a trace), and was known to be a ruthless boss, thanks to his prior experience as the head of MurderInc in the 1930s. However, Anastasia's past would come back to bite him, as he had murdered his own boss without the Commission's approval, and he was assassinated in a famous gangland hit in 1957 orchestrated by [[BigBadDuumvirate Carlo Gambino and Vito Genovese]]. [[TheStarscream Carlo Gambino]], [[DragonWithAnAgenda the family's namesake and Anastasia's underboss]], later took over as boss and led it to prosperous times, thanks [[VillainousFriendship to his ties with Tommy Lucchese, the boss of the Lucchese family]], and both of them would further solidify this alliance into a relationship when Gambino's son Thomas married one of Lucchese's daughters in 1962. Gambino eventually became the Mafia's '''de facto''' [[TheChessmaster boss of all bosses]] as the other families in New York and elsewhere were facing various troubles, such as illness (for the Lucchese family), internal warfare (within the Bonanno and Colombo families) and legal problems (within the Genovese family and Chicago Outfit). But before his death in 1976, Gambino made his biggest mistake by naming his cousin Paul Castellano as his heir and successor over his underboss [[TheDragon Neil Dellacroce]], who was the most likely candidate for succeeding Gambino, but was imprisoned at the time for tax evasion, effectively splitting the family into two factions; the pro-Dellacroce faction, which was led by John Gotti, Dellacroce's protege, believed that Castellano did not earn his stripes on the street, and was seen as a pampered [[YesMan yes-man]] who inherited the position simply because of his blood ties to Gambino despite being a big earner for the family. Though he disapproved of Gambino's choice of picking his cousin as boss, Dellacroce still managed to keep the peace between the two factions for the next 9 years until his death from cancer in 1985. But despite this, there were simmering tensions between Gotti and Castellano, as the latter became increasingly greedy; Castellano even began to demand a 15% tribute (instead of the usual 10%) in some cases, and though there was an unofficial "ban" placed by Gambino, who ordered his men not to get caught dealing drugs, this was often flouted as even Castellano often turned a blind eye to this "ban" by accepting drug payments from several of his capos, including the Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi), and from the Gotti and Roy [=DeMeo=] crews. By this time, the federal government was initiating a crackdown on organized crime, especially the Mafia -- it was spearheaded by Rudolph Giuliani, an aggressive US Attorney who saw the mob with nothing but contempt -- and began to actively target the Five Families' leadership, with Castellano topping the list because he was the Mafia Commission's chairman at the time. By 1985, Castellano was in a slew of problems, ranging from legal pressure from the federal government, personal problems with his family (after they found out about his affair with his maid) and dissension among the ranks within the Gambinos, especially from the Dellacroce/blue-collar faction. After Dellacroce's death from cancer in December 1985, Castellano was gunned down outside Sparks Steak House a few weeks later on the orders of Gotti, who was reportedly angry that Castellano was a no-show at his mentor Dellacroce's funeral (other reasons included Castellano's greed, the prospect of Castellano ratting out his henchmen and bosses in the wake of the Commission case because he often badmouthed them, and a fear that he might kill Gotti in a dispute over the family's unofficial "ban" on drug dealing). Gotti took over following Castellano's assassination, but his tenure as boss was marred by frequent indictments (as he was under intense FBI scrutiny since the 1970s), assassination attempts by rivals who were outraged at the unsanctioned hit on Castellano, and [[ItsAllAboutMe his media-hungry profile.]] By the early 1990s, [[NotWhatISignedOnFor Sammy Gravano (his underboss)]], [[DefectorFromDecadence fed up]] with Gotti's antics, [[TheStoolPigeon decided to]] [[TheInformant cooperate with the FBI.]] Gotti was imprisoned for life in 1992 after ducking several attempts by federal prosecutors to have him indicted, and subsequently died of cancer 10 years later; his brother Peter took over as boss in 2002, but he too was imprisoned for life, and still runs the family from behind bars. Since then, the family has been quietly rebuilding its former shell after John Gotti's demise.



* vouch for: to personally guarantee--with one's life--the reputation of someone dealing with the Family.

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* vouch for: to personally guarantee--with guarantee—with one's life--the life—the reputation of someone dealing with the Family.



* 1983-1984 — Carl "Corky" Civella — convicted in 1984.

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* 1983-1984 — Carl "Corky" Civella convicted in 1984.
15th Dec '17 1:40:35 PM Njein
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However, things didn't go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring; he later formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing in drug trafficking, and it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction believed that it was a lucrative business, while the anti-drugs faction thought drugs were bad for business and would bring attention. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had crews that were actively dealing in drugs, and even set up Montreal as an outpost for importing heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a "ban" on narcotics trafficking imposed in the 1950s, many families often dealt drugs on the sly, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and generally tolerated it as long as no made man was caught dealing drugs.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin Meeting of 1957]] really confirmed its existence. [[CriminalConvention It]] was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Lucky Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses after eliminating]] Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957. Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Giuseppe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese, Stefano Magaddino and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno [[BlatantLies claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield]]. Genovese was blamed for the ensuing debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another big blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing the government a good glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. By this time, enforcement began putting more effort into cracking down on organized crime, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 bolstered prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the feds were able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed the Mafia with nothing but contempt). Also, with many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia called them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and others in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Dominick Montiglio, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on terrorism since 9/11), the American Mafia is down but not out: it remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs to avoid FBI heat.

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However, things didn't go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring; he later formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing dabbling in drug trafficking, and narcotics smuggling, but it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction camps: those in favor believed that it was a lucrative business, operation, while the anti-drugs faction those opposed thought drugs were bad for business and it would bring attention. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal dealing with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. America. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had crews that were actively dealing deep in their neck with drugs, and even set up shop in Montreal as an outpost for importing to import heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a an unofficial "ban" on narcotics trafficking being imposed in the 1950s, many families often dealt drugs on the sly, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and generally tolerated to it as long as no made man nobody was caught dealing drugs.

pinched.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin Meeting of in late 1957]] really confirmed its existence. it. [[CriminalConvention It]] was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Lucky Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses mob's overlord]] after eliminating]] killing Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957. Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Giuseppe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese, Stefano Magaddino and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno [[BlatantLies claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield]]. Genovese was blamed got a lot of flak for the ensuing debacle, this, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another big blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing the government a good glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. By this time, law enforcement began putting more effort into cracking down on organized crime, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 bolstered prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the feds were able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed saw the Mafia mob with nothing but contempt). Also, with With many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate left and right with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia called them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and others in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Dominick Montiglio, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on terrorism since 9/11), the American Mafia is down but not out: it remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs to avoid FBI heat.attention.



* '''Garbage hauling''': One area that is very notable for mob infiltration is garbage hauling. The Mafia got into this industry when cities outsourced their waste hauling activities to contractors, and that meant potential for the mob to infiltrate these companies. The so-called “garbage mobsters” who ran these operations often falsified paperwork and tampered with waste scales, sometimes to skim profits from the business, and sometimes to hide dirty money in it. Crew bosses and members often got no-work, no-show “consulting” positions at the firms, which gave them a legitimate reason to explain their income. They also divvied up routes in cities, rigged contract bids to favor mob-controlled garbage haulers, and strong-armed outsiders and customers in order to quash any outside competition and keep their prices artificially high. The Genovese family still has some control over garbage hauling, through Alphonse "Allie Shades" Malangone, a capo who also has some control over the family's interests in the Fulton Fish Market. ''The Sopranos'' is also accurate in its portrayal of the North Jersey hauling market around the turn of the 21st century: the division of New Jersey into a myriad of municipalities makes it hard to catch corrupt deals like this, though the state has intervened to block this when it has the resources.
* '''Construction and real estate''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction and real estate services. In the 1970s and 80s, most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket. The mob has always ingrained itself within real estate crimes, such as "swampland-in-Florida-for-sale" scams, predatory lending schemes and equity fraud.
* '''Cargo services''': Another area that's rife with mob infiltration is in cargo services, especially in the trucking, airport services and dockyards. Albert Anastasia, in addition to being a mob-hired hit-man, also had a great degree of control over the unions at the Brooklyn docks, while the Five Families had crews at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, committing crimes such as truck hijacking and infiltration of unions, among other activities. The Teamsters were mob-influenced, especially during Jimmy Hoffa's tenure; he even had connections with the Detroit mafia. The mob would oftentimes infiltrate and shake down unions and businesses servicing this industry, and coerce them into placing mob-friendly candidates. The Lucchese family has had a stranglehold on the Garment District, through their infiltration of various businesses and unions.

to:

* '''Garbage hauling''': One area that is very notable for mob infiltration is garbage hauling. The Mafia got into this industry when cities outsourced their waste hauling activities to contractors, and that meant money-making potential for the mob them to infiltrate these companies. The so-called “garbage mobsters” who ran these operations often falsified paperwork and tampered with waste scales, sometimes to skim profits from the business, and sometimes to hide dirty money ill-gotten gains in it. Crew bosses and members often got no-work, no-show “consulting” "no-work", "no-show consulting" positions at the firms, which gave them a legitimate reason to explain their income. They also divvied up routes in cities, rigged contract bids to favor mob-controlled garbage haulers, and strong-armed outsiders and customers in order to quash any outside competition and keep their prices artificially high. The Genovese family still has some control over garbage hauling, through Alphonse "Allie Shades" Malangone, a capo who also has some control over the family's interests in the Fulton Fish Market. ''The Sopranos'' is also accurate in its portrayal of the North Jersey hauling market around the turn of the 21st century: the division of New Jersey into a myriad of municipalities makes it hard to catch corrupt deals like this, though the state has intervened to block this when it has the resources.
* '''Construction and real estate''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction and real estate services. In the 1970s and 80s, most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got hold of a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket. The Plus, the mob has always ingrained itself within real estate crimes, such as "swampland-in-Florida-for-sale" scams, predatory lending schemes and equity fraud.
* '''Cargo services''': Another area that's rife with mob infiltration is in cargo services, especially in the trucking, airport services and dockyards. Albert Anastasia, in addition to being a mob-hired hit-man, also had a great degree of control over the unions at the Brooklyn docks, while the Five Families had crews at Idlewild (now JFK) Airport, committing crimes such as truck hijacking and infiltration of unions, among other activities. The Teamsters were mob-influenced, especially during Jimmy Hoffa's tenure; he even had connections with the Detroit mafia. The mob would oftentimes infiltrate and shake down unions and businesses servicing this industry, and coerce them into placing mob-friendly candidates. The Lucchese family has had a stranglehold on the Garment District, through their infiltration of various businesses and unions.



* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia -- in fact, the early mob families always had illegal numbers running operations. From card games and numbers running to betting on horses and other sports, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.

to:

* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia -- in fact, the early mob families always had illegal numbers running operations. From card games and numbers running to betting on horses and other sports, sports betting, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.



* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drug faction believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. Eventually they pro-drug faction won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to thus, as many of them took a cut of the proceeds in exchange for dealing on the sly. The Bonannos became very notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily in the 1950s while using pizza joints as a way to cover up the heroin distribution.

to:

* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drug faction those opposed to it believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. attract attention. Eventually they pro-drug faction those in favor of it won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to thus, as with many of them took taking a cut of the proceeds in exchange for dealing on the sly. sly despite an "unofficial" ban on drug smuggling. The Bonannos became very notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily in the 1950s while using pizza joints as a way to cover up the heroin distribution.it up.
7th Dec '17 10:48:55 AM Njein
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With Masseria and Maranzano out of the picture in 1931, it paved the way for Luciano's rise to power. He not only restructured the American Mafia by introducing a Commission to resolve disputes among the families, but also branched out to work with other ethnic mobs (including the [[KosherNostra Jewish mafia]] and [[TheIrishMob the Irish Mob]]) to form a [[TheSyndicate National Crime Syndicate]]. To ensure that the other mobsters are falling in line, Luciano even formed a Brooklyn-based gang of Italian, Irish and Jewish hitmen called MurderInc to function as the Syndicate's murder-for-hire and enforcement arm; it was led by Albert Anastasia and Louis Buchalter, who were both notorious hitmen and labor racketeers. This crew of contract killers was estimated to have committed at as many as 900 murders between 1931 and 1951.

to:

With "Mustache Petes" like Masseria and Maranzano out of the picture way in 1931, it paved the way path for Luciano's rise to power. He not only restructured the American Mafia by introducing a Commission to resolve disputes among the families, but also branched out to work with other ethnic mobs (including the [[KosherNostra Jewish mafia]] and [[TheIrishMob the Irish Mob]]) to form a [[TheSyndicate National Crime Syndicate]]. To ensure that the other mobsters are falling in line, Luciano even formed a Brooklyn-based gang of Italian, Irish and Jewish hitmen called MurderInc to function as the Syndicate's murder-for-hire and enforcement arm; it was led by Albert Anastasia and Louis Buchalter, who were both notorious hitmen and labor racketeers. This crew of contract killers was estimated to have committed at as many as 900 murders between 1931 and 1951.



The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin Meeting of 1957]] really confirmed its existence. [[CriminalConvention It]] was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Lucky Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses after eliminating]] Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957. Around 100 mobsters attended [[CriminalConvention the meeting]] at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Giuseppe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese, Stefano Magaddino and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for the ensuing debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another big blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing the public and government a good glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. By this time, the FBI started to put more effort into cracking down on organized crime, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 bolstered prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the feds were able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed the Mafia with nothing but contempt). Also, with many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and others in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Dominick Montiglio, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on terrorism since 9/11), the American Mafia is down but not out: it remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs to avoid FBI heat.

to:

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin Meeting of 1957]] really confirmed its existence. [[CriminalConvention It]] was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Lucky Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses after eliminating]] Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957. Around 100 mobsters attended [[CriminalConvention the meeting]] meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Giuseppe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese, Stefano Magaddino and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno [[BlatantLies claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield.cornfield]]. Genovese was blamed for the ensuing debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another big blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing the public and government a good glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. By this time, the FBI started to put enforcement began putting more effort into cracking down on organized crime, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 bolstered prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

By the 1980s, the feds were able to crack down on the Mafia's activities, culminating in the Mafia Commission Case (which was spearheaded by Rudy Giuliani, an ambitious US attorney and future mayor of New York City who viewed the Mafia with nothing but contempt). Also, with many of them facing lengthy prison sentences, an increasing number of mafiosi began to cooperate with the FBI in 1990s. Among the more notable [[TheStoolPigeon cooperating witnesses (or "rats", as the Mafia calls called them)]] was Sammy Gravano, whose testimony helped take down John Gotti, Vincent Gigante and others in the 1990s; Joe Massino was another example, when he became the first official boss to become an informant in 2005. Phil Leonetti, Dominick Montiglio, Jimmy Fratianno, Gaspipe Casso (though he was later thrown out) and Salvatore Vitale were also good examples of mobsters becoming informer. Despite these convictions and informants (and with the FBI now focusing more on terrorism since 9/11), the American Mafia is down but not out: it remains a formidable force and is quietly rebuilding its lost power base, as it's rumored to earn between $50 and $90 billion a year; it now outsources some of its work to other gangs to avoid FBI heat.



* '''Construction and real estate''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction and real estate services. Most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket. The mob has always ingrained itself within real estate crimes, such as "swampland-in-Florida-for-sale" scams, predatory lending schemes and equity fraud.

to:

* '''Construction and real estate''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction and real estate services. Most In the 1970s and 80s, most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket. The mob has always ingrained itself within real estate crimes, such as "swampland-in-Florida-for-sale" scams, predatory lending schemes and equity fraud.



* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams and mortgage fraud in recent years, the Mafia has always been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as [[PonziScheme Ponzi schemes]], [[FourOneNineScam advance-fee fraud]] and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers into selling shady stock deals to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.

to:

* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams and mortgage fraud in recent years, the Mafia has always been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as [[PonziScheme Ponzi schemes]], [[FourOneNineScam advance-fee fraud]] and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers brokers into selling shady stock deals to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.



* '''Loansharking/shylocking''': Illegal gambling and sports betting also led to the rise of a new activity - loansharking. One of the key moneymakers for the Mafia is to provide loans to [[TrappedByGamblingDebts degenerate gamblers]], drug addicts and those with a bad credit history at usurious rates, and often with the ominous threat of violence if they did not pay back. By the 1960s, loan sharks grew even more coordinated, and could pool information on borrowers to better size up risks and ensure a borrower did not try to pay off one loan by borrowing from another LoanShark.

to:

* '''Loansharking/shylocking''': Illegal gambling and sports betting also led to the rise of a new activity - loansharking. One of the key moneymakers for the Mafia is to provide loans to [[TrappedByGamblingDebts degenerate gamblers]], drug addicts and those with a bad credit history at usurious and often illegal rates, and often with the ominous threat of violence if they did not pay back. By the 1960s, loan sharks grew even more coordinated, and could pool information on borrowers to better size up risks and ensure a borrower did not try to pay off one loan by borrowing from another LoanShark.



* '''Contraband smuggling''': From bootlegging and gunrunning in the 1920s and 1930s to cigarette smuggling and human trafficking, the Mafia has been involved in all sorts of contraband smuggling, as a way to evade import duties/taxes and to smuggle in banned items. Bootlegging became the Mafia's primary moneymaker in the 1920s, as many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] began their mob careers during Prohibition. By the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, many of them were millionaires, and soon dabbled in other areas such as numbers running, labor racketeering and narcotics trafficking (drug trafficking eventually became the mob's biggest moneymaker, but it also attracted attention). In the 1980s, the Colombo family formed a gas tax evasion scheme with the Russian mafia by siphoning off money that would have went to the federal government.
* '''Murder-for-hire''': The Mafia would have failed if it did not employ any threat of violence in regards to its illicit activities. Murder, Inc., a Brooklyn-based band of Italian and Jewish hit-men, became the National Crime Syndicate's enforcement arm, and committed as many as 800 hits to ensure mobsters are falling in line. Bugsy Siegel and Albert Anastasia began their careers as hit-men, as did many of the mobsters in the 1920s, becoming bodyguards and enforcers for more powerful bosses. Many made men usually begin their careers as hit-men, committing murders on behalf of their mob superiors. The Sicilian Mafia is very notorious in this, as they not only killed rival members, but also went after law enforcement officials, judges, politicians and anybody who dared to cross them; even families of made members were not spared, especially if a made man decided [[TheInformant to cooperate with authorities]]. Paolo Borsellino and and Giovanni Falcone, two government prosecutors who led an anti-Mafia crusade in the 1980s, learned this the hard way when both were killed in separate car bombings in 1992, forcing the Italian government to crack down on the Sicilian mob's activities.
* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] in the 1920s. Even Paul Castellano began his mob career in the 1930s by holding up a haberdasher; despite being asked to identify his accomplices, he refused to so (and served a three-month stint as a result of his refusal to rat out), earning the respect of local mobsters, especially his cousin Carlo Gambino.

to:

* '''Contraband smuggling''': From bootlegging and gunrunning in the 1920s and 1930s to cigarette smuggling and human trafficking, the Mafia has been involved in all sorts of contraband smuggling, as a way to evade import duties/taxes and to smuggle in banned items. Bootlegging became the Mafia's primary moneymaker in the 1920s, as many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] began their mob careers during Prohibition. By the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, many of them were millionaires, and soon dabbled in other areas such as numbers running, labor racketeering and narcotics trafficking (drug trafficking eventually became the mob's biggest moneymaker, but it also attracted attention). In the 1980s, the Colombo family formed a gas tax evasion scheme with the Russian mafia mob by siphoning off money that would have went to the federal government.
* '''Murder-for-hire''': The Mafia would have failed if it did not employ any threat of violence in regards to its illicit activities. Murder, Inc., MurderInc, a Brooklyn-based band of Italian and Jewish hit-men, became the National Crime Syndicate's enforcement arm, and committed as many as 800 hits to ensure mobsters are falling in line. Bugsy Siegel and Albert Anastasia began their careers as hit-men, as did many of the mobsters in the 1920s, becoming bodyguards and enforcers for more powerful bosses. Many made men usually begin their careers as hit-men, committing murders on behalf of their mob superiors. The Sicilian Mafia is very notorious in this, as they not only killed rival members, but also went after law enforcement officials, judges, politicians and anybody who dared to cross them; even families of made members were not spared, especially if a made man decided [[TheInformant to cooperate with authorities]]. Paolo Borsellino and and Giovanni Falcone, two government prosecutors who led an anti-Mafia crusade in the 1980s, learned this the hard way when both were killed in separate car bombings in 1992, forcing the Italian government to crack down on the Sicilian mob's activities.
* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] in the 1920s. Even Paul Castellano began his mob career in the 1930s by holding up a haberdasher; despite being asked to identify his accomplices, he refused to so (and so, and served a three-month stint as a result of his refusal to rat out), earning result. This earned him the respect of local mobsters, especially his cousin Carlo Gambino.



* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough power went into his head,]] and decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. The Commission replaced him and installed Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] as boss in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, Arizona in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.

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* '''Bonanno crime family''' - Has a huge presence in northern Brooklyn (Williamsburg, Bushwick, Knickerbocker Avenue and Greenpoint), southern Brooklyn (Bay Ridge, Bensonhurst, Bath Avenue), Queens (Ridgewood, Maspeth, Middle Village, Sunnyside and Metropolitan Avenue) and Staten Island with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, the Bronx, Westchester, New Jersey, Florida and Canada (the family had a crew in Tucson, AZ until Joe Bonanno's forced retirement in the 1960s); the family also has a "Zip" faction. Though a mid-sized family (approx. size is between 150-200 made men), it sometimes held the number one spot, especially with the feds hammering down indictments on the other families in the 1990s. Oftentimes the unruliest of the Five Families (owing to its independent streak since the Castellammarese War; the Bonannos' generally disruptive behavior even threw them out of the Commission in the 1980s), the Bonanno family originally hailed from Castellammare del Golfo, a small seaside town in western Sicily. Many of its earliest members came from this town and settled down in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, including family namesake Joe Bonanno; the family was very tight-knit and considered to be the most Sicilian of the Five Families, partly because most of them came from Castellammare del Golfo or had personal ties to that region. Eventually, the family came under the control of Salvatore Maranzano, who came to the United States after escaping from Mussolini's death squads in the 1920s and fancied himself as a mob version of Caesar, but Joe "the Boss" Masseria, the boss of the Morello gang, soon saw him as a growing threat to his power base, and tried to violently take over the Castellammarese Clan's bootlegging rackets. But Maranzano resisted, and this led to a [[MobWar turf war]] that only ended with Masseria's death in 1931. With Masseria out of the way, Maranzano declared [[BigBadWannabe himself to be the Boss of all Bosses]], [[TheStarscream reneging on the peace deal]] he made with Lucky Luciano prior to Masseria's death to ensure peace between the two sides. [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem Soon enough enough, the power went into his head,]] and Maranzano decreed that Luciano was to be marked for death, alongside Frank Costello and Vito Genovese. But Luciano somehow got wind of this, and using this info (alongside the fact that Maranzano was facing a potential tax audit like Al Capone before him), he makes a move before Maranzano gets to him, and the Boss of Bosses is eliminated on September 10, 1931 by hitmen posing as IRS agents. With the old guard eliminated, [[DragonAscendant Maranzano's protégé and ambitious underboss Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno]] took over in late 1931. Bonanno even forged close ties with Joe Profaci, boss of the Profaci (now Colombo) crime family and with Steve Magaddino (his cousin and boss of the Buffalo family); he even became a major heroin trafficker despite repeatedly denying any involvement. But, [[BigBadWannabe he]] harbored even bigger ambitions and sought to become [[TheChessmaster the boss of bosses]] (after Vito Genovese failed in his own bid to become the Mafia's kingmaker) by eliminating several of his rivals (notably Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese) on the Commission in the 1960s, but it came to a sputtering halt when [[TheStarscream Joe]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda Colombo]], a capo in the Profaci family and the designated gunman, told about Bonanno's plan to Gambino and the rest of the Commission. Bonanno was ordered to come forward several times but each time, he was a no-show, and simply fled New York by faking his own kidnapping in late 1964; at the same time, he was facing a grand jury subpoena investigating organized crime activities in the aftermath of the Valachi hearings. The Commission replaced him and installed Gaspar [=DiGregorio=] as boss in 1965, but it wasn't acknowledged by Bill Bonanno (Joe Bonanno's son), triggering an [[MobWar internal turf war]] that only ended when Bonanno was forced to step down and retire to Tucson, Arizona in late 1968. After Bonanno's forced retirement, the family was known to have a revolving door of weak and ineffectual bosses in the 1970s, and its troubles didn't end as Carmine Galante, a former [[DragonAscendant underboss]] to Joe Bonanno and known drug pusher, attempted to seize control but was eliminated in 1979, allowing Philip "Rusty" Rastelli to regain full control of the family (he was originally installed as boss in 1973, but faced a lengthy prison sentence for racketeering). Rastelli then faced another challenge from [[AvengingTheVillain several Galante loyalists]] who thought he was too weak to run the family and wanted to avenge Galante's death, but they too were eliminated by Rastelli supporters led by [[TheDragon Joe Massino, his protege and underboss.]] But the Donnie Brasco incident (in which an FBI agent infiltrated one of the crews and almost got made) did throw the Bonannos out of the Commission; other reasons for being kicked out of the mob's ruling council included their generally disruptive behavior, the fact that they were notorious for being drug pushers and the on-and-off infighting that's been going since Joe Bonanno's ouster in 1968 for most of the 1980s. Dominick "Sonny Black" Napolitano, whose crew was unwittingly infiltrated by Joe Pistone aka "Donnie Brasco", ended up dead and his hands were chopped off as a warning to others to never shake hands with law enforcement, while several other wiseguys connected to Sonny Black were either dead, demoted in rank or imprisoned; by this time, they were largely regarded as a [[IncompetenceInc joke]] by both the FBI and wiseguys in the other families. But being stripped of their Commission seat actually worked to the Bonannos' favor as they were the only one of the Five Families to avoid an indictment on the Mafia Commission Trial, thus allowing them to quietly rebuild their lost power base while the other families were hammered down with indictments, lengthy prison sentences and [[TheInformant mobsters flipping left and right to save their skin.]] [[DragonAscendant Massino]], Rastelli's NumberTwo, took over as boss in 1991, and he quickly worked to rebuild the family to its former glory by the dawn of the millennium by adding new made members (bringing the family membership back to approx. 160 made men), and expanding into Wall Street scams, union racketeering and white-collar fraud; Massino was even proud that the Bonannos never had any of their wiseguys flip since Joe Bonanno became boss in 1931. But this all came crashing down in 2002 when several of his button men [[TheStoolPigeon actually flipped]], especially [[NotWhatISignedUpFor Salvatore "Good-Looking Sal" Vitale]], who regarded Massino as a older brother-like figure to him, but once Massino gets out of jail in 1992, their relationship slowly became shaky to the point that Massino wanted him dead, and this became the catalyst for Vitale to [[TheInformant flip]] in 2003. Massino faced a lengthy prison sentence, and it was upgraded to the death penalty in 2004 after one of the murders he committed was traced back to him. In hopes of saving his life, he became the [[TheStoolPigeon first]] [[TheInformant official boss of a crime family to turn rat]], testifying against Vincent "Vinny Gorgeous" Basciano, his handpicked successor, in 2005. Once again, the Bonannos are now in shambles after [[TheInformant Massino flipped]] against his former mob colleagues and are still struggling to rebuild themselves in the aftermath. The family is now headed by Michael Mancuso, who took over as boss following Basciano's imprisonment in 2013.
4th Dec '17 8:08:22 PM Njein
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* '''Boss''' - [[TheDon The official head of a particular family]]. "Don" is an honorific, not a title: in today's Italy it's reserved to ''priests''. Since Mafia families in Sicily are more numerous and smaller than those in the United States, the title is not as distinguished, although the boss still has paramount authority within his region. "Hits" on individuals under his family's protection are at the sole discretion of the boss, and he also decides who is allowed to become a formal member of the family ("opening the books" is a term used by the Cosa Nostra to induct new members into a family). Much of the boss's other duties include settling disputes (holding "sit-downs") between family members and other crime families, relaying orders down the chain of command, receiving a tribute from the family's capos (and rarely, soldiers and associates serving directly under him) and promote or demote ("knock down" or "break") family members at will. Murdering (or attempting to murder) an official boss is a big no-no in the Mafia, as the Commission would order the usurper's death for killing his own boss without explicit permission (only the Commission can authorize a hit on a boss - though this rule has oftentimes been flouted many times).

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* '''Boss''' - [[TheDon The official head of a particular family]]. "Don" is an honorific, not a title: in today's Italy it's reserved to ''priests''. Since Mafia families in Sicily are more numerous and smaller than those in the United States, the title is not as distinguished, although the boss still has paramount authority within his region. "Hits" on individuals under his family's protection are at the sole discretion of the boss, and he also decides who is allowed to become a formal member of the family ("opening the books" is a term used by the Cosa Nostra to induct new members into a family). Much of the boss's other duties include settling disputes (holding "sit-downs") between family members and other crime families, relaying orders down the chain of command, receiving a tribute from the family's capos (and rarely, soldiers and associates serving directly under him) and promote or demote ("knock down" or "break") family members at will. Murdering (or attempting to murder) an official boss is a big no-no in the Mafia, as the Commission would order the usurper's death for killing his own boss without explicit permission (only the Commission can authorize a hit on a boss bosses - though this rule has oftentimes been flouted many times).



* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The third-in-command of a Mafia family, a consigliere is an advisor or counselor to the boss, with the additional responsibility of representing the boss in Commission meetings with other crime families. In theory, he is one of the few allowed to argue with the boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families often use the position for a veteran who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was "chased" or exiled to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the number-three man. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.
* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss/Front Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when the official boss is free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this since the 1970s and have been playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy" bosses (usually high-ranking capos) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the ''[[TheAllegedBoss de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss in]] ''[[TheManBehindTheMan all but name]]'', especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a low profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.).

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* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The third-in-command of a Mafia family, a consigliere is an advisor or counselor to the boss, with the additional responsibility of representing the boss family in Commission meetings with other crime families.meetings. In theory, he is one of the few allowed to argue with the boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families often use the position for a veteran who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was "chased" or exiled to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the number-three man. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.
* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss/Front Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when the official boss is free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this since the 1970s and have been playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy" bosses (usually high-ranking capos) grunts) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the ''[[TheAllegedBoss de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss in]] ''[[TheManBehindTheMan all but name]]'', especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a low profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.).



* '''Ruling Panel''' - Another rank unique to the American Mafia, this also appeared in response to greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s, as most of the "official" bosses faced long prison sentences. The boss sometimes delegates a panel/ruling committee of high-ranking capos (who still operate their own crews at the same time) to run the day-to-day operations of the family while the boss retains ultimate control of the family from behind bars, and usually relays his orders to the family via a "messenger", who could then send orders down the chain of command to avoid suspicion. The families can also use these ''ruling panels'' as a way to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's [[TheManBehindTheMan actually calling the shots]], and to shield the higher-ups from law enforcement scrutiny.
* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'', faction or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory or racket assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's actually in charge]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.

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* '''Ruling Panel''' - Another rank unique to the American Mafia, this also appeared in response to greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s, as most of the "official" bosses faced long prison sentences. The boss sometimes delegates a panel/ruling committee of high-ranking capos (who still operate their own crews at the same time) to run the day-to-day operations of the family while the boss retains ultimate control of the family from behind bars, and usually relays his orders to the family via a "messenger", who could then send orders down the chain of command to avoid suspicion. The families can also use these ''ruling panels'' as a way to prevent law enforcement outsiders from knowing who's [[TheManBehindTheMan actually calling the shots]], and to shield the higher-ups from law enforcement scrutiny.
* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'', faction or crew of approx. 10-20 soldiers and many more associates as he can efficiently control in a certain territory or racket assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, score from his underlings, and passes a fixed sum or percentage on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's actually in charge]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.



* '''Associates''' - "''Giovane d'onore''" (man of honor), "''cugino''" (cousin), or "connected guy". An associate is a person who is not a soldier in a crime family, but works for them and shares in the execution of and profits from the criminal enterprise. In Italian criminal organizations, "associates" are usually members of the criminal organization who are not of Italian descent, or junior members who may someday rise to become soldiers for the family; this process can take a decade or longer depending upon the family and the individual's qualifications. This can be tricky sometimes; associates with a history of making serious money often command respect beyond their title. Distinctions are usually drawn between those associates loosely associated with the family, and those who have gone "on record" with a specific soldier or captain; the latter are more tightly controlled in their dealings and are usually candidates for membership. American mafiosi may refer to an associate as "a friend of mine", rather than "a friend of ours," a quiet warning to watch what is said in their presence since the associate is an outsider. ''Giovane d'onore'' is unique to the Camorra. Non-Italians will never go beyond this rank, but many of them, such as Meyer Lansky, Jimmy "the Gent" Burke, Bugsy Siegel, Bumpy Johnson, and Mickey Cohen were widely respected and even earned the respect of actual Mafia members. And although Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa could not become officially made because they were corrupt NYPD officers, they solicited their services to the New York mob as cold-blooded Mafia hitmen.

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* '''Associates''' - "''Giovane d'onore''" (man of honor), "''cugino''" (cousin), or "connected guy". An associate is a person who is not a soldier in a crime family, but works for them and shares in the execution of and profits from the criminal enterprise. In Italian criminal organizations, "associates" are usually members of the criminal organization who are not of Italian descent, or junior members who may someday rise to become soldiers for the family; this process can take a decade or longer depending upon the family and the individual's qualifications. This can be tricky sometimes; sometimes, as associates with a history of making serious money often command respect beyond their title. Distinctions are usually drawn between those associates loosely associated with the family, and those who have gone "on record" with a specific soldier or captain; the latter are more tightly controlled in their dealings and are usually candidates for membership. American mafiosi may refer to an associate as "a friend of mine", rather than "a friend of ours," a quiet warning to watch what is said in their presence since the associate is an outsider. ''Giovane d'onore'' is unique to the Camorra. Non-Italians will never go beyond this rank, but many of them, such as Meyer Lansky, Jimmy "the Gent" Burke, Bugsy Siegel, Bumpy Johnson, and Mickey Cohen were widely respected and even earned the respect of actual Mafia members. And although Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa could not become officially made because they were corrupt NYPD officers, they solicited their services to the New York mob as cold-blooded Mafia hitmen.
28th Nov '17 1:30:15 PM Njein
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* '''Garbage hauling''': One area that is very notable for mob infiltration is garbage hauling. The Mafia got into this industry when cities outsourced their garbage hauling activities to outside contractors, and that meant potential for the mob to infiltrate these companies. The so-called “garbage mobsters” who ran these operations often falsified paperwork and tampered with waste scales, sometimes to skim profits from the business, and sometimes to hide dirty money in it. Crew bosses and members often got no-work, no-show “consulting” positions at the firms, which gave them a legitimate reason to explain their income. They also divvied up routes in cities, rigged contract bids to favor mob-controlled garbage haulers, and strong-armed outsiders and customers in order to quash any outside competition and keep their prices artificially high. The Genovese family still has some control over garbage hauling, through Alphonse "Allie Shades" Malangone, a capo who also has some control over the family's interests in the Fulton Fish Market. ''The Sopranos'' is also accurate in its portrayal of the North Jersey hauling market around the turn of the 21st century: the division of New Jersey into myriad municipalities makes it hard to catch corrupt deals like this, though the State a has stepped in to block this when it has the resources.

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* '''Garbage hauling''': One area that is very notable for mob infiltration is garbage hauling. The Mafia got into this industry when cities outsourced their garbage waste hauling activities to outside contractors, and that meant potential for the mob to infiltrate these companies. The so-called “garbage mobsters” who ran these operations often falsified paperwork and tampered with waste scales, sometimes to skim profits from the business, and sometimes to hide dirty money in it. Crew bosses and members often got no-work, no-show “consulting” positions at the firms, which gave them a legitimate reason to explain their income. They also divvied up routes in cities, rigged contract bids to favor mob-controlled garbage haulers, and strong-armed outsiders and customers in order to quash any outside competition and keep their prices artificially high. The Genovese family still has some control over garbage hauling, through Alphonse "Allie Shades" Malangone, a capo who also has some control over the family's interests in the Fulton Fish Market. ''The Sopranos'' is also accurate in its portrayal of the North Jersey hauling market around the turn of the 21st century: the division of New Jersey into a myriad of municipalities makes it hard to catch corrupt deals like this, though the State a state has stepped in intervened to block this when it has the resources.



* '''Loansharking/shylocking''': Illegal gambling and sports betting also led to the rise of a new activity - loansharking. One of the key moneymakers for the Mafia is to provide loans to [[TrappedByGamblingDebts degenerate gamblers]], drug addicts and those with a bad credit history at high interest rates, and often with the ominous threat of violence if they did not pay back. By the 1960s, loan sharks grew even more coordinated, and could pool information on borrowers to better size up risks and ensure a borrower did not try to pay off one loan by borrowing from another LoanShark.

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* '''Loansharking/shylocking''': Illegal gambling and sports betting also led to the rise of a new activity - loansharking. One of the key moneymakers for the Mafia is to provide loans to [[TrappedByGamblingDebts degenerate gamblers]], drug addicts and those with a bad credit history at high interest usurious rates, and often with the ominous threat of violence if they did not pay back. By the 1960s, loan sharks grew even more coordinated, and could pool information on borrowers to better size up risks and ensure a borrower did not try to pay off one loan by borrowing from another LoanShark.



* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drug faction believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. Eventually they pro-drug faction won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to drug dealing, as many of them took a cut in exchange for dealing it on the sly. The Bonannos became very notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily in the 1950s while using pizza joints as a way to cover up the heroin distribution.
* '''Contraband smuggling''': From bootlegging and gunrunning in the 1920s and 1930s to cigarette smuggling and human trafficking, the Mafia has been involved in all sorts of contraband smuggling, as a way to evade import duties/taxes and to smuggle in banned items. Bootlegging became the Mafia's primary moneymaker in the 1920s, as many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] began their mob careers during Prohibition. By the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, many of them were millionaires, and soon dabbled in other areas such as numbers running, labor racketeering and narcotics trafficking (drug trafficking eventually became the mob's biggest moneymaker, but it also attracted attention).

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* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drug faction believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. Eventually they pro-drug faction won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to drug dealing, thus, as many of them took a cut of the proceeds in exchange for dealing it on the sly. The Bonannos became very notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily in the 1950s while using pizza joints as a way to cover up the heroin distribution.
* '''Contraband smuggling''': From bootlegging and gunrunning in the 1920s and 1930s to cigarette smuggling and human trafficking, the Mafia has been involved in all sorts of contraband smuggling, as a way to evade import duties/taxes and to smuggle in banned items. Bootlegging became the Mafia's primary moneymaker in the 1920s, as many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] began their mob careers during Prohibition. By the time Prohibition was repealed in 1933, many of them were millionaires, and soon dabbled in other areas such as numbers running, labor racketeering and narcotics trafficking (drug trafficking eventually became the mob's biggest moneymaker, but it also attracted attention). In the 1980s, the Colombo family formed a gas tax evasion scheme with the Russian mafia by siphoning off money that would have went to the federal government.
26th Nov '17 12:46:42 PM Njein
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* '''Construction''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction. Most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket.

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* '''Construction''': '''Construction and real estate''': Another area that is rife with mob activity is construction.construction and real estate services. Most major construction projects in New York City could not go ahead without the Five Families' approval, especially if the contract was above $2 million; also many mobsters in major cities were provided with "no-show" jobs in mob-controlled construction companies to explain their income to the IRS. The mob bribed or threatened union leaders in order to obtain a piece of the action whenever they got a construction project, and in some cases, took over the union leadership themselves. Once the Mafia had its grip on a union, it could control an entire industry, and could halt or slow down a project if contractors and developers didn't make the right pay-offs. These pay-offs to mob-controlled contractors and unions often forced outsiders to pass these costs down the chain, including developers, brokers, etc., and in turn, forcing real estate prices to skyrocket. The mob has always ingrained itself within real estate crimes, such as "swampland-in-Florida-for-sale" scams, predatory lending schemes and equity fraud.



* '''Food distribution''': This area was also rife with mob activity. Paul Castellano used his Dial Meat Purveyors as a way to strong-arm poultry distributors and supermarkets into stocking his products, thanks to his prior experience as a butcher early in his mob career, while the Bonanno family used pizza joints as a cover to smuggle and distribute imported heroin in the United States; Joe Bonanno even had behind-the-scenes interests in the cheese industry during his 60+ years in the mob. The Fulton Fish Market is still rife with mob activity, especially with the Genovese and Bonanno families forcing non-mob affiliated competitors to pay a "tax" in order to sell their fish. Mobsters even infiltrated and shook down restaurants, bars and nightclubs if their owners could not pay back the loan they owed, or if they failed to pay the extortion "tax".
* '''Garment manufacturing''': Clothing is another sector that's still rife with mob infiltration. The Lucchese and Gambino families have had significant interests in the trucking and production in New York's Garment District, with corresponding influence and control of various Teamsters and Ladies Garment Workers' locals, alongside with their Jewish allies Lepke Buchalter and Jacob "Gurrah" Shapiro. The garment industry is divided essentially into two parts: the jobbers who design and sell the garments, and the contractors who assemble and sew the apparel. The bulk of the products were made-up in Chinatown, so there was a constant movement back and forth between the garment district located mainly between 34th and 39th Streets and the makers located south of Canal Street, three miles down the island. The trucking operation was the life-blood of the business, connecting the heart (the district) to the limbs (Chinatown.) Whoever controlled the trucks controlled the garment industry, which by the 1950s was employing more than 300,000 workers. With their control of the trucking and garment workers unions, the Mafia could essentially put a halt to goods coming in and out of the Garment District if the right payoffs weren't made.
* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams and mortgage fraud in recent years, the Mafia has been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as [[PonziScheme Ponzi schemes]], [[FourOneNineScam advance-fee fraud]] and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers into selling fraudulent penny stock to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.
* '''Political/governmental corruption''': American politics is still rife with corruption, especially in cities and small towns, where machine politics still has a sway over the locality's budget. New York and Chicago were great examples of machine politics, and mobsters would take advantage of this in exchange for political favors and to rig contracts in favor of mob-controlled businesses; Tommy Lucchese and Frank Costello often jockeyed with one another over who would control Tammany Hall. The mob would sometimes offer bribes to politicians and crooked officials in exchange for turning a blind eye to organized crime activities. In the 1990s, two NYPD officers were revealed to be working for the Mafia as mob-hired hitmen and contract killers, and were on the Lucchese family's payroll for years.

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* '''Food distribution''': This area was also rife with mob activity. Paul Castellano used his Dial Meat Purveyors as a way to strong-arm poultry meat distributors and supermarkets into stocking his poultry products, thanks to his prior experience as a butcher early in his mob career, while the Bonanno family used pizza joints as a cover to smuggle and distribute imported heroin in the United States; Joe Bonanno even had behind-the-scenes interests in the cheese industry distributors such as Grande Cheese during his 60+ years in the mob. The Fulton Fish Market is still rife with mob activity, especially with the Genovese and Bonanno families forcing non-mob affiliated competitors to pay a "tax" in order to sell their fish. Mobsters even infiltrated and shook down restaurants, bars and nightclubs if their owners could not pay back the loan they owed, or if they failed to pay the extortion "tax".
* '''Garment manufacturing''': Clothing is another sector that's still rife with mob infiltration. The Lucchese and Gambino families have had significant interests in the trucking and production in New York's Garment District, with corresponding influence and control of various Teamsters and Ladies Garment Workers' locals, alongside with their Jewish allies Lepke Buchalter and Jacob "Gurrah" Shapiro. The garment industry is divided essentially into two parts: the jobbers who design and sell the garments, and the contractors who assemble and sew the apparel. The bulk of the products were made-up in Chinatown, so there was a constant movement back and forth shuffling between the garment district located mainly between 34th and 39th Streets and the makers located south of Canal Street, three miles down the island. The trucking operation was the life-blood of the business, connecting the heart (the district) to the limbs (Chinatown.) Whoever controlled the trucks controlled the garment industry, which by the 1950s was employing more than 300,000 workers. With their control of the trucking and garment workers unions, the Mafia and their labor union cronies could essentially put a halt to goods coming in and out of the Garment District if the right payoffs weren't made.
* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams and mortgage fraud in recent years, the Mafia has always been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as [[PonziScheme Ponzi schemes]], [[FourOneNineScam advance-fee fraud]] and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers into selling fraudulent penny shady stock deals to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.
* '''Political/governmental corruption''': American politics is still rife with corruption, especially in cities and small towns, where machine politics still has a sway over the locality's budget. New York and Chicago were great examples of machine politics, and mobsters would take advantage of this in exchange for political favors and to rig contracts in favor of mob-controlled businesses; Tommy Lucchese and Frank Costello often jockeyed with one another over who would control Tammany Hall. The mob would sometimes offer bribes to politicians {{Corrupt Politician}}s and crooked officials in exchange for turning a blind eye to organized crime activities. In the 1990s, two NYPD officers were revealed to be working for the Mafia as mob-hired hitmen and contract killers, and were on the Lucchese family's payroll for years.



* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia. From card games and numbers running to betting on horses and other sports, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.

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* '''Illegal gambling''': Gambling has always been a very important business in the Mafia.Mafia -- in fact, the early mob families always had illegal numbers running operations. From card games and numbers running to betting on horses and other sports, the Mafia has earned cash from all of them. They operated many illegal and luxurious gambling operations throughout the United States, while police officers and politicians turned a blind eye to these gambling rackets in exchange for payoffs. Las Vegas, Cuba and Atlantic City became gambling meccas, and the mob took notice. Though the Mafia has a diminished influence in Las Vegas, its long-lasting impact on the gambling mecca's development will be felt for decades to come.



* '''Extortion''': The Mafia has been involved in extortion of various types from the start, as it started out as Black Hand extortion rings in the early 1900s. Eventually, mobsters began to strong-arm businesses, unions, and freelance criminals, forcing them down to pay a "street tax" in exchange for operating in territories the Mafia controlled in a given area. They could shake down businesses and individuals in many ways, including loansharking, confidence tricks, protection rackets, and shakedowns. Often, the ominous threat of violence was often employed in many of these rackets, to ensure that these businesses, individuals, etc. are falling in line.

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* '''Extortion''': The Mafia has been involved in extortion of various types from the start, as it started out as Black Hand extortion rings in the early 1900s. Eventually, mobsters began to strong-arm businesses, unions, and freelance criminals, forcing them down to pay a "street tax" in exchange for operating in territories the Mafia controlled in a given area. They could shake down businesses and individuals in many ways, including loansharking, confidence tricks, protection rackets, and shakedowns. Often, the ominous threat of violence was often employed in many of these rackets, to ensure that these businesses, individuals, etc. they are falling in line.



* '''Murder-for-hire''': The Mafia would have failed if it did not employ any threat of violence in regards to its illicit activities. Murder, Inc., a Brooklyn-based band of Italian and Jewish hit-men, became the National Crime Syndicate's enforcement arm, and committed as many as 800 hits to ensure mobsters are falling in line. Bugsy Siegel and Albert Anastasia began their careers as hit-men, as did many of the mobsters in the 1920s, becoming bodyguards and enforcers for more powerful bosses. Many made men usually begin their careers as hit-men, committing murders on behalf of their mob superiors. The Sicilian Mafia is very notorious in this, as they not only killed rival members, but also went after law enforcement officials, judges, politicians and anybody who dared to cross them; even women and children of made members were not spared, especially if a made man decided [[TheInformant to cooperate with authorities]]. Paolo Borsellino and and Giovanni Falcone, two government prosecutors who led an anti-Mafia crusade in the 1980s, learned this the hard way when both were killed in separate car bombings in 1992, forcing the Italian government to crack down on the Sicilian mob's activities.

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* '''Murder-for-hire''': The Mafia would have failed if it did not employ any threat of violence in regards to its illicit activities. Murder, Inc., a Brooklyn-based band of Italian and Jewish hit-men, became the National Crime Syndicate's enforcement arm, and committed as many as 800 hits to ensure mobsters are falling in line. Bugsy Siegel and Albert Anastasia began their careers as hit-men, as did many of the mobsters in the 1920s, becoming bodyguards and enforcers for more powerful bosses. Many made men usually begin their careers as hit-men, committing murders on behalf of their mob superiors. The Sicilian Mafia is very notorious in this, as they not only killed rival members, but also went after law enforcement officials, judges, politicians and anybody who dared to cross them; even women and children families of made members were not spared, especially if a made man decided [[TheInformant to cooperate with authorities]]. Paolo Borsellino and and Giovanni Falcone, two government prosecutors who led an anti-Mafia crusade in the 1980s, learned this the hard way when both were killed in separate car bombings in 1992, forcing the Italian government to crack down on the Sicilian mob's activities.



* '''Auto theft''': The Gambino family has had a big hand in auto theft rings, especially through Roy DeMeo, one of the mob's most feared hitmen. He would sell stolen cars to chop shops, who would strip them of their auto parts to be sold to scrap dealers. Criminals are also hopeful that there is little incentive on the part of the victim to search their stolen vehicle, as even if the car is found, recovery may cost more (in insurance, legal, and transportation fees) than the car is actually worth, especially if the stolen car is of low value. A chop shop must be able to take apart a car without damaging the parts and keep them organized. Time is of the essence: more cars processed equals higher profits. There is no advantage to a large inventory, as it can be done more efficiently in a "JIT" (Just In Time) manner by asking a thief only when cars are needed.

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* '''Auto theft''': The Gambino family has had a big hand in auto theft rings, especially through Roy DeMeo, [=DeMeo=], one of the mob's most feared hitmen. He would sell stolen cars to chop shops, who would strip them of their auto parts to be sold to scrap dealers. Criminals are also hopeful that there is little incentive on the part of the victim to search their stolen vehicle, as even if the car is found, recovery may cost more (in insurance, legal, and transportation fees) than the car is actually worth, especially if the stolen car is of low value. A chop shop must be able to take apart a car without damaging the parts and keep them organized. Time is of the essence: more cars processed equals higher profits. There is no advantage to a large inventory, as it can be done more efficiently in a "JIT" (Just In Time) manner by asking a thief only when cars are needed.



The Mafia solicits specific people for membership -- one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become a made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy cannot become a made member of the Mafia.

Before being inducted, a potential made man is required to carry out a contract killing. Traditionally this was in order to prove loyalty to the Mafia, but in modern times this also serves to show that one is not an undercover cop; any murder committed for [[ItsPersonal personal reasons]] "do not count". Committing one's first contract killing is referred to as "making your bones", and a potential inductee who does it earns his "button" in the Mafia - meaning that he is on track to becoming an official member. However, earning one's "button" does not always involve killing; good "earners," or experienced associates who have not necessarily murdered for the Mafia but are good in earning money, have in the past earned their "button," or become made men, due to their other valuable contributions beyond contract killing. Until the 1980s, one only had to be involved in a murder (such as driving the getaway car) or be a major "earner" for the family in order to fulfill the requirements. It was not until the Donnie Brasco fiasco, which revealed that undercover FBI agent Joe Pistone was on the verge of being made into the Bonanno crime family, that a rule was made that potential inductees must actually perform a killing.

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The Mafia solicits specific people for membership -- one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become a made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy cannot can never become a made member of the Mafia.

an official member, thought that rule has oftentimes been flouted for corrupt cops.

Before being inducted, a potential made man is required to carry out a contract killing. Traditionally this was in order to prove loyalty to the Mafia, but in modern times this also serves to show that one is not an undercover cop; cop (no, a cop may ''not'' legally conspire to commit a murder, nor assault a civilian, lest they be branded as a felon if they do so and face stiff penalties); any murder committed for [[ItsPersonal personal reasons]] "do not count". Committing one's first contract killing is referred to as "making your bones", and a potential inductee who does it earns his "button" in the Mafia - meaning that he is on track to becoming an official member. However, earning one's "button" does not always involve killing; good "earners," or experienced associates who have not necessarily murdered for the Mafia but are good in earning money, have in the past earned their "button," or become made men, due to their other valuable contributions beyond contract killing. Until the 1980s, one only had to be involved in a murder (such as driving the getaway car) or be a major "earner" for the family in order to fulfill the requirements. It was not until the Donnie Brasco fiasco, which revealed that undercover FBI agent Joe Pistone was on the verge of being made into the Bonanno crime family, that a rule was made that potential inductees must actually perform a killing.
12th Nov '17 1:49:53 PM Njein
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* '''Buffalo/Magaddino crime family''' - Nicknamed the Arm, this family ran much of upstate New York, with satellite crews in Rochester, Youngstown (Ohio), Toronto and southern Ontario. Originally founded by Stefano Magaddino (Joe "Bananas" Bonanno's cousin), this family is now largely in decline because of internal warfare, a dispute with Bonanno in the 1960s and the death of Stefano Magaddino in 1974.
* '''De Cavalcante crime family''' - the inspiration behind [[Series/TheSopranos the Sopranos]], this family runs rackets in Newark and Trenton (Atlantic City is under the Philly Mob's control, while northern New Jersey is under the influence of the Five Families).

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* '''Buffalo/Magaddino '''Magaddino/Buffalo crime family''' - Nicknamed the Arm, this family ran much of upstate New York, with satellite crews in Rochester, Youngstown (Ohio), Toronto and southern Ontario. Originally founded by Stefano Magaddino (Joe "Bananas" Bonanno's cousin), this family is now largely in decline because of internal warfare, a dispute with Bonanno in the 1960s and the death of Stefano Magaddino in 1974.
* '''De Cavalcante '''[=DeCavalcante=]/New Jersey crime family''' - the inspiration behind [[Series/TheSopranos the Sopranos]], this family runs rackets in Newark and Trenton (Atlantic City is under the Philly Mob's control, while northern New Jersey is under the influence of the Five Families).Families' control).



* '''Pittsburgh crime family''' - has control of Pittsburgh, Western Pennsylvania and portions of Eastern Ohio. The family has been largely in decline since the death of John [=LaRocca=] in 1984.

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* '''Pittsburgh '''[=LaRocca=]/Pittsburgh crime family''' - has control of Pittsburgh, Western Pennsylvania and portions of Eastern Ohio. The family has been largely in decline since the death of John [=LaRocca=] in 1984.



* '''Tampa Bay/Trafficante crime family''' - controls much of southern Florida (including Tampa Bay), except for Miami, which is an open territory. They reached their peak strength under Santo Trafficante Jr., who had gambling rackets in Cuba and had ties with Fulgencio Batista, then the president of Cuba in the 1950s. When the Cuban Revolution came by, he lost his gambling rackets and was involved in a botched CIA plot to rub off Castro; he was also presumably involved in a plot to kill JFK, though this has been disputed. Since his death, the family has been in decline, allowing the New York mafia to take control of rackets in the area.
* '''New Orleans crime family''' - Once controlled Louisiana, this family (also nicknamed the Combine) has been largely defunct due to Carlos Marcello's death in 1993. If the Genovese and Gambino families are the Yankees and Mets, the New Orleans family would be the Cincinatti Reds; they were the first known Mafia organization in the company (controlling groups of Italian stevedores in the aftermath of the American Civil War), before, too sure in their own power, they killed a police chief and were all but wiped out by an angry lynch mob. Marcello was aligned with Sam Giancana and Santo Trafficante, and was allegedly involved in a plot to kill JFK. In the 1980s, due to a string of convictions, the family has now receded much of its activities.
* '''Dallas crime family''' - Once controlled Dallas, Houston and Austin, this family is now largely defunct since the 1990s. May have been involved in the plot to kill JFK, as Jack Ruby had been known to meet Joseph Civello, the boss of Dallas Mafia at the time.

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* '''Tampa Bay/Trafficante '''Trafficante/Tampa Bay crime family''' - controls much of southern Florida (including Tampa Bay), except for Miami, which is an open territory. They reached their peak strength under Santo Trafficante Jr., who had gambling rackets in Cuba and had ties with Fulgencio Batista, then the president of Cuba in the 1950s. When the Cuban Revolution came by, he lost his gambling rackets and was involved in a botched CIA plot to rub off Castro; he was also presumably involved in a plot to kill JFK, though this has been disputed. Since his death, the family has been in decline, allowing the New York mafia to take control of rackets in the area.
* '''New Orleans Orleans/Marcello crime family''' - Once controlled Louisiana, this family (also nicknamed the Combine) has been largely defunct due to Carlos Marcello's death in 1993. If the Genovese and Gambino families are the Yankees and Mets, the New Orleans family would be the Cincinatti Reds; they were the first known Mafia organization in the company (controlling groups of Italian stevedores in the aftermath of the American Civil War), before, too sure in their own power, they killed a police chief and were all but wiped out by an angry lynch mob. Marcello was aligned with Sam Giancana and Santo Trafficante, and was allegedly involved in a plot to kill JFK. In the 1980s, due to a string of convictions, the family has now receded much of its activities.
* '''Dallas '''Dallas/Civello crime family''' - Once controlled Dallas, Houston and Austin, this family is now largely defunct since the 1990s. May have been involved in the plot to kill JFK, as Jack Ruby had been known to meet Joseph Civello, the boss of Dallas Mafia at the time.



* '''Detroit Partnership''' - One of the more active Mafia families, this family has control over the Detroit metro area and parts of southern Ontario. It was involved with the Teamsters, notably with Jimmy Hoffa in the 1950s and 1960s; it is alleged that Joe Zerilli may have been involved in Hoffa's disappearance. Despite federal indictments, the family remains one of the more active Mafia families.
* '''Cleveland crime family''' - Nicknamed the Mayfield Road Mob, it was once one of the more active mafia families and had control over much of Ohio. In the 1970s, it was involved in a turf war with Irish mobster Danny Greene over control of union rackets; the war ended when Greene was killed in a car bomb planted by rival mobsters. In 1983, Angelo Lonardo, a high-ranking member of the Cleveland mob, decided to turn informer and give state's evidence against his fellow mobsters; this ultimately diminished the power of the Cleveland Mafia, still recovering from the war with Danny Greene and is now largely defunct.
* '''Kansas City crime family''' - has control of Greater Kansas City and Nebraska. It was involved in gambling rackets in Las Vegas with the backing of the Outfit. Operation Strawman, a sting operation that included wiretapping phones of reputed mobsters, revealed that Kansas City mafia was involved in the skimming of gambling profits at the Tropicana Casino.
* '''St. Louis crime family''' - once an arm of the Kansas City Mafia, it broke off in the 1960s to become a separate crime family. Largely in decline since the 1990s.
* '''Milwaukee crime family''' - controls Milwaukee and Madison, it is largely in decline since the death of Frank Balistrieri in 1993. He was known to use car bombs to wipe out his enemies, and was once involved in a sting operation set up by the FBI (who had sent Joe Pistone), but declined to set up a vending machine operation with Pistone.

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* '''Detroit '''Zerilli crime family/Detroit Partnership''' - One of the more active Mafia families, this family has control over the Detroit metro area and parts of southern Ontario. It was involved with the Teamsters, notably with Jimmy Hoffa in the 1950s and 1960s; it is alleged that Joe Zerilli may have been involved in Hoffa's disappearance. Despite federal indictments, the family remains one of the more active Mafia families.
* '''Cleveland '''Scalish/Cleveland crime family''' - Nicknamed the Mayfield Road Mob, it was once one of the more active mafia families and had control over much of Ohio. In the 1970s, it was involved in a turf war with Irish mobster Danny Greene over control of union rackets; the war ended when Greene was killed in a car bomb planted by rival mobsters. In 1983, Angelo Lonardo, a high-ranking member of the Cleveland mob, decided to turn informer and give state's evidence against his fellow mobsters; this ultimately diminished the power of the Cleveland Mafia, still recovering from the war with Danny Greene and is now largely defunct.
* '''Kansas '''Civella/Kansas City crime family''' - has control of Greater Kansas City and Nebraska. It was involved in gambling rackets in Las Vegas with the backing of the Outfit. Operation Strawman, a sting operation that included wiretapping phones of reputed mobsters, revealed that Kansas City mafia was involved in the skimming of gambling profits at the Tropicana Casino.
* '''St.'''Giordano/St. Louis crime family''' - once an arm of the Kansas City Mafia, it broke off in the 1960s to become a separate crime family. Largely in decline since the 1990s.
* '''Milwaukee '''Balistrieri/Milwaukee crime family''' - controls Milwaukee and Madison, it is largely in decline since the death of Frank Balistrieri in 1993. He was known to use car bombs to wipe out his enemies, and was once involved in a sting operation set up by the FBI (who had sent Joe Pistone), but declined to set up a vending machine operation with Pistone.



* '''Los Angeles crime family''' - Has control of Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego. It used to be much more powerful until the 1950s; the family has been in decline since Frank DeSimone's death in 1967. For this reason, the family is nicknamed the Mickey Mouse mafia because of DeSimone's incompetence (he never expanded the crime family). Jack Dragna, the previous boss, had earned a seat on the Commission thanks to his strong ties to the Five Families; he was also involved in a brief war with Mickey Cohen in the 1950s. In the 1980s, Jimmy Fratianno, a former underboss, decided to flip after he feared his rivals might order a hit on him; this ultimately diminished the power of the LA crime family, which has never recovered since then.
* '''Denver crime family''' - This family once controlled rackets in Denver, Boulder and Pueblo in Colorado. Defunct since the 1990s.
* '''San Francisco crime family''' - This family once controlled Northern California and San Francisco. Defunct since the 1990s.
* '''San Jose crime family''' - This family once controlled San Jose, the Bay Area and Santa Clara County. Like the other West Coast Mafia families, it is defunct since the 1990s.

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* '''Los '''Dragna/Los Angeles crime family''' - Has control of Los Angeles, Orange County and San Diego. It used to be much more powerful until the 1950s; 1950s, but the family has been in decline since Frank DeSimone's [=DeSimone=]'s death in 1967. For this reason, the family is nicknamed the Mickey Mouse mafia mob because of DeSimone's [=DeSimone=]'s incompetence (he never expanded the crime family). Jack Dragna, the previous boss, had earned a seat on the Commission thanks to his strong ties to the Five Families; he was also involved in a brief war with Mickey Cohen in the 1950s. In the 1980s, Jimmy Fratianno, a former underboss, decided to flip after he feared his rivals might order a hit on him; this ultimately diminished the power of the LA crime family, which has never recovered since then.
* '''Denver '''Smaldone/Denver crime family''' - This family once controlled rackets in Denver, Boulder and Pueblo in Colorado. Defunct since the 1990s.
* '''San '''Lanza/San Francisco crime family''' - This family once controlled Northern California and San Francisco. Defunct since the 1990s.
* '''San '''Cerrito/San Jose crime family''' - This family once controlled San Jose, the Bay Area and Santa Clara County. Like the other West Coast Mafia families, it is defunct since the 1990s.
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