History UsefulNotes / TheMafia

2nd Dec '16 2:00:17 PM Njein
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* joint, the: prison; synonyms: the can, the pen, go away to college, doing time.

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* joint, the: prison; synonyms: the can, the pen, go away to college, doing time.time, the slammer, Hoosegow, mainline joint, skinner joint, stoney lonesome, lockup, glasshouse, bucket, club fed, greybar hotel, big house, calaboose, castle, cooler, country club, crowbar hotel, digger, farm, guardhouse, hole, jug, juvie, pokey, rock, sneezer, stockade, the clink.



* make your bones: Carrying out the first contracted (an on-the-book hit approved by the boss) killing in order to be accepted into the Mafia and become a made man. The hit proved absolute loyalty to the Mafia and, after the Donnie Brasco fiasco, to show that the potential recruit is not an undercover police officer. Murders committed for personal reasons do not count.

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* make your bones: Carrying out the first contracted (an on-the-book hit approved by the boss) killing in order to be accepted into the Mafia and become a made man. The hit proved absolute loyalty to the Mafia and, after the Donnie Brasco fiasco, debacle, to show that the potential recruit is not an undercover police officer. Murders committed for personal reasons do not count.
1st Dec '16 8:16:26 AM Njein
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The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept and closely guarded secret for years. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob; furthermore, the FBI successfully taped an initiation ceremony of New England's Patriarca crime family in 1989 (the Patriarca family lost a lot of respect when this was exposed). The Mafia inductions described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.

to:

The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept and closely guarded secret for years. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob; furthermore, the FBI managed to successfully taped bug an initiation ceremony of New England's Patriarca crime family in 1989 (the Patriarca family lost a lot of respect when this was exposed). The Mafia inductions described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.
29th Nov '16 7:48:29 AM Njein
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The Mafia solicits specific people for membership - one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become an official made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy cannot become a made member of the Mafia.

to:

The Mafia solicits specific people for membership - one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become an official a made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or attended a police academy cannot become a made member of the Mafia.



When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a [[CovertGroup closed and secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history)]], that there's [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way in and one way out]], and that [[LoyalToThePosition this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family]].

to:

When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a [[CovertGroup closed and secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history)]], that there's the [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way out is in and one way out]], a box]], and that [[LoyalToThePosition this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family]].



The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept and closely guarded secret for years. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob. The Mafia induction described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.

to:

The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept and closely guarded secret for years. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob. mob; furthermore, the FBI successfully taped an initiation ceremony of New England's Patriarca crime family in 1989 (the Patriarca family lost a lot of respect when this was exposed). The Mafia induction inductions described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.



* Whenever they're called in by their superiors, they must oblige without reservation.
* They must [[TheOathBreaker also never]] [[TheInformant cooperate with authorities]] in any way and must serve out prison sentences without complaint - the vow of Omerta.

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* Whenever they're called in by their superiors, they must [[UndyingLoyalty oblige without reservation.reservation]].
* They must [[TheOathBreaker also never]] [[TheInformant cooperate with authorities]] in any way and must serve out prison sentences without complaint - hence the vow of Omerta.



A made man must have enough success in his schemes in order to remain in favor with his superiors and avoid becoming a liability. Some associates become soldiers because of their usefulness in strong-arm work, but even they must demonstrate an ability to earn money. A soldier will be given profitable rackets to run by his superiors, but for the most part they must also generate money on their own.

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A made man must have enough success in his schemes in order to remain in favor with his superiors and avoid becoming a long-term liability. Some associates become soldiers because of their usefulness in strong-arm work, but even they must demonstrate an ability to earn money. A soldier will be given profitable rackets to run by his superiors, but for the most part they must also generate money on their own.
28th Nov '16 12:26:16 PM Njein
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The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really confirmed its existence. The meeting in Apalachin was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses by eliminating]] [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957.]] Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

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The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the [[CriminalConvention Apalachin Meeting of 1957 1957]] really confirmed its existence. [[CriminalConvention The meeting in Apalachin Apalachin]] was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses by eliminating]] [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano (now Gambino) family in October of 1957.]] Around 100 mobsters attended [[CriminalConvention the meeting meeting]] at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.



When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history), that there's [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way in and one way out]], and that this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family.

to:

When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a [[CovertGroup closed and secret society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history), history)]], that there's [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way in and one way out]], and that [[LoyalToThePosition this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family.family]].



After the induction ceremony, the associate becomes a made man and holds the rank of soldier in the Mafia totem pole.A made man enjoys the full protection and backing of the Mafia establishment as long as he remains in favor and earns enough money, a percentage of which must be passed up the hierarchy. A made man is traditionally seen as "untouchable" by fellow criminals; he is to be respected and feared. Killing or assaulting a made man for any reason without explicit permission of the Mafia family leadership is a big no-no which is punishable by death, regardless of whether the perpetrator had a legitimate grievance; however, a made man can be killed if a strong argument is provided and the higher-ups green-light it.

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After the induction ceremony, the associate becomes a made man and holds the rank of soldier in the Mafia totem pole. A made man enjoys the full protection and backing of the Mafia establishment as long as he remains in favor and earns enough money, a percentage of which must be passed up the hierarchy. A made man is traditionally seen as "untouchable" by fellow criminals; he is to be respected and feared. Killing or assaulting a made man for any reason without explicit permission of the Mafia family leadership higher-ups is a big no-no which is punishable by death, regardless of whether the perpetrator had a legitimate grievance; however, a made man can be killed if a strong argument is provided and the higher-ups green-light it.



* They must vow to stay loyal to the Mafia for life and kick a fixed portion of their earnings to their superiors - Omerta.

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* They must [[UndyingLoyalty vow to stay stay]] [[LoyalToThePosition loyal to the Mafia Mafia]] [[UndyingLoyalty for life life]] and kick a fixed portion of their earnings to their superiors - Omerta. superior.



* They must also never cooperate with authorities in any way and must serve out prison sentences without complaint.

to:

* They must [[TheOathBreaker also never never]] [[TheInformant cooperate with authorities authorities]] in any way and must serve out prison sentences without complaint.complaint - the vow of Omerta.



*** 1946-1951 - Vincent "The Executioner" Mangano - head of the LCN's conservative-Sicilian faction, disappeared in April 1951

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*** 1946-1951 - Vincent "The Executioner" Mangano - head of the LCN's conservative-Sicilian conservative/Sicilian faction, disappeared in April 1951



* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory or racket assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's actually in charge]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.

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* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' ''borgata'', faction or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory or racket assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's actually in charge]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.
26th Nov '16 9:21:26 PM Njein
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The Mafia solicits specific people for membership - one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become an official made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or even attended a police academy cannot become a made member of the Mafia.

to:

The Mafia solicits specific people for membership - one cannot just choose to join up. Also, in order to become an official made man, the inductee had to be a male of full Italian descent (though this restriction has been loosened over time, some Mafia families are more restrictive of whom they want to bring in than others). An associate of a crime family who was in the police force or even attended a police academy cannot become a made member of the Mafia.



When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a secret society, that there's [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way in and one way out]], and that this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family. The mobster's sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint and the picture placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint". Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.

The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept secret for decades. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob. The Mafia induction described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.

to:

When the crime family "opens the books" (accepts new members), an associate will get a call telling him to get ready and be dressed. He is then taken to a private place for the ceremony to take place, usually done in a dark room or in the basement of a fellow mobster’s house. At a table sits the boss, the underboss, consigliere and some of the family's capos and soldiers. The mobster is then told that this is a secret society, society (the boss also talks about the secret society's history), that there's [[ResignationsNotAccepted only one way in and one way out]], and that this ‘thing of ours’ comes before your blood family.family.

A gun and a knife are put in front of the inductee, with the boss asking the would-be member if he would use these to defend his fellow members - the inductee has to say yes.
The mobster's sponsor would then prick the inductee’s trigger finger until blood came out. The blood would then be put on a picture of a saint and the picture placed in the hands of the inductee. Then the boss lights the picture on fire and while the wiseguy juggles it in his hands, the boss says: "If you divulge the secrets of our life, your soul will burn in hell just like this saint". Then the newly made guy kisses the higher-ups on both cheeks.

The details of a Mafia induction ceremony were a carefully kept and closely guarded secret for decades.years. But in 1963, Joe Valachi’s testimony before a Senate subcommittee shined a spotlight on the mob. The Mafia induction described above is the ceremony conducted by the Sicilian Mafia as well as most American Mafia families. Circumstances can alter some of the details of the ceremony, such as an induction in prison or a quick induction during a gang war.



* They must vow to stay loyal to the Mafia for life and kick a fixed portion of their earnings to their superiors.
* Whenever they're called for by their superiors, they must oblige without reservation.

to:

* They must vow to stay loyal to the Mafia for life and kick a fixed portion of their earnings to their superiors.superiors - Omerta.
* Whenever they're called for in by their superiors, they must oblige without reservation.



** '''Chairman of the Commission''': There was no "ruler" of the Commission, but there was a nominated Chairman or Head of the National Commission. This was used as a substitute to the role of ''boss of bosses'', as that had the connotations of the old Mustache Pete system of one-man rule.

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** '''Chairman of the Commission''': There was no "ruler" of the Commission, but there was a nominated Chairman or Head of the National Commission. This was used as a substitute to the role of ''boss of all bosses'', as that had the connotations of the old Mustache Pete system of one-man rule.



* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The adviser/right-hand man, only third (or fourth counting the Godfather) is that the adviser keeps the legal face of the family and sometimes acts as the family lawyer. In theory, he is the only one allowed to argue with the Boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families use the position for an experienced member who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was banished to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the consigliere. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.

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* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The adviser/right-hand man, only third (or fourth counting the Godfather) is that the adviser keeps the legal face of the family and sometimes acts as the family lawyer. In theory, he is the only one allowed to argue with the Boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families often use the position for an experienced member a veteran who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes de facto control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was banished "chased" to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the consigliere. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.
25th Nov '16 5:55:15 AM Njein
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* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in western Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants (current membership is around 110-130 made men), ineffectual and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s (this family used to be much stronger thanks to its ties with the Bonannos). Originally a small and fairly-well organized gang of Sicilian mafiosi hailing from the town of Villabate (not far from Palermo, Sicily), the crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family at the time. [[BadBoss But, he was known to be miserly]] [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem and notoriously greedy (he even demanded a $25 monthly tribute to be kicked up to him), and his tightfisted attitude]] led to the first family war in the late 1950s. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo who wanted a greater share of the loot Profaci kept for himself; at first, it seemed that Gallo would win this battle, but soon, most of the family's 150+ wiseguys chose to side with Profaci. [[TheStarscream Carmine Persico]], a Gallo loyalist, later switched sides and rejoined the Profaci faction when he realized Gallo was the wrong horse to bet upon; he was nicknamed the "Snake" as a result of his treachery towards the Gallo crew (he tried to strangle Joe Gallo's younger brother Larry to death at a bar, but Larry survived thanks to a police officer timely intervention; Persico was forced to flee). Profaci died of cancer in 1962, but his underboss [[DragonAscendant Joe]] [[DragonInChief Magliocco]] continued the battle against the remaining Gallo crew. The war ended with Gallo's arrest in 1963, but [[DemotedToDragon Magliocco]] soon became embroiled in an audacious plot hatched by [[BigBadWannabe Joe Bonanno]] to eliminate several of their rivals and take over the Commission. However, their plans sputtered to an abrupt halt when [[MagnificentBastard Joe]] [[TheStarscream Colombo]], another capo in the Profaci family, [[TheStoolPigeon exposed their plot to the Commission.]] For his reward, Colombo took over the family in 1963 after Magliocco was forced to retire (since the other bosses knew that Magliocco had several health issues and would die anytime soon, they let him go but ordered him to step down and pay a $50,000 fine; Bonanno was also ordered to come forward several times but was a no-show despite being asked to explain, and he fled to avoid being killed in 1964 by faking his own kidnapping); with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name from Profaci to Colombo. However, much to Gambino's dismay, Colombo was too publicity-friendly, as he claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italian-Americans (he even formed a political group to decry the FBI's actions, and allied with Meir Kahane and the Jewish Defense League). Colombo was later gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from and died as a result of it in 1978) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. This led to another internal war, and the family blamed it on Joe Gallo (though it was speculated that Colombo's rivals, including Gambino, ordered it); he was later shot to death in 1972 while dining with his family (the remaining Gallo crew later joined the Genovese family). [[DragonAscendant Carmine Persico]] took over the family in 1972, but spent much of his reign while imprisoned (he used a series of acting bosses and ruling panels to run the family from prison). Persico and his acting boss, [[DragonInChief Gennaro "Jerry Lang" Langella]], were later indicted on the Mafia Commission Case in 1986, facing 100+ year life sentences; to ensure that he remains as the official boss, Persico even groomed his son [[MookLieutenant Alphonse]] to become the acting boss, but Allie Boy was convicted in a separate trial. Persico then nominates Victor Orena, his cousin and a capo to become the [[MookLieutenant street boss]], [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder but]] [[TheStarscream Orena had]] [[BigBadWannabe bigger]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda ambitions.]] The family would split again for a 3rd time in the early 1990s when Orena, who felt Persico was out of touch and was planning to do a TV interview (much like how Joe Bonanno did one in 1983 after writing a book about his life, and how the TV interview was used in the Mafia Commission Trial), tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle after [[WonTheWarLostThePeace 12 deaths (including three innocent bystanders), 18 associates missing and 12 of his members turning informer (and still runs the battered family from behind bars)]], the Colombos have been weakened because of numerous informants and more government crackdowns in the 2000s.

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* '''Colombo crime family''' - Big presence in western Brooklyn (notably Red Hook, Brooklyn Heights, Cobble Hill, Park Slope, Gowanus and Carroll Gardens) and Staten Island, with smaller crews and factions in Manhattan, Queens, Long Island and Florida; also has a crew based in Los Angeles (the family used to have a faction in New Jersey, but that has been disbanded since the 1990s). Currently the weakest of the Five Families thanks to numerous informants (current membership is around 110-130 made men), ineffectual and/or publicity-hungry bosses and internal wars since the 1960s (this family used to be much stronger thanks to its ties with the Bonannos). Originally a small and fairly-well organized gang of Sicilian mafiosi hailing from the town of Villabate (not far from Palermo, Sicily), the crime family was originally known as the Profaci crime family after the first boss, Joseph Profaci, who established good ties with Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family at the time. [[BadBoss But, he was known to be miserly]] [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem and notoriously greedy (he even demanded a $25 monthly tribute to be kicked up to him), and his tightfisted attitude]] led to the first family war in the late 1950s. This war was ignited by Joe Gallo, a capo who wanted a greater share of the loot Profaci kept for himself; at first, it seemed that Gallo would win this battle, but soon, most of the family's 150+ wiseguys chose to side with Profaci. [[TheStarscream Carmine Persico]], a Gallo loyalist, later switched sides and rejoined the Profaci faction when he realized Gallo was the wrong horse to bet upon; he was nicknamed [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder the "Snake" as a result of his treachery towards the Gallo crew crew]] (he tried to strangle Joe Gallo's younger brother Larry to death at a bar, but Larry survived thanks to a police officer timely intervention; Persico was forced to flee). Profaci died of cancer in 1962, but his underboss [[DragonAscendant Joe]] [[DragonInChief Magliocco]] continued the battle against the remaining Gallo crew. The war ended with Gallo's arrest in 1963, but [[DemotedToDragon Magliocco]] soon became embroiled in an audacious plot hatched by [[BigBadWannabe Joe Bonanno]] to eliminate several of their rivals and take over the Commission. However, their plans sputtered to an abrupt halt when [[MagnificentBastard Joe]] [[TheStarscream Colombo]], another capo in the Profaci family, [[TheStoolPigeon exposed their plot to the Commission.]] For his reward, Colombo took over the family in 1963 after Magliocco was forced to retire (since the other bosses knew that Magliocco had several health issues and would die anytime soon, they let him go but ordered him to step down and pay a $50,000 fine; Bonanno was also ordered to come forward several times but was a no-show despite being asked to explain, and he fled to avoid being killed in 1964 by faking his own kidnapping); with Carlo Gambino's backing, he changed the family name from Profaci to Colombo. However, much to Gambino's dismay, Colombo was too publicity-friendly, as he claimed the FBI was falsely targeting Italian-Americans (he even formed a political group to decry the FBI's actions, and allied with Meir Kahane and the Jewish Defense League). Colombo was later gunned down and put in a coma (that he never recovered from and died as a result of it in 1978) in 1971 during a rally at Columbus Circle. This led to another internal war, and the family blamed it on Joe Gallo (though it was speculated that Colombo's rivals, including Gambino, ordered it); he was later shot to death in 1972 while dining with his family (the remaining Gallo crew later joined the Genovese family). [[DragonAscendant Carmine Persico]] took over the family in 1972, but spent much of his reign while imprisoned (he used a series of acting bosses and ruling panels to run the family from prison). Persico and his acting boss, [[DragonInChief Gennaro "Jerry Lang" Langella]], were later indicted on the Mafia Commission Case in 1986, facing 100+ year life sentences; to ensure that he remains as the official boss, Persico even groomed his son [[MookLieutenant Alphonse]] to become the acting boss, but Allie Boy was convicted in a separate trial. Persico then nominates Victor Orena, his cousin and a capo to become the [[MookLieutenant street boss]], [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder but]] [[TheStarscream Orena had]] [[BigBadWannabe bigger]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda ambitions.]] The family would split again for a 3rd time in the early 1990s when Orena, who felt Persico was out of touch and was planning to do a TV interview (much like how Joe Bonanno did one in 1983 after writing a book about his life, and how the TV interview was used in the Mafia Commission Trial), tried to take over as boss. While Persico won the battle after [[WonTheWarLostThePeace 12 deaths (including three innocent bystanders), 18 associates missing and 12 of his members turning informer (and still runs the battered family from behind bars)]], the Colombos have been weakened because of numerous informants and more government crackdowns in the 2000s.
20th Nov '16 9:18:21 AM Njein
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The murders of [[BadBoss Masseria]] and [[BigBadWannabe Maranzano]] in 1931 paved the way for Lucky Luciano's rise to power. He not only restructured the American Mafia (by introducing a Commission to resolve disputes among the families), but also branched out to work with other ethnic mobs (including the [[KosherNostra Jewish mafia]] and the Irish Mob) to form a National Crime Syndicate. To ensure that the other mobsters are falling in line, Luciano even formed a Brooklyn-based gang of Italian, Irish and Jewish hitmen called Murder Inc. to function as the Syndicate's murder-for-hire and enforcement arm; it was led by Albert Anastasia and Louis Buchalter, who were both notorious hitmen and labor racketeers. This group of hitmen and contract killers was estimated to have committed at least 500 and 900 contract killings between 1931 and 1951.

However, things didn't go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring; he later formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing in drug trafficking, and it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction believed that it was a lucrative business, while the anti-drugs faction thought drugs were bad for business and would bring attention. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had crews that were actively dealing in drugs, and even set up Montreal as an outpost for importing heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a ban on narcotics trafficking imposed in the 1950s, many families dealt drugs on the sly to avoid any heat from the law, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and generally tolerated it as long as no made man was caught dealing drugs.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really confirmed the existence of La Cosa Nostra in the United States. The meeting in Apalachin was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses by eliminating]] [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano {now Gambino) family in October of 1957.]] Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.

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The murders of [[BadBoss Masseria]] and [[BigBadWannabe Maranzano]] in 1931 paved the way for Lucky Luciano's rise to power. He not only restructured the American Mafia (by introducing a Commission to resolve disputes among the families), but also branched out to work with other ethnic mobs (including the [[KosherNostra Jewish mafia]] and the Irish Mob) to form a National Crime Syndicate. To ensure that the other mobsters are falling in line, Luciano even formed a Brooklyn-based gang of Italian, Irish and Jewish hitmen called Murder Inc. to function as the Syndicate's murder-for-hire and enforcement arm; it was led by Albert Anastasia and Louis Buchalter, who were both notorious hitmen and labor racketeers. This group of hitmen and contract killers was estimated to have committed at least 500 and as many as 900 contract killings murders between 1931 and 1951.

However, things didn't go well for Luciano, and he was deported back to Italy in 1946 following his conviction for running a prostitution ring; he later formed ties with the Sicilian Mafia to distribute drugs in the United States. It was at this time that the Mafia started considering dealing in drug trafficking, and it immediately split into two camps; the pro-drug trafficking faction believed that it was a lucrative business, while the anti-drugs faction thought drugs were bad for business and would bring attention. The pro-drug trafficking faction eventually won out, and many lower-ranking mobsters began to deal with the Sicilians and other drug traffickers to import narcotics into the USA. Joe Bonanno, the boss of the Bonanno crime family, had crews that were actively dealing in drugs, and even set up Montreal as an outpost for importing heroin into the United States. Carlo Gambino, boss of the Gambino family, used Zips (imported Sicilian mafiosi) to import heroin via his cousins, while Vito Genovese actively pushed for narcotics trafficking, but was imprisoned on presumably trumped up charges of drug dealing. Despite a ban on narcotics trafficking imposed in the 1950s, many families often dealt drugs on the sly to avoid any heat from the law, and bosses such as Paul Castellano (Carlo Gambino's cousin and brother-in-law) turned a blind eye and generally tolerated it as long as no made man was caught dealing drugs.

The Kefauver hearings in 1951 determined that a vast criminal conspiracy operated by Italian mobsters did exist behind the scenes, and the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 really confirmed the existence of La Cosa Nostra in the United States. its existence. The meeting in Apalachin was set up by [[BigBadWannabe Vito]] [[TheStarscream Genovese, Luciano's former underboss]], who aimed to wrest control of the Genovese family from Frank Costello, his main rival and to become [[BigBadWannabe the Boss of all Bosses by eliminating]] [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia, the boss of the Mangano {now (now Gambino) family in October of 1957.]] Around 100 mobsters attended the meeting at this small town not far from Binghamton, New York, but it turned into a big disaster when a curious state trooper got wind of it (and sent in reinforcements). More than 60 mobsters were caught including Genovese himself; others nabbed include Carlo Gambino, Paul Castellano, Joe Profaci and Santo Trafficante; Tommy Lucchese and Sam Giancana themselves eluded capture, while Joe Bonanno claimed he was not there at the meeting despite being caught by state troopers in a nearby cornfield. Genovese was blamed for this debacle, and he ended up in prison for trumped-up charges on narcotics trafficking in 1959. Another blow to the mob came in 1963 when a low-level soldier named Joe Valachi became the first made man to flip by providing a glimpse into the inner workings of the Mafia. At this time, the FBI started to put more effort into organized crime activities, and the passage of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1970 also helped federal prosecutors in building cases against individual mobsters and their families.
19th Nov '16 5:27:29 PM Njein
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* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street/East Harlem, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx (primarily in Morris Park, Pelham Bay and Arthur Avenue), Westchester, northern New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews and factions in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still the strongest and biggest of the Five Families (the family size has varied from 250 to 450 made men, and currently has approx. 275-350 made men). The oldest of the New York families, it was known as the Morello crime family and eventually came under the control of Morello capo [[BadBoss Giuseppe "Joe the Boss" Masseria]], who had a penchant for violence and was notoriously greedy. His heavy-handed attempts to strong arm and control the other Italian gangs, especially the Williamsburg-based Castellammarese gang, led to a bloody turf war in 1928; the Castellammarese War claimed at least 150+ lives and dragged on until Masseria was gunned down at a Coney Island restaurant in 1931. [[BigBadWannabe Salvatore]] [[EntitledBastard Maranzano]], now the nominal victor of this turf war, [[ItsAllAboutMe immediately wasted no time into reorganizing the Five Families (and by extension, the entire Mafia) under his control by declaring himself the boss of bosses;]] the [[YoungGun Young Turks]], led by an upstart gangster named [[MagnificentBastard Charles]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda "Lucky" Luciano]](the [[YoungGun Young Turks were a younger generation of Americanized mafiosi]], and were swayed by Maranzano into fighting for him), realized that Maranzano was much [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem greedier]] [[ItsAllAboutMe than they thought.]] So, they decided that the boss of all bosses had to go, and Luciano takes over in September of 1931 after Maranzano was eliminated. With the old guard out of the way, Luciano can now consolidate his own power. Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission (and becoming its 1st chairman) to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "hitting the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring in 1937 and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was craving to go legitimate. But he was faced with a growing threat from [[DragonWithAnAgenda Vito Genovese]], who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia and William "Willie Moore" Moretti). Genovese, with the sufficient backing of [[CoDragons Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese]], then ordered a hit on Costello in May of 1957; Costello manages to survive the hit (thanks to the gunman's unintentional warning, he managed to get away with only a scalp wound) and steps down to avoid further bloodshed. Later that year, Genovese ordered a hit on [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia]] and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the bloodletting that's going on in New York since the attempted hit on Costello earlier that year. But the Apalachin Meeting proved to be a big debacle as it exposed the LCN to law enforcement, media and public scrutiny, and the other bosses (notably [[TheStarscream Gambino and Lucchese,]] who switched sides and supported Costello, Luciano and Lansky) had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. Later, in 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named [[TheStoolPigeon Joe Valachi]] became the first made man to [[TheInformant flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings;]] Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence his reason to cooperate with federal authorities. Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels and acting bosses) until his death in 1969. Though the family was run by a series of acting bosses and ruling panels after Genovese's death, Phil "Benny Squint" Lombardo (the family's street boss since 1962) was regarded as the ''[[TheChessmaster de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss and]] [[TheAllegedBoss had the final say in family matters, especially since 1969.]] Ill health forces Lombardo to step down and name [[DragonAscendant Vincent "Chin" Gigante]] (the alleged gunman behind the Costello hit) as his successor in 1981; [[TheAllegedBoss Gigante]] later names [[TheManBehindTheMan Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss]]. Gigante further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by [[ObfuscatingDisability feigning]] [[ObfuscatingInsanity insanity]] [[PlayingSick and]] [[ObfuscatingStupidity pretending to have a low IQ]]; this ruse fooled law enforcement until 1997, when he was imprisoned for multiple racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and since his death, it is implied the family now uses a ruling panel of capos to manage its daily affairs and to avoid FBI attention, with [[TheManBehindTheMan Liborio "Barney" Bellomo (a protege of Vincent Gigante and the head capo of the 116th Street crew)]] pretty much having [[TheAllegedBoss the final say on family matters]], in a matter that's reminiscent of Philip Lombardo in the 1970s.

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* '''Genovese crime family''' - Large presence in Manhattan (notably Little Italy, 116th Street/East Harlem, Lower East Side, Greenwich Village and the Manhattan/New Jersey waterfronts), the Bronx (primarily in Morris Park, Pelham Bay and Arthur Avenue), Westchester, northern New Jersey and Connecticut, with smaller crews and factions in Queens, Brooklyn and Florida (the family also has a small crew in Springfield, Massachusetts). Regarded as the Ivy League of the Mafia, the family is still the strongest and biggest of the Five Families (the family size has varied from 250 to 450 made men, and currently has approx. 275-350 made men). The oldest of the New York families, it was known as the Morello crime family and eventually came under the control of Morello capo [[BadBoss Giuseppe "Joe the Boss" Masseria]], who had a penchant for violence and was notoriously greedy. His heavy-handed attempts to strong arm and control the other Italian gangs, especially the Williamsburg-based Castellammarese gang, led to a bloody turf war in 1928; the Castellammarese War claimed at least 150+ lives and dragged on until Masseria was gunned down at a Coney Island restaurant in 1931. [[BigBadWannabe Salvatore]] [[EntitledBastard Maranzano]], now the nominal victor of this turf war, [[ItsAllAboutMe immediately wasted no time into reorganizing the Five Families (and by extension, the entire Mafia) under his control by declaring himself the boss of bosses;]] the [[YoungGun Young Turks]], led by an upstart gangster named [[MagnificentBastard Charles]] [[DragonWithAnAgenda "Lucky" Luciano]](the [[YoungGun Young Turks were a younger generation of Americanized mafiosi]], and were swayed by Maranzano into fighting for him), realized that Maranzano was much [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem greedier]] [[ItsAllAboutMe than they thought.]] So, they decided that the boss of all bosses had to go, and Luciano takes over in September of 1931 after Maranzano was eliminated. With the old guard out of the way, Luciano can now consolidate his own power. Luciano then revolutionized the American Mafia by forming a Mafia Commission (and becoming its 1st chairman) to settle disputes and encouraging the other bosses to work with each other instead of "hitting the mattresses". However, he faced an indictment from Thomas Dewey for running a prostitution ring in 1937 and was deported back to Italy in 1946, where he worked with the Sicilian mafia to establish an international drug ring. The family was taken over by Frank Costello, Luciano's consigliere and a key political fixer; he had huge gambling rackets in New York City and was craving to go legitimate. But he was faced with a growing threat from [[DragonWithAnAgenda Vito Genovese]], who was Luciano's former underboss and was silently eliminating allies of Costello after returning to the United States in 1945 (notably Albert Anastasia and William "Willie Moore" Moretti). Genovese, with the sufficient backing of [[CoDragons Carlo Gambino and Tommy Lucchese]], then ordered a hit on Costello in May of 1957; Costello manages to survive the hit (thanks to the gunman's unintentional warning, he managed to get away with only a scalp wound) and steps down to avoid further bloodshed. Later that year, Genovese ordered a hit on [[AxCrazy Albert Anastasia]] and called a meeting of major mob leaders to explain the bloodletting that's going on situation in New York since the attempted hit on Costello earlier that year. But York. But, the Apalachin Meeting proved to be a big debacle as it exposed the LCN Mafia to law enforcement, media and public outside scrutiny, and the other bosses (notably [[TheStarscream Gambino and Lucchese,]] who switched sides and supported Costello, Luciano and Lansky) had him falsely implicated on a drug charge. Later, in 1963, a low-level soldier in his family named [[TheStoolPigeon Joe Valachi]] became the first made man to [[TheInformant flip and testify about the American Mafia's inner workings;]] Valachi feared Genovese ordered a hit on him, hence his reason to cooperate with federal authorities. Genovese continued to rule the family from prison (via ruling panels and acting bosses) until his death in 1969. Though the family was run by a series of acting "dummy" bosses and ruling panels after Genovese's death, Phil "Benny Squint" Lombardo (the family's street boss since 1962) was regarded as the ''[[TheChessmaster de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss and]] [[TheAllegedBoss had the final say in family matters, especially since 1969.]] Ill health forces Lombardo to step down and name [[DragonAscendant Vincent "Chin" Gigante]] (the alleged gunman behind the Costello hit) as his successor in 1981; [[TheAllegedBoss Gigante]] later names [[TheManBehindTheMan Anthony "Fat Tony" Salerno as his "dummy" boss]]. Gigante further shielded himself from law enforcement scrutiny by [[ObfuscatingDisability feigning]] [[ObfuscatingInsanity insanity]] [[PlayingSick and]] [[ObfuscatingStupidity pretending to have a low IQ]]; this ruse fooled law enforcement worked until 1997, when he was imprisoned for multiple racketeering and murder charges. He ran the family from prison until his death in 2005, and since his death, it is implied the family now uses a ruling panel of capos to manage its daily affairs and to avoid FBI attention, with [[TheManBehindTheMan Liborio "Barney" Bellomo (a protege of Vincent Gigante and the head capo of the 116th Street crew)]] pretty much having [[TheAllegedBoss the final say on family matters]], in a matter that's reminiscent of Philip Lombardo in the 1970s.



* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx (especially Morris Park, Arthur Avenue, Pelham Bay and Throggs Neck), East Harlem, Westchester, New England and northern New Jersey, with smaller crews and factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island, Queens and Florida. The family began as a splinter crew of the Morello family, taking over its rackets in the Bronx. It was something of the Franz Ferdinand of the Castellammarese War, as Masseria's attempt to violently replace the family's boss ended up throwing the rest of the family under the sway of Maranzano and starting open conflict between the two groups. Widely reckoned as the smallest (The family manpower has often hovered between 120 and 160 made men) and most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, [[DragonInChief Tommy Lucchese]] to do business with the other families. Gagliano died in 1951, but [[DragonAscendant names Lucchese as his successor]] before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio, Robert F. Wagner and Vincent Impellitteri while jockeying with Frank Costello over the control of Tammany Hall. [[DragonInChief Lucchese]] also backed [[BigBadWannabe Vito Genovese]] and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their respective families, but chose to build a closer relationship with [[VillainousFriendship Gambino]] after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter in 1962, and in return, [[BigBadDuumvirate Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK Airport]]). Lucchese later died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Carmine Tramunti, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Tramunti later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Tony "Ducks" Corallo took over as boss in 1973 after Tramunti was indicted and convicted for narcotics trafficking in the French Connection case. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies took place - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named [[BadBoss Victor Amuso]] and [[DragonInChief Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso]] as the [[DragonAscendant new boss and underboss]], respectively, in 1987, but it proved to be a disaster, as [[BigBadDuumvirate Amuso and Casso]] were known to be [[AxCrazy violent hitmen and drug traffickers]] (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; their predecessors came from the Bronx-East Harlem faction). [[BadBoss Soon enough, they ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death]] (this forced ''actual'' [[DefectorFromDecadence wiseguys in the family to flip]] because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem whacking of the entire New Jersey Crew,]] when they failed to show up for a meeting and [[BadBoss pay a hefty tribute]] (they actually demoted the Jersey crew's head capo, Anthony Accetturo, to the mere rank of a soldier and replaced him with an Amuso loyalist; Accetturo later [[TheInformant flipped]] when [[MoralEventHorizon Amuso ordered a hit on his wife,]] [[EvenEvilHasStandards despite the Mafia's longtime ban on harming women]]), but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both Amuso and Casso were captured in 1993, but the latter decided to [[TheInformant flip]] [[TheStoolPigeon in 1994]], revealing that [[DirtyCop two NYPD officers]] named [[LawmanGoneBad Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa]] were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as [[KillerCop contract killers]] for the Mafia (Eppolito even had relatives who were in the mob, but could never get inducted because he was a cop). Both of them were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.

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* '''Lucchese crime family''' - Has a large presence in the Bronx (especially Morris Park, Arthur Avenue, Pelham Bay and Throggs Neck), East Harlem, Westchester, New England and northern New Jersey, with smaller crews and factions in lower Manhattan, Brooklyn, Staten Island, Long Island, Queens and Florida. The family began as a splinter crew of the Morello family, taking over its rackets in the Bronx. It was something of the Franz Ferdinand of the Castellammarese War, as Masseria's attempt to violently replace the family's boss ended up throwing the rest of the family under the sway of Maranzano and starting open conflict between the two groups. Widely reckoned as the smallest (The family manpower has often hovered between 120 and 160 made men) and most peaceful family of the Five Families (until the 1980s), the family's first official boss was Tommy Gagliano, who preferred to keep a low profile. He expanded the family's grip on the Garment District and used his underboss, [[DragonInChief Tommy Lucchese]] to do business with the other families. Gagliano died in 1951, but [[DragonAscendant names Lucchese as his successor]] before dying. Lucchese continued to maintain the family's grip on the Garment District, and soon controlled trucking rackets at the new Idlewild (now JFK) Airport; he also built close relations with Tammany Hall (the local Democratic Party political machine) and with politicians such as Carmine DeSapio, Robert F. Wagner and Vincent Impellitteri while jockeying with Frank Costello over the control of Tammany Hall. [[DragonInChief Lucchese]] also backed [[BigBadWannabe Vito Genovese]] and Carlo Gambino in their fights to take control of their respective families, but chose to build a closer relationship with [[VillainousFriendship Gambino]] after the Apalachin Meeting of 1957 (Gambino's son married his daughter in 1962, and in return, [[BigBadDuumvirate Lucchese gave Gambino access to rackets at JFK Airport]]). Lucchese later died of cancer in 1967, and was replaced by Carmine Tramunti, who had a good relationship with the other bosses; Tramunti later branched out in construction and narcotics trafficking. Tony "Ducks" Corallo took over as boss in 1973 after Tramunti was indicted and convicted for narcotics trafficking in the French Connection case. Under Corallo's reign, one of the most infamous robberies took place - the Lufthansa Heist. It occurred when several truck hijackers linked to Jimmy "the Gent" Burke and Paul Vario ran off with nearly $6 million in cash and jewelry. Corallo, facing life imprisonment following the Mafia Commission trial, named [[BadBoss Victor Amuso]] and [[DragonInChief Anthony "Gaspipe" Casso]] as the [[DragonAscendant new boss and underboss]], respectively, in 1987, but it proved to be a disaster, as [[BigBadDuumvirate Amuso and Casso]] were known to be [[AxCrazy violent hitmen and drug traffickers]] (the two of them came from the Brooklyn faction; their predecessors came from the Bronx-East Harlem faction). [[BadBoss Soon enough, they ordered anybody that was a purported informant to be marked for death]] (this forced ''actual'' [[DefectorFromDecadence wiseguys in the family to flip]] because of the increasingly erratic behavior of Amuso and Casso); Amuso even ordered the [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem whacking of the entire New Jersey Crew,]] when they failed to show up for a meeting and [[BadBoss pay a hefty tribute]] (they actually demoted the Jersey crew's head capo, Anthony Accetturo, to the mere rank of a soldier and replaced him with an Amuso loyalist; Accetturo later [[TheInformant flipped]] when [[MoralEventHorizon [[WouldHitAGirl Amuso ordered a hit on his wife,]] [[EvenEvilHasStandards despite the Mafia's longtime ban on harming women]]), but never went through with it because of massive indictments against many mafiosi at the time. Both Amuso and Casso were captured in 1993, but the latter decided to [[TheInformant flip]] [[TheStoolPigeon in 1994]], revealing that [[DirtyCop two NYPD officers]] named [[LawmanGoneBad Louis Eppolito and Steven Caracappa]] were on the Lucchese family's payroll for several years, working as [[KillerCop contract killers]] for the Mafia (Eppolito even had relatives who were in the mob, but could never get inducted become made because he was a cop). Both of them were sentenced to life imprisonment, but Casso was thrown out of the Witness Program in 1998 for numerous infractions. Amuso still runs the battered Lucchese family to this day via the help of ruling panels and acting bosses, a trait shared with the other Mafia families in New York.
19th Nov '16 5:05:58 PM Njein
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* '''Labor racketeering''': The Mafia is very notorious for infiltrating unions, especially in the construction, garbage hauling, food services, cargo/airport services and clothing. Tommy Lucchese had a hand in controlling the Garment District, while the Detroit mafia was involved with Jimmy Hoffa and the Teamsters; Albert Anastasia had control of the Brooklyn docks, and had ties to the International Longshoremen's Association through his younger brother Anthony. The New York families even had enough power within these unions to bring construction activities within the city to a standstill, if they didn't get the right payoffs. The crimes involved in labor racketeering included union shakedowns, embezzling from workers' benefit plans, rigging union elections so they could place mob-friendly candidates, coercing companies into hiring mob-controlled union workers, and providing "no-show" jobs to mobsters.

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* '''Labor racketeering''': The Mafia is very notorious for infiltrating unions, especially in the construction, garbage hauling, food services, cargo/airport services and clothing. Tommy Lucchese had a hand in controlling the Garment District, while the Detroit mafia was involved with Jimmy Hoffa and the Teamsters; Albert Anastasia had control of the Brooklyn docks, and had ties to the International Longshoremen's Association through his younger brother Anthony. The New York families even had enough power within these unions to bring construction activities within the city to a standstill, if they didn't get the right payoffs. The crimes involved in labor racketeering included union shakedowns, embezzling from workers' benefit plans, rigging union elections so they could place in favor of mob-friendly candidates, coercing companies into hiring mob-controlled union workers, and providing "no-show" jobs to mobsters.



* '''Garment manufacturing''': Clothing is another sector that's still rife with mob infiltration. The Lucchese and Gambino families had significant interests in the trucking and production in New York's Garment District, with corresponding influence and control of various Teamsters and Ladies Garment Workers' locals, alongside with their Jewish allies Lepke Buchalter and Jacob "Gurrah" Shapiro. The garment industry is divided essentially into two parts: the jobbers who design and sell the garments, and the contractors who assemble and sew the apparel. The bulk of the products were made-up in Chinatown, so there was a constant movement back and forth between the garment district located mainly between 34th and 39th Streets and the makers located south of Canal Street, three miles down the island. The trucking operation was the life-blood of the business, connecting the heart (the district) to the limbs (Chinatown.) Whoever controlled the trucks controlled the garment industry, which by the 1950s was employing more than 300,000 workers. With their control of the trucking and garment workers unions, the Mafia could essentially put a halt to goods coming in and out of the Garment District if the right payoffs weren't made.
* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams during the Internet boom, the Mafia has been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as Ponzi schemes, advance-fee fraud and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers into selling fraudulent penny stock to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.

to:

* '''Garment manufacturing''': Clothing is another sector that's still rife with mob infiltration. The Lucchese and Gambino families have had significant interests in the trucking and production in New York's Garment District, with corresponding influence and control of various Teamsters and Ladies Garment Workers' locals, alongside with their Jewish allies Lepke Buchalter and Jacob "Gurrah" Shapiro. The garment industry is divided essentially into two parts: the jobbers who design and sell the garments, and the contractors who assemble and sew the apparel. The bulk of the products were made-up in Chinatown, so there was a constant movement back and forth between the garment district located mainly between 34th and 39th Streets and the makers located south of Canal Street, three miles down the island. The trucking operation was the life-blood of the business, connecting the heart (the district) to the limbs (Chinatown.) Whoever controlled the trucks controlled the garment industry, which by the 1950s was employing more than 300,000 workers. With their control of the trucking and garment workers unions, the Mafia could essentially put a halt to goods coming in and out of the Garment District if the right payoffs weren't made.
* '''Financial crimes''': Why else would the mob ignore this area? From tax evasion and counterfeiting in the 1920s and 1930s, to money laundering in the 1960s, to "pump-and-dump" stock scams during and mortgage fraud in the Internet boom, 1990s and 2000s, the Mafia has been involved in many financial crimes. They were also involved in confidence tricks such as Ponzi schemes, advance-fee fraud and are now making a foray into identity theft and cybercrimes, oftentimes with other organized crime groups. The Bonanno family was heavily involved in stock market scams during the Internet bubble of the 1990s, where they would coerce stockbrokers into selling fraudulent penny stock to unsuspecting investors. During the late 2000s recession, mobsters took advantage of the ongoing crisis by participating in mortgage scams, whether through predatory lending schemes or mortgage fraud.



* '''Pornography''': Prostitution became another moneymaker for the mafia, as they began to infiltrate peep show booths, porn distributors and child pornography, especially around Times Square, during the [[BigRottenApple decline of New York City in the 1970s]]. The Gambino family had interests in that area, especially through Robert DiBernardo, who was one of the very few thought to have become 'made' in the Mafia without committing a murder. His name was later used to discredit Geraldine Ferraro's run for the US Senate in the 1990s, when her ties with the mobster were questioned. Lucky Luciano was accused of pandering and deported back to Italy, despite little or no evidence that he was actually running prostitution rings. Michael "Mikey Z" Zaffarano, a now-deceased capo in the Bonanno family, even had interests in adult-only movie theaters.

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* '''Pornography''': Prostitution became another moneymaker for the mafia, as they began to infiltrate peep show booths, porn distributors and child pornography, especially around Times Square, during the [[BigRottenApple decline of New York City in the 1970s]]. The Gambino family had interests in that area, especially through Robert DiBernardo, Di Bernardo, who was one of the very few thought to have become 'made' in the Mafia without committing a murder. His name was later used to discredit Geraldine Ferraro's run for the US Senate in the 1990s, when her ties with the mobster were questioned. Lucky Luciano was accused of pandering and deported back to Italy, despite little or no evidence that he was actually running prostitution rings. Michael "Mikey Z" Zaffarano, a now-deceased capo in the Bonanno family, even had interests in adult-only movie theaters.



* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drugs faction believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. Eventually they pro-drugs faction won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to drug dealing, as many of them took a cut in exchange for dealing it on the sly. The Bonannos became notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily.

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* '''Narcotics trafficking''': This became the mob's biggest moneymaker after bootlegging declined in the 1930s, as the Mafia began to dabble into the drug trade. However, this split them into two groups, with the pro-drug faction advocating in favor of it, while the anti-drugs anti-drug faction believed it would bring in law enforcement heat on them. Eventually they pro-drugs pro-drug faction won out, and many low-ranking mobsters began to deal extensively with the Sicilians and other organized crime groups. Bosses such as Paul Castellano, Carlo Gambino and others often turned a blind eye to drug dealing, as many of them took a cut in exchange for dealing it on the sly. The Bonannos became very notorious for heroin trafficking, especially under Joe Bonanno, who sent his underboss Carmine Galante to set up Montreal as an outpost for importing drugs into the United States from Sicily.



* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] in the 1920s. Even Paul Castellano began his mob career in the 1930s by holding up a haberdasher; despite being asked to identify his accomplices, he refused to so (and served a three-month stint as a result of his refusal to rat out), earning the respect of mobsters.

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* '''Armed robbery''': Many mobsters began their mob careers serving as enforcers and armed robbers, and by the 1970s, mobsters were hijacking trucks coming out of JFK Airport, and then selling the stolen merchandise to known fences across New York City. John Gotti, Joe Massino and Sal Vitale began their mob careers as truck hijackers in the 1960s, as did many of the [[YoungGun Young Turks]] in the 1920s. Even Paul Castellano began his mob career in the 1930s by holding up a haberdasher; despite being asked to identify his accomplices, he refused to so (and served a three-month stint as a result of his refusal to rat out), earning the respect of mobsters.local mobsters, especially his cousin Carlo Gambino.



* '''The Commission''': Luciano's answer to the ''capo di tutti i capi'' title. Originally consisted of the bosses of the Five Families in New York, the boss of the Buffalo family, and UsefulNotes/AlCapone, with [[TheManBehindTheMan substantial input]] from "associates" such as Meyer Lansky. Other cities, such as Detroit and Philadelphia, once had seats on the Commission, but later lost it. Later pared down to just the Five Families (the Bonannos were thrown out the Commission in the 1980s due to their generally disruptive behavior in the Mafia), with Chicago doing its own thing, but it still has a seat on the Commission; the idea worked so well that the Sicilian Mafia was encouraged to form a similar body. The Commission is headed by a nominal Chairman, who was not seen as the '''capo di capi''' as law enforcement usually claimed it to be; in the mob, crime bosses are viewed as peers, and having one boss reign supreme over the others runs contrary to this idea (Luciano saw what happened to Masseria and Maranzano - [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem the power went into their heads]], [[ItsAllAboutMeand they immediately became arrogant in treating their subordinates]]). Luciano became the first Chairman of the Mafia Commission after establishing it in 1931. Contrary to popular belief, the Commission does not "rule" the Mafia (see above re: bosses, orders, and tribute), it's intended to be a body for settling disputes that might otherwise lead to violations of "honor" and all-out turf wars--think more of a UsefulNotes/UnitedNations of the Underworld or a board of directors of mob bosses rather than a King of the Mafia (or even a Parliament of the Mafia). Only the Commission can approve a new boss before he could take over officially, allow who can become a made man and who can't, and vote on issues (such as the narcotics trade) that might require inter-family cooperation. Though the bosses used to meet more often, greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s and an increasing number of informants, notably Sammy "the Bull" Gravano, have forced the Commission underground, and the families now send lower-level members such as capos to disciss business and resolve inter-family disputes. Also, the five New York City bosses have not met with each other since Paul Castellano was killed in late 1985, as the last meeting took place a month before his death (though there was a mini-Commission meeting in 2000, most of the attendees at the time were acting bosses with the lone exception of Joe Massino of the Bonanno family, who was the last full-fledged boss remaining on the streets; most of the official bosses were imprisoned by this time).
** '''Chairman of the Commission''': There was no "ruler" of the Commission, but there was a nominated Chairman or Head of the National Commission. This was used as a substitute to the role of ''capo di tutti capi'', as that had the connotations of the old Mustache Pete system of one-man rule.

to:

* '''The Commission''': Luciano's answer to the ''capo di tutti i capi'' title. Originally consisted of the bosses of the Five Families in New York, the boss of the Buffalo family, and UsefulNotes/AlCapone, with [[TheManBehindTheMan substantial input]] from "associates" such as Meyer Lansky. Other cities, such as Detroit and Philadelphia, once had seats on the Commission, but later lost it. Later pared down to just the Five Families (the Bonannos were thrown out the Commission in the 1980s due to their generally disruptive behavior in the Mafia), with Chicago doing its own thing, but it still has a seat on the Commission; the idea worked so well that the Sicilian Mafia was encouraged to form a similar body. The Commission is headed by a nominal Chairman, who was not seen as the '''capo di capi''' as law enforcement usually claimed it to be; in the mob, crime bosses are viewed as peers, and having one boss reign supreme over the others runs contrary to this idea (Luciano saw what happened to Masseria and Maranzano - [[ScrewTheRulesIMakeThem the power went into their heads]], [[ItsAllAboutMeand [[ItsAllAboutMe and they immediately became arrogant in treating their subordinates]]). Luciano became the first Chairman of the Mafia Commission after establishing it in 1931. Contrary to popular belief, the Commission does not "rule" the Mafia (see above re: bosses, orders, and tribute), it's intended to be a body for settling disputes that might otherwise lead to violations of "honor" and all-out turf wars--think more of a UsefulNotes/UnitedNations of the Underworld or a board of directors of mob bosses rather than a King of the Mafia (or even a Parliament of the Mafia). Only the Commission can approve a new boss before he could take over officially, allow who can become a made man and who can't, and vote on issues (such as the narcotics trade) that might require inter-family cooperation. Though the bosses used to meet more often, greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s and an increasing number of informants, notably Sammy "the Bull" Gravano, have forced the Commission underground, and the families now send lower-level members such as capos to disciss discuss business and resolve inter-family disputes. Also, the five New York City bosses have not met with each other since Paul Castellano was killed in late 1985, as the last meeting took place a month before his death (though there was a mini-Commission meeting in 2000, most of the attendees at the time were acting bosses with the lone exception of Joe Massino of the Bonanno family, who was the last full-fledged boss remaining on the streets; most of the official bosses were imprisoned by this time).
family).
** '''Chairman of the Commission''': There was no "ruler" of the Commission, but there was a nominated Chairman or Head of the National Commission. This was used as a substitute to the role of ''capo di tutti capi'', ''boss of bosses'', as that had the connotations of the old Mustache Pete system of one-man rule.



* '''Underboss''' - The second-in-command of a mafia family and usually becomes the boss if the official boss is unavailable (death, prison, on the lam, etc.). The underboss's power varies: some are mere figureheads, while others could be very influential, sometimes running a faction within the family or in rare cases, becoming the ''de facto'' or effective head of the family even if the official boss is free. The former types are often "knocked down" (demoted), or "whacked" (take a guess) when their patron is no longer guiding their fortunes or if they fall out of favor with the boss. Will collect tribute from most of the family's captains (some, known as "king's men" have the honor of handing theirs directly to the boss), taking a hefty cut before passing it up, and may be in charge of larger rackets requiring citywide coordination (for example, sports betting, which requires bookies across an urban area to hedge each other's bets to collect profit with minimum risk). It should be noted that ''Capobastone'' is used mainly within the 'Ndrangheta, though.
* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when bosses are free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this since the 1970s and have been [[BaitAndSwitchBoss playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement]] using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy bosses" (usually high-ranking capos) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the ''[[TheAllegedBoss de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss in]] ''[[TheManBehindTheMan all but name]]'', especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a low profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.).

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* '''Underboss''' - [[TheDragon The second-in-command second-in-command]] of a mafia family and [[DragonAscendant usually becomes the boss if the official boss is unavailable (death, prison, on the lam, etc.). ]] The underboss's power varies: varies by family: some are mere figureheads, while others could be very influential, sometimes running a faction within the family or in rare cases, becoming the ''de facto'' or effective head of the family even if the official boss is free. The former types are often "knocked down" (demoted), or "whacked" (take a guess) when their patron is no longer guiding their fortunes or if they fall out of favor with the boss. Will collect tribute from most of the family's captains (some, known as "king's men" men", have the honor of handing theirs directly to the boss), taking a hefty cut before passing it up, and may be in charge of larger rackets requiring citywide coordination (for example, sports betting, which requires bookies across an urban area to hedge each other's bets to collect profit with minimum risk). It should be noted that ''Capobastone'' is used mainly within the 'Ndrangheta, though.
* '''Acting Boss/Street Boss''' - A rank unique to the American Mafia, appearing in response to the increase in the number of racketeering convictions since the 1980's, rendering most "official" bosses and underbosses no longer at liberty to control the day-to-day operations of their families. This responsibility usually ends up being delegated to a capo (who still operates his own crew in the meantime), who can send a "messenger" to receive orders from the boss and pass along tribute. Even when bosses are free, this structure is at times maintained as a facade to prevent law enforcement from determining where exactly orders are coming from - the Genovese family is a notable user of this since the 1970s and have been [[BaitAndSwitchBoss playing bait-and-switch with law enforcement]] using this tactic, as they would oftentimes prop up "dummy bosses" "dummy" bosses (usually high-ranking capos) while the official boss remains hidden from law enforcement scrutiny. May sometimes in fact be the ''[[TheAllegedBoss de facto]]'' [[TheManBehindTheMan boss in]] ''[[TheManBehindTheMan all but name]]'', especially if the official boss is old, ill, or kept incommunicado in prison, and if the Street Boss would rather keep a low profile. (Note: This, essentially, was the rank [[Series/TheSopranos Tony Soprano]] occupied for most of the series.).



* '''Ruling Panel''' - Another rank unique to the American Mafia, this also appeared in response to greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s, as most of the "official" bosses faced long prison sentences. The boss sometimes delegates a panel/ruling committee of high-ranking capos (who still operate their own crews at the same time) to run the day-to-day operations of the family while the boss retains ultimate control of the family from behind bars, and usually relays his orders to the family via a "messenger", who could then send orders down the chain of command to avoid suspicion. The families can also use these ''ruling panels'' to shield the higher-ups to fool law enforcement as to [[TheManBehindTheMan where the orders are actually coming from]] (this tactic is used by the Genovese family since the 1970s to hide the real boss).
* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The adviser/right hand man, only third (or fourth counting the Godfather) is that the adviser keeps the legal face of the family and sometimes acts as the family lawyer. In theory, he is the only one allowed to argue with the Boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families use the position for an experienced member who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was banished to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the consigliere. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.
* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing where the orders are actually coming from]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.

to:

* '''Ruling Panel''' - Another rank unique to the American Mafia, this also appeared in response to greater law enforcement scrutiny in the 1980s, as most of the "official" bosses faced long prison sentences. The boss sometimes delegates a panel/ruling committee of high-ranking capos (who still operate their own crews at the same time) to run the day-to-day operations of the family while the boss retains ultimate control of the family from behind bars, and usually relays his orders to the family via a "messenger", who could then send orders down the chain of command to avoid suspicion. The families can also use these ''ruling panels'' as a way to prevent law enforcement from knowing who's [[TheManBehindTheMan pulling the strings from behind the scenes]], and to shield the higher-ups to fool from law enforcement as to [[TheManBehindTheMan where the orders are actually coming from]] (this tactic is used by the Genovese family since the 1970s to hide the real boss).
scrutiny.
* '''[[TheConsigliere Consigliere]]''' - The adviser/right hand adviser/right-hand man, only third (or fourth counting the Godfather) is that the adviser keeps the legal face of the family and sometimes acts as the family lawyer. In theory, he is the only one allowed to argue with the Boss, when he thinks what the boss is doing could destroy the family. Most "consigliere" types in media (such as [[TropeMaker Tom Hagen]]) are actually based on Mob ''lawyers''. Though the Commission specified a counselor in each family to act as their eyes and ears, most RealLife mob bosses treated it as a lower-level position. Many families use the position for an experienced member who knows the ins and outs of the family's power, but does not wish to rise to the boss or underboss position for whatever reason. Chicago would be a subversion, with the "consigliere" being a sort of "boss emeritus" aka capo consigliere (mobsters Tony Accardo and Paul Ricca held this title, and exercised [[TheManBehindTheMan behind-the-scenes control]] of the Chicago Outfit for nearly 50 years while letting lower-level capos such as Sam Giancana or Joey "Doves" Aiuppa hold the title of boss). Nicodemo Scarfo was another subversion, as he became the boss of the Philly Mob when the previous boss, Phil Testa, was assassinated while the underboss, Peter Casella, was banished to Florida. At the time of Phil Testa's death, Scarfo was the consigliere. A consigliere generally has one soldier underneath him as an aide-de-camp and source of additional income; the lack of attachment to a crew supposedly makes him more "impartial" and obviously makes him less powerful.
* '''Capodecina/Caporegime''' - Also known as a captain, skipper, ''capo'', or "crew chief," the ''capo'' may oversee a ''borgata'' or crew of soldiers as he can efficiently control in a certain territory or racket assigned to him. Grants permission for all criminal activities in his crew (unauthorized activities may run afoul of another crew or another family's rackets), collects a share of every score, and passes a fixed sum on to the higher-ups of the family. Capos are, in effect, the family's "middle management." Their control over the family's earners and shooters gives them a great deal of power, and they are often the kingmakers if the boss position becomes vacant (if the official boss dies, retires or is incapacitated). The latter title is unique to the Italian-American Mafia. Sometimes, if a capo is in good graces with the boss (especially if they're a good earner and is respected by the other wiseguys), then the official boss may promote the capo to street or acting boss (while running their own crew), especially if the boss is imprisoned, ill, semi-retired, wants to lay low or [[TheManBehindTheMan as a facade to prevent law enforcement from knowing where the orders are who's actually coming from]].in charge]]. On occasions, a capo may be placed in charge of a faction that a family has significant interests in; for example, the Genovese family, which has four crews in its New Jersey faction, appoints one of the capos to supervise it. Another example was John Gotti, who was the ''de facto'' head of the Gambino family's blue-collar crews prior to becoming boss.



* broken: a made man who is demoted in rank or "knocked down". Though much better than being put on the shelf, banned from dealing with LCN members or rubbed out, the wiseguy loses a lot of power when they're demoted from a very powerful underboss to a mere soldier.

to:

* broken: a made man who is demoted in rank or "knocked down". Though much better than being put on the shelf, shelved, banned from dealing with the LCN members or rubbed out, the wiseguy loses a lot of power when they're demoted from a very powerful underboss to a mere soldier.



* put on a shelf: a made man who is forced into retirement. Instead of being permanently banned from the LCN or whacked (rubbed out), the made man is no longer active and loses his power within the organization even though he is an official member.

to:

* put on a shelf/the shelf: a made man who is forced into retirement. Instead of being permanently banned from the LCN or whacked (rubbed out), the made man is no longer active and loses his power within the organization even though he is an official member.
14th Nov '16 10:23:02 AM Njein
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Before being inducted, a potential made man is required to carry out a contract killing. Traditionally this was in order to prove loyalty to the Mafia; in modern times this also serves to show that one is not an undercover cop; murders committed for personal reasons "do not count". Committing one's first contract killing is referred to as "making one's bones". Performing a contract killing to become a made man is also known as getting or earning one's "button" or becoming a so-called "button man" or hitman for the Mafia. However, earning one's "button" does not always involve killing; heavy "earners," or experienced associates who have not necessarily murdered for the Mafia but instead make significant profit for the Mafia, have in the past earned their "button," or become made men, due to their other valuable contributions beyond contract killing. Until the 1980s, one only had to be involved in a murder (such as driving the getaway car) or be a major "earner" for the family in order to fulfill the requirements. It was not until the Donnie Brasco fiasco, which revealed that undercover FBI agent Joe Pistone was on the verge of being made into the Bonanno crime family, that a rule was made that potential inductees must actually perform a killing.

to:

Before being inducted, a potential made man is required to carry out a contract killing. Traditionally this was in order to prove loyalty to the Mafia; Mafia, but in modern times this also serves to show that one is not an undercover cop; murders any murder committed for [[ItsPersonal personal reasons reasons]] "do not count". Committing one's first contract killing is referred to as "making one's your bones". Performing a contract killing to become a made man is also known as getting or earning one's "button" or becoming a so-called "button man" or hitman for the Mafia. However, earning one's "button" does not always involve killing; heavy good "earners," or experienced associates who have not necessarily murdered for the Mafia but instead make significant profit for the Mafia, are good in earning money, have in the past earned their "button," or become made men, due to their other valuable contributions beyond contract killing. Until the 1980s, one only had to be involved in a murder (such as driving the getaway car) or be a major "earner" for the family in order to fulfill the requirements. It was not until the Donnie Brasco fiasco, which revealed that undercover FBI agent Joe Pistone was on the verge of being made into the Bonanno crime family, that a rule was made that potential inductees must actually perform a killing.



Made men are the only ones who can rise through the ranks of the Mafia, from soldier to capo, consigliere, underboss, and boss. There is another obstacle - they have to be considered ''and'' approved by the Mafia Commission. In the 1920s and 1930s, the New York mafia was involved in the Castellammarese War. Mafia families would often recruit new members in large numbers; as they could not be recognized by the other families, they easily approached the rival capos and [[DeadlyEuphemism rubbed them out]]. To put a stop to this, it was required of the families to give a list of prospective members to the Commission. This list was circulated among the other families and eliminated the risk of not being recognized; it also gave the opportunity of removing any inductee which some other family had a problem with. If such an inductee were to become a made man, individual disagreements between him and any other member could easily spark turf wars.

to:

Made men are the only ones who can rise through the ranks of the Mafia, from soldier to capo, consigliere, underboss, and boss. There is another obstacle - they all potential inductees have to be considered ''and'' approved by the Mafia Commission. In the 1920s and 1930s, the New York mafia was involved in the Castellammarese War. Mafia families would often recruit new members in large numbers; as they could not be recognized by the other families, they easily approached the rival capos and [[DeadlyEuphemism rubbed them out]]. To put a stop to this, it was required of the families to give a list of prospective members to the Commission. This list was circulated among the other families and eliminated the risk of not being recognized; it also gave the opportunity of removing any inductee which some other family had a problem with. If such an inductee were to become a made man, individual disagreements between him and any other member could easily spark turf wars.
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