History UsefulNotes / TheLondonUnderground

18th May '17 1:20:07 PM Trueman001
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** The station Mornington Cresent was apparently chosen because of its erratic opening hours (which have varied between fully open, fully closed, closed Sundays, peak hours only, and exit only during peaks) and the difficulty in getting there by train -- there are two Northern Line routes between Euston and Camden Town, but Mornington Crescent is only on the Charing Cross branch, which leads to a somewhat eccentric service pattern. Bewildered fans can occassionally be found standing on the Northern Line platforms trying to figure it out.

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** The station Mornington Cresent Crescent was apparently chosen because of its erratic opening hours (which have varied between fully open, fully closed, closed Sundays, peak hours only, and exit only during peaks) and the difficulty in getting there by train -- there are two Northern Line routes between Euston and Camden Town, but Mornington Crescent is only on the Charing Cross branch, which leads to a somewhat eccentric service pattern. Bewildered fans can occassionally occasionally be found standing on the Northern Line platforms trying to figure it out.


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** If devised nowadays, the game would probably be named after Kensington Olympia, which is said to currently (May 2017) get only two Tube trains a day, except on rare occasions. This makes getting the record for visiting all stations much more difficult than before, since it requires very precise planning ''and'' a measure of luck in avoiding problems elsewhere.
18th May '17 1:08:13 PM Trueman001
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* The whole plot of the novel ''Tunnel Vision'' is a bet the main character, Andy, does with his best friend that he can ride the whole system in a day (people have tried this). Him being a '{{trainspotter}}', his internal monologue features a lot of useless trivia about the system.

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* The whole plot of the novel ''Tunnel Vision'' is a bet the main character, Andy, does with his best friend that he can ride the whole system in a day (people have tried done this). Him being a '{{trainspotter}}', his internal monologue features a lot of useless trivia about the system.
15th Mar '17 6:22:24 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* The first available metro system in ''Mini Metro'' is the London Underground.

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* The first available metro system in ''Mini Metro'' ''VideoGame/MiniMetro'' is the London Underground.
20th Feb '17 12:18:44 PM DarcyFoster
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Entire books have been written on the system, so we'll be brief here. The London Underground runs on a four-rail 630V direct current. It has 275 stations at present. Not all of the Underground is actually "underground"; much of it is (like many other subway systems) above the surface, over half in this case, with some "underground" stations in the open air (in fact some Underground trains share stations with UsefulNotes/NationalRail services). The Docklands Light Railway is a separate system -- almost entirely above the surface, run by a different company and has a different power system -- but is shown on the tube map and counted as a tube line for ticketing purposes. Many people seem to think it is just another tube line.

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Entire books have been written on the system, so we'll be brief here. The London Underground runs on a four-rail 630V direct current. It has 275 stations at present. Not all of the Underground is actually "underground"; much of it is (like many other subway systems) above the surface, over half in this case, with some "underground" stations in the open air [[note]]in an unusual example, the Underground platforms at Whitechapel are ''above'' its Overground platforms[[/note]] (in fact some Underground trains share stations with UsefulNotes/NationalRail services). The Docklands Light Railway is a separate system -- almost entirely above the surface, run by a different company and has a different power system -- but is shown on the tube map and counted as a tube line for ticketing purposes. Many people seem to think it is just another tube line.
12th Dec '16 3:14:14 PM LondonKdS
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* Music videos filmed at Underground stations include Howard Jones' "New Song" and Music/{{Aqua}}'s "Turn Back Time" (from the '' Film/SlidingDoors'' soundtrack), both filmed at Holborn station; Boris Gardiner's "I Want To Wake Up With You", filmed at Westbourne Park station; and Music/TheProdigy's "Firestarter", filmed on the Aldwych branch.

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* Music videos filmed at Underground stations include Howard Jones' "New Song" and Music/{{Aqua}}'s "Turn Back Time" (from the '' Film/SlidingDoors'' soundtrack), both filmed at Holborn station; Boris Gardiner's "I Want To Wake Up With You", filmed at Westbourne Park station; and both Everlast's "Black Jesus" and Music/TheProdigy's "Firestarter", filmed on the Aldwych branch.
22nd Nov '16 7:16:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via the Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the]] ''[[ArmyOfTheDead Veirdrdraugar]]''.

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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via the Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the]] ''[[ArmyOfTheDead Veirdrdraugar]]''.the ''Veirdrdraugar''.
10th Nov '16 7:19:58 AM 06tele
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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground became a more complex network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]

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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground became a more complex network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was became convinced that Underground users didn't care how far away their destination destinations actually was, were; only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was were which and how they connected up, but didn't bother which made no effort to represent how far away apart the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, However, the Underground now covers a much greater area than it once did, which means that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close much nearer than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 7:17:17 AM 06tele
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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become a more complex network, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]

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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become became a more complex network, network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 7:16:43 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become a more complex network, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 6:52:44 AM 06tele
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The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock, and there are now proposals for 1980s District Line trains to be rebuilt with diesel engines for rural National Rail routes[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.

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The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock, and there are now proposals for 1980s District Line trains to be rebuilt with diesel engines for rural National Rail routes[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.
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