History UsefulNotes / TheLondonUnderground

17th Mar '16 5:53:13 PM DarkPhoenix94
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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the ''Veirdrdraugar'']].

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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via the Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the ''Veirdrdraugar'']].the]] ''[[ArmyOfTheDead Veirdrdraugar]]''.


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** And in chapter 71, [[spoiler: Agent 13]] and two MI13 Agents evacuate the Prime Minister in response to a HYDRA assault via a train leaving from one of these stations and passing through a kind of portal network linking multiple underground lines, while being pursued by the Red Hood and a group of the ''Veidrdraugar.''
4th Mar '16 9:53:12 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/{{Creep}}''. The poster for this, featuring a woman's bloodied hand against the front of a Tube train, was famously banned from being displayed in the system. A semi [[{{Trainspotter}} rail-fans's]] point on the poster: It features a 1972 stock Northern Line train, withdrawn from service a number of years before ''Creep'' was made.

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* ''Film/{{Creep}}''.''Film/{{Creep 2004}}''. The poster for this, featuring a woman's bloodied hand against the front of a Tube train, was famously banned from being displayed in the system. A semi [[{{Trainspotter}} rail-fans's]] point on the poster: It features a 1972 stock Northern Line train, withdrawn from service a number of years before ''Creep'' was made.
11th Nov '15 9:52:17 AM Trueman001
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In June 2012 (just in time for the Olympics) the latest new transport medium was added to the [=TfL=] network, the [[https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/emirates-air-line/ Emirates Air Line]] (spelled "Air Line" to distinguish it from the Emirates Airline which sponsors it). This isn't a train (it's a cable car, but it's shown on the Underground map with all the above services. It was hyped as the first commuter cable car in Britain, but the actual use (predictably, given the poor connections with the DLR and Underground) turned out to be almost entirely by tourists, leading to criticisms about it having been paid for out of the transport budget.

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In June 2012 (just in time for the Olympics) the latest new transport medium was added to the [=TfL=] network, the [[https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/emirates-air-line/ Emirates Air Line]] (spelled "Air Line" to distinguish it from the Emirates Airline which sponsors it). This isn't a train (it's a cable car, car), but it's shown on the Underground map with all the above services. It was hyped as the first commuter cable car in Britain, but the actual use (predictably, given the poor connections with the DLR and Underground) turned out to be almost entirely by tourists, leading to criticisms about it having been paid for out of the transport budget.
3rd Nov '15 2:21:47 PM MRAustin
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* As noted in the Live Action TV section, a great deal of Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/{{Neverwhere}}'' is set in these tunnels and other service and sewer tunnels of London.

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* As noted in the Live Action TV section, a great deal of Creator/NeilGaiman's ''Literature/{{Neverwhere}}'' is set in these tunnels and other service and sewer tunnels of London.London, and the fantastical spaces that take their name from (or somehow inspired the name of) stations on the tube network - hence, there really is an Earl who who holds court at Earl's Court, there really are Seven Sisters, there really is an order of Black Friars at Blackfriars, and there really are Shepherds at Shepherd's Bush - but ''pray you never meet them''.
14th Oct '15 3:27:27 AM LondonKdS
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In November 2007, Transport for London[[note]]They used to italicise the "''for''"[[/note]] (the company that runs the network, nearly all of the buses and the tram system in Croydon) acquired some National Rail lines, which became "London Overground" (one of these, the Gospel Oak to Barking line, is actually non-electrified and much of the rest is dual voltage). [=TfL=] also runs a tram system in the Croydon area, as well as a riverboat service.

In June 2012 (just in time for the Olympics) was opened the latest addition to the [=TfL=] network, the [[https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/emirates-air-line/ Emirates Air Line]] (spelled "Air Line" to distinguish it from the Emirates Airline which sponsors it). This isn't a train (it's a cable car, the first commuter cable car in Britain), but it's shown on the Underground map with all the above services.

to:

In November 2007, Transport for London[[note]]They used to italicise the "''for''"[[/note]] (the company that runs the network, nearly all of the buses and the tram system in Croydon) acquired some National Rail lines, which became "London Overground" (one of these, the Gospel Oak to Barking line, is actually non-electrified and much of the rest is dual voltage). In 2015 this was expanded to cover various lines in North-East London departing from Liverpool Street main line station. [=TfL=] also runs a tram system in the Croydon area, as well as a riverboat service.

In June 2012 (just in time for the Olympics) was opened the latest addition new transport medium was added to the [=TfL=] network, the [[https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/emirates-air-line/ Emirates Air Line]] (spelled "Air Line" to distinguish it from the Emirates Airline which sponsors it). This isn't a train (it's a cable car, the first commuter cable car in Britain), but it's shown on the Underground map with all the above services.
services. It was hyped as the first commuter cable car in Britain, but the actual use (predictably, given the poor connections with the DLR and Underground) turned out to be almost entirely by tourists, leading to criticisms about it having been paid for out of the transport budget.



Most deep-level stations have escalators (the one at Angel is the longest in Western Europe), but obviously at stations five metres below ground level they're just not worth it. The tendency of the early tube operators to switch from lifts (elevators) to escalators when they became available means a large part of the network is inaccessible to wheelchair users -- although sometimes there are stations which would be completely accessible if it weren't for a few steps between the bottom lift level and the platforms. To avoid pointed stares and quiet mutterings do not stand on or put any luggage on the left hand side of the escaltor (this side is for people walking up the escaltor in a hurry) or stand still at the top/bottom of the escalator. People using the tube are often in a hurry and these faux pas are notorious as tourist behaviour.

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Most deep-level stations have escalators (the one at Angel is the longest in Western Europe), but obviously at stations five metres below ground level they're just not worth it. The tendency of the early tube operators to switch from lifts (elevators) to escalators when they became available means a large part of the network is inaccessible to wheelchair users -- although sometimes there are stations which would be completely accessible if it weren't for a few steps between the bottom lift level and the platforms. To avoid pointed stares and quiet mutterings do not stand on or put any luggage on the left hand side of the escaltor escalator (this side is for people walking up the escaltor escalator in a hurry) or stand still at the top/bottom of the escalator. People using the tube are often in a hurry and these faux pas are notorious as tourist behaviour.



There are two different sizes of trains (although the gauge is the same), depending on how the original line was constructed. with larger trains being used for the subsurface lines, which use cut-and-cover construction in tunnels, and tube-shaped trains for the deep-level lines bored far underground. And each line has different trains to suit the subtleties of each set of tracks (although the sub-surface lines are due to have a standardised set soon).

to:

There are two different sizes of trains (although the gauge is the same), depending on how the original line was constructed. with larger trains being used for the subsurface lines, which use cut-and-cover construction in tunnels, and tube-shaped trains for the deep-level lines bored far underground. And each line has different trains to suit the subtleties of each set of tracks (although the 2010s saw the construction of a new fleet of trains to serve all the sub-surface lines are due to have a standardised set soon).
lines, with only internal seat layout differences).



The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.

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The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock[[/note]] stock, and there are now proposals for 1980s District Line trains to be rebuilt with diesel engines for rural National Rail routes[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.
20th Aug '15 7:34:44 AM Trueman001
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Added DiffLines:

In June 2012 (just in time for the Olympics) was opened the latest addition to the [=TfL=] network, the [[https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/emirates-air-line/ Emirates Air Line]] (spelled "Air Line" to distinguish it from the Emirates Airline which sponsors it). This isn't a train (it's a cable car, the first commuter cable car in Britain), but it's shown on the Underground map with all the above services.
8th Aug '15 2:06:35 PM john_e
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Added DiffLines:

* [[http://www.nomic.net/deadgames/mornington/dunx/ Mornington Nomic]] is an attempt to construct an actual, playable version of "Mornington Crescent".
4th Aug '15 6:06:14 PM phoenix
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!!London Underground sub-tropes:
* ColorCodedForYourConvenience: Like most subway systems, each line has a designated colour used both on the map and on the signs that appear at stations. Some of the trains (but not all) also have their handhold poles painted in the correct colour for the line.
** Bakerloo: Brown
** Central: Red
** Circle: Yellow
** District: Green
** Hammersmith & City: Pink
** Jubilee: Silver (Often mistaken for grey. The line was built to mark the queen's silver jubilee.)
** Metropolitian: Purple
** Northern: Black
** Piccadilly: Dark blue
** Victoria: Light blue
** Waterloo & City: Turquoise
* DummiedOut: Various parts of the system have or had provision for future expansion that (for one reason or another) never took place.
** South Kensington had an extra platform for a proposed deep-level line running below the District line
** Aldwych had two extra lift shafts that were never used.
** City Thameslink[[note]] Originally called St. Paul's Thameslink; the name was changed to avoid confusion with St. Paul's Underground station several hundred yards away[[/note]] doesn't have an Underground station, but it does have a corridor leading to where one would have been if the Jubilee Line had followed its original planned route.
** When Tottenham Court Road was expanded for the Crossrail project, the [[http://www.flickr.com/photos/ianvisits/8923251213/ new passages]] included stubs for the Crossrail 2 platforms if/when they get built.
* [[HeyitsthatVoice Hey, it’s that voice!]]: Tim Bentinck (who plays David Archer in TheArchers ) is the voice on the Piccadilly Line saying “Mind the gap❕”
* SinisterSubway: There is a considerable amount of abandoned or disused infrastructure in the system. [[http://underground-history.co.uk/front.php Underground History]] has details on the vast majority of it.
** Inner-city highlights include:
*** The former Piccadilly line station at Down Street
*** The Jubilee line between Charing Cross and Green Park that was shut when the extension was opened
*** The Piccadilly line's Aldwych branch
*** The original King William Street station and tunnels of the City & South London Railway (the rest of which is now part of the Northern line)
** Further out of town:
*** Disused Metropolitan Railway stations in Buckinghamshire -- particularly Verney Junction, which is (barely) still in place but hardly sees any traffic. [[note]]One train per day, at around 2am, stops a few miles short for the engine to run-round the train.[[/note]]
*** The Northern Heights extensions that didn't happen, including some unfinished brick viaducts. for more information on these, see [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jjuD288JlCs Unfinished London]]
** Until quite recently, when its comically Victorian rolling stock was replaced, the Northern Line was noted for its darkness and gloom. Not for nothing was the subway attack in ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'' set in a Northern Line station.
* SubwaysSuck: The tube is actually an extremely good way to get around London. However, it is often noisy, crowded, hot and smelly, and problems occur relatively frequently (normally a signal failure). The old-fashioned architecture doesn't help, because as beautiful as it is, it makes the stations feel ancient, not to mention that it's frequently very compact, making stations easily crowded and harder to ventilate.
* One Under: The term used when someone goes under a train (fatally or not), be it as a result of attempted or actual suicide, murder or accident. Has turned up in fiction at least twice (as in ''Series/StateOfPlay''). Many drivers who are involved in a "One Under" don't drive a train again. Not exclusive to this system, of course. Many stations have areas under the tracks to stop people doing that sort of thing, known as "suicide pits". These incidents are prevented at the underground stations on the 1999 extension of the Jubilee Line, since they were built with platform screen doors.


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!!Tropes as portrayed in fiction:

* SinisterSubway: There is a considerable amount of abandoned or disused infrastructure in the system. [[http://underground-history.co.uk/front.php Underground History]] has details on the vast majority of it. Until quite recently, when its comically Victorian rolling stock was replaced, the Northern Line was noted for its darkness and gloom. Not for nothing was the subway attack in ''Film/AnAmericanWerewolfInLondon'' set in a Northern Line station.
* One Under: The term used when someone goes under a train (fatally or not), be it as a result of attempted or actual suicide, murder or accident. Has turned up in fiction at least twice (as in ''Series/StateOfPlay''). Many drivers who are involved in a "One Under" don't drive a train again. Not exclusive to this system, of course. Many stations have areas under the tracks to stop people doing that sort of thing, known as "suicide pits". These incidents are prevented at the underground stations on the 1999 extension of the Jubilee Line, since they were built with platform screen doors.

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3rd Aug '15 3:38:31 PM DaibhidC
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* The non-fiction book ''Literature/NotesFromASmallIsland'' by Creator/BillBryson suggests a fun game to play with someone who's unfamiliar with London. You challenge them to see who can get from Bank to Mansion House the quicker. They will consult the map (which, it must be remembered, favours clearly showing connections over conveying distance), take the Central Line to Liverpool Street, and then change to the Circle line to get to Mansion House. You, meanwhile, have left the station and walked a little way down Queen Victoria Street. There are several other points where this works.
17th Jul '15 9:20:48 AM morane
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The city's considerable age has led to several stations having wonderfully evocative names, including East India, Seven Sisters, Elephant & Castle, Tooting Bec, White City and the unintentionally hilarious Cockfosters.[[note]]Though it's worth mentioning most of these stations are named after the places they are based in -- the area names came before their respective stations.[[/note]] Try not to coo too much, though, because it will make your position as a tourist even more obvious. In fact, the best way to act on the Tube is to nonchalantly read a book (or the free papers that end up littering the cars), or else [[ZombieApocalypse stare straight ahead with dead eyes]].[[note]]This is an interesting bit of human behaviour relating to personal space, very closely related to the UncomfortableElevatorMoment -- but much longer, and going sideways. Normally, people -- or at least Brits -- would keep a bit more distance from each other, but that's just not practical in the pack cylinder shaped cars of the tube lines, so instead they retreat into the mind and ignore it.[[/note]] This tendency by London Tubegoers is often referenced in the rest of the country, with [[OopNorth Northerners]] claiming that they can (and do) easily find each other on a given Tube train due to being the only people who act as if there are other human beings present.

to:

The city's considerable age has led to several stations having wonderfully evocative names, including East India, Seven Sisters, Elephant & Castle, Tooting Bec, White City and the unintentionally hilarious Cockfosters.[[note]]Though it's worth mentioning most of these stations are named after the places they are based in -- the area names came before their respective stations.[[/note]] The name Cockfosters has been recorded as far back as 1524, and is thought to be either the name of a family, or that of a house which stood on Enfield Chase. One suggestion is that it was "the residence of the cock forester (or chief forester)"[[/note]] Try not to coo too much, though, because it will make your position as a tourist even more obvious. In fact, the best way to act on the Tube is to nonchalantly read a book (or the free papers that end up littering the cars), or else [[ZombieApocalypse stare straight ahead with dead eyes]].[[note]]This is an interesting bit of human behaviour relating to personal space, very closely related to the UncomfortableElevatorMoment -- but much longer, and going sideways. Normally, people -- or at least Brits -- would keep a bit more distance from each other, but that's just not practical in the pack cylinder shaped cars of the tube lines, so instead they retreat into the mind and ignore it.[[/note]] This tendency by London Tubegoers is often referenced in the rest of the country, with [[OopNorth Northerners]] claiming that they can (and do) easily find each other on a given Tube train due to being the only people who act as if there are other human beings present.
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