History UsefulNotes / TheLondonUnderground

20th Feb '17 12:18:44 PM DarcyFoster
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Entire books have been written on the system, so we'll be brief here. The London Underground runs on a four-rail 630V direct current. It has 275 stations at present. Not all of the Underground is actually "underground"; much of it is (like many other subway systems) above the surface, over half in this case, with some "underground" stations in the open air (in fact some Underground trains share stations with UsefulNotes/NationalRail services). The Docklands Light Railway is a separate system -- almost entirely above the surface, run by a different company and has a different power system -- but is shown on the tube map and counted as a tube line for ticketing purposes. Many people seem to think it is just another tube line.

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Entire books have been written on the system, so we'll be brief here. The London Underground runs on a four-rail 630V direct current. It has 275 stations at present. Not all of the Underground is actually "underground"; much of it is (like many other subway systems) above the surface, over half in this case, with some "underground" stations in the open air [[note]]in an unusual example, the Underground platforms at Whitechapel are ''above'' its Overground platforms[[/note]] (in fact some Underground trains share stations with UsefulNotes/NationalRail services). The Docklands Light Railway is a separate system -- almost entirely above the surface, run by a different company and has a different power system -- but is shown on the tube map and counted as a tube line for ticketing purposes. Many people seem to think it is just another tube line.
12th Dec '16 3:14:14 PM LondonKdS
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* Music videos filmed at Underground stations include Howard Jones' "New Song" and Music/{{Aqua}}'s "Turn Back Time" (from the '' Film/SlidingDoors'' soundtrack), both filmed at Holborn station; Boris Gardiner's "I Want To Wake Up With You", filmed at Westbourne Park station; and Music/TheProdigy's "Firestarter", filmed on the Aldwych branch.

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* Music videos filmed at Underground stations include Howard Jones' "New Song" and Music/{{Aqua}}'s "Turn Back Time" (from the '' Film/SlidingDoors'' soundtrack), both filmed at Holborn station; Boris Gardiner's "I Want To Wake Up With You", filmed at Westbourne Park station; and both Everlast's "Black Jesus" and Music/TheProdigy's "Firestarter", filmed on the Aldwych branch.
22nd Nov '16 7:16:49 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via the Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the]] ''[[ArmyOfTheDead Veirdrdraugar]]''.

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* In ''Fanfic/ChildOfTheStorm'', Loki, Sif and the Warriors Three go down into the Tube system via the Victoria Station during Operation Overlord (the name was intentional) to hunt [[ArmyOfTheDead the]] ''[[ArmyOfTheDead Veirdrdraugar]]''.the ''Veirdrdraugar''.
10th Nov '16 7:19:58 AM 06tele
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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground became a more complex network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]

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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground became a more complex network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was became convinced that Underground users didn't care how far away their destination destinations actually was, were; only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was were which and how they connected up, but didn't bother which made no effort to represent how far away apart the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, However, the Underground now covers a much greater area than it once did, which means that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close much nearer than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 7:17:17 AM 06tele
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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become a more complex network, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]

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One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become became a more complex network, network of lines, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 7:16:43 AM 06tele
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Added DiffLines:

One of the most striking things about the Underground is its iconic map, which more closely resembles an electrical wiring diagram than a conventional map. Early Underground maps superimposed the stations onto maps of London itself, but as the Underground become a more complex network, it became very difficult to tell from a regular map what changes you had to make in order to get to where you wanted to go. In 1931, technical draughtsman Harry Beck was convinced that Underground users didn't care far away their destination actually was, only how to get there. He was inspired by wiring diagrams to design a map that clearly represented which lines was which and how they connected up, but didn't bother to represent how far away the stations were in real life. He straightened the curves and made stations a uniform distance apart from each other, and the result is a design classic which has been copied so widely that we [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny forget how ground-breaking it was]]. It does mean, however, that the current map can mislead users into thinking that their destination is close than it actually is.[[note]]For example, on the Tube map, the distance from Watford station to Marylebone station is roughly the same as the distance from Marylebone station to Tower Hill station. In real life, Marylebone and Tower Hill are about four miles from each other (a Tube journey of about 23 minutes, given that there are a lot of stations in between) but Marylebone and Watford are about 16 miles apart (around 50 minutes.)[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 6:52:44 AM 06tele
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The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock, and there are now proposals for 1980s District Line trains to be rebuilt with diesel engines for rural National Rail routes[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.

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The gauge is the same as main line trains,[[note]]Meaning that with some modification, ageing Underground trains can be and are repurposed for surface work; the Island Line on the Isle of Wight famously uses old deep-level tube stock, and there are now proposals for 1980s District Line trains to be rebuilt with diesel engines for rural National Rail routes[[/note]] and there are some sections of track where the underground shares tracks with other trains. The Crossrail network, currently being built beneath central London (linking two existing National Rail lines), is ''not'' part of the Underground, although inevitably it will share stations with it.
23rd Oct '16 10:17:53 AM nombretomado
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** The Tube has banned quite a few ads from the network over the years, mostly for being too raunchy, though recent ads such as an admirably blunt one for Vegas, 'come to the place where [[BritishAccents your accent]] is an aphrodisiac', suggest that this policy is being relaxed (or it is generally assumed that children won't understand what the word 'aphrodisiac' means).

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** The Tube has banned quite a few ads from the network over the years, mostly for being too raunchy, though recent ads such as an admirably blunt one for Vegas, 'come to the place where [[BritishAccents [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents your accent]] is an aphrodisiac', suggest that this policy is being relaxed (or it is generally assumed that children won't understand what the word 'aphrodisiac' means).
20th Oct '16 11:25:48 AM AgProv
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The city's considerable age has led to several stations having wonderfully evocative names, including East India, Seven Sisters, Elephant & Castle, Tooting Bec, White City and the unintentionally hilarious Cockfosters.[[note]]Though it's worth mentioning most of these stations are named after the places they are based in -- the area names came before their respective stations. The name Cockfosters has been recorded as far back as 1524, and is thought to be either the name of a family, or that of a house which stood on Enfield Chase. One suggestion is that it was "the residence of the cock forester (or chief forester)"[[/note]] Try not to coo too much, though, because it will make your position as a tourist even more obvious. In fact, the best way to act on the Tube is to nonchalantly read a book (or the free papers that end up littering the cars), or else [[ZombieApocalypse stare straight ahead with dead eyes]].[[note]]This is an interesting bit of human behaviour relating to personal space, very closely related to the UncomfortableElevatorMoment -- but much longer, and going sideways. Normally, people -- or at least Brits -- would keep a bit more distance from each other, but that's just not practical in the pack cylinder shaped cars of the tube lines, so instead they retreat into the mind and ignore it.[[/note]] This tendency by London Tubegoers is often referenced in the rest of the country, with [[OopNorth Northerners]] claiming that they can (and do) easily find each other on a given Tube train due to being the only people who act as if there are other human beings present.

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The city's considerable age has led to several stations having wonderfully evocative names, including East India, Seven Sisters, Elephant & Castle, Tooting Bec, White City and the unintentionally hilarious Cockfosters.[[note]]Though it's worth mentioning most of these stations are named after the places they are based in -- the area names came before their respective stations. The name Cockfosters has been recorded as far back as 1524, and is thought to be either the name of a family, or that of a house which stood on Enfield Chase. One suggestion is that it was "the residence of the cock forester (or chief forester)"[[/note]] Try not to coo too much, though, because it will make your position as a tourist even more obvious. In fact, the best way to act on the Tube is to nonchalantly read a book (or the free papers that end up littering the cars), or else [[ZombieApocalypse stare straight ahead with dead eyes]].[[note]]This is an interesting bit of human behaviour relating to personal space, very closely related to the UncomfortableElevatorMoment -- but much longer, and going sideways. Normally, people -- or at least Brits -- would keep a bit more distance from each other, but that's just not practical in the pack cylinder shaped cars of the tube lines, so instead they retreat into the mind and ignore it.[[/note]] This tendency by London Tubegoers is often referenced in the rest of the country, with [[OopNorth Northerners]] claiming that they can (and do) easily find each other on a given Tube train due to being the only people who act as if there are other human beings present.
present. [[note]]The unique arrangement whereby tube carriages have long bank seats where people are forced to directly face each other across the aisle has often been remarked upon by non-Londoners, used to seats being at right-angles to the direction of travel and therefore meaning you can safely look at the back of the seat in front, or the ''back'' of somebody else's head. Outsiders have been heard to loudly query this quirk of design, which is held to be just asking for trouble. Or at the very least, psychological disturbance.[[/note]]
12th Aug '16 6:40:33 AM DarkPhoenix94
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The network is divided into nine fare zones, and two ancillary sections for Watford Junction and Essex/Kent (formerly six with four ancillary sections, one for Hertfordshire and three for Buckinghamshire), dubbed the Travelcard Zones, because of the ticket type that allows the unlimited use of the whole network and most of the National Rail network in the area for its validity period (a day to a year), except the river boats where you just get a discount. The integrated ticket was introduced by the GLC in 1981 as part of a general price cut. The cut was ruled illegal, but the ticket stayed. Zone 1 is Central London and you will see estate agents (realtors) use "Zone 1" to advertise properties. In recent years the prepaid, scannable "Oyster card" has become very popular among regular Tube users, allowing you to travel without buying a ticket and giving a good discount into the bargain.

The most famous quote associated with the system is the above-mentioned "Mind the gap", used on stations with curved platforms (albeit with a lot of stations using BoringButPractical variations on the phrase). Based on the experiences of our British Tropers, this is probably [[TheKlutz advice]] [[SlipperySkid worth]] [[DynamicEntry listening to.]]

to:

The network is divided into nine fare zones, and two ancillary sections for Watford Junction and Essex/Kent (formerly six with four ancillary sections, one for Hertfordshire and three for Buckinghamshire), dubbed the Travelcard Zones, because of the ticket type that allows the unlimited use of the whole network and most of the National Rail network in the area for its validity period (a day to a year), except the river boats where you just get a discount. The integrated ticket was introduced by the GLC in 1981 as part of a general price cut. The cut was ruled illegal, but the ticket stayed. Zone 1 is Central London and you will see estate agents (realtors) use "Zone 1" to advertise properties. In recent years the prepaid, scannable "Oyster card" has become very popular among regular Tube users, allowing you to travel without buying a ticket and giving a good discount into the bargain.

bargain. More recently, the system has been made compatible with contactless debit and credit cards, smoothing things even further.

The most famous quote associated with the system is the above-mentioned "Mind the gap", used on stations with curved platforms (albeit with a lot of stations using BoringButPractical variations on the phrase).phrase - though some have announcers that liven things up a little). Based on the experiences of our British Tropers, this is probably [[TheKlutz advice]] [[SlipperySkid worth]] [[DynamicEntry listening to.]]



** About twenty chapters later, it's revealed that [[ComicBook/CaptainBritainAndMI13 [=MI13=]]] under Peter Wisdom's command have taken up residence in some of the old, disused tube stations, using them as a new HQ following the destruction of their previous one.
** And in chapter 71, [[spoiler: Agent 13]] and two MI13 Agents evacuate the Prime Minister in response to a HYDRA assault via a train leaving from one of these stations and passing through a kind of portal network linking multiple underground lines, while being pursued by the Red Hood and a group of the ''Veidrdraugar.''

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** About twenty chapters later, it's revealed that [[ComicBook/CaptainBritainAndMI13 [=MI13=]]] under Peter Wisdom's command have taken up residence in some of the old, disused tube stations, using them as a new and [[SinisterSubway somewhat creepy]] HQ following the destruction of their previous one.
** And in chapter 71, [[spoiler: Agent 13]] and two MI13 [=MI13=] Agents evacuate the Prime Minister in response to a HYDRA assault via a train leaving from one of these stations and passing through a kind of portal network linking multiple underground lines, while being pursued by the Red Hood and a group of the ''Veidrdraugar.''



** The Tube has banned quite a few ads from the network over the years, mostly for being too raunchy.

to:

** The Tube has banned quite a few ads from the network over the years, mostly for being too raunchy.raunchy, though recent ads such as an admirably blunt one for Vegas, 'come to the place where [[BritishAccents your accent]] is an aphrodisiac', suggest that this policy is being relaxed (or it is generally assumed that children won't understand what the word 'aphrodisiac' means).


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* ''Film/ThorTheDarkWorld'' has most of its Earth sequences set in London and during the final battle in Greenwich, Thor is unexpectedly teleported to the Underground and has to take the Tube back to the battle.
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