History UsefulNotes / TheLawsAndCustomsOfWar

10th Apr '16 7:26:45 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted for this campaign anyway (instead, they wrote an [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-dzCt2xeSo infuriatingly catchy song about it]]), but if he were magically resurrected and placed on trial before a fair tribunal, it would even today be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted for this campaign anyway (instead, they wrote an [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-dzCt2xeSo infuriatingly catchy song about it]]), but if he were magically resurrected and placed on trial before a fair tribunal, it he would doubtless be acquitted, as his acts would even today be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.
10th Apr '16 7:24:18 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted anyway, but if he were magically resurrected and placed on trial before a fair tribunal, his campaign would even today be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted anyway, for this campaign anyway (instead, they wrote an [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O-dzCt2xeSo infuriatingly catchy song about it]]), but if he were magically resurrected and placed on trial before a fair tribunal, his campaign it would even today be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.
10th Apr '16 7:21:28 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted anyway, but even today his campaign would be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted anyway, but even today if he were magically resurrected and placed on trial before a fair tribunal, his campaign would even today be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.
10th Apr '16 7:19:55 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed.

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the food was eaten, the slaves were set free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed. \n Sherman's side won, so he would never have been prosecuted anyway, but even today his campaign would be considered horrifically cruel but not illegal.
10th Apr '16 7:17:56 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff and cotton was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, private homes, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff and cotton was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).free, and the rest was either burned or reduced to rubble) while relatively few civilians were actually killed.
10th Apr '16 7:15:52 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff and cotton was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea that wrecked Georgia in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff and cotton was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).
10th Apr '16 7:14:22 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, manufactured goods, cotton, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff and cotton was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).
10th Apr '16 7:11:35 PM karstovich2
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. [[JustFollowingOrders Obeying orders in doing so]] doesn't make it not a war crime. One example of this is [[http://users.clas.ufl.edu/ggiles/barbaros.html the German Military (Wehrmacht)'s]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_crimes_of_the_Wehrmacht#Barbarossa_Decree 13/5/1941 'Barbarossa Decree']]. Section I.4 mandated that:

to:

[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. This is subject to some fine distinctions, however; if civilians are in or near a legitimate military target, it is not generally considered a war crime to destroy the target in the absence of other options. This is how it was not considered a war crime for the various belligerents during World War II to go around bombing each others' factories--the factories were generally producing either war materiel or other items necessary or useful to the war effort, and thus the fact that the workers were civilians was considered less important than the military character of the goods they produced. Moreover, the rule against killing or wounding civilians does not extend to seizing or destroying their property; examples from the 20th century wars are innumerable, but probably the best example of this in history was Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman's March to the Sea in September-December 1864 (and later campaigns in the Carolinas in early 1865) during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar (a war fought largely in accordance with the modern rules of war), in which vast quantities of civilian property (including railroad infrastructure, manufacturing facilities, and especially food and slaves) were seized and destroyed (the industrial stuff was burned and broken, the food was eaten, and the slaves were set free).

[[JustFollowingOrders Obeying Again, obeying orders in doing so]] killing civililans]] doesn't make it not a war crime. One example of this what ''not'' to do is [[http://users.clas.ufl.edu/ggiles/barbaros.html the German Military (Wehrmacht)'s]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_crimes_of_the_Wehrmacht#Barbarossa_Decree 13/5/1941 'Barbarossa Decree']]. Section I.4 mandated that:
10th Apr '16 6:54:31 PM karstovich2
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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. That means, for example, a computer programmer or network technician setting up a military network is a legitimate military target, but a programmer or tech setting up a computer network for a news bureau, even though they are filming in a war zone, is not. This is why anyone who works in a combat or combat logistics position wears a uniform while on duty ''even if they are not in a combat area'', so that combatants and civilians are clearly distinguished. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.

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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. That means, for example, a computer programmer or network technician setting up a military network is a legitimate military target, but a programmer or tech setting up a computer network for a news bureau, even though they are filming in a war zone, is not. This is why anyone who works in a combat or combat logistics position wears a uniform while on duty ''even if they are not in a combat area'', so that combatants and civilians are clearly distinguished. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) ("outside the fight," i.e. incapable of fighting) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.
3rd Feb '16 7:13:29 AM Dingbot
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A quick way to show that a killer is really a bad guy is to have their bullets having a cross cut into the tip. This will cause the bullet to expand when it enters the body, causing far more damage. Since hollow points are permitted in most non-military applications and are more reliable ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FMJ jacked]] dum-dums have a disturbing tendency to leave the jacket in the barrel of the gun, nevermind the fact that they don't expand that reliably) dum-dums are usually used to show how bad someone is. Or that setting pre-dates the invention of hollow points. Named after an arms factory in India, by the way.

to:

A quick way to show that a killer is really a bad guy is to have their bullets having a cross cut into the tip. This will cause the bullet to expand when it enters the body, causing far more damage. Since hollow points are permitted in most non-military applications and are more reliable ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FMJ jacked]] jacketed]] dum-dums have a disturbing tendency to leave the jacket in the barrel of the gun, nevermind the fact that they don't expand that reliably) dum-dums are usually used to show how bad someone is. Or that setting pre-dates the invention of hollow points. Named after an arms factory in India, by the way.
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