History UsefulNotes / TheLawsAndCustomsOfWar

3rd Feb '16 7:13:29 AM Dingbot
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FMJ—full metal jacket (not the movie, this time!) "Jacked" bullets might have been treated with steroids, though, so maybe there's that!
A quick way to show that a killer is really a bad guy is to have their bullets having a cross cut into the tip. This will cause the bullet to expand when it enters the body, causing far more damage. Since hollow points are permitted in most non-military applications and are more reliable ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FMJ jacked]] dum-dums have a disturbing tendency to leave the jacket in the barrel of the gun, nevermind the fact that they don't expand that reliably) dum-dums are usually used to show how bad someone is. Or that setting pre-dates the invention of hollow points. Named after an arms factory in India, by the way.
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A quick way to show that a killer is really a bad guy is to have their bullets having a cross cut into the tip. This will cause the bullet to expand when it enters the body, causing far more damage. Since hollow points are permitted in most non-military applications and are more reliable ([[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FMJ jacked]] jacketed]] dum-dums have a disturbing tendency to leave the jacket in the barrel of the gun, nevermind the fact that they don't expand that reliably) dum-dums are usually used to show how bad someone is. Or that setting pre-dates the invention of hollow points. Named after an arms factory in India, by the way.
6th Jan '16 7:22:14 PM Tdarcos
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Added DiffLines:
* Note that the last two are only illegal if you're going to ''attack''. Doing these in order to desert or to escape the battlefield are not illegal (but your own side will, of course, shoot you - presumably after a trial, we hope - if they catch you deserting).
6th Jan '16 7:07:50 PM Tdarcos
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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. That means, for example, a computer programmer or network technician setting up a military network is a legitimate military target, but a programmer or tech setting up a computer network for a news bureau is not. This is why anyone who works in a combat or combat logistics position wears a uniform while on duty ''even if they are not in a combat area'', so that combatants and civilians are clearly distinguished. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.
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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. That means, for example, a computer programmer or network technician setting up a military network is a legitimate military target, but a programmer or tech setting up a computer network for a news bureau bureau, even though they are filming in a war zone, is not. This is why anyone who works in a combat or combat logistics position wears a uniform while on duty ''even if they are not in a combat area'', so that combatants and civilians are clearly distinguished. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.
6th Jan '16 7:06:37 PM Tdarcos
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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.
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Wounding or killing 'combatants' is not a war crime. 'Combatants' are people who fight (e.g. infantry) or directly assist those fighting (e.g. logistics personnel). [[WouldNotShootACivilian Wounding or killing anyone else, i.e. civilians, is a war crime]]. That means, for example, a computer programmer or network technician setting up a military network is a legitimate military target, but a programmer or tech setting up a computer network for a news bureau is not. This is why anyone who works in a combat or combat logistics position wears a uniform while on duty ''even if they are not in a combat area'', so that combatants and civilians are clearly distinguished. Wounding or killing combatants who have surrendered, [[SinkTheLifeBoats are leaving damaged vehicles]], or become '[[KickThemWhileTheyAreDown hors de combat]]' (wounded) all constitute war crimes. It is a war crime for a combatant to disguise themselves as a civilian with the intent to attack. A combatant disguising themselves as a civilian for reasons other than intent to attack (inc. desertion and escape) is not a war crime.
3rd Jan '16 8:38:48 PM MAI742
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It is a war crime to order soldiers to kill prisoners, and for soldiers to kill prisoners whether ordered to do so or not. An infamous example of this is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commissar_Order#History the 'Commissar Order']], issued to the German military on 6/6/1941 (later rescinded on 6/5/1942). Section 2 states:
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It is a war crime to order soldiers to kill prisoners, and for soldiers to kill prisoners whether ordered to do so or not. An infamous example of this is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commissar_Order#History the 'Commissar Order']], issued to the German military on 6/6/1941 (later rescinded (rescinded on 6/5/1942).6/5/1942 when increased Waffen-SS presence made it unnecessary for Wehrmacht personnel to continue handling these actions themselves). Section 2 states:
2nd Jan '16 4:09:31 PM Timjames98
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Deliberately wounding or killing civilians is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. [[JustFollowingOrders Obeying orders in doing so]] doesn't make it not a war crime. One example of this is [[http://users.clas.ufl.edu/ggiles/barbaros.html the German Military (Wehrmacht)'s]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_crimes_of_the_Wehrmacht#Barbarossa_Decree 13/5/1941 'Barbarossa Decree']]. Section I.4 mandated that:
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[[RapePillageandBurn Deliberately wounding or killing civilians civilians]] is a war crime, as is obeying or issuing orders to wound or kill civilians. [[JustFollowingOrders Obeying orders in doing so]] doesn't make it not a war crime. One example of this is [[http://users.clas.ufl.edu/ggiles/barbaros.html the German Military (Wehrmacht)'s]] [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_crimes_of_the_Wehrmacht#Barbarossa_Decree 13/5/1941 'Barbarossa Decree']]. Section I.4 mandated that:
13th Dec '15 6:07:17 PM MAI742
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The history of war is replete with examples where a relatively small-scale breach of the rules regarding the killing of [=POWs=] or shot-out airmen resulted in massive retaliations by the other side. To give a pair of WW2 examples: A Japanese fighter machinegunning a bailed-out [=B-17=] crew and killing eight of the thirteen at Bismarck Sea resulted in the US and Australians sinking the lifeboats and rafts of the convoy after it was destroyed, killing thousands of Japanese soldiers; during the Battle of the Bulge the murder of a group of American prisoners by the SS caused a number of American units to refuse to accept surrenders during the course of the battle, costing hundreds of German lives.
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The history of war is replete with examples where a relatively small-scale breach of the rules regarding the killing of [=POWs=] or shot-out airmen resulted in massive retaliations by the other side. To give a pair of WW2 examples: A Japanese fighter machinegunning a bailed-out [=B-17=] crew and killing eight of the thirteen at Bismarck Sea resulted in the US and Australians sinking the lifeboats and rafts of the convoy after it was destroyed, killing thousands of Japanese soldiers; during the Battle of the Bulge the murder of a group of American prisoners by the SS caused a number of American units to refuse to accept surrenders during the course of the battle, costing hundreds of German lives. lives. Worst of all, public opinion compelled the USA to prosecute the junior SS officers responsible in the postwar trials process. This gave the Soviets a 'foot in the door' when arguing for the prosecution of more senior officers responsible for War Crimes.
13th Dec '15 5:57:46 PM MAI742
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After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) of these people were convicted of War Crimes and served five years in jail before their early release for reasons of 'good behaviour' and poor health.
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After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) Ultimately a full thirteen of these people (including Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein, who had been in British custody) were convicted of War Crimes and served up to five years in jail before their early release for reasons of 'good behaviour' and poor health.
13th Dec '15 5:52:55 PM MAI742
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After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) of these people were convicted of War Crimes and served up five years in jail before their early release for reasons of 'good behaviour' and poor health.
to:
After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) of these people were convicted of War Crimes and served up five years in jail before their early release for reasons of 'good behaviour' and poor health.
13th Dec '15 5:52:35 PM MAI742
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There was a distinct difference in the interpretation of this order in 'the east' and in 'the west. In areas which might eventually be liberated by Anglo-American forces, it was often interpreted to mean 'the deportation of the male population for slave labor'. In the Eastern Empire, which overlapped with areas which might be liberated by the Soviets, it was understood as 'death for 100 civilians for every member of the military killed by partisan action." [[AnOfficerAndAGentleman More understanding local commanders would consult with local leaders and attempt to fulfill their quotas using 'inessential' members of communities]] such as Jews or Romani ([[UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust before they were deported in 1942]]), disabled or mentally ill people, gays, the elderly, or children. In that order. After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) of these people were convicted of War Crimes and served up to five years in jail.
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There was a distinct difference in the interpretation of this order in 'the east' and in 'the west.west'. In areas which might eventually be liberated by Anglo-American forces, it was often interpreted to mean 'the deportation of the male population for slave labor'. In the Eastern Empire, which overlapped with areas which might be liberated by the Soviets, it was understood as 'death for 100 civilians for every member of the military killed by partisan action." [[AnOfficerAndAGentleman More understanding local commanders would consult with local leaders and attempt to fulfill their quotas using 'inessential' members of communities]] such as Jews or Romani ([[UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust before they were deported in 1942]]), disabled or mentally ill people, gays, the elderly, or children. In that order. After the war the Poles and Soviets attempted to have the German commanders in Anglo-American custody who had enforced these orders tried for war crimes. They were partially successful in that some of the actions of some figures, even a few of the ones [[UsefulNotes/WeAreNotTheWehrmacht important to the rearmament of West Germany]] including [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinz_Guderian#Later_life_and_death Heinz Guderian]], were eventually investigated by US and British commissions. Ultimately, two (Marshalls Kesselring and Manstein) of these people were convicted of War Crimes and served up to five years in jail.jail before their early release for reasons of 'good behaviour' and poor health.
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