History UsefulNotes / TheArabSpring

5th Feb '18 8:46:48 AM MeerkatMario
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In December of 2010, a young merchant immolates himself to death in protest of the thuggish policies of the Tunisian dictatorship. This soon leads to protests and, eventually, the resignation and flight of the dictator...and the beginnings of a revolutionary wave not seen since the end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. The sheer size, importance, multitude of methods, and brutality of the unrest has made it a modern real life showcase of many tropes, listed below.

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In December of 2010, a young merchant immolates himself to death in protest of the thuggish policies of the Tunisian dictatorship. This soon leads to protests and, eventually, the dictator's resignation and flight of the dictator...exile...and the beginnings of a revolutionary wave not seen since the end of the UsefulNotes/ColdWar. The sheer size, importance, multitude of methods, and brutality of the unrest has made it a modern real life showcase of many tropes, listed below.



* {{UsefulNotes/Libya}}: Tunisia's neighbor to the east did not have it as easy. Muammar al-Gaddafi, Libya's dictator, did not follow Ben Ali's example and resign, instead choosing to fight. Rebels seized the city of Benghazi and the military unsuccessfully tried to retake it. After that, all hell broke loose, launching a full-scale civil war. The US and friends led a military intervention as well, providing the rebels with air support. This has caused a lot of contention in the West. After a few months, Gaddafi was captured and killed and his regime fell apart. However, the clean-up has not been easy. The country was still wracked by civil unrest and violence as various factions tried to gain control. A nominally democratic government was set up, but in 2014 it was split again in a political squabble too complicated to handle here. One is better off looking at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libyan_Civil_War_(2014%E2%80%93present) the other wiki]] instead.
* {{UsefulNotes/Egypt}}: Mass protests erupted in Tahrir Square early into 2011, with many inspired by the activists in Tunisia. The dictator Hosni Mubarak ended up resigning, handing the reigns over the military who, to their credit, did transition Egypt to democracy by holding democratic elections. Of course, the military very quickly reversed course when Mohammad Morsi, who was affiliated with the very divisive Muslim Brotherhood, won the election. It didn't take long for the military to overthrow Morsi's new government, replacing him with the director of military intelligence, Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi, in a rigged election. Al-Sisi then massacred Islamist protesters who were demonstrating against the coup and has essentially become another PresidentForLife, [[FullCircleRevolution bringing the revolution in Egypt full circle.]]

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* {{UsefulNotes/Libya}}: Tunisia's neighbor to the east did not have it as easy. Muammar al-Gaddafi, Libya's dictator, did not follow Ben Ali's example and resign, instead choosing to fight. Rebels seized the city of Benghazi and the military unsuccessfully tried to retake it. After that, all hell broke loose, launching a full-scale civil war. The US and friends led a military intervention as well, providing the rebels with air support. This has caused a lot of contention in the West. After a few months, Gaddafi was captured and killed and his regime fell apart. However, the clean-up has not been so easy. The country was still wracked by civil unrest and violence as various factions tried to gain control. A nominally democratic government was set up, but in 2014 it was split again in a political squabble too complicated to handle here. One is better off looking at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libyan_Civil_War_(2014%E2%80%93present) the other wiki]] Other Wiki]] instead.
* {{UsefulNotes/Egypt}}: Mass protests erupted in Tahrir Square early into 2011, with many inspired by the activists in Tunisia. The dictator Hosni Mubarak ended up resigning, handing the reigns over the military who, to their credit, did transition Egypt to democracy by holding democratic elections. Of course, the military very quickly reversed course when Mohammad Morsi, who was affiliated with the very divisive Muslim Brotherhood, won the election. It didn't take long for the military to overthrow Morsi's new government, replacing him with the director of military intelligence, Abdel-Fattah Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, in a rigged election. Al-Sisi then massacred Islamist protesters who were demonstrating against the coup and has essentially become another PresidentForLife, [[FullCircleRevolution bringing the revolution in Egypt full circle.]]
3rd Feb '18 10:15:18 AM FFShinra
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** '''The Kurds''' themselves have tried this in both Syria and Iraq, trying (in Syria) to gain the favor of Sunni Arab tribes that had historical emnity with either the tribes that joined Daesh or with Assad. In Iraq, they played on the fears of Sunni minorties fear of Shia persecution to gain their alleigance. In the case of Iraq, it did not work too well when they finally made their move to secede in 2017, but it has so far worked in Syria, at least enough that the SDF controls everything east of the Euphrates.

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** '''The Kurds''' The '''Kurds''' themselves have tried this in both Syria and Iraq, trying (in Syria) to gain the favor of Sunni Arab tribes that had historical emnity with either the tribes that joined Daesh or with Assad. In Iraq, they played on the fears of Sunni minorties fear of Shia persecution to gain their alleigance. In the case of Iraq, it did not work too well when they finally made their move to secede in 2017, but it has so far worked in Syria, at least enough that the SDF controls everything east of the Euphrates.


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** In '''Egypt''', the RevolvingDoorRevolution is largely due to this, with the military raising the fear of political Islam hijacking the state through democracy to allow them to come back to power under El-Sisi.
3rd Feb '18 10:09:54 AM FFShinra
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* DivideAndConquer: After the First World War, the colonial powers relied on this – in one form or another – and the post-colonial dictatorships that replaced them continued the practices, fueling generations-long tensions which finally came to a boil. In most cases, a small minority group was privileged by the colonial powers, using them as middle-men to rule the rest of the country – who they loyally served, either because they were well compensated, they were previously abused by the majority, or simply because they had never enjoyed power. These sectarian differences could be religious, ethnic, tribal, or a combination of the three. The following list is the ''short'' version, as complex local factors shape the political situation in each region:
** '''Syria''' is a Sunni-majority country with several minorities. The French propped up the Alawites (a local offshoot branch of Shi’a Islam) as their middle-management allies. The Alawites are concentrated in a strip of land along the coast, the Kurds along the northern border, while the rest of the country is mostly Sunni (with some Druze in the south, and sizable Christian enclaves in the major cities). The Assad family is Alawite, and continued to oppress the Sunni majority after the colonial period, often by allying themselves with other minorities such as Christians and Druze under the guise of secular pan-Arabism.
** '''Iraq''' was the opposite: a majority Shi’a Arab country with a Sunni Arab minority. The Shi'a are concentrated in the south, with the Sunni Arabs in the middle of the country. The Sunni minority had ruled the country with an iron fist since the Ottoman era (a practice the British continued), with the Saddam Hussein era being merely the most well known example, because they feared that the Shi’a majority would oppress them if they ever relented. There’s also a large Kurdish enclave in the north: Most Kurds are also Sunni, but the Sunni Arabs oppressed them due to them not being Arab and for their secessionist [[UnderStatement tendencies]]. This decades-long mistreatment brought resentment from the Shi’a and Kurds. Once the tables were turned, Sunni fears were justified, eventually leading to the rise of Daesh in Iraq after roughly a decade of Shia mistreatment against them.
** '''The Kurds''', concentrated along the post-WWI colonial-drawn borders of what is now Turkey, Iran, Iraq, and Syria, became a potential threat to the cohesion and stability of all four. None of these four countries want to see them succeed in their nationalist goals, though instances of EnemyMine have allowed the Kurds to survive the decades since the Great War by playing the four off each other. The western intervention against Daesh in Iraq and Syria has largely had the effect of strengthening the Kurds' fighting capabilities, even as major western ally Turkey complains that these same Kurdish forces are actively fighting to secede from them. In October 2017, Iraqi Kurdistan held a referendum that voted in favor of establishing itself as an independent state, raising tensions with the entire region.
*** The '''Yazidis''' live in a tiny enclave in the mountains of northwestern Iraq, numbering around 650,000. The Yazidis are ethnically Kurdish, but are distinguished by their adherance to their pre-Islamic faith. Islamic rulers have oppressed them for centuries as "devil worshipers" due to their interpretation of aspects of the Yazidi religion. Daesh seized on this as an excuse to declare them as "pagans" and therefore okay to ''literally'' enslave under their selective reading of out of context quotes from the Koran: ''at least'' 3,000 Yazidi women and girls were kidnapped by Daesh and literally auctioned as sex slaves to other areas they control. Daesh has also used this religious difference as an excuse to single out Yazidis for a calculated campaign of mass extermination in any region they move into.

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* DivideAndConquer: After To counter the First World War, the colonial powers relied on this – in one form or another – protests and the post-colonial dictatorships that replaced them continued the practices, fueling generations-long tensions which finally came to a boil. In most cases, a small minority group was privileged by the colonial powers, using them as middle-men to rule the rest unrest, some of the country – who they loyally served, either because they were well compensated, they were previously abused by various governments and entrenched elites tried this tactic, to varying degrees of success:
** In '''Syria''',
the majority, or simply because government of Bashar al-Assad went about it by releasing all the Islamists they had never enjoyed power. These sectarian differences could be religious, ethnic, tribal, or a combination of the three. The following list is the ''short'' version, as complex local factors shape the political situation in each region:
** '''Syria''' is a Sunni-majority country with several minorities. The French propped up the Alawites (a local offshoot branch of Shi’a Islam) as their middle-management allies. The Alawites are concentrated in a strip of land along the coast, the Kurds along the northern border, while the rest of the country is mostly Sunni (with some Druze
imprisoned, in the south, hope that they would hijack the rebellion and sizable Christian enclaves in help make manifest the major cities). The Assad family is Alawite, propaganda that he had been spouting from the beginning: That there was no rebellion or uprising, that it was instead a terrorist incursion that sought to overthrow the modern and continued to oppress the Sunni majority after the colonial period, often by allying themselves with other minorities such as Christians and Druze under the guise of secular pan-Arabism.
state system. The result was the likes of the Nusra Front and Daesh gaining the boost they needed in fighters and ideologues needed to push the initial rebellion to the sidelines, making Assad's straw man a reality.
** '''Iraq''' was did this between the opposite: a majority Shi’a Arab country with a Sunni Arab minority. The Shi'a are concentrated in the south, with the Sunni Arabs in the middle Talabani and Barzani factions of the country. The Sunni Kurds to stymie their attempt to secede in 2017. More broadly, the central government in Baghdad would tell minority had ruled groups like the country with an iron fist since the Ottoman era (a practice the British continued), with the Saddam Hussein era being merely the most well known example, because Assyrians or Turkmen that they feared that the Shi’a majority would oppress them if they ever relented. There’s also a large stood to lose in an independant Kurdish enclave in the north: Most Kurds are also Sunni, but the Sunni Arabs oppressed them due to them not being Arab and for their secessionist [[UnderStatement tendencies]]. This decades-long mistreatment brought resentment from the Shi’a and Kurds. Once the tables were turned, Sunni fears were justified, eventually leading to the rise of Daesh in Iraq after roughly a decade of Shia mistreatment against them.
state.
** '''The Kurds''', concentrated along the post-WWI colonial-drawn borders of what is now Turkey, Iran, Kurds''' themselves have tried this in both Syria and Iraq, and Syria, became a potential threat trying (in Syria) to gain the cohesion and stability favor of all four. None Sunni Arab tribes that had historical emnity with either the tribes that joined Daesh or with Assad. In Iraq, they played on the fears of these four countries want Sunni minorties fear of Shia persecution to see them succeed in gain their nationalist goals, though instances of EnemyMine have allowed alleigance. In the Kurds to survive the decades since the Great War by playing the four off each other. The western intervention against Daesh in Iraq and Syria has largely had the effect case of strengthening the Kurds' fighting capabilities, even as major western ally Turkey complains that these same Kurdish forces are actively fighting Iraq, it did not work too well when they finally made their move to secede from them. In October in 2017, Iraqi Kurdistan held a referendum but it has so far worked in Syria, at least enough that voted in favor of establishing itself as an independent state, raising tensions with the entire region.
*** The '''Yazidis''' live in a tiny enclave in the mountains of northwestern Iraq, numbering around 650,000. The Yazidis are ethnically Kurdish, but are distinguished by their adherance to their pre-Islamic faith. Islamic rulers have oppressed them for centuries as "devil worshipers" due to their interpretation of aspects
SDF controls everything east of the Yazidi religion. Daesh seized on this as an excuse to declare them as "pagans" and therefore okay to ''literally'' enslave under their selective reading of out of context quotes from the Koran: ''at least'' 3,000 Yazidi women and girls were kidnapped by Daesh and literally auctioned as sex slaves to other areas they control. Daesh has also used this religious difference as an excuse to single out Yazidis for a calculated campaign of mass extermination in any region they move into. Euphrates.



** '''Yemen''', meanwhile, has a Sunni/Shia split, a strong tribal split, and both are further complicated by the fact that Yemen was once two countries, the southern half of which wants to secede again. "Northern" Yemen, [[NonIndicativeName which is actually the west of the country]], is the smaller but more fertile region in the coastal mountains along the Red Sea with a majority Shia population, "Southern" Yemen (the east of the country, bordering Oman) is the larger of the two but primarily inhospitable desert: it is mostly Sunni, but also has its own tribal separatist movements and, with the port of Aden, is slightly more cosmopolitian. Until his overthrow, Saleh would play the various tribes against one another and bribe the rest with aid money. After his overthrow, Hadi attempted the same, but simply could not pull it off. Now the situation has devolved to where you have the Houthis (Shia tribesmen) and Saleh (secularist former dictator) teaming up against Hadi (unionist puppet dictator) who is aligned with the Hirak (southern seperatist Adenites and tribesmen), with both sides trying to enact this trope against the other.

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** '''Yemen''', meanwhile, has a Sunni/Shia split, a strong tribal split, and both are further complicated by the fact that Yemen was once two countries, the southern half of which wants to secede again. "Northern" Yemen, [[NonIndicativeName which is actually the west of the country]], is the smaller but more fertile region in the coastal mountains along the Red Sea with a majority Shia population, "Southern" Yemen (the east of the country, bordering Oman) is the larger of the two but primarily inhospitable desert: it is mostly Sunni, but also has its own tribal separatist movements and, with the port of Aden, is slightly more cosmopolitian. Until his overthrow, Saleh would play the various tribes against one another and bribe the rest with aid money. After his overthrow, Hadi attempted the same, but simply could not pull it off. Now the situation has devolved to where you have the Houthis (Shia tribesmen) and Saleh (secularist former dictator) teaming up against Hadi (unionist puppet dictator) who is aligned with the Hirak (southern seperatist Adenites and tribesmen), with both sides trying to enact this trope against the other. Saudi Arabia's attempt to try this between Saleh and the Houthis led to the former's death.
31st Jan '18 9:22:14 PM DoktorSoviet
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* {{UsefulNotes/Syria}}: Easily the worst off of the countries in the Arab Spring, which is saying something considering the state of most of the other countries on this list. The dictator of Syria, Bashar al-Assad, was not having any of this protesting business from day one, and ordered bloody crackdowns on civilian protesters. In response, a part of the military chose to defect rather than firing on their own citizens, and soon a civil war was underway. The civil war has been ongoing since then, and still doesn't seem close to ending. The Free Syrian Army, as it was called, started out as a loose coalition led by the military defectors, but this coalition has largely fallen apart as many Syrians can't agree what kind of regime they want to replace the Assad one with. Many Islamic extremist groups like the Islamic State [[note]]originally founded in {{UsefulNotes/Iraq}} and technically not a component of the original FSA, but it rose concurrently around the time that the other Islamists split off from the FSA[[/note]], the Islamic Front, and al-Nusra, split off from this main force. The Kurds formed a loose alliance with the FSA, creating their own state that is colloquially known as Rojava. Many countries have chosen one side or the other, with the US and its European allies backing Rojava, Russia backing al-Assad's regime, and Turkey backing the FSA. The war also spilled over into {{UsefulNotes/Iraq}}, as ISIS started to conquer territory, and even threatened to take Baghdad at one point. They were eventually beaten back by the Iraqi Army [[note]]with very heavy support from various Shiite militias and their neighbor {{UsefulNotes/Iran}}[[/note]] and Peshmerga[[note]]the name for the armed forces of Iraqi Kurdistan[[/note]]. The war has attracted international attention, especially in the media. This was mostly centered around the atrocities committed by the Islamic State, which dominated headlines during its rapid emergence in 2014. However, another extensive point of coverage that has led to ceaseless political division in the west are the war refugees. Around half of the Syrian population has fled the country, and many of them have chosen to flee to Europe. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment It would be better to avoid discussing this issue here and it is known to be incredibly divisive.]]

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* {{UsefulNotes/Syria}}: Easily the worst off of the countries in the Arab Spring, which is saying something considering the state of most of the other countries on this list. The dictator of Syria, Bashar al-Assad, was not having any of this protesting business from day one, and ordered bloody crackdowns on civilian protesters. In response, a part of the military chose to defect rather than firing on their own citizens, and soon a civil war was underway. The civil war has been ongoing since then, and still doesn't seem close to ending. The Free Syrian Army, as it was called, started out as a loose coalition led by the military defectors, but this coalition has largely fallen apart as many Syrians can't agree what kind of regime they want to replace the Assad one with. Many Islamic extremist groups like the Islamic State [[note]]originally founded in {{UsefulNotes/Iraq}} and technically not a component of the original FSA, but it rose concurrently around the time that the other Islamists split off from the FSA[[/note]], the Islamic Front, and al-Nusra, split off from this main force. The Kurds formed a loose alliance with the FSA, creating their own state that is colloquially known as Rojava. Many countries have chosen one side or the other, with the US and its European allies backing Rojava, Russia backing al-Assad's regime, and Turkey backing the FSA. The war also spilled over into {{UsefulNotes/Iraq}}, as ISIS started to conquer territory, and even threatened to take Baghdad at one point. They were eventually beaten back by the Iraqi Army [[note]]with very heavy support from various Shiite militias and their neighbor {{UsefulNotes/Iran}}[[/note]] and Peshmerga[[note]]the name for the armed forces of Iraqi Kurdistan[[/note]]. The war has attracted international attention, especially in the media. This was mostly centered around the atrocities committed by the Islamic State, which dominated headlines during its rapid emergence in 2014. However, another extensive point of coverage that has led to ceaseless political division in the west are the war refugees. Around half of the Syrian population has fled the country, have been displaced, and many of them have chosen to flee to Europe. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment It would be better to avoid discussing this issue here and it is known to be incredibly divisive.]]
25th Jan '18 10:55:17 PM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

* ButtMonkey: The Kurds. Both in Syria ''and'' Iraq.
20th Jan '18 10:49:49 AM FFShinra
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* GameChanger: Russia full stop. Russian planes and logistical help has, all Things considered, kept teh Assad government in Place, and also helped the SAA getting a lot of momentum on the ground. As of january 2018, the IS and adjacent Groups are all but wiped out from most of their hideouts.

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* GameChanger: Russia full stop. Russian planes and logistical help has, all Things considered, kept teh the Assad government in Place, and also helped the SAA getting a lot of momentum on the ground. As of january January 2018, the IS and adjacent Groups groups are all but wiped out from most of their hideouts.
18th Jan '18 6:45:23 AM Eilevgmyhren
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Added DiffLines:

* BalkanizeMe: Consider that the Kurd militias have carved out a hold on the entire eastern bank of the Euphrates river (with some western backing), a possible territorial claim may be expected in the area - but beware of the Turks.


Added DiffLines:

* GameChanger: Russia full stop. Russian planes and logistical help has, all Things considered, kept teh Assad government in Place, and also helped the SAA getting a lot of momentum on the ground. As of january 2018, the IS and adjacent Groups are all but wiped out from most of their hideouts.
12th Jan '18 5:50:25 PM NogaiKhan
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* LegionOfDoom: The (primarily Arab and Iraqi/Syrian) Islamic State has received over 40,000 foreign fighters from Muslim populations all around the world, ranging from other Arabs in countries like Saudi Arabia, to Turkic people from Xinjiang and Kazakhstan, to Iranic people from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan, to Chechens and Dagestanis from the Caucasus, to the primarily Berber population of Tunisia.



** In Syria, there is the Syrian Government, the rebels (which include a broad swathe of groups ranging from al-Qaeda to the Free Syrian Army), the Syrian Democratic Forces (consisting mostly of Kurds but also other ethnic groups) and the Islamic State. The Syrian Government and the SDF are [[FriendlyEnemy Frenemies]] and the rest just loathe each other. Nowhere is this dynamic more exemplary than in the Aleppo countryside which is the only regon where all four groups are in close proximity to one-another.

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** In Syria, there is the are at least five main sides. The Syrian Government, Government and its allies (Iran, Russia, Hezbollah), the rebels very loosely associated Syrian Opposition (which include a broad swathe of groups ranging from al-Qaeda to groups, possibly hundreds in total) and its allies (Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar), the Free Syrian Army), the Syrian Democratic Forces Tahrir al-Sham organization (led by Al-Nusra, an Al-Qaeda affiliate), Rojava (consisting mostly of Kurds but also other ethnic groups) groups under the 'Syrian Democratic Forces' banner) and its allies (the United States, various NATO countries), and lastly the Islamic State. State on its own. The Syrian Government and the SDF are [[FriendlyEnemy Frenemies]] [[EnemyMine on-again off-again enemies who often cooperate]] and the rest just loathe each other. Nowhere is this dynamic more exemplary than in the Aleppo countryside which is the only regon region where all four five groups are in close proximity to one-another.
5th Dec '17 3:52:53 PM FFShinra
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* {{UsefulNotes/Yemen}}: Protests started in Sana'a against the president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. In 2011, he fled to Saudi Arabia after an assassination attempt, and the government was handed to his vice president Abd al-Rab Mansur al-Hadi. Al-Hadi attempted to negotiate with the opposition, but he won some blatantly farcical elections in 2012 and set up a new government. The Shiite Houthis in Yemen -who had been one of the main drivers for revolution in the first place- began to protest al-Hadi's regime, and low intensity fighting occurred. This became high intensity fighting when, in 2015, al-Hadi was overthrown and the Houthis took control. [[{{UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia}} Saudi Arabia]] and co. decided to intervene and are fighting a war against the Houthis, who are allegedly supported by {{UsefulNotes/Iran}}. To add yet another startling twist onto things, exiled president Saleh returned to Yemen and [[EnemyMine sided with the Houthi government against the Saudis.]]

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* {{UsefulNotes/Yemen}}: Protests started in Sana'a against the president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. In 2011, he fled to Saudi Arabia after an assassination attempt, and the government was handed to his vice president Abd al-Rab Mansur al-Hadi. Al-Hadi attempted to negotiate with the opposition, but he won some blatantly farcical elections in 2012 and set up a new government. The Shiite Houthis in Yemen -who had been one of the main drivers for revolution in the first place- began to protest al-Hadi's regime, and low intensity fighting occurred. This became high intensity fighting when, in 2015, al-Hadi was overthrown and the Houthis took control. [[{{UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia}} Saudi Arabia]] and co. decided to intervene and are fighting a war against the Houthis, who are allegedly supported by {{UsefulNotes/Iran}}. To add yet another startling twist onto things, exiled president Saleh returned to Yemen and [[EnemyMine sided with the Houthi government against the Saudis.]]Saudis]], [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder before turning against them in favor of the Saudis almost three years later]], and then promptly getting killed.
4th Dec '17 9:02:49 PM FFShinra
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* BookEnds: Some thirty years ago, Ali Abdullah Saleh found himself elevated to political power thanks to the assassination of his predecessor and his ability to [[WildCard change allegiances with minimal repercussions]]. In 2017, he was assassinated by the Houthis after his latest scheme to shift his support from the Houthis to the Saudis backfired spectacularly.

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* BookEnds: Some thirty years ago, Ali Abdullah Saleh found himself elevated to political power thanks to the assassination of his predecessor and his ability to [[WildCard [[ChronicBackstabbingDisorder change allegiances with minimal repercussions]]. In 2017, he was assassinated by the Houthis after his latest scheme to shift his support from the Houthis to the Saudis backfired spectacularly.



* DidntSeeThatComing: Ali Abdullah Saleh, who had a well known reputation in the region as a MagnificentBastard who routinely betrayed any erstwhile ally who no longer suited his purpose, had decided to play that same card again with the Houthis who he had allied with at the start of the Yemeni Civil War. Unlike every other time he has tried that in the previous four or five decades of his political career however, the Houthis were on to him from the start, eventually leading to Saleh being HoistByHisOwnPetard by getting himself executed for treason once he publically broke with the Houthi ranks and tried to join up with the Saudi coalition. His faction, afterwards, was too stunned for words beyond that of his sons vowing revenge.



* HypercompetentSidekick: Prime Minister ([[TheMainCharactersDoEverything and Vice President]]) Khaled Bahah, from most reports, was considered more popular, more respected, and more competant than Hadi, his superior. Indeed, most saw him as a worthy successor to lead Yemen should the war ever conclude with the government still standing. Naturally, this irritated Hadi and led to a tense relationship between the two until Hadi finally and unceremoniously sacked Bahah in favor of a nameless pencil pusher as prime minister and Major General Mohsen as vice president. The trope tends to apply to Mohsen as well, who is now more powerful than Hadi himself in practice.

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* HypercompetentSidekick: Prime Minister ([[TheMainCharactersDoEverything and Vice President]]) Khaled Bahah, from most reports, was considered more popular, more respected, and more competant than Hadi, his superior. Indeed, most saw him as a worthy successor to lead Yemen should the war ever conclude with the government still standing. Naturally, this irritated Hadi and led to a tense relationship between the two until Hadi finally and unceremoniously sacked Bahah in favor of a nameless pencil pusher as prime minister and Major General Mohsen as vice president. The trope tends to apply to Mohsen as well, who is now more powerful than Hadi himself in practice. Former president Saleh, for his part, saw himself this way vis a vis the Houthis, but for once, he ended up being WrongGenreSavvy, to fatal results for himself.



* WeAreStrugglingTogether: What are normally called "pro-Hadi" or "loyalist" forces by the media actually comprise of several factions whose intentions are blatantly at cross purposes with one another. The representative faction, those loyal to President Hadi, have been mostly wiped out by the Houthis. The main local force involved with the "loyalists" are actually southern separatists. The tribes in the east and center are barely involved in the fighting at all, and are only considered loyalist because they have not taken an active side on the conflict...and those who have are now with AQAP. The Coalition of mostly foreigner militaries are the only faction keeping the "loyalists" in the fight. The tension between these entities is a major reason why they continue to lose against the more isolated Houthis.

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* WeAreStrugglingTogether: What are normally called "pro-Hadi" or "loyalist" forces by the media actually comprise of several factions whose intentions are blatantly at cross purposes with one another. The representative faction, those loyal to President Hadi, have been mostly wiped out by the Houthis. The main local force involved with the "loyalists" are actually southern separatists. The tribes in the east and center are barely involved in the fighting at all, and are only considered loyalist because they have not taken an active side on the conflict...and those who have are now with AQAP. The Coalition of mostly foreigner militaries are the only faction keeping the "loyalists" in the fight. The tension between these entities is a major reason why they continue to lose against the more isolated Houthis.
Houthis. The Houthis themselves had to deal with this with regards to former president Ali Abdullah Saleh and his faction, eventually leading to their formal split and Saleh dead.
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