History UsefulNotes / Swords

18th Aug '17 6:23:18 PM TheBigBopper
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'''Barong'''
* The Barong is a short sword used by Moro groups in the Southern Philippines such as the Tausug, Yakan, and Sinama. The patterned blade is leaf-shaped and single-edged, only 8 to 22 inches (20 to 56 cm) long but thick enough to give it some heft for cutting. The handle of wood, ebony, or carabao horn widens towards the pommel, which is curved toward the edge of the blade. Scabbards are made of two boards wrapped in rattan.
18th Aug '17 6:16:43 PM TheBigBopper
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* The ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris kris]]'', usually the size of a dagger but sometimes the size of a sword, has a double-edged blade which flares asymmetrically at the base to form a sort of guard. It is native to Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Singapore and the Philippines, where it is called the kalis. Kris made in the modern era usually have wavy-profiled blades (see "flamberge"), always with an odd number of curves, but straight blades were more common in earlier times. Kris blades have damascus-like patterns in the steel which come from forging them out of iron ore with some nickel content; the number of patterns to be appreciated is similar to Middle Eastern and Japanese Blades. The grip is curved like that of a pistol to make thrusting more convenient, and can be a minaiture work of art sculpted out of rare wood, precious metals, or ivory. The sheath has a long tube for the blade and a widened top to enclose the guard of the sword, a little bit like the scabbard of the Greek Xiphos. It has a huge amount of talismanic, religious, and cultural significance, and is featured on the flags of many provinces, states, and parties.

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* The ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris kris]]'', usually the size of a dagger but sometimes the size of a sword, has a double-edged blade which flares asymmetrically at the base to form a sort of guard. It is native to Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Singapore and the Philippines, where it is called the kalis. Kris made in the modern era usually have wavy-profiled blades (see "flamberge"), always with an odd number of curves, but straight blades were more common in earlier times. Kris blades have damascus-like patterns in the steel which come from forging them out of iron ore with some nickel content; the number of patterns to be appreciated is similar to Middle Eastern and Japanese Blades. The grip is curved like that of a pistol to make thrusting more convenient, and can be a minaiture work of art sculpted out of rare wood, precious metals, or ivory. The sheath has a long tube for the blade and a widened top to enclose the guard of the sword, a little bit like the scabbard of the Greek Xiphos. It has a huge amount of talismanic, religious, and cultural significance, and is featured on the flags of many provinces, states, and political parties.
18th Aug '17 6:16:04 PM TheBigBopper
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* The ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris kris]]'' was usually a dagger, but it had sword variants (also known as kalis). The kris has an asymmetrical blade with a wavelike pattern, which would widen wounds the sword inflicted.

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* The ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris kris]]'' was kris]]'', usually the size of a dagger, dagger but it had sword variants (also known as kalis). The kris sometimes the size of a sword, has an asymmetrical a double-edged blade with a wavelike pattern, which would widen wounds flares asymmetrically at the sword inflicted.
base to form a sort of guard. It is native to Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, Brunei, Singapore and the Philippines, where it is called the kalis. Kris made in the modern era usually have wavy-profiled blades (see "flamberge"), always with an odd number of curves, but straight blades were more common in earlier times. Kris blades have damascus-like patterns in the steel which come from forging them out of iron ore with some nickel content; the number of patterns to be appreciated is similar to Middle Eastern and Japanese Blades. The grip is curved like that of a pistol to make thrusting more convenient, and can be a minaiture work of art sculpted out of rare wood, precious metals, or ivory. The sheath has a long tube for the blade and a widened top to enclose the guard of the sword, a little bit like the scabbard of the Greek Xiphos. It has a huge amount of talismanic, religious, and cultural significance, and is featured on the flags of many provinces, states, and parties.


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'''Kampilan'''
* Used by the Maguindanao and Maranao people of the Philippine island of Mindanao, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kampilan Kampilan]] is a large sword by Philippine standards, with a straight, single-edged pattern welded blade about 36 to 40 inches (90 to 100 cm) long. The blade is thick and narrow at the base but becomes progressively thinner and wider towards the tip, with a "broken backed" point like a seax, the back of which sometimes has a small spike or spur on it. It is basically a cutting weapon, and whether the small spike symbolizes something or has any functional purpose is a matter ShroudedInMyth. The hilt is made of hardwood, with a thick crossguard and a bifurcated pommel shaped like a creature's open mouth. Scabbards were usually two pieces of unardorned wood bound together with rattan fibers, and were treated as fairly disposable.

'''Panabas'''
* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Panabas Panabas]] is a large chopping sword from the Philippines: its name is a shortening of the word "pang-tabas", which means "chopping tool". 2-4 feet (60-120 cm) overall, with a hardwood handle that makes up over half the length of the sword, the blade is forward-curved, single edged, and wider at the tip. It is meant to chop like a meat cleaver, with thrusting as an afterthought at best, and while the tip can be pointed it is often blunt or square-shaped. Scabbards were rarely used, and when they were they consisted only of two pieces of wood that were taken apart to remove the sword.
18th Aug '17 12:13:43 PM TheMyonner
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'''[[MacheteMayhem Parang and Golok]]''

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'''[[MacheteMayhem Parang and Golok]]''Golok]]'''
17th Aug '17 10:22:10 AM TheMyonner
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'''[[MacheteMayhem Parang and Golok]]''
* The ''parang'' and ''golok'' are cutting tools used by peoples throughout the Malay Archipelago, especially in Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines. They're both similar to the western machete, but are generally designed with a heavier blade than the machete, which is quite handy when dealing with dense, woody vegetation like what grows in Southeast Asia. The golok is generally shorter than the parang, the former having a blade up to 50 centimetres long, the latter being up to 90 centimetres long. Shapes vary, but generally look like a curved version of the machete, with the sharp edge on the outside of the curve. While they're both intended to be used as tools, there are countless recorded instances of them being used as weapons.
14th Aug '17 12:15:15 PM HazelMcCallister
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Twisting a billet made of various kinds of steel and iron produced a rippled pattern, which on the finished blade may be revealed through polishing and etching; such a blade is called ''pattern-welded.'' In Europe, better-quality sword blades were frequently pattern-welded prior to the High Middle Ages. The surface pattern looks similar to Damascus steel and modern sellers often bill it as "genuine Damascus," though sword buffs often prefer to call it "false Damascus," as historical Middle-Eastern Damascus was made through an entirely different process.

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Twisting a billet made of various kinds of steel and iron produced a rippled pattern, which on the finished blade may be revealed through polishing and etching; such a blade is called ''pattern-welded.'' In Europe, better-quality sword blades were frequently pattern-welded prior to the High Middle Ages. The surface pattern looks similar to Damascus steel and modern sellers often bill it as "genuine Damascus," though sword buffs often prefer to call it "false Damascus," as historical Middle-Eastern Damascus was it's made through by an entirely different process.
process (see "Middle-Eastern Swords")



Pattern-welded swords of various designs gained particular acclaim amongst European crusaders, who knew them as [[AppliedPhlebotinum Damascus steel]] blades, after the great blade markets of the city of Damascus in UsefulNotes/{{Syria}}. They were made with high-carbon crucible steel of Indian origin, now commonly called ''wootz'', a corruption of several South Indian words meaning "steel." The original method of their creation was lost sometime in the 17th century, a fact attributed to the depletion of unique iron ores used in its production.

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Pattern-welded Certain Middle-Eastern swords of various designs gained particular acclaim amongst European crusaders, who knew them as [[AppliedPhlebotinum Damascus steel]] blades, after the great blade markets of the city of Damascus in UsefulNotes/{{Syria}}. Like katana, Damascus swords acquired a myth of being impossibly sharp and nigh-unbreakable. They were made with high-carbon crucible steel of Indian origin, from India, now commonly called ''wootz'', a corruption of several South Indian words meaning "steel." The original method Production of their creation was lost sometime in the 17th century, new wootz ended around 1700, a fact attributed to the depletion of the unique iron ores used it was made from, and the exact technique was forgotten. It seems to have been made by melting iron with dry plant matter for carbon in its production.
a crucible, sealed against outside air; this allowed the smith to control the steel's carbon content. In addition to extra elements from the ores, wootz contains iron carbide grains, visible in rippled bands on a forged blade. These make Damascus blades look similar to pattern-welded ones, which have often been called "Damascus" as a result.
4th Aug '17 9:00:37 AM HazelMcCallister
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A full list of the terms for different parts of various types of sword would be unwieldy for this page, although words like ''quillon'', ''ricasso'', ''sageo'' and so on are handy to know. Overviews may be found for European swords [[https://myarmoury.com/feature_glossary.html here]] and for Japanese ones [[https://www.japaneseswordindex.com/glossary.htm here]].



* Meaning "side-inserted." The Japanese short sword, single-edged and normally curved like the katana. These were often used where a katana would be unwieldy, such as indoors or in close-quarter combat. During the feudal era it became fashionable for samurai to wear a katana and wakizashi together, the pair being called a ''daishō'' (大小, "big-small"). Eventually this pair of swords became the symbol or badge of office of a samurai and was enforced by laws in the Edo period. Some martial arts schools taught the use of [[DualWielding two swords simultaneously]], one in each hand, the most famous of which is probably [[UsefulNotes/MiyamotoMusashi Miyamoto Musashi's]] ''niten ichi ryu.''

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* Meaning "side-inserted." The Japanese short sword, single-edged and normally curved like the katana. These were often used where a katana would be unwieldy, such as indoors or in close-quarter combat. During the feudal era it became fashionable for samurai to wear a katana and wakizashi together, the pair being called a ''daishō'' (大小, "big-small"). Eventually this pair of swords the daishō became the symbol or badge of office of a samurai and was enforced by laws in the Edo period. Some martial arts schools taught the use of [[DualWielding two swords simultaneously]], one in each hand, the most famous of which is probably [[UsefulNotes/MiyamotoMusashi Miyamoto Musashi's]] ''niten ichi ryu.''



Popular in media yet widely misunderstood, swords from the La Tene culture of c. 500-0 BCE (broadly associated with Celtic-speaking peoples) were influential in Europe, as they were among the earliest examples of folded swords there and led the way for the development of the spatha, Viking sword and Medieval arming sword.

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Popular in media yet widely misunderstood, swords from the La Tene culture of c. 500-0 BCE (broadly associated with Celtic-speaking peoples) were influential in Europe, as they were among the earliest examples of folded laminated swords there and led the way for the development of the spatha, Viking sword and Medieval arming sword.



[[folder:Middle-Eastern blades]]

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[[folder:Middle-Eastern blades]]Swords]]


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'''Akinakes'''
* Aka ''acinaces'', this is the Greek and Latin form of the name for a short sword/dagger from Central Asia that was spread to the Middle East by the Medes and Persians in the Classical period. It had a tapering, double-edged blade with a small guard and wide pommel, and its scabbard had a large tab at the top by which it was hung from the wearer's belt, usually at the right hip. This is the kind of sword that [[Film/ThreeHundred the Immortals]] would've used in real life. Because of its association with Persia, the word ''acinaces'' has sometimes been used as a Latin translation for "scimitar," thence curved swords in general; Jesuit priests even used it to refer to the katana.


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'''Saif'''
* The Arabic name for a curved sword. Arab sabers also come from Turco-Mongolian roots and broadly resemble the kilij and shamshir, but may be less curved, have broader "hatchet" points, shorter quillons, or curved or animal head-shaped pommels, among many other differences.

'''Pulwar'''
* Aka ''pulouar'', an early modern saber from Afghanistan. The pulwar is related to the tulwar and shamshir, and may have a blade similar to one or the other. It's distinguished from them by having a hilt similar to the tulwar but with deeply downturned quillons and a teacup-shaped pommel.

'''Qama and Kindjal'''
* Aka ''qame'', ''kina'', ''kinzhal'', ''qaddara'' [[SpellMyNameWithAnS and so forth]]. An early modern short sword or dagger with a broad, double-edged blade and long point. It may be straight or curved, but always has a full-profile tang with riveted grips and an integrated small guard and pommel. The kindjal originated in the Caucasus, and was used from Iran to the Ottoman Empire and the Don Cossacks straddling Russia and Ukraine. It is part of [[https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/d4/f9/e2/d4f9e264c9bff965d0a7028e4ded9a82.jpg traditional Caucasian men's dress]].
3rd Aug '17 3:12:18 AM TheBigBopper
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3rd Aug '17 3:08:29 AM TheBigBopper
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* Next are curved swords. These swords generally have a single sharpened edge that curves toward the tip of the blade. Though some types have blades that end in a point that can be used to stab, curved swords are primarily designed for slashing. If you're planning to fight from horseback, a curved sword is your best bet: any other type of sword tends to get stuck in its victims, which will likely result in it being yanked from your grip as you thunder by at 25-30 miles an hour. Curved swords are easier to use on horseback because the curvature of the blade makes the vector of force diagonal to the cutting edge, imparting a slicing motion that makes sword strokes cleaner and more efficient. They're also easier to unsheathe while horseback, since the drawing motion more closely follows the movement of your elbow. Very common in nomadic horse cultures, namely those of Central Asia and areas influenced by them, such as the Middle East and China, and (later and indirectly) Europe. The word "sabre"/"saber" is occasionally used as a generic name for this category of swords, leading some snark-minded Western scholars to mock-call katanas "two-handed sabers."

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* Next are curved swords. These swords generally have a single sharpened edge that curves toward the tip of the blade. Though some types have blades that end in a point that can be used to stab, curved swords are primarily designed for slashing. If you're planning to fight from horseback, a curved sword is your best bet: any other type of sword tends to get stuck in its victims, which will likely result in it being yanked from your grip as you thunder by at 25-30 miles an hour.bet. Curved swords are easier to use on horseback because the curvature of the blade makes the vector of force diagonal to the cutting edge, imparting a slicing motion that makes sword strokes cleaner and more efficient. They're also easier to unsheathe while horseback, since the drawing motion more closely follows the movement of your elbow. Very common in nomadic horse cultures, namely those of Central Asia and areas influenced by them, such as the Middle East and China, and (later and indirectly) Europe. The word "sabre"/"saber" is occasionally used as a generic name for this category of swords, leading some snark-minded Western scholars to mock-call katanas "two-handed sabers."
2nd Aug '17 12:28:24 PM thekeyofe
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* Next are curved swords. These swords generally have a single sharpened edge that curves toward the tip of the blade. Though some types have blades that end in a point that can be used to stab, curved swords are primarily designed for slashing. If you're planning to fight from horseback, a curved sword is your best bet: any other type of sword tends to get stuck in its victims, which will likely result in it being yanked from your grip as you thunder by at 40 miles an hour. Curved swords are easier to use on horseback because the curvature of the blade makes the vector of force diagonal to the cutting edge, imparting a slicing motion that makes sword strokes cleaner and more efficient. They're also easier to unsheathe while horseback, since the drawing motion more closely follows the movement of your elbow. Very common in nomadic horse cultures, namely those of Central Asia and areas influenced by them, such as the Middle East and China, and (later and indirectly) Europe. The word "sabre"/"saber" is occasionally used as a generic name for this category of swords, leading some snark-minded Western scholars to mock-call katanas "two-handed sabers."

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* Next are curved swords. These swords generally have a single sharpened edge that curves toward the tip of the blade. Though some types have blades that end in a point that can be used to stab, curved swords are primarily designed for slashing. If you're planning to fight from horseback, a curved sword is your best bet: any other type of sword tends to get stuck in its victims, which will likely result in it being yanked from your grip as you thunder by at 40 25-30 miles an hour. Curved swords are easier to use on horseback because the curvature of the blade makes the vector of force diagonal to the cutting edge, imparting a slicing motion that makes sword strokes cleaner and more efficient. They're also easier to unsheathe while horseback, since the drawing motion more closely follows the movement of your elbow. Very common in nomadic horse cultures, namely those of Central Asia and areas influenced by them, such as the Middle East and China, and (later and indirectly) Europe. The word "sabre"/"saber" is occasionally used as a generic name for this category of swords, leading some snark-minded Western scholars to mock-call katanas "two-handed sabers."
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