History UsefulNotes / Swords

12th Mar '17 3:37:56 AM Alceister
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Unarguably the most famous Japanese weapon by far is [[KatanasAreJustBetter the katana]]. While the word "katana" in Japanese refers to any sword with a curved, single-edged blade, many sword lovers use the term to define the moderately curved, single edged sword with blade-length no less than 60cm. Most Katana exhibit the distinctive long hilt about 1/4 of the overall length, which provides balance when used with a one-handed grip and leverage when used with two, but they are not the only Japanese swords with this feature. The katana is largely associated with samurai, though throughout most of samurai history it was only one of their three primary weapons, the others being the spear and the bow. It wasn't until the 17th century that the katana became so synonymous with the samurai.

to:

* Unarguably the most famous Japanese weapon by far is [[KatanasAreJustBetter the katana]]. While the word "katana" in Japanese refers to any sword with a curved, single-edged blade, many sword lovers use the term to define the moderately curved, single edged sword with blade-length no less than 60cm. Most Katana katana exhibit the distinctive long hilt about 1/4 of the overall length, which provides balance when used with a one-handed grip and leverage when used with two, but they are not the only Japanese swords with this feature. The katana is largely associated with samurai, though throughout most of samurai history it was only one of their three primary weapons, the others being the spear and the bow. It wasn't until the 17th century that the katana became so synonymous with the samurai.
6th Jan '17 11:43:40 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


From about the 11th century on, Japanese armor was mostly made of lacquered leather sewn together with cord. This lightweight armor offered good protection against arrows but was less effective against swords. Most native Japanese weapons were designed for slashing attacks, a slash being the quickest way to inflict maximum damage on a lightly armored opponent. In the 14th-16th centuries, metal armor (often lacquered) became more and more common. Even ''ashigaru'' (peasant warriors) would wear mass-produced metal armor. However, despite improvements in metallurgy and the influence of European traders, Japanese metal armor was still lighter and weaker than European plate armor. Also, spears, bows, and eventually firearms were the main battlefield weapons of the ''Sengoku Jidai'', with the sword used mainly as a backup weapon. These factors, combined with the peace established after 1600, meant that Japanese swords remained primarily slashing weapons rather than evolving into thrusting weapons as European swords had.

to:

From about the 11th century on, Japanese armor was mostly made of lacquered leather sewn laced together with cord.silk. This lightweight armor offered good protection against arrows but was less effective against swords. Most native Japanese weapons were designed for slashing cutting attacks, a slash cut being the quickest way to inflict maximum damage on a lightly armored opponent. In the 14th-16th centuries, metal armor (often lacquered) became more and more common. Even ''ashigaru'' (peasant warriors) would wear mass-produced metal armor. However, despite improvements in metallurgy and the influence of European traders, Japanese metal armor was still lighter and weaker than European plate armor. Also, spears, bows, and eventually firearms were the main battlefield weapons of the ''Sengoku Jidai'', with the sword used mainly as a backup weapon. These factors, combined with the peace established after 1600, meant that Japanese swords remained primarily slashing cutting weapons rather than evolving into thrusting weapons as European swords had.



* Unarguably the most famous Japanese weapon by far is [[KatanasAreJustBetter the katana]]. While the word "katana" in Japanese refers to any sword with a curved, single-edged blade, many sword lovers use the term to define the moderately curved, single edged sword with blade-length no less than 60cm. Most Katana exhibit the distinctive long hilt, which provides balance when used with a one-handed grip and leverage when used with two, but they are not the only Japanese swords with this feature. The katana is largely associated with samurai, though throughout most of samurai history it was only one of their three primary weapons, the others being the spear and the bow. It wasn't until the 17th century that the katana became so synonymous with the samurai.

to:

* Unarguably the most famous Japanese weapon by far is [[KatanasAreJustBetter the katana]]. While the word "katana" in Japanese refers to any sword with a curved, single-edged blade, many sword lovers use the term to define the moderately curved, single edged sword with blade-length no less than 60cm. Most Katana exhibit the distinctive long hilt, hilt about 1/4 of the overall length, which provides balance when used with a one-handed grip and leverage when used with two, but they are not the only Japanese swords with this feature. The katana is largely associated with samurai, though throughout most of samurai history it was only one of their three primary weapons, the others being the spear and the bow. It wasn't until the 17th century that the katana became so synonymous with the samurai.
6th Jan '17 11:40:24 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Cutting motions are of limited use against metal armor. To get through to someone who is clad in steel, you'll really need more of a stab, or a thrust; this was true even in the days of maille[[note]]calling it "chain mail" is redundant, as there ''is'' no such thing as non-chain mail. You can have scales ''over'' mail, or plate over mail, or even splinted mail which has integrated plates, but all of these involve chain.[[/note]] and only grew worse as full plate armor was layered over it. Alternatively, one could also cause injury through armour using sheer blunt force trauma, as even a man fully clad in steel was susceptible to being stunned by a steel mace swung directly at their helmeted head.

By the 15th century, full plate armour (made of hardened and spring-tempered steel plates) was commonplace in Western Europe; thus, impetus was placed on the development of weaponry that could defeat a man wearing such pieces of armour without sacrificing versatility. The poleaxe was one such weapon that demonstrates this focus, combining an axe head with both a spear point and a hammerhead on a long wooden shaft. Swords in particular had their points narrowed and their grips lengthened in order to accommodate the use of both hands for a more forceful swing or thrust. As these and other such weapons became more common, tactics that made better use of these weapons were developed and eventually became so effective as to render armour almost useless. This subsequently resulted in the decline of the knightly order, since such tactics favoured the use of massed troops instead of individually talented warriors.

to:

Cutting motions are of limited use against metal armor. To get through to someone who is clad in steel, you'll really need more of a stab, or a thrust; this was true even in the days of maille[[note]]calling it "chain mail" is redundant, as there ''is'' no such thing as non-chain mail. You can have scales ''over'' mail, or plate over mail, or even splinted mail which has integrated plates, but all of these involve chain.[[/note]] and only grew worse as full plate armor was layered over it. Alternatively, one could also cause injury through armour using sheer blunt force trauma, as even a man fully clad in steel was susceptible to being stunned by a steel mace swung directly at their helmeted head.

head. That said, in early periods such as Viking Age Europe you would probably find that most non-elite combatants didn't wear any metal armor besides a helmet, and relied mostly on their shields, meaning that a sword that could cut well was still very useful.

By the 15th century, full plate armour (made of hardened and spring-tempered steel plates) was commonplace in Western Europe; thus, impetus was placed on the development of weaponry that could defeat a man wearing such pieces of armour without sacrificing versatility. The poleaxe pollaxe was one such weapon that demonstrates this focus, combining an axe head with both a spear point and a hammerhead on a long 5-6 foot wooden shaft. Swords in particular had their points narrowed blades made narrower and stiffer and their grips lengthened in order to accommodate the use of both hands for a more forceful swing or thrust. As these and other such weapons became more common, tactics that made better use of these weapons were developed and eventually became so thrust, but the most effective as technique for fighting in armor was "half-swording", or gripping the middle of the blade with the off hand to render armour almost useless. This subsequently resulted guide the point into the gaps in the decline plate. The increasing effectiveness of firearms and pike formations in the knightly order, since such tactics 16th century favoured the use of massed troops instead of individually talented warriors.
warriors, and the fully armored knight wielding the lance was replaced by the three-quarter or half-armored cuirassier armed with a sword and a pair of pistols.
9th Dec '16 1:53:17 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[caption-width-right:350:One thing they all can do: kill (and look {{badass}}).]]

to:

[[caption-width-right:350:One thing they all can do: kill (and look {{badass}}).badass).]]
30th Sep '16 4:14:21 PM aurora369
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

'''Flamberge'''
* A flamberge, which means flaming sword, was not a single type of sword, but rather a shape of blade: wavy, curved many times. There could be a small flamberge sidesword, or a large flamberge greatsword. The waves on the blade widened the wound, provided for some saw-like armor cutting properties and made the wounds inflicted by such a sword much harder to treat. This made flamberges very effective, but inhumane; there were numerous bans on these blades, and a soldier taken prisoner with a flamberge was usually executed on spot. Flamberges, however, were expensive to craft; it took a lot of skill to hammer all those waves on a blade, and if you just grind them on, the resulting blade will be very structurally weak.
11th Sep '16 8:27:17 PM MrWoodchip
Is there an issue? Send a Message


There are also a number of now-overlooked sub-techniques to go with swordsmanship: do you have a two-hand sword or would you like something in your off-hand (sword sizes can be roughly split into 2-handed[[note]]The real life {{BFS}}s, like the German [[OneHandedZweihander zweihander]], the Italian spadone or the Iberian montante (all different styles of the same weapon). The shortest started at around just under a metre and a half but could go as far as two and tended to weigh 2 to 3 kilograms.[[/note]], hand-and-a-half[[note]]This is usually what someone means when they say "Bastard Sword" or "Longsword". Swords that were short and light enough to use one handed, but had a longer hilt which meant they could be used with both hands for more power and speed. They tended to be only slightly longer and heavier than one-handed swords.[[/note]] or one-handed[[note]]No more than a metre in length and either designed specifically to be used with something else in your off hand (such as a traditional arming sword with a shield) or just be a light blade that didn't need more than one hand to use (e.g. machetes, cutlasses). Either way, they tended to weigh one kilo or less.[[/note]])? What would you like? A dagger or main gauche, for counter-attacks? A buckler, for parrying? A large wooden shield, which might trap your opponent's blade? How about half-swording -- which is when you grab your own sword halfway down the blade[[note]]perfectly safe as long as you hold on firmly and don't slide your flesh against the edge[[http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwuQPfvSSlo/]].[[/note]] for use against armor? Traditional DualWielding, with two swords of similar make, was an extremely unorthodox technique both in the East and West, and today is mostly excused by {{Rule of Cool}}. If you're on horseback, you'll probably opt to simply hold your sword out on one side and drag it along the ground while you gallop, or to simply hack and slash from the superior vantage point provided by your mount.

to:

There are also a number of now-overlooked sub-techniques to go with swordsmanship: do you have a two-hand sword or would you like something in your off-hand (sword sizes can be roughly split into 2-handed[[note]]The real life {{BFS}}s, like the German [[OneHandedZweihander zweihander]], the Italian spadone or the Iberian montante (all different styles of the same weapon). The shortest started at around just under a metre and a half but could go as far as two and tended to weigh 2 to 3 kilograms.[[/note]], hand-and-a-half[[note]]This is usually what someone means when they say "Bastard Sword" or "Longsword". Swords that were short and light enough to use one handed, but had a longer hilt which meant they could be used with both hands for more power and speed. They tended to be only slightly longer and heavier than one-handed swords.[[/note]] or one-handed[[note]]No more than a metre in length and either designed specifically to be used with something else in your off hand (such as a traditional arming sword with a shield) or just be a light blade that didn't need more than one hand to use (e.g. machetes, cutlasses). Either way, they tended to weigh one kilo or less.[[/note]])? What would you like? A dagger or main gauche, for counter-attacks? A buckler, for parrying? A large wooden shield, which might trap your opponent's blade? How about half-swording -- which is when you grab your own sword halfway down the blade[[note]]perfectly safe as long as you hold on firmly and don't slide your flesh against the edge[[http://https://www.edge[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vwuQPfvSSlo/]].[[/note]] for use against armor? Traditional DualWielding, with two swords of similar make, was an extremely unorthodox technique both in the East and West, and today is mostly excused by {{Rule of Cool}}. If you're on horseback, you'll probably opt to simply hold your sword out on one side and drag it along the ground while you gallop, or to simply hack and slash from the superior vantage point provided by your mount.
21st May '16 12:29:49 PM AnonFangeekGirl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:


!! Southeast Asian Swords
* The [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris kris]] was usually a dagger, but it had sword variants (also known as kalis). The kris has an asymmetrical blade with a wavelike pattern, which would widen wounds the sword inflicted.
21st May '16 12:09:26 PM machiavellianFictionist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


'''Spadroon/Infantry Officer's Sword'''
* The spadroon is a weapon that attempts to combine the cutting capacity of the broadsword of it's era with the convenience of the smallsword. In theory the concept of a broadsword or backsword blade on a smallsword hilt is not particularly bad, but in practice the spadroon was considered a spectacularly mediocre weapon. This was because most models tried to make the sword as light as possible, resulting in a blade to flexible to thrust properly and too narrow to cut to any significant effect. The 1796 Pattern British Infantry Officer's Sword, for example, was often refereed to as "the perfect encumbrance". Even so, the concept was still solid, and in the nineteenth century it evolved into many excellent models of infantry officer's swords. Only this time, a narrow blade very similar to that of a short rapier was coupled with a very light and simple sabre-like hilt. The French Model 1882 Infantry Officer's Sword is a perfect example.

to:

'''Spadroon/Infantry Officer's '''Spadroon/Officer's Sword'''
* The spadroon is a weapon that attempts to combine the cutting capacity of the broadsword of it's era with the convenience of the smallsword. In theory the concept of a broadsword or backsword blade on a smallsword hilt is not particularly bad, but in practice the spadroon was considered a spectacularly mediocre weapon. This was because most models tried to make the sword as light as possible, resulting in a blade to flexible to thrust properly and too narrow to cut to any significant effect. The 1796 Pattern British Infantry Officer's Sword, for example, was often refereed to as "the perfect encumbrance". Even so, the concept was still solid, and in the nineteenth century it evolved into many excellent models of infantry officer's swords. Only this time, a narrow blade very similar to that of a short rapier was coupled with a very light and simple sabre-like hilt. The French Model 1882 Infantry Officer's Sword is a perfect example.
14th May '16 6:22:14 PM Zxczxczbfgman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The ''messer'' and it's variants were mostly used in German-speaking lands in the 14th-16th centuries. A similar weapon known as the ''falchion'' was in use across Europe from the 11th-14th centuries.

to:

* The ''messer'' and it's variants were mostly used in German-speaking lands in the 14th-16th centuries. A similar weapon known as the ''falchion'' was in use across Europe from the 11th-14th centuries.
centuries. The fundamental difference between a messer and a falchion lies in the grip construction; falchions use a guard/grip/pommel arrangement, like a "real" sword, while messers use flat grip panels either side of a flat, broad tang, more like a common kitchen knife.



* A somewhat rare variant of the longsword was the estoc, essentially an edgeless longsword with either a diamond or triangle blade profile. This was a weapon specialized for armored combat, first appearing in the 15th century and becoming more common in the 16th century.

to:

* A somewhat rare variant of the longsword was the estoc, essentially an edgeless longsword with either a diamond or triangle blade profile. This was a weapon specialized for armored combat, first appearing in the 15th century and becoming more common in the 16th century.
century. Since it was a pure thrusting weapon, but much heavier than the later rapier, it was often used as what amounted to a short, heavy lance (since the main wooden lance often broke during the charge). The later "koncerz" (essentially a one-handed estoc with a knuckle guard), famously used by the Winged Hussars, was an extension of the concept.
2nd May '16 8:29:13 AM machiavellianFictionist
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The European sabre appeared during the 16h century in Eastern Europe. The Hungarian and Polish versions are the most well known today, both owing a lot of their features to the scimitars introduced to those regions by the Ottoman Turks. The blades of these weapons were similarly identical to their Turkish predecessors, but the hilts resembled the designs Europeans would eventually adopt, with the iconic D-shaped knuckle bow appearing in the 17th century. Other likely predecessor were the curved swords of Magyars of the early middle ages, who would later become the Hungarians.

to:

* The European sabre appeared during the 16h century in Eastern Europe. The Hungarian and Polish versions are the most well known today, both owing a lot of their features to the scimitars introduced to those regions by the Ottoman Turks. The blades of these weapons were similarly identical to their Turkish predecessors, but the hilts resembled the designs Europeans would eventually adopt, with the iconic D-shaped knuckle bow appearing in the 17th century. Other likely predecessor predecessors were the curved swords of Magyars of the early middle ages, who would later become the Hungarians.
This list shows the last 10 events of 240. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Swords