History UsefulNotes / Suicide

22nd Oct '16 11:22:18 AM MasterofGalaxies4628
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While it is impossible to pin down a single cause of depression, there are many diagnosable symptoms that almost entirely stem from widespread changes in brain activity. Sufferers become either agitated (in the clinical sense; experiencing constant irritation, stress, and anxiety) or lethargic (both mental and physical capabilities are severely diminished), but the common result is that neither are able to feel ''happy'', or even their former baselines of "normal." A correlation (note that the direction of causation is still debated) also seen between depression/suicide and over-general memory; the inability to pinpoint specific happy or depressed periods, leading to the understatement of the former and overstatement of the latter.

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While it is impossible to pin down a single cause of depression, there are many diagnosable symptoms that almost entirely stem from widespread changes in brain activity. Sufferers become either agitated (in the clinical sense; experiencing constant irritation, stress, and anxiety) or lethargic (both mental and physical capabilities are severely diminished), but the common result is that neither are able to feel ''happy'', or even their former baselines of "normal." A correlation (note that the direction of causation is still debated) also seen between depression/suicide and over-general memory; the inability to pinpoint specific happy or depressed periods, leading to the [[AccentuateTheNegative understatement of the former and overstatement of the latter.
latter]].



* Misconception: '''a suicidal person must have substantial reason to feel that way.''' Many people are only familiar with the extreme form of DrivenToSuicide, where a single and severe emotional trauma makes the person's reason for killing themselves clear. While this can be the case, even a long string of disappointments or a series of moderate disappointments in a short enough time can become unbearable. In the case of a family history of depression, there really might be no situational reason to explain their depression; they just had [[CosmicPlaything bad luck with genetics.]]

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* Misconception: '''a '''A suicidal person must have substantial reason to feel that way.''' Many people are only familiar with the extreme form of DrivenToSuicide, where a single and severe emotional trauma makes the person's reason for killing themselves clear. While this can certainly be the case, even [[TraumaCongaLine a long string of disappointments or a series of moderate disappointments in a short enough time time]] can become unbearable. In the case of a family history of depression, there really might be no situational reason to explain their depression; they just had [[CosmicPlaything bad luck with genetics.]]



** That said, going too far in the other direction and assuming that suicidality is only out of a known biological mental illness is also a huge misconception and mistake. It IS possible to be DrivenToSuicide, especially in situations involving UsefulNotes/{{Abuse}} to the point where the abuse (especially emotional abuse) has entirely destroyed someone's self-concept or taken away their will to live. Do not immediately assume that a suicidal person's family or religious organization is somehow always "on their side" or "trying to save them from themselves" - these are two groups that ''can'' and sometimes ''do'' inflict such pervasive emotional abuse. Also, some people with no or only mild apparent previous mental illness ''can'' be DrivenToSuicide by a sudden tragedy - sudden loss of a meaningful person such as a relative or spouse/lover to death and severe financial loss are two huge risk factors. In this case, they think that they're literally facing a FateWorseThanDeath. [[note]] There is actually a strong connection between economic recessions/depressions/austerity and suicides, one ''not'' explained by the lack of or postponement of seeking mental health services during such - financial loss ''itself'' is the suicide-inspiring factor.[[/note]]
* Misconception: '''All suicidality is a result of an episode of mental illness, suicidal people are all "crazy" or "psychotic."''': This is HollywoodPsychology in action. While psychosis is a frequent factor in suicide (note the high rate among untreated/badly treated schizophrenics, and mixed manic/depressed episodes in Bipolar 1 are close behind for it), many people attempt or even commit suicide simply because the pain of their life situation has exceeded their ability to cope with said pain, and many times this is a result of hyperrealistic pessimism or traumatic events (including abuse, rape, the loss of loved ones, extreme financial loss and/or social ostracism), ''not'' loss of touch with reality. As said above, it ''is'' possible to be DrivenToSuicide, and even the SeenItAllSuicide out of sheer annoyance and boredom with life is possible. While there is some argument that clinical depression is a part of the inability to cope with pain, to fail to recognize and legitimize the suffering of victims who are in serious, legitimate pain for reasons ''outside their own mind'' often only makes the situation worse. This is especially true with those who are contemplating suicide for financial reasons, as mentioned above, because something as simple as keeping them from becoming homeless or providing them with a sufficiently paying job/unemployment assistance/food/needed medical care can itself end the feeling of hopelessness and save their lives.

to:

** That said, going too far in the other direction and assuming that suicidality is only out of a known biological mental illness is also a huge misconception and mistake. It IS ''is'' possible to be DrivenToSuicide, especially in situations involving UsefulNotes/{{Abuse}} to the point where the abuse (especially emotional abuse) has entirely destroyed someone's self-concept or taken away their will to live. Do not immediately assume that a suicidal person's family or religious organization is somehow always "on their side" or "trying to save them from themselves" - these are two groups that ''can'' and sometimes ''do'' inflict such pervasive emotional abuse. Also, some people with no or only mild apparent previous mental illness ''can'' be DrivenToSuicide by a sudden tragedy - sudden loss of a meaningful person such as a relative or spouse/lover to death and severe financial loss are two huge risk factors. In this case, they think that they're literally facing a FateWorseThanDeath. [[note]] There [[note]]There is actually a strong connection between economic recessions/depressions/austerity and suicides, one ''not'' explained by the lack of or postponement of seeking mental health services during such - financial loss ''itself'' is the suicide-inspiring factor.[[/note]]
* Misconception: '''All suicidality is a result of an episode of mental illness, illness; suicidal people are all "crazy" or "psychotic."''': This is HollywoodPsychology in action. While psychosis is a frequent factor in suicide (note the high rate among untreated/badly treated schizophrenics, and mixed manic/depressed episodes in Bipolar 1 are close behind for it), many people attempt or even commit suicide simply because the pain of their life situation has exceeded their ability to cope with said pain, and many times this is a result of hyperrealistic pessimism or traumatic events (including abuse, rape, the loss of loved ones, extreme financial loss and/or social ostracism), ''not'' loss of touch with reality. As said above, it ''is'' possible to be DrivenToSuicide, and even the SeenItAllSuicide out of sheer annoyance and boredom with life is possible. While there is some argument that clinical depression is a part of the inability to cope with pain, to fail to recognize and legitimize the suffering of victims who are in serious, legitimate pain for reasons ''outside their own mind'' often only makes the situation worse. This is especially true with those who are contemplating suicide for financial reasons, as mentioned above, because something as simple as keeping them from becoming homeless or providing them with a sufficiently paying job/unemployment assistance/food/needed medical care can itself end the feeling of hopelessness and save their lives.



* Misconception: '''calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (or are even just an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. This is because:

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* Misconception: '''calling '''Calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (or are even just an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. This is because:



* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are dangerously violent.''' While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others and never will be. In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less lethal methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil for doing so.

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* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are [[AxCrazy dangerously violent.violent]].''' While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others and never will be. In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less lethal methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil for doing so.



* Misconception: '''it is easy to tell when someone is suicidal.''' It has a basis in fact, as most people become unhappy before attempting suicide, but there are different ways of showing such an emotion and many are ''not'' seen as suicidal until someone discovers the body or takes them to the emergency room. This is due to the person believing their existence is unwanted, not revealing their emotions to be less of a burden to others, or denying their feelings in an attempt to make them go away. Finally, they may attempt to work through it themselves or be too proud to accept help, as it is "only in their head." They often force themselves to appear [[StepfordSmiler happy, amused]], or "normal," in which the only people who could tell the difference are close friends and family members--of which the vast majority do not have medical backgrounds, and thus don't have the training to deal with it appropriately. On the other side, those who ''do'' have family in the medical field may hide their symptoms because "a [[TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes doctor/nurse/psychologist's kid shouldn't have any problems]]."

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* Misconception: '''it '''It is easy to tell when someone is suicidal.''' It has a basis in fact, as most people become unhappy before attempting suicide, but there are different ways of showing such an emotion and many are ''not'' seen as suicidal until someone discovers the body or takes them to the emergency room. This is due to the person believing their existence is unwanted, not revealing their emotions to be less of a burden to others, or denying their feelings in an attempt to make them go away. Finally, they may attempt to work through it themselves or be too proud to accept help, as it is "only in their head." They often force themselves to appear [[StepfordSmiler happy, amused]], or "normal," in which the only people who could tell the difference are close friends and family members--of which the vast majority do not have medical backgrounds, and thus don't have the training to deal with it appropriately. On the other side, those who ''do'' have family in the medical field may hide their symptoms because "a [[TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes doctor/nurse/psychologist's kid shouldn't have any problems]]."



*** In many cases, it's the extent of the depression that prevents suicide attempts. The depressed person simply does not have the motivation to kill themselves. If they improve, [[GoneHorriblyRight the motivation can increase without an improvement in feelings]], and the person attempts suicide. [[http://biopsychiatry.com/antidepressants/warnings.html This can prove a problem for those on antidepressants.]].

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*** In many cases, it's the extent of the depression that prevents suicide attempts. The depressed person simply does not have the motivation to kill themselves. If they improve, [[GoneHorriblyRight the motivation can increase without an improvement in feelings]], and the person attempts suicide. [[http://biopsychiatry.com/antidepressants/warnings.html This can prove a problem for those on antidepressants.]].antidepressants]].



* Misconception: '''everything goes back to normal right away.''' While the short-term problem may be dealt with, it can take several months to go back to normal even without the physical recuperation of a suicide attempt. Major depression involves severe chemical imbalance in the person's brain, and relapsing or attempting suicide again after a year is common among nearly half of all sufferers. Even after therapy, it can take several years for the person to genuinely return to normal; further complication is when the person themselves thinks that this is true. They may hide their symptoms of relapse to keep others from worrying, or go for years without further treatment in the mistaken belief that they "should be back to normal." Even worse are the cases where the suicide is taken for a joke or forced to be abandoned, and the depressing events continue.

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* Misconception: '''everything '''Everything goes back to normal right away.''' While the short-term problem may be dealt with, it can take several months to go back to normal even without the physical recuperation of a suicide attempt. Major depression involves severe chemical imbalance in the person's brain, and relapsing or attempting suicide again after a year is common among nearly half of all sufferers. Even after therapy, it can take several years for the person to genuinely return to normal; further complication is when the person themselves thinks that this is true. They may hide their symptoms of relapse to keep others from worrying, or go for years without further treatment in the mistaken belief that they "should be back to normal." Even worse are the cases where the suicide is taken for a joke or forced to be abandoned, and the depressing events continue.



* Misconception: '''all suicides leave suicide notes, so if a suicide doesn't leave a note either the attempt wasn't serious or it wasn't really suicide.''' Again, utter nonsense perpetuated by Hollywood. Most suicides don't leave notes. In some countries fewer than one in ten suicides leave notes. It's more common in the US specifically because of media depictions.
* Misconception: '''the average suicide victim is a young adult.''' This varies hugely from country to country, but in most Western countries elders commit suicide at a much higher rate than younger people, and contrary to conventional wisdom it's not due to age or health but almost wholly due to depression.

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* Misconception: '''all '''All suicides leave suicide notes, so if a suicide doesn't leave a note either the attempt wasn't serious or it wasn't really suicide.''' Again, utter nonsense perpetuated by Hollywood. Most suicides don't leave notes. In some countries fewer than one in ten suicides leave notes. It's more common in the US specifically because of media depictions.
* Misconception: '''the '''The average suicide victim is a young adult.''' This varies hugely from country to country, but in most Western countries elders commit suicide at a much higher rate than younger people, and contrary to conventional wisdom it's not due to age or health but almost wholly due to depression.



* Misconception: '''anyone who considers or attempts suicide is being selfish and cowardly.''' [[SuicideIsShameful This is a very pervasive stereotype]], and also one of the most untrue. People attempt suicide for a variety of reasons, whether that's due to a long history of depression or recent traumas, and oftentimes people in the grip of depression who are considering suicide attempt it out of a desire for it "all to be over." The best way to help someone who's attempted or is about to attempt suicide is not to tell them they're being 'selfish' or 'inconsiderate', but to assist them in getting the help they need. Sometimes, the suicidal person will feel that they are burdening society with their existence and ''actually feels selfish for ''not'' killing themselves'' (in other words, they consider themselves to be TheLoad or even TheMillstone in relation to the rest of the world).
** The ''inverse'' is sometimes the case. People who survive or intentionally botch their suicide won't always be happy at first. Some may in fact feel worse, because either [[DeathSeeker they couldn't even manage to]] ''[[DeathSeeker die]]'' [[DeathSeeker properly]], they feel like they've been [[YankTheDogsChain cheated out of relief]], or they feel they "chickened out" and have now burdened their loved ones with financial and emotional stress--the exact thing they wanted to avoid. It is a ''very'' twisted form of SurvivorGuilt that is often confusing for loved ones to deal with.
* Misconception: '''all teens aren't really serious about suicide.''' This applies to children as well - some people believe that teenagers are doing it for the attention, and the children are just joking/can't really want to die. But there are teens who are genuinely suffering. If a teen or child is forced to abandon a suicide attempt, and life continues as normal, this can just make it worse and the child/teen more likely to actually commit suicide.
* Misconception: '''If someone isn't serious about suicide, they likely won't commit it.''' This ties into both the aforementioned misconception about suicide notes, the one that teens aren't really serious, and in general the (false) idea that most suicide is not an impulsive act. Accidental suicide doesn't require intent at all - simply ambivalence or not caring as to whether one lives or dies. Most suicides are impulsive, with survivors reporting regretting attempts [[HappilyFailedSuicide almost as soon as they were underway]]. Finally, even some "joke suicides" such as someone engaging in an action likely to cause death on a [[SuicideDare dare]]/as a joke have "[[GoneHorriblyRight succeeded]]," as a short browse of the DarwinAwards will show.
* Misconception: '''medication and/or hospitalization alone will fix it.''' Unfortunately, too many people have this view of mental illness (especially depression) as [[TheMentallyDisturbed something people just need to "snap out of," or something that can be "fixed"]]. While medication and hospitalization can help some, there are some caveats to believing both are some sort of instantly effective cures for depression.

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* Misconception: '''anyone '''Anyone who considers or attempts suicide is being selfish and cowardly.''' [[SuicideIsShameful This is a very pervasive stereotype]], and also one of the most untrue. People attempt suicide for a variety of reasons, whether that's due to a long history of depression or recent traumas, and oftentimes people in the grip of depression who are considering suicide attempt it out of a desire for it "all to be over." The best way to help someone who's attempted or is about to attempt suicide is not to tell them they're being 'selfish' or 'inconsiderate', but to assist them in getting the help they need. Sometimes, the suicidal person will feel that they are burdening society with their existence and ''actually feels selfish for ''not'' killing themselves'' (in other words, they consider themselves to be TheLoad or even TheMillstone in relation to the rest of the world).
** The ''inverse'' is sometimes the case. People who [[BungledSuicide survive or intentionally botch their suicide suicide]] won't always be happy at first. Some may in fact feel worse, because either [[DeathSeeker they couldn't even manage to]] ''[[DeathSeeker die]]'' [[DeathSeeker properly]], they feel like they've been [[YankTheDogsChain cheated out of relief]], or they feel they "chickened out" and have now burdened their loved ones with financial and emotional stress--the exact thing they wanted to avoid. It is a ''very'' twisted form of SurvivorGuilt that is often confusing for loved ones to deal with.
* Misconception: '''all '''All teens aren't really serious about suicide.''' This applies to children as well - some people believe that teenagers are doing it for the attention, and the children are just joking/can't really want to die. But there are teens who are genuinely suffering. If a teen or child is forced to abandon a suicide attempt, and life continues as normal, this can just make it worse and the child/teen more likely to actually commit suicide.
* Misconception: '''If someone isn't serious about suicide, they likely won't commit it.''' This ties into both the aforementioned misconception about suicide notes, the one that teens aren't really serious, and in general the (false) idea that most suicide is suicides are not an impulsive act.acts. Accidental suicide doesn't require intent at all - simply ambivalence or not caring as to whether one lives or dies. Most suicides are impulsive, with survivors reporting regretting attempts [[HappilyFailedSuicide almost as soon as they were underway]]. Finally, even some "joke suicides" such as someone engaging in an action likely to cause death on a [[SuicideDare dare]]/as a joke have "[[GoneHorriblyRight succeeded]]," as a short browse of the DarwinAwards will show.
* Misconception: '''medication '''Medication and/or hospitalization alone will fix it.''' Unfortunately, too many people have this view of mental illness (especially depression) as [[TheMentallyDisturbed something people just need to "snap out of," or something that can be "fixed"]]. While medication and hospitalization can help some, there are some caveats to believing both are some sort of instantly effective cures for depression.



* Misconception: '''Depressed or suicidal people must be living wrong, getting religion/getting sober/committing to a natural lifestyle/manifesting positive thoughts will fix it!''' This is one of the most damaging and often suicide-inspiring misconceptions of depression there is. It makes the guilt and self-blame a depression sufferer already has far worse to believe that their suffering is their own fault. It's also one that can lead people suffering from depression to make life choices that at best do nothing and at worst destroy their lives with no benefit.

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* Misconception: '''Depressed or suicidal people must be living wrong, wrong; getting religion/getting sober/committing to a natural lifestyle/manifesting positive thoughts will fix it!''' This is one of the most damaging and often suicide-inspiring misconceptions of depression there is. It makes the guilt and self-blame a depression sufferer already has far worse to believe that their suffering is their own fault. It's also one that can lead people suffering from depression to make life choices that at best do nothing and at worst destroy their lives with no benefit.



*** If preventing suicide was as easy as "thinking positively," and "having faith," bipolar 1 manic episodes would have ''zero'' suicide risk - as opposed to the ''increased'' risk of suicide that they actually have. Persons, who are in a manic state are definitely having ''too much'' of faith and positive thoughts - it's called "grandiosity" and a "feeling of invincibility" - ''so much so'' that it is out of touch with reality and that they are likely to commit accidental suicide by taking risks that have a large chance of death (e.g. believing they can walk on a freeway without being hit by cars, using firearms with no regard for [[UsefulNotes/GunSafety safe practices]], believing they are truly physically invincible or simply not thinking of how risky an activity is until they are already risking their life).

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*** If preventing suicide was as easy as "thinking positively," and "having faith," bipolar 1 manic episodes would have ''zero'' suicide risk - as opposed to the ''increased'' risk of suicide that they actually have. Persons, Persons who are in a manic state are definitely having ''too much'' of faith and positive thoughts - it's called "grandiosity" and a "feeling of invincibility" - ''so much so'' that it is out of touch with reality and that they are likely to commit accidental suicide by taking risks that have a large chance of death (e.g. believing they can walk on a freeway without being hit by cars, using firearms with no regard for [[UsefulNotes/GunSafety safe practices]], believing they are truly physically invincible or simply not thinking of how risky an activity is until they are already risking their life).



** '''[[HairTriggerTemper Unusual or constant anger/irritability or irrational rage.]]''' This is more common in male sufferers (due to many cultures viewing anger/rage/violence as more acceptable for men than crying, and to a lesser degree due to how the male brain is wired and due to testosterone itself - men are hormonally less prone to crying episodes), and it's also common as a result of mixed states in bipolar, or bipolar people who are heavy drinkers or stimulant users.

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** '''[[HairTriggerTemper Unusual or constant anger/irritability or irrational rage.]]''' This is more common in male sufferers (due to many cultures viewing anger/rage/violence as more acceptable for men [[MenDontCry than crying, crying]], and to a lesser degree due to how the male brain is wired and due to testosterone itself - men are hormonally less prone to crying episodes), and it's also common as a result of mixed states in bipolar, or bipolar people who are heavy drinkers or stimulant users.
6th Oct '16 7:31:29 PM nombretomado
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* The infamous case of [[http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1356&dat=20020526&id=VOJPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0ggEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6973,4696794 Shawn Woolley]], the game addict who was (supposedly) driven to suicide by ''EverQuest''. In reality his mother drove him to it. Everybody just blamed ''EverQuest'' because [[NewMediaAreEvil it was more convenient]].

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* The infamous case of [[http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1356&dat=20020526&id=VOJPAAAAIBAJ&sjid=0ggEAAAAIBAJ&pg=6973,4696794 Shawn Woolley]], the game addict who was (supposedly) driven to suicide by ''EverQuest''.''VideoGame/EverQuest''. In reality his mother drove him to it. Everybody just blamed ''EverQuest'' ''[=EverQuest=]'' because [[NewMediaAreEvil it was more convenient]].
24th Jul '16 2:09:02 PM PugBuddies
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** Police involvement can raise the risk of violence. An unstable but nonviolent person can be killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone with the potential to become violent may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not. Police don't ''want'' a situation to turn violent, and they certainly don't want a suicidal person to die, but police involvement is not appropriate for most suicide attempts.

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** Police involvement can raise the risk of violence. An unstable but nonviolent person can be killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone with the potential to become violent may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not. Police don't ''want'' a situation to turn violent, and they certainly don't want a suicidal person to die, but police involvement is not appropriate for most suicide attempts.



** At the same time, with ''some'' attempts, it ''is'' possible to get a person to a hospital without involving the police. This can be accomplished by ''not'' mentioning suicide in the emergency services call if the person isn't an active threat (e.g. overdoses, cutting when the cutting implement is no longer in reach/usable) but by explaining that it is an accident/ medical problem (and ''not'' requesting no police be sent, as this raises suspicions) and only mentioning that it was a suicide attempt once at the hospital. Or, if the person isn't in danger of immediate death (e.g. they've overdosed but are still awake and breathing, they cut across their wrists and the wrists are bandaged) to call a private medical transport or to drive them to the hospital yourself.
*** However, if the person is in serious medical condition, ''do not prioritize avoiding police involvement over their life.'' Do whatever it takes to get them to the hospital in time to save them.

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** At the same time, with ''some'' attempts, it ''is'' possible to get a person to a hospital without involving the police. This can be accomplished by ''not'' mentioning suicide in the emergency services call if the person isn't an active threat (e.g. overdoses, cutting when the cutting implement is no longer in reach/usable) but by explaining that it is an accident/ medical problem (and ''not'' requesting no police be sent, as this raises suspicions) and only mentioning that it was a suicide attempt once at the hospital. Or, if the person isn't in danger of immediate death (e.g. they've overdosed but are still awake and breathing, they cut across their wrists and the wrists are bandaged) to call a private medical transport or to drive them to the hospital yourself.
*** However, if
If the person is in serious medical condition, ''do not prioritize avoiding police involvement over their life.'' Do whatever it takes to get them to the hospital medical attention in time to save them. time.
20th Jul '16 5:27:11 PM PugBuddies
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*** However, if the person is in serious medical condition, ''do not prioritize avoiding police involvement over their life.'' Do whatever it takes to get them to the hospital in time to save them. If that means involving the police, so be it.

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*** However, if the person is in serious medical condition, ''do not prioritize avoiding police involvement over their life.'' Do whatever it takes to get them to the hospital in time to save them. If that means involving the police, so be it.
20th Jul '16 5:24:10 PM PugBuddies
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* Misconception: '''All suicidality is a result of an episode of mental illness, suicidal people are all "crazy" or "psychotic."''': This is one that is a case of HollywoodPsychology and generalization. While it is definitely true that psychosis is a frequent factor in suicide (note the high rate among untreated/badly treated schizophrenics, and mixed manic/depressed episodes in Bipolar 1 are close behind for it), ''many'' people attempt or even commit suicide simply because the pain of their life situation has exceeded their ability to cope with said pain, and many times this is a result of ''hyperrealistic'' pessimism or actual, real traumatizing events (including abuse, rape, the loss of loved ones, extreme financial loss and/or social ostracism), ''not'' loss of touch with reality. As said above, it ''is'' possible to be DrivenToSuicide, and even the SeenItAllSuicide out of sheer annoyance and boredom with life is possible. While there is some argument that clinical depression is a part of the inability to cope with pain, to fail to recognize and legitimize the suffering of victims who are in serious, legitimate pain for reasons ''outside their own mind'' often only makes the situation worse. This is especially true with those who are contemplating suicide for financial reasons, as mentioned above, because something as simple as keeping them from becoming homeless or providing them with a sufficiently paying job/unemployment assistance/food/needed medical care can itself end the feeling of hopelessness and save their lives.

to:

* Misconception: '''All suicidality is a result of an episode of mental illness, suicidal people are all "crazy" or "psychotic."''': This is one that is a case of HollywoodPsychology and generalization. in action. While it is definitely true that psychosis is a frequent factor in suicide (note the high rate among untreated/badly treated schizophrenics, and mixed manic/depressed episodes in Bipolar 1 are close behind for it), ''many'' many people attempt or even commit suicide simply because the pain of their life situation has exceeded their ability to cope with said pain, and many times this is a result of ''hyperrealistic'' hyperrealistic pessimism or actual, real traumatizing traumatic events (including abuse, rape, the loss of loved ones, extreme financial loss and/or social ostracism), ''not'' loss of touch with reality. As said above, it ''is'' possible to be DrivenToSuicide, and even the SeenItAllSuicide out of sheer annoyance and boredom with life is possible. While there is some argument that clinical depression is a part of the inability to cope with pain, to fail to recognize and legitimize the suffering of victims who are in serious, legitimate pain for reasons ''outside their own mind'' often only makes the situation worse. This is especially true with those who are contemplating suicide for financial reasons, as mentioned above, because something as simple as keeping them from becoming homeless or providing them with a sufficiently paying job/unemployment assistance/food/needed medical care can itself end the feeling of hopelessness and save their lives.



* Misconception: '''calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (even being an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. This is because:
** Police involvement, especially police involvement that ends badly, can shut off communication and encourage someone who needs, above all else, to talk and share and be open with their emotions to instead be so afraid of consequences from a law enforcement visit, that they [[PoorCommunicationKills close off communication]] and/or [[StepfordSmiler pretend happiness]] [[PoorCommunicationKills rather than openly communicating pain]]. ''You do not know'' if someone is being an AttentionWhore or if they actually need to talk.
** Not all police officers are understanding of suicide attempts and suicidality, especially among women and GLBTQIA people or with people they've had prior contacts with for suicide attempts. You may have an understanding cop answer the call; you may have the call answered by a cop who has never handled a suicidal person before, or who panics, or who does any number of things that can make the situation worse.
** Police involvement can raise the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone with the potential to become violent may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not. Police don't ''want'' a situation to turn violent, and they certainly don't want a suicidal person to die, but police involvement is not appropriate for most suicide attempts.

to:

* Misconception: '''calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (even being (or are even just an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. This is because:
** Police involvement, especially police involvement that ends badly, can shut off communication and encourage someone who needs, above all else, to talk and share and be open with their emotions to instead be so afraid shut down. Due to fear of consequences from a law enforcement visit, that (misplaced or not) they can [[PoorCommunicationKills close off communication]] and/or [[StepfordSmiler pretend happiness]] [[PoorCommunicationKills rather than openly communicating pain]]. ''You do not know'' if someone is being an AttentionWhore or if they actually need to talk.pain]].
** Not all police officers are understanding of suicide attempts and suicidality, especially among women and GLBTQIA people or with people they've had prior contacts with for suicide attempts. Some police officers ''are'' understanding; others may assume it's a false alarm when it is in fact very real. You may have an understanding cop answer the call; you may have the call answered by a cop who has never handled a suicidal person before, or who panics, or who does any number of things that can make the situation worse.
** Police involvement can raise the risk of violence. Someone An unstable who is otherwise not violent may but nonviolent person can be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone with the potential to become violent may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not. Police don't ''want'' a situation to turn violent, and they certainly don't want a suicidal person to die, but police involvement is not appropriate for most suicide attempts.



* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are dangerously violent.''' While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others and never will be. In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less lethal methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, ''don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil'' for doing so.

to:

*** However, if the person is in serious medical condition, ''do not prioritize avoiding police involvement over their life.'' Do whatever it takes to get them to the hospital in time to save them. If that means involving the police, so be it.
* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are dangerously violent.''' While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others and never will be. In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less lethal methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, ''don't don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil'' evil for doing so.
20th Jul '16 5:05:26 PM PugBuddies
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* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are dangerously violent.''' This is one of the absolute worst misconceptions of suicidal people there is (and has led to their being killed or gravely injured "for officer safety" by police officers, see above) as well as causing even well-meaning friends and family to avoid them fearing they will be the next mass murderer or the like. While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others ''and never will be.'' In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less likely to be successful methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, ''don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil'' for doing so.

to:

* Misconception: '''People even experiencing thoughts of suicide (much less attempting it) are dangerously violent.''' This is one of the absolute worst misconceptions of suicidal people there is (and has led to their being killed or gravely injured "for officer safety" by police officers, see above) as well as causing even well-meaning friends and family to avoid them fearing they will be the next mass murderer or the like. While suicide is the ultimate act of violence toward ''oneself,'' most people who consider or even attempt it are ''not'' homicidal toward others ''and and never will be.'' be. In fact, the majority of suicide attempts are conducted in privacy/isolation both because the person is often alone/isolated, ''and'' does not want to harm anyone else with the attempt; ''and'' some attempters pick less likely to be successful lethal methods such as drugs or cutting for this very reason. If someone is expressing suicidal thoughts, ''don't treat them like they are dangerous or evil'' for doing so.



* Misconception: '''There is nothing a person who is not a police officer, psychologist, or psychiatrist can do to prevent suicide.''' There ''are'' things a relatively untrained person (especially a friend or lover) can do ''before'' the point of "immediately lethal action" is reached if they are present. Those include making sure there are no firearms/sharp knives, razors, or other cutting implements/drugs or chemicals with a lethal overdose capacity/hanging methods accessible to the person (a quick look around the room should suffice at first), talking to and listening to the person ''as someone who cares about them,'' and providing distractions. As noted below, suicide is often an impulsive act, and if the impulse can be resisted, many such suicides can be prevented. Also, some people are ''far'' more willing to talk to and listen to a lover or friend than they are the police or a doctor, and there ''are'' ways of being there for someone and providing support for someone that aren't formal or the result of training but do help far more than professional help does. Finally, believing too much in this misconception leads people to isolate depressed or suicidal people in fear of them or their emotions, believing that they are only capable of being "handled" by professionals - which worsens depression and feelings of being removed from/dissociated from humanity.
** Removing access to firearms, especially, is ''very'' important. Guns are ''the'' most lethal and irreversible suicide method (shooting yourself in the head has less than a 10% chance of survival, and those who do survive are often left far more permanently physically damaged for the rest of their lives than people who overdose or cut) and many studies have shown their mere presence increases contemplation of suicide.

to:

* Misconception: '''There is nothing a person who is not a police officer, psychologist, or psychiatrist can do to prevent suicide.''' There ''are'' things a relatively untrained person (especially a friend or lover) significant other) can do ''before'' the point of "immediately lethal action" is reached if they are present. Those include making sure there are no firearms/sharp knives, razors, or other cutting implements/drugs or chemicals with a lethal overdose capacity/hanging methods accessible to the person (a quick look around the room should suffice at first), talking to and listening to the person ''as someone who cares about them,'' and providing distractions. As noted below, suicide is often an impulsive act, and if the impulse can be resisted, many such suicides can be prevented. Also, some people are ''far'' more willing to talk to and listen to a lover or friend than they are the police or a doctor, and there ''are'' ways of being there for someone and providing support for someone that aren't formal or the result of training but do help far more than professional help does. Finally, believing too much in this misconception leads people to isolate depressed or suicidal people in fear of them or their emotions, believing that they are only capable of being "handled" by professionals - which worsens depression and feelings of being removed from/dissociated from humanity.
** Removing access to firearms, especially, is ''very'' important. Guns are ''the'' most lethal and irreversible suicide method (shooting yourself in the head has less than a 10% chance of survival, and those who do survive are often left far more permanently physically damaged for the rest of their lives than people who overdose or cut) and many studies have shown there is evidence that their mere presence increases contemplation of suicide.



** This is especially important (so much so that laypeople obtaining some degree of at least suicide prevention "first aid" training is a viable strategy for preventing suicide) in communities that don't relate well to outsiders at all (military or emergency services veterans) or that generally see police and/or mental health professionals as adversarial forces of conformity and to whom some may actually be exactly that (among many others, urban poor or minorities, some LGBTQ people, sex workers, and some parts of the arts and music have this issue with police and sometimes therapists). While professionals may be the ideal, there ''are'' people who will be angered or frightened or silenced by professional involvement as opposed to gratefully receiving it, and nonprofessional help from their own community before a situation becomes immediately lethal is often the best chance they have at staying alive and/or getting professional help.
* Misconception: '''it is easy to tell when someone is suicidal.''' It has a basis in fact, as most people become unhappy before attempting suicide, but there are different ways of showing such an emotion and many are ''not'' thought as suicidal until someone discovers the body or takes them to the emergency room. This is due to the person believing their existence is unwanted, not revealing their emotions to be less of a burden to others, or denying their feelings in an attempt to make them go away. Finally, they may attempt to work through it themselves or be too proud to accept help, as it is "only in their head." They often force themselves to appear [[StepfordSmiler happy, amused]], or "normal," in which the only people who could tell the difference are close friends and family members--of which the vast majority do not have medical backgrounds, and thus don't have the training to deal with it appropriately. On the other side, those who ''do'' have family in the medical field may hide their symptoms because "a [[TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes doctor/nurse/psychologist's kid shouldn't have any problems]]."

to:

** This is especially important (so much so that laypeople obtaining some degree of at least suicide prevention "first aid" training is a viable strategy for preventing suicide) in communities that don't relate well to outsiders at all (military or emergency services veterans) or that generally see who are more likely to distrust police and/or mental health professionals as adversarial forces of conformity and to whom some may actually be exactly that (among many others, urban poor or minorities, some LGBTQ people, sex workers, and some parts of the arts and music have this issue with police and sometimes therapists). artists/musicians). While professionals may be the ideal, there ''are'' people who will be angered or frightened or silenced by professional involvement as opposed to gratefully receiving it, and nonprofessional help from their own community before a situation becomes immediately lethal is often the best chance they have at staying alive and/or getting professional help.
* Misconception: '''it is easy to tell when someone is suicidal.''' It has a basis in fact, as most people become unhappy before attempting suicide, but there are different ways of showing such an emotion and many are ''not'' thought seen as suicidal until someone discovers the body or takes them to the emergency room. This is due to the person believing their existence is unwanted, not revealing their emotions to be less of a burden to others, or denying their feelings in an attempt to make them go away. Finally, they may attempt to work through it themselves or be too proud to accept help, as it is "only in their head." They often force themselves to appear [[StepfordSmiler happy, amused]], or "normal," in which the only people who could tell the difference are close friends and family members--of which the vast majority do not have medical backgrounds, and thus don't have the training to deal with it appropriately. On the other side, those who ''do'' have family in the medical field may hide their symptoms because "a [[TheCobblersChildrenHaveNoShoes doctor/nurse/psychologist's kid shouldn't have any problems]]."



* Misconception: '''All suicides are planned for a long time.''' Many times, ''suicide is impulsive,'' especially in the severely traumatized, the bipolar, people for whom it is the result of a sudden traumatizing event such as rape or the loss of a loved one, and/or those who use drugs with a rush-crash pattern from alcohol to meth, and a viable strategy for preventing it is to get the person to wait out the impulse to commit suicide, with no judgment on their feelings but simply "running down the clock" and keeping them in a safe or safer environment while they are experiencing the impulse to die until it legitimately recedes, at least for the time being. For some of these persons (those suffering from trauma/PTSD and/or complicated grief), treatment itself involves making a suicide "emergency plan" or "safety plan" that relies on their seeking out people and things to help them get past the impulses, because ''nothing'' will entirely eradicate said impulses and a UsefulNotes/{{trigger}} can bring them back.

to:

* Misconception: '''All suicides are planned for a long time.''' Many times, ''suicide is impulsive,'' especially in the severely traumatized, the bipolar, people for whom it is the result of who have suffered a sudden traumatizing event such as rape or the loss of a loved one, and/or those who use drugs with a rush-crash pattern from alcohol to meth, and a viable strategy for preventing it is to get the person to wait out the impulse to commit suicide, with no judgment on their feelings but simply "running down the clock" and keeping them in a safe or safer environment while they are experiencing the impulse to die until it legitimately recedes, at least for the time being. For some of these persons (those suffering from trauma/PTSD and/or complicated grief), treatment itself involves making a suicide "emergency plan" or "safety plan" that relies on their seeking out people and things to help them get past the impulses, because ''nothing'' will entirely eradicate said impulses and a UsefulNotes/{{trigger}} can bring them back.



* Misconception: '''anyone who considers or attempts suicide is being selfish and cowardly.''' [[SuicideIsShameful This is a very pervasive stereotype]], but for obvious reasons, it's one of the most blatantly untrue ones. People attempt suicide for a variety of reasons, whether that's due to a long history of depression or recent traumas, and oftentimes people in the grip of depression who are considering suicide attempt it out of a desire for it "all to be over." The best way to help someone who's attempted or is about to attempt suicide is not to tell them they're being 'selfish' or 'inconsiderate', but to assist them in getting the help they need. Sometimes, the suicidal person will feel that they are burdening society with their existence and ''actually feels selfish for ''not'' killing themselves'' (in other words, they consider themselves to be TheLoad or even TheMillstone in relation to the rest of the world).

to:

* Misconception: '''anyone who considers or attempts suicide is being selfish and cowardly.''' [[SuicideIsShameful This is a very pervasive stereotype]], but for obvious reasons, it's and also one of the most blatantly untrue ones.untrue. People attempt suicide for a variety of reasons, whether that's due to a long history of depression or recent traumas, and oftentimes people in the grip of depression who are considering suicide attempt it out of a desire for it "all to be over." The best way to help someone who's attempted or is about to attempt suicide is not to tell them they're being 'selfish' or 'inconsiderate', but to assist them in getting the help they need. Sometimes, the suicidal person will feel that they are burdening society with their existence and ''actually feels selfish for ''not'' killing themselves'' (in other words, they consider themselves to be TheLoad or even TheMillstone in relation to the rest of the world).



*** Also, if you are severely depressed (or alternately, in a manic or psychotic episode), while you may be pondering religious ideas or thoughts, you are likely not of a sound enough mind to choose a religion or belief system wisely. You should wait until you are in a better frame of mind. Many highly demanding or even outright abusive or fraudulent religious sects actively recruit mentally ill/troubled people. In such a state you ''are'' more vulnerable to making very bad decisions.

to:

*** Also, if you are severely depressed (or alternately, in a manic or psychotic episode), while you may be pondering religious ideas or thoughts, you are likely not of a sound enough mind to choose a religion or belief system wisely. You should wait until you are in a better frame of mind. Many highly demanding or even outright abusive or fraudulent religious sects actively recruit mentally ill/troubled people. In such a state you ''are'' more vulnerable to making very bad decisions.
18th Jul '16 4:54:28 PM PugBuddies
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* Misconception: '''calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (even being an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. The reasons why calling police on a suicidal person can be NiceJobBreakingItHero are below:
** Police involvement, especially police involvement that ends badly or the threat of police, can shut off communication and encourage someone who needs, above all else, to talk and share and be open with their emotions to instead be so afraid of consequences from a law enforcement visit, that they [[PoorCommunicationKills close off communication]] and/or [[StepfordSmiler pretend happiness]] [[PoorCommunicationKills rather than openly communicating pain]]. ''You do not know'' if someone is being an AttentionWhore or if they actually need to talk, and silencing helps no one.
** Not all police officers are understanding of suicide attempts and suicidality, especially among women and GLBTQIA people or with people they've had prior contacts with for suicide attempts. Having a cop come out and berate someone for being a drama queen or telling them they're better off dead will worsen the situation.
** Police involvement raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not.

to:

* Misconception: '''calling police is always the solution.''' Calling authorities on someone or pressing a "suicide notify" button on a post is a last resort - which too many people take as the proper response. The only time one should call authorities is if there is a threat of harm to ''others'' involving the method of choice, or the person is actively violent toward anyone trying to help. If you have any sort of pre-existing friendship with the person threatening suicide (even being an acquaintance), it's generally better to try to talk to them and encourage them to talk to others, or to contact close friends of the person that can help. The reasons why calling police on a suicidal person can be NiceJobBreakingItHero are below:
This is because:
** Police involvement, especially police involvement that ends badly or the threat of police, badly, can shut off communication and encourage someone who needs, above all else, to talk and share and be open with their emotions to instead be so afraid of consequences from a law enforcement visit, that they [[PoorCommunicationKills close off communication]] and/or [[StepfordSmiler pretend happiness]] [[PoorCommunicationKills rather than openly communicating pain]]. ''You do not know'' if someone is being an AttentionWhore or if they actually need to talk, and silencing helps no one.
talk.
** Not all police officers are understanding of suicide attempts and suicidality, especially among women and GLBTQIA people or with people they've had prior contacts with for suicide attempts. Having You may have an understanding cop answer the call; you may have the call answered by a cop come out and berate someone for being who has never handled a drama queen suicidal person before, or telling them they're better off dead will worsen who panics, or who does any number of things that can make the situation.
situation worse.
** Police involvement raises can raise the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone who may potentially be with the potential to become violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not. Police don't ''want'' a situation to turn violent, and they certainly don't want a suicidal person to die, but police involvement is not appropriate for most suicide attempts.
18th Jul '16 2:41:45 PM PugBuddies
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** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives, and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not.

to:

** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives, and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because many police officers are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways and may be unprepared to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not.
18th Jul '16 2:38:11 PM PugBuddies
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** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police feeling threatened, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives (e.g. the "weapons" they had would have at most bruised or scratched an officer in proper gear if even that), and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because ''many'' police officers are trained to [[StopOrIWillShoot force compliance to their orders with violence]] ''and'' are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not.
** Police will investigate/arrest for any "criminal activity" going on in many cases. This may include simply having a bag of marijuana around them or unpaid traffic warrants - so police involvement can leave someone with a lasting criminal record and its repercussions for the rest of their life. Worse, the police may even arrest someone for merely having the tool of their suicide attempt, if it is a gun or certain drugs.

to:

** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police feeling threatened, perceiving a threat where there is none, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives (e.g. the "weapons" they had would have at most bruised or scratched an officer in proper gear if even that), lives, and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because ''many'' many police officers are trained to [[StopOrIWillShoot force compliance to their orders with violence]] ''and'' are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they do not.
** Police will investigate/arrest for any "criminal activity" going on in many cases. This may include simply having a bag of marijuana around them or unpaid traffic warrants - so police involvement can leave someone with a lasting criminal record and its repercussions for the rest of their life. Worse, the police may even arrest someone for merely having the tool of their suicide attempt, if it is a gun or certain drugs.
not.
18th Jul '16 2:15:34 PM PugBuddies
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** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police feeling threatened, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives (e.g. the "weapons" they had would have at most bruised or scratched an officer in proper gear if even that), and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because ''many'' police officers are trained to [[StopOrIWillShoot force compliance to their orders with violence]] ''and'' are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis doesn't immediately obey them and respect their authority. In essence, they believe that ViolenceReallyIsTheAnswer when it in fact is not.

to:

** Police involvement ''heavily'' raises the risk of violence. Someone unstable who is otherwise not violent may be mistaken for violent and killed or seriously injured by police feeling threatened, and someone who may potentially be violent but who can probably be kept from engaging in it may be pushed over the edge by police involvement. In one two-week period in 2013, there were at least four cases of police shooting dead suicidal people who ''posed little or no threat'' to the officers' lives (e.g. the "weapons" they had would have at most bruised or scratched an officer in proper gear if even that), and [[https://www.google.com/search?q=police+brutality+against+mentally+ill&oq=police+violence+against+mentally+ill&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0.7804j0j7&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=93&ie=UTF-8 the trend shows no means of ending]]. This is because ''many'' police officers are trained to [[StopOrIWillShoot force compliance to their orders with violence]] ''and'' are not trained in nonviolent deescalation or in the proper ways to handle a psychological crisis or medical emergency, especially if the person who is ill or in crisis doesn't immediately obey them and respect their authority. In essence, appears to pose a threat to the officers or others when in reality they believe that ViolenceReallyIsTheAnswer when it in fact is do not.
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