History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs

16th Jan '16 11:38:08 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
''Stegosaurus''' tail was muscular and flexible, and could have been put on the ground to lift the animal on its hindlegs and reach higher vegetation (this is not sure however). When swung from side to side, this tail made a [[BewareMyStingerTail powerful weapon]] against enemies. Near the tip of the tail was a group of four long spikes known as the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thagomizer thagomizer]]'', a term that originates from a ''[[TheFarSide Far Side]]'' cartoon, later adopted by the paleontological community (you can find it used in serious scientific publications) in an even more awesome case of AscendedFanon than "raptors".
to:
''Stegosaurus''' tail was muscular and flexible, and could have been put on the ground to lift the animal on its hindlegs and reach higher vegetation (this is not sure however). When swung from side to side, this tail made a [[BewareMyStingerTail powerful weapon]] against enemies. Near the tip of the tail was a group of four long spikes known as the ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thagomizer thagomizer]]'', a term that originates from a ''[[TheFarSide ''[[ComicStrip/TheFarSide Far Side]]'' cartoon, later adopted by the paleontological community (you can find it used in serious scientific publications) in an even more awesome case of AscendedFanon than "raptors".
20th Nov '15 11:19:25 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The ceratopsids’ horn structure was more like cattle’s than to a rhino’s: that is, bony protrusions covered with a horny sheath. Their function is still debated: maybe ceratopsian horns were simply display devices. The frequently-seen "''Triceratops'' goring to death a big carnivore" scene could not be realistic, and some think the frontal horns were too fragile and not pointed enough to go through flesh. Although given the keratinous sheath would have made the horn less likely to break and many animals often use their horns for offensive purposes against carnivores, goring may still be plausible. Another classic hypothesis is that triceratopses locked their horns like deer in head-vs-head combats, based on possible "wounds" found in ceratopsian skulls. However, only some ''Triceratops'' specimens show curved frontal horns apt for that, others had straight horns. The frill was variable, too: some individuals had tubercles on its edges, while others had smooth shields. Generally, most media ''Triceratops''es have tubercled frills.
to:
The ceratopsids’ horn structure was more like cattle’s than to a rhino’s: that is, bony protrusions covered with a horny sheath. Their function is still debated: maybe ceratopsian horns were simply display devices. The frequently-seen "''Triceratops'' goring to death a big carnivore" scene could not be realistic, and some think the frontal horns were too fragile and not pointed enough to go through flesh. Although given the keratinous sheath would have made the horn less likely to break and many animals often use their horns for offensive purposes against carnivores, help better shape it, goring may still be plausible. Another classic hypothesis is that triceratopses locked their horns like deer in head-vs-head combats, based on possible "wounds" found in ceratopsian skulls. However, only some ''Triceratops'' specimens show curved frontal horns apt for that, others had straight horns. The frill was variable, too: some individuals had tubercles on its edges, while others had smooth shields. Generally, most media ''Triceratops''es have tubercled frills.
20th Nov '15 11:17:02 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The ceratopsids’ horn structure was more like cattle’s than to a rhino’s: that is, bony protrusions covered with a horny sheath. Their function is still debated: maybe ceratopsian horns were simply display devices. The frequently-seen "''Triceratops'' goring to death a big carnivore" scene could not be realistic, and some think the frontal horns were too fragile and not pointed enough to go through flesh. Another classic hypothesis is that triceratopses locked their horns like deer in head-vs-head combats, based on possible "wounds" found in ceratopsian skulls. However, only some ''Triceratops'' specimens show curved frontal horns apt for that, others had straight horns. The frill was variable, too: some individuals had tubercles on its edges, while others had smooth shields. Generally, most media ''Triceratops''es have tubercled frills.
to:
The ceratopsids’ horn structure was more like cattle’s than to a rhino’s: that is, bony protrusions covered with a horny sheath. Their function is still debated: maybe ceratopsian horns were simply display devices. The frequently-seen "''Triceratops'' goring to death a big carnivore" scene could not be realistic, and some think the frontal horns were too fragile and not pointed enough to go through flesh. Although given the keratinous sheath would have made the horn less likely to break and many animals often use their horns for offensive purposes against carnivores, goring may still be plausible. Another classic hypothesis is that triceratopses locked their horns like deer in head-vs-head combats, based on possible "wounds" found in ceratopsian skulls. However, only some ''Triceratops'' specimens show curved frontal horns apt for that, others had straight horns. The frill was variable, too: some individuals had tubercles on its edges, while others had smooth shields. Generally, most media ''Triceratops''es have tubercled frills.
20th Nov '15 11:05:04 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The back plates were the most distinctive stegosaurian feature, but it isn't entirely clear what their purpose was. It was debated whether the plates were covered in horn or in skin, but a [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/01/10/stegosaur-skin-plates-sex/ recent study on stegosaur skin impression]] suggests the former is more likely. Defense, thermoregulation, and display (mating or threat) are the classic hyps, but we haven’t definitive proof for any. The early theory that they were used for armor is the most unlikely: the plates were dermic structures not attached to the skeleton, and were rich in blood-vessels (if wounded, they’d have bled a lot, bringing the animal to death). Furthermore the plates are irregularly placed to be used as armor and would leave the animal's sides unprotected. Although if covered in horn they might have had sharp edges, which would make them effective as defense. The "solar panel/radiator" theory was the most followed until recent years: it could explain the vessels, and also the singular arrangement of these plates--they were asymmetrically-placed, giving more surface to solar rays. There is still possibility for this theory, as studies on crocodilian scutes show they have usage for thermoregulartory purposes. ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' popularized the third theory, showing a ''Stegosaurus'' reddening its plates and scaring an ''Allosaurus'' away. However, if used for display, they might also have had the function to make the animal look larger or communicating with others of its kind.
to:
The back plates were the most distinctive stegosaurian feature, but it isn't entirely clear what their purpose was. It was debated whether the plates were covered in horn or in skin, but a [[http://scienceblogs.com/tetrapodzoology/2011/01/10/stegosaur-skin-plates-sex/ recent study on stegosaur skin impression]] suggests the former is more likely. Defense, thermoregulation, and display (mating or threat) are the classic hyps, but we haven’t definitive proof for any. The early theory that they were used for armor is the most unlikely: the plates were dermic structures not attached to the skeleton, and they were rich in blood-vessels (if wounded, they’d have bled a lot, bringing the animal to death). Furthermore the plates are irregularly placed to be used as armor and would leave the animal's sides unprotected. Although if covered in horn they might have had sharp edges, which would make them effective as defense. The "solar panel/radiator" theory was the most followed until recent years: it could explain the vessels, and also the singular arrangement of these plates--they were asymmetrically-placed, giving more surface to solar rays. There is still possibility for this theory, as studies on crocodilian scutes show they have usage for thermoregulartory purposes. ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' popularized the third theory, showing a ''Stegosaurus'' reddening its plates and scaring an ''Allosaurus'' away. However, if used for display, they might also have had the function to make the animal look larger or communicating with others of its kind.
19th Nov '15 11:37:10 AM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
If you see ''Stegosaurus'' in popular media, don't be surprised to see inaccuracies. To this day, it could have paired plates or even plates in a single line, instead of zigzagging in two lines -- and they could be wrongly round or triangular instead of pentagonal. And it could have none, two, three, five, six, or even ''eight'' spikes. These spikes may be shown much shorter than in reality [[note]] The fossil spikes were about three feet in length, and they might have been covered in horn which would have made them larger[[/note]]. In some cases the neck is unrealistically long, like Dinny in AlleyOop, making it resemble a cross between a stegosaurian and a sauropod. The body may be shown as very low-slung and fat (even when faced in the front), and the legs are often stubby. ''Stegosaurus'' may often be depicted with a turtle-like face instead of a horse-shaped one like in real life. Occasionally, it is shown with a beak full of teeth or even worse, ''no beak''. In many old films, ''Stegosaurus'' is shown as a sorta "predestined loser" against big meat-eaters like ''Allosaurus'', ''Ceratosaurus'' or ''[[AnachronismStew Tyrannosaurus]]'', being too slow to defend itself effectively. Later in modern portraits, ''Stegosaurus'' [[TookALevelInBadass took a level in badass]] and more often wins fights with the aforementioned carnivores, like in ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'' or ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', as it is now considered to be agile and flexible in spite of its slow running speed and heavy body.
to:
If you see ''Stegosaurus'' in popular media, don't be surprised to see inaccuracies. To this day, it could have paired plates or even plates in a single line, instead of zigzagging in two lines -- and they could be wrongly round or triangular instead of pentagonal. And it could have none, two, three, five, six, or even ''eight'' spikes. These spikes may be shown much shorter than in reality [[note]] The fossil spikes were about three feet in length, and they might have been covered in horn which would have made them larger[[/note]]. In some cases the neck is unrealistically long, like Dinny in AlleyOop, ''ComicStrip/AlleyOop'', making it resemble a cross between a stegosaurian and a sauropod. The body may be shown as very low-slung and fat (even when faced in the front), and the legs are often stubby. ''Stegosaurus'' may often be depicted with a turtle-like face instead of a horse-shaped one like in real life. Occasionally, it is shown with a beak full of teeth or even worse, ''no beak''. In many old films, ''Stegosaurus'' is shown as a sorta "predestined loser" against big meat-eaters like ''Allosaurus'', ''Ceratosaurus'' or ''[[AnachronismStew Tyrannosaurus]]'', being too slow to defend itself effectively. Later in modern portraits, ''Stegosaurus'' [[TookALevelInBadass took a level in badass]] and more often wins fights with the aforementioned carnivores, like in ''Film/TheLostWorldJurassicPark'' or ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', as it is now considered to be agile and flexible in spite of its slow running speed and heavy body.
10th Nov '15 3:46:46 PM CJCroen1393
Is there an issue? Send a Message
At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare for some reason]]. Speaking of misplaced wildlife, you can expect any of these three to be placed in the same habitat as at least ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Triceratops''. In reality, ''Deinonychus'' and ''Utahraptor'' were already extinct by the time ''T. rex'' came along and ''Velociraptor'' lived on the other side of the planet. However, this inaccuracy was vindicated somewhat by the discovery of ''Acheroraptor'' (described in 2013) and ''Dakotaraptor'' (described in 2015), which greatly resembled ''Velociraptor'' and ''Deinonychus'' respectively, and the latter was roughly the size of ''Utahraptor''.
to:
At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare for some reason]]. Speaking of misplaced wildlife, you can expect any of these three to be placed in the same habitat as at least ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Triceratops''. In reality, ''Deinonychus'' and ''Utahraptor'' were already extinct by the time ''T. rex'' came along and ''Velociraptor'' lived on the other side of the planet.planet[[note]]though a nigh identical relative of ''T. rex'', ''Tarbosaurus bataar'' did coexist with ''Velociraptor''[[/note]]. However, this inaccuracy was vindicated somewhat by the discovery of ''Acheroraptor'' (described in 2013) and ''Dakotaraptor'' (described in 2015), which greatly resembled ''Velociraptor'' and ''Deinonychus'' respectively, and the latter was roughly the size of ''Utahraptor''.
10th Nov '15 3:44:45 PM CJCroen1393
Is there an issue? Send a Message
At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare for some reason]].
to:
At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare for some reason]]. \n Speaking of misplaced wildlife, you can expect any of these three to be placed in the same habitat as at least ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Triceratops''. In reality, ''Deinonychus'' and ''Utahraptor'' were already extinct by the time ''T. rex'' came along and ''Velociraptor'' lived on the other side of the planet. However, this inaccuracy was vindicated somewhat by the discovery of ''Acheroraptor'' (described in 2013) and ''Dakotaraptor'' (described in 2015), which greatly resembled ''Velociraptor'' and ''Deinonychus'' respectively, and the latter was roughly the size of ''Utahraptor''.
24th Oct '15 5:47:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
''Trachodon'' first appeared in pop-media in 1925 (''Film/TheLostWorld'' film adaptation), in which is portrayed as a prey for a giant carnivore. Since then, it became THE duckbill in public consciousness, to the point "trachodont" was also used as a popular synonym of "hadrosaur" (a bit like "brontosaur" as a synonym of sauropod). Since the "renaissance" times, ''Anatosaurus'' has become the most widely-used name. After 1990, ''Trachodon'' rapidly disappeared in pop-consciousness -– even though its ghost is still seen sometimes, like the "brontosaur" one. As it seems, the name ''Edmontosaurus'' hasn’t gone a long way in non-docu media: when an edmontosaurine appears, is simply known as "duckbill," and the crested ''Parasaurolophus'' has become the most portrayed hadrosaur today. Compensating this, edmontosaurines remain still quite common in documentary media, being the only hadrosaurs which could have met TyrannosaurusRex in RealLife. Current dino-books usually show them with the name ''Edmontosaurus'', while "''Anatotitan''" became popularized by ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', and has also appeared in {{Primeval}}. According to the most recent researches, its proper name is either ''Edmontosaurus'' or ''Anatosaurus''.
to:
''Trachodon'' first appeared in pop-media in 1925 (''Film/TheLostWorld'' film adaptation), in which is portrayed as a prey for a giant carnivore. Since then, it became THE duckbill in public consciousness, to the point "trachodont" was also used as a popular synonym of "hadrosaur" (a bit like "brontosaur" as a synonym of sauropod). Since the "renaissance" times, ''Anatosaurus'' has become the most widely-used name. After 1990, ''Trachodon'' rapidly disappeared in pop-consciousness -– even though its ghost is still seen sometimes, like the "brontosaur" one. As it seems, the name ''Edmontosaurus'' hasn’t gone a long way in non-docu media: when an edmontosaurine appears, is simply known as "duckbill," and the crested ''Parasaurolophus'' has become the most portrayed hadrosaur today. Compensating this, edmontosaurines remain still quite common in documentary media, being the only hadrosaurs which could have met TyrannosaurusRex in RealLife. Current dino-books usually show them with the name ''Edmontosaurus'', while "''Anatotitan''" became popularized by ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', and has also appeared in {{Primeval}}.Series/{{Primeval}}. According to the most recent researches, its proper name is either ''Edmontosaurus'' or ''Anatosaurus''.
21st Oct '15 10:28:46 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message
In 2014, ''Spinosaurus'' received an almost-total makeover after new fossils were discovered. In addition to tiny pores in its skull that might have enabled it to sense underwater prey (which was already known by then), ''Spinosaurus'' also had a relatively small pelvis and short hind legs with flat - possibly webbed - hind feet, among other adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle - all in all showing a surprising degree of convergent evolution with the ancestors of modern whales. Unrelated to its amphibious makeover, its reconstruction also gives it a dip in the middle of its dorsal spines similar to that of its relative ''Ichthyovenator''. It has been suggested that the hind limbs were [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/theres-something-fishy-about-spinosaurus9112014 scaled]] [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/there-may-be-more-fishiness-in-spinosaurus9132014 incorrectly]]but then the people who made the discoveries [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/aquatic-spinosaurus-the-authors-responsd9182014 have]] [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.de/2014/09/the-spinosaurus-hindlimb-controversy.html?spref=tw responded]] putting these supposed corrections to doubt. Also, the tall spine on the sail might have [[http://qilong.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/spinosaurus-a-hint/ actually]] been located further back on the body thus forming a more shallow and gradual version of the "classic" ''Spinosaurus'' sail [[note]] The authors of the new reconstruction never gave a reason why they thought the sail was shaped that way. [[/note]], although this too is debatable. Finally, it has been suggested that ''Spinosaurus'' held its neck [[http://theropoda.blogspot.it/2014/09/spinosaurus-revolution-episodio-iv-una.html vertically]] rather than horizontally. This would have shifted the center of gravity back and allow ''Spinosaurus'' to walk bipedally albeit in a [[https://sites.google.com/site/palaeontologyandearthsciences/assignments/spinosauruslocomotiontype-andreacau tripodal stance]].[[note]] Spinosaurus' forelimbs and shoulders seem to lack the weight-bearing adaptations needed for quadrupedal movement. [[/note]] Other alternatives for land locomation are hobbling like a pangolin using its forelimbs to prop itself back up, or maybe even crawling on its belly like a crocodile or a pinniped. Time will tell if the legs are really that short, although it does seem to have shorter legs (but seemingly still a biped) and be almost entirely aquatic.
to:
In 2014, ''Spinosaurus'' received an almost-total makeover after new fossils were discovered. In addition to tiny pores in its skull that might have enabled it to sense underwater prey (which was already known by then), ''Spinosaurus'' also had a relatively small pelvis and short hind legs with flat - possibly webbed - hind feet, among other adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle - all in all showing a surprising degree of convergent evolution with the ancestors of modern whales. Unrelated to its amphibious makeover, its reconstruction also gives it a dip in the middle of its dorsal spines similar to that of its relative ''Ichthyovenator''. It has been suggested that the hind limbs were [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/theres-something-fishy-about-spinosaurus9112014 scaled]] [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/there-may-be-more-fishiness-in-spinosaurus9132014 incorrectly]]but incorrectly]] but then the people who made the discoveries [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/aquatic-spinosaurus-the-authors-responsd9182014 have]] [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.de/2014/09/the-spinosaurus-hindlimb-controversy.html?spref=tw responded]] putting these supposed corrections to doubt. Also, the tall spine on the sail might have [[http://qilong.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/spinosaurus-a-hint/ actually]] been located further back on the body thus forming a more shallow and gradual version of the "classic" ''Spinosaurus'' sail [[note]] The authors of the new reconstruction never gave a reason why they thought the sail was shaped that way. [[/note]], although this too is debatable. Finally, it has been suggested that ''Spinosaurus'' held its neck [[http://theropoda.blogspot.it/2014/09/spinosaurus-revolution-episodio-iv-una.html vertically]] rather than horizontally. This would have shifted the center of gravity back and allow ''Spinosaurus'' to walk bipedally albeit in a [[https://sites.google.com/site/palaeontologyandearthsciences/assignments/spinosauruslocomotiontype-andreacau tripodal stance]].[[note]] Spinosaurus' [[note]]Spinosaurus' forelimbs and shoulders seem to lack the weight-bearing adaptations needed for quadrupedal movement. movement.[[/note]] Other alternatives for land locomation are include hobbling like a pangolin using its forelimbs to prop itself back up, or maybe even crawling on its belly like a crocodile or a pinniped. Time will tell if the legs are really that short, although it does seem to have shorter legs (but seemingly still a biped) and be almost entirely aquatic.
21st Oct '15 10:26:42 PM schoi30
Is there an issue? Send a Message
In 2014, ''Spinosaurus'' received an almost-total makeover after new fossils were discovered. In addition to tiny pores in its skull that might have enabled it to sense underwater prey (which was already known by then), ''Spinosaurus'' also had a relatively small pelvis and short hind legs with flat - possibly webbed - hind feet, among other adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle - all in all showing a surprising degree of convergent evolution with the ancestors of modern whales. Unrelated to its amphibious makeover, its reconstruction also gives it a dip in the middle of its dorsal spines similar to that of its relative ''Ichthyovenator''. It has been suggested that the hind limbs were [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/theres-something-fishy-about-spinosaurus9112014 scaled]] [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/there-may-be-more-fishiness-in-spinosaurus9132014 incorrectly]]but then the people who made the discoveries [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/aquatic-spinosaurus-the-authors-responsd9182014 have]] [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.de/2014/09/the-spinosaurus-hindlimb-controversy.html?spref=tw responded]] putting these supposed corrections to doubt. Also, the tall spine on the sail might have [[http://qilong.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/spinosaurus-a-hint/ actually]] been located further back on the body thus forming a more shallow and gradual version of the "classic" ''Spinosaurus'' sail [[note]] The authors of the new reconstruction never gave a reason why they thought the sail was shaped that way. [[/note]], although this too is debatable. Finally, it has been suggested that ''Spinosaurus'' held its neck [[http://theropoda.blogspot.it/2014/09/spinosaurus-revolution-episodio-iv-una.html vertically]] rather than horizontally. This would have shifted the center of gravity back and allow ''Spinosaurus'' to walk bipedally albeit in a [[https://sites.google.com/site/palaeontologyandearthsciences/assignments/spinosauruslocomotiontype-andreacau tripodal stance]].[[note]] Spinosaurus' forelimbs and shoulders seem to lack the weight-bearing adaptations needed for quadrupedal movement. [[/note]] Time will tell if the legs are really that short, although it does seem to have shorter legs (but seemingly still a biped) and be almost entirely aquatic.
to:
In 2014, ''Spinosaurus'' received an almost-total makeover after new fossils were discovered. In addition to tiny pores in its skull that might have enabled it to sense underwater prey (which was already known by then), ''Spinosaurus'' also had a relatively small pelvis and short hind legs with flat - possibly webbed - hind feet, among other adaptations for a semiaquatic lifestyle - all in all showing a surprising degree of convergent evolution with the ancestors of modern whales. Unrelated to its amphibious makeover, its reconstruction also gives it a dip in the middle of its dorsal spines similar to that of its relative ''Ichthyovenator''. It has been suggested that the hind limbs were [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/theres-something-fishy-about-spinosaurus9112014 scaled]] [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/there-may-be-more-fishiness-in-spinosaurus9132014 incorrectly]]but then the people who made the discoveries [[http://www.skeletaldrawing.com/home/aquatic-spinosaurus-the-authors-responsd9182014 have]] [[http://markwitton-com.blogspot.de/2014/09/the-spinosaurus-hindlimb-controversy.html?spref=tw responded]] putting these supposed corrections to doubt. Also, the tall spine on the sail might have [[http://qilong.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/spinosaurus-a-hint/ actually]] been located further back on the body thus forming a more shallow and gradual version of the "classic" ''Spinosaurus'' sail [[note]] The authors of the new reconstruction never gave a reason why they thought the sail was shaped that way. [[/note]], although this too is debatable. Finally, it has been suggested that ''Spinosaurus'' held its neck [[http://theropoda.blogspot.it/2014/09/spinosaurus-revolution-episodio-iv-una.html vertically]] rather than horizontally. This would have shifted the center of gravity back and allow ''Spinosaurus'' to walk bipedally albeit in a [[https://sites.google.com/site/palaeontologyandearthsciences/assignments/spinosauruslocomotiontype-andreacau tripodal stance]].[[note]] Spinosaurus' forelimbs and shoulders seem to lack the weight-bearing adaptations needed for quadrupedal movement. [[/note]] Other alternatives for land locomation are hobbling like a pangolin using its forelimbs to prop itself back up, or maybe even crawling on its belly like a crocodile or a pinniped. Time will tell if the legs are really that short, although it does seem to have shorter legs (but seemingly still a biped) and be almost entirely aquatic.
This list shows the last 10 events of 426. Show all.