History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs

28th Nov '16 4:05:10 AM Spinosegnosaurus77
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* No humans lived contemporaneously with non-avian dinosaurs.

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* No humans lived contemporaneously with non-avian Mesozoic dinosaurs.
28th Nov '16 1:56:58 AM Morgenthaler
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[[OlderThanRadio 1850s]]: The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_Palace_Dinosaurs Crystal Palace dinosaur sculptures]] in London introduced dinosaurs to the public. The image they provide is of scaly bulky doglike dragons (quite undinosaurian critters to our modern view). Introducing: ''Iguanodon'' and ''Megalosaurus''. The park also introduced some non-dinosaur reptiles: the flying ''Pterodactylus'' and the swimming ''Mosasaurus'', ''Ichthyosaurus'', and ''Plesiosaurus''. In 1864 novel ''JourneyToTheCenterOfTheEarth'' portrayed the latest two as the first "antediluvian reptiles" ever in literature.

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[[OlderThanRadio 1850s]]: The [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crystal_Palace_Dinosaurs Crystal Palace dinosaur sculptures]] in London introduced dinosaurs to the public. The image they provide is of scaly bulky doglike dragons (quite undinosaurian critters to our modern view). Introducing: ''Iguanodon'' and ''Megalosaurus''. The park also introduced some non-dinosaur reptiles: the flying ''Pterodactylus'' and the swimming ''Mosasaurus'', ''Ichthyosaurus'', and ''Plesiosaurus''. In 1864 novel ''JourneyToTheCenterOfTheEarth'' ''Literature/JourneyToTheCenterOfTheEarth'' portrayed the latest two as the first "antediluvian reptiles" ever in literature.
27th Nov '16 8:08:17 PM nombretomado
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Unlike ornithomimids, oviraptorids have attracted the attention of dino-writers only since the 2000s: ''after'' the apparition of the feathered, non-egg-stealing scientific depiction. And yet, expect to see them in the older inaccurate way nonetheless (and you could also see oviraptorids and ornithomimids mixed up with each other). E.g. in the 2000 Disney movie ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', a featherless "Oviraptor" steals Aladar's egg, but loses it before it has a chance to eat the contents. More recently, an "Oviraptor" appeared in ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' TV series: feathered and not egg-stealing. Both portrayals show the oviraptors with a ''Citipati''-like tall crest on their head. ''{{Dinotopia}}'' [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] the animal's ScienceMarchesOn story showing it in two variations; the featherless "Oviraptor" and the feathered "Ovinutrix" ("egg-nurse").

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Unlike ornithomimids, oviraptorids have attracted the attention of dino-writers only since the 2000s: ''after'' the apparition of the feathered, non-egg-stealing scientific depiction. And yet, expect to see them in the older inaccurate way nonetheless (and you could also see oviraptorids and ornithomimids mixed up with each other). E.g. in the 2000 Disney movie ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', a featherless "Oviraptor" steals Aladar's egg, but loses it before it has a chance to eat the contents. More recently, an "Oviraptor" appeared in ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' TV series: feathered and not egg-stealing. Both portrayals show the oviraptors with a ''Citipati''-like tall crest on their head. ''{{Dinotopia}}'' ''Literature/{{Dinotopia}}'' [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] the animal's ScienceMarchesOn story showing it in two variations; the featherless "Oviraptor" and the feathered "Ovinutrix" ("egg-nurse").



Despite its scientific relevance, because of its relatively modest appearence ''Protoceratops'' is less portrayed in pop-media than ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus''. Maybe the most well-known protoceratops is B.J., that yellow guy seen in Series/BarneyAndFriends. In the much more beloved book series ''{{Dinotopia}}'', the talking dino-character who befriends humans is also a ''Protoceratops''.

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Despite its scientific relevance, because of its relatively modest appearence ''Protoceratops'' is less portrayed in pop-media than ''Triceratops'' and ''Styracosaurus''. Maybe the most well-known protoceratops is B.J., that yellow guy seen in Series/BarneyAndFriends. In the much more beloved book series ''{{Dinotopia}}'', ''Literature/{{Dinotopia}}'', the talking dino-character who befriends humans is also a ''Protoceratops''.
27th Nov '16 8:07:12 PM nombretomado
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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''[[{{Dinotopia}} Dinotopia: The World Beneath]]''

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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''[[{{Dinotopia}} ''[[Literature/{{Dinotopia}} Dinotopia: The World Beneath]]''
8th Nov '16 6:56:35 PM Morgenthaler
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There is some controversy regarding ''Spinosaurus''’ diet and way-of-life: did it prey on fish like its smaller cousin ''Baryonyx'' (see later), or on giant herbivores like ''Tyrannosaurus''? Experts tended to prefer the first option at the time ''Film/JurassicParkIII'' was produced, and this fostered even more criticism about the film portrayal as the [[BigBad Ultimate Superpredator]]. Today ''Spinosaurus'' is generally believed a middle-way between these two extremes: an opportunist like a giant, clawed, saltwater crocodile, attacking other smaller dinosaurs when given the opportunity, as well as eating giant fish ([[BadAss usually sharks and other fish the size of most dinosaurs]]) and possibly crocodiles, a feat requiring tremendous levels of strength, and using its size to steal kills from other predators. We're unsure about the latter, though: ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Carcharodontosaurus]]'' was specially adapted towards big-game hunting and could open its jaws very wide to inflict sever slicing cuts, likely causing the spinosaur to bleed to death. Its large size would, however, make it a hard target to bite for other predators.

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There is some controversy regarding ''Spinosaurus''’ diet and way-of-life: did it prey on fish like its smaller cousin ''Baryonyx'' (see later), or on giant herbivores like ''Tyrannosaurus''? Experts tended to prefer the first option at the time ''Film/JurassicParkIII'' was produced, and this fostered even more criticism about the film portrayal as the [[BigBad Ultimate Superpredator]]. Today ''Spinosaurus'' is generally believed a middle-way between these two extremes: an opportunist like a giant, clawed, saltwater crocodile, attacking other smaller dinosaurs when given the opportunity, as well as eating giant fish ([[BadAss usually (usually sharks and other fish the size of most dinosaurs]]) dinosaurs) and possibly crocodiles, a feat requiring tremendous levels of strength, and using its size to steal kills from other predators. We're unsure about the latter, though: ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Carcharodontosaurus]]'' was specially adapted towards big-game hunting and could open its jaws very wide to inflict sever slicing cuts, likely causing the spinosaur to bleed to death. Its large size would, however, make it a hard target to bite for other predators.
7th Nov '16 3:48:58 PM schoi30
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''Baryonyx'' was the first discovered fish-eater among dinosaurs, and several traits scientists today assign to ''Spinosaurus'' were initially based on ''Baryonyx''. Together, these dinosaurs (plus ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Suchomimus]]'' and few others) form the spinosaurid family. However, ''Baryonyx'' was quite different from ''Spinosaurus'': it had no sail on its back,[[note]]However, its relative and possible synonym ''Suchomimus'' did have a sail, though much shorter than that of ''Spinosaurus''.[[/note]] and was considerably smaller (10 m long and weighing 2 tons, like an ''Allosaurus''). Its head was thinner with a small bump on its top, and gharial-like jaws with twice the teeth than most other theropods. ''Baryonyx'' was probably more aquatic than ''Spinosaurus'': fish might have made a greater part of its diet, possibly with occasional carrion and small land animals as a supplement. Its short hindlegs show it was not an expecially-fast runner; moreover, its blunt croc-like teeth and weak thin jaws probably prevented the "bary" to kill preys the size of a fully-grown ''Iguanodon'' in spite of the former's huge thumbclaws (incidentally, ''Iguanodon'' too had oversized thumbnails, but they were almost-straight and not curved like the carnivore's ones).

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''Baryonyx'' was the first discovered fish-eater among dinosaurs, and several traits scientists today assign to ''Spinosaurus'' were initially based on ''Baryonyx''. Together, these dinosaurs (plus ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Suchomimus]]'' and few others) form the spinosaurid family. However, ''Baryonyx'' was quite different from ''Spinosaurus'': it had no sail on its back,[[note]]However, its relative and possible synonym ''Suchomimus'' did have a sail, though much shorter than that of ''Spinosaurus''.[[/note]] and was considerably smaller (10 m long and weighing 2 tons, like an ''Allosaurus''). Its head was thinner with a small bump on its top, and gharial-like jaws with twice the teeth than most other theropods. ''Baryonyx'' was probably more less aquatic than ''Spinosaurus'': fish might have made a greater part of its diet, possibly with occasional carrion and small land animals as a supplement. Its short hindlegs show it was not an expecially-fast runner; moreover, its blunt croc-like teeth and weak thin jaws probably prevented the "bary" to kill preys the size of a fully-grown ''Iguanodon'' in spite of the former's huge thumbclaws (incidentally, ''Iguanodon'' too had oversized thumbnails, but they were almost-straight and not curved like the carnivore's ones).
6th Nov '16 5:47:34 PM schoi30
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Some decades later, a companion was added to ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeAnkylosaurs Hylaeosaurus]]'': ''Polacanthus''. English too, and also conviving with ''Iguanodon'' in Early Cretaceous, it was also 4 m long, and also very incomplete. In older depictions, ''Polacanthus'' had a very light armor, only made by couples of long dorsal spikes (hence the name, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin “many spines”]]), a bony shield on its hips, and small plates on the tail. Some portrayals took a further step and gave it a stegosaur-like thagomizer. The spiked-tailed polacanth made cameo appearances in ''Film/PlanetOfDinosaurs'' and the film adaptation of ''Literature/TheLandThatTimeForgot'' as well as a more prominent role in ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}'' as Robbie Sinclair's friend Spike. Today we know its armor was complete and ''Ankylosaurus''-like (though even spikier) and with no club-like tails. The polacanth appears with this new look in ''Documentary/WalkingWithDinosaurs as a follower of ''Iguanodon''’s herds.

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Some decades later, a companion was added to ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeAnkylosaurs Hylaeosaurus]]'': ''Polacanthus''. English too, and also conviving with ''Iguanodon'' in Early Cretaceous, it was also 4 m long, and also very incomplete. In older depictions, ''Polacanthus'' had a very light armor, only made by couples of long dorsal spikes (hence the name, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin “many spines”]]), a bony shield on its hips, and small plates on the tail. Some portrayals took a further step and gave it a stegosaur-like thagomizer. The spiked-tailed polacanth made cameo appearances in ''Film/PlanetOfDinosaurs'' and the film adaptation of ''Literature/TheLandThatTimeForgot'' as well as a more prominent role in ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}'' as Robbie Sinclair's friend Spike. Today we know its armor was complete and ''Ankylosaurus''-like (though even spikier) and with no club-like tails. The polacanth appears with this new look in ''Documentary/WalkingWithDinosaurs ''Documentary/WalkingWithDinosaurs'' as a follower of ''Iguanodon''’s herds.
21st Oct '16 5:23:34 PM Berrenta
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At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare for some reason]]. Speaking of misplaced wildlife, you can expect any of these three to be placed in the same habitat as at least ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Triceratops''. In reality, ''Deinonychus'' and ''Utahraptor'' were already extinct by the time ''T. rex'' came along and ''Velociraptor'' lived on the other side of the planet[[note]]though a nigh identical relative of ''T. rex'', ''Tarbosaurus bataar'' did coexist with ''Velociraptor''[[/note]]. However, this inaccuracy was vindicated somewhat by the discovery of ''Acheroraptor'' (described in 2013) and ''Dakotaraptor'' (described in 2015), which greatly resembled ''Velociraptor'' and ''Deinonychus'' respectively, and the latter was roughly the size of ''Utahraptor''.

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At the same time that the name ''Velociraptor'' became popular, a new dromaeosaurid was discovered in Utah. This animal was even larger and slightly older than ''Deinonychus'', living 128--105 mya and being 23 ft / 7 m long and as tall as a human. It was named ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utahraptor Utahraptor]]'', beginning an awesome case of science culture AscendedFanon -- before ''Franchise/JurassicPark'', no genus of dromaeosaurids except ''Velociraptor'' had the ''-raptor'' suffix to its name. Since the film, paleontologists started to use it for naming most new dromaeosaurids. Despite the scantiness of its remains, the discovery of ''Utahraptor'' was much reported in media as it incidentally matched the size of the oversized JP raptors (or rather, was even longer than they were). Many then reported the Utahraptors as "the most fearsome killing-machines of all times", capable to kill, in packs, the biggest sauropods and even to [[KillEmAll destroy entire dinosaur species]]. However, ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'' was not so extreme, showing ''Utahraptor'' hunting the relatively smaller ''Iguanodon'' -- not in Utah but [[MisplacedWildlife in Europe]] [[TheyJustDidntCare Europe for some reason]]. Speaking of misplaced wildlife, you can expect any of these three to be placed in the same habitat as at least ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Triceratops''. In reality, ''Deinonychus'' and ''Utahraptor'' were already extinct by the time ''T. rex'' came along and ''Velociraptor'' lived on the other side of the planet[[note]]though a nigh identical relative of ''T. rex'', ''Tarbosaurus bataar'' did coexist with ''Velociraptor''[[/note]]. However, this inaccuracy was vindicated somewhat by the discovery of ''Acheroraptor'' (described in 2013) and ''Dakotaraptor'' (described in 2015), which greatly resembled ''Velociraptor'' and ''Deinonychus'' respectively, and the latter was roughly the size of ''Utahraptor''.



In media, ''Archaeopteryx'' is fairly established as the "first bird." It will fly like a bird, and perch like a bird, neither of which was possible for the real-life ''Archaeopteryx''. Media archeopteryges will [[ScienceMarchesOn lack the sickle claws on their feet]], and possibly [[TheyJustDidntCare also their wing-fingers and teeth]]. Expect also to see them with a naked head, making them resembling "feathered lizards." Actually, their head would have been almost totally feathered like deinonychosaurs and most modern birds (see RaptorAttack).

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In media, ''Archaeopteryx'' is fairly established as the "first bird." It will fly like a bird, and perch like a bird, neither of which was possible for the real-life ''Archaeopteryx''. Media archeopteryges will [[ScienceMarchesOn lack the sickle claws on their feet]], and possibly [[TheyJustDidntCare also their wing-fingers and teeth]].teeth. Expect also to see them with a naked head, making them resembling "feathered lizards." Actually, their head would have been almost totally feathered like deinonychosaurs and most modern birds (see RaptorAttack).



While these two do feature prominently in dinosaur books and sometimes documentaries (''Hesperornis'', for example, was the [[RedShirt token prey animal]] in ''[[Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs Sea Monsters]]'' and ''Ichthyornis'' got a bit part in ''Series/DinosaurPlanet'' as a [[CarnivoreConfusion scummy scavenger]]), their presence is rare in more mainstream media, presumably because, besides their teeth and ''Hesperornis''' large size, they don't have a lot of [[RuleOfCool cool points]]. That hasn't stopped folks from trying (for better or worse). An ''Ichthyornis'', creatively [[StealthInsult and perhaps fittingly]] named "Ichy" appears as a one-shot villain in the fourth ''[[WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime Land Before Time]]'' movie, accompanied by an equally villainous ''Deinosuchus''. ''Ichthyornis'' also cameos in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', erroneously depicted as a ducklike creature rather than a seagull-like one, and are among the many factors contributing to the start of the movie when they attack the mother ''Pteranodon'' carrying Aladar's egg, causing her to drop it. In ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Hesperornis'' appears as [[NonMaliciousMonster an aggressive but non-malicious creature]] that kills a plumber after its anomaly appears in someone's flooded basement. It's portrayal there is probably one of the ''worst'' of any prehistoric bird--to the point that the creature designers had it ''[[TheyJustDidntCare scaly and standing upright]]''.

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While these two do feature prominently in dinosaur books and sometimes documentaries (''Hesperornis'', for example, was the [[RedShirt token prey animal]] in ''[[Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs Sea Monsters]]'' and ''Ichthyornis'' got a bit part in ''Series/DinosaurPlanet'' as a [[CarnivoreConfusion scummy scavenger]]), their presence is rare in more mainstream media, presumably because, besides their teeth and ''Hesperornis''' large size, they don't have a lot of [[RuleOfCool cool points]]. That hasn't stopped folks from trying (for better or worse). An ''Ichthyornis'', creatively [[StealthInsult and perhaps fittingly]] named "Ichy" appears as a one-shot villain in the fourth ''[[WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime Land Before Time]]'' movie, accompanied by an equally villainous ''Deinosuchus''. ''Ichthyornis'' also cameos in ''Disney/{{Dinosaur}}'', erroneously depicted as a ducklike creature rather than a seagull-like one, and are among the many factors contributing to the start of the movie when they attack the mother ''Pteranodon'' carrying Aladar's egg, causing her to drop it. In ''Series/{{Primeval}}'', ''Hesperornis'' appears as [[NonMaliciousMonster an aggressive but non-malicious creature]] that kills a plumber after its anomaly appears in someone's flooded basement. It's portrayal there is probably one of the ''worst'' of any prehistoric bird--to the point that the creature designers had it ''[[TheyJustDidntCare scaly ''scaly and standing upright]]''.
upright''.



Another common mistake when portraying sauropods is to show them with elephant-like nails or hooves, falling straight in [[MostWritersAreHuman Most Writers Are Mammals]]. Actually, sauropods had true claws. They usually had a thumb-claw on each forefoot (which was narrower than in modern elephants) and three claws on each hindfoot (which was broader and more elephant-like than the forefoot). Even so, in most portraits that do show clawed sauropods, they usually have [[TheyJustDidntCare four or five claws on each foot]]. More related with ReptilesAreAbhorrent is the way to depict sauropods' necks as serpentine: you'd even find brontosaurs using them like snakes when attack their prey. Actually, their neck had relatively few vertebrae like a giraffe's and were relatively stiff (expecially if compared with their flexible tails which had often more than 50-70 bones).

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Another common mistake when portraying sauropods is to show them with elephant-like nails or hooves, falling straight in [[MostWritersAreHuman Most Writers Are Mammals]]. Actually, sauropods had true claws. They usually had a thumb-claw on each forefoot (which was narrower than in modern elephants) and three claws on each hindfoot (which was broader and more elephant-like than the forefoot). Even so, in most portraits that do show clawed sauropods, they usually have [[TheyJustDidntCare four or five claws on each foot]].foot. More related with ReptilesAreAbhorrent is the way to depict sauropods' necks as serpentine: you'd even find brontosaurs using them like snakes when attack their prey. Actually, their neck had relatively few vertebrae like a giraffe's and were relatively stiff (expecially if compared with their flexible tails which had often more than 50-70 bones).



Living in western North America during the Late Jurassic Period (154--150 million years ago), ''Diplodocus'' was a neighbor of ''Apatosaurus''. Both dinosaurs belonged to the same family, Diplodocidae, and many features of ''Apatosaurus'' (the whip-like tail, the skull-shape, and the longer hindlimbs) are shared by ''Diplodocus'' as well. Unlike ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus''[='=] portraits have always had a narrow-ended tail and the long head with a flattened snout typical of diplodocids (the ''Diplodocus''[='=] skull and tail-end are known since the first discoveries). This means the two animals can be easily distinguished from each other in older media (unless the artists didn't know better or knew but [[TheyJustDidntCare didn't care]]). [[note]] The aforementioned "Gertie" is a good example, being similar to a generic diplodocid but with unrealistically short stub tail and elephantine feet.[[/note]]

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Living in western North America during the Late Jurassic Period (154--150 million years ago), ''Diplodocus'' was a neighbor of ''Apatosaurus''. Both dinosaurs belonged to the same family, Diplodocidae, and many features of ''Apatosaurus'' (the whip-like tail, the skull-shape, and the longer hindlimbs) are shared by ''Diplodocus'' as well. Unlike ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus''[='=] portraits have always had a narrow-ended tail and the long head with a flattened snout typical of diplodocids (the ''Diplodocus''[='=] skull and tail-end are known since the first discoveries). This means the two animals can be easily distinguished from each other in older media (unless the artists didn't know better or knew but [[TheyJustDidntCare didn't care]]).media. [[note]] The aforementioned "Gertie" is a good example, being similar to a generic diplodocid but with unrealistically short stub tail and elephantine feet.[[/note]]



Brachiosaurs are visually distinct from diplodocids in several ways. First, their necks were noticeably longer than their tails, and their back sloped ''backwards'' instead of forwards. Going to more detail, their tail had a thicker end lacking any "whip"; their neck was stronger, had more vertebrae and was held more vertically like a giraffe; their teeth bordered most of their jaws and were chisel-like; their nasal openings were unfused, placed more forwardly, and much wider than diplodocids (the brachiosaur subgroup of sauropods, "Macronarians", just means "large nostrils").[[note]]In the past some palaeontologists suggested sauropods had a ''tapir-like proboscis'' observing the shape of their skull![[/note]] Finally, brachiosaurs are nearly the ''only'' non-bird dinosaurs with forelimbs longer than hindlimbs ("Brachiosaurus" means "arm lizards"). Sometimes these difference get glossed over in popular media, which may show brachiosaurs with diplodocid heads, necks, bodies, legs, and tails. In these cases, they might be recognizable as brachiosaurs only [[TheyJustDidntCare thanks to a more upright body-shape]].

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Brachiosaurs are visually distinct from diplodocids in several ways. First, their necks were noticeably longer than their tails, and their back sloped ''backwards'' instead of forwards. Going to more detail, their tail had a thicker end lacking any "whip"; their neck was stronger, had more vertebrae and was held more vertically like a giraffe; their teeth bordered most of their jaws and were chisel-like; their nasal openings were unfused, placed more forwardly, and much wider than diplodocids (the brachiosaur subgroup of sauropods, "Macronarians", just means "large nostrils").[[note]]In the past some palaeontologists suggested sauropods had a ''tapir-like proboscis'' observing the shape of their skull![[/note]] Finally, brachiosaurs are nearly the ''only'' non-bird dinosaurs with forelimbs longer than hindlimbs ("Brachiosaurus" means "arm lizards"). Sometimes these difference get glossed over in popular media, which may show brachiosaurs with diplodocid heads, necks, bodies, legs, and tails. In these cases, they might be recognizable as brachiosaurs only [[TheyJustDidntCare thanks to a more upright body-shape]].body-shape.
2nd Oct '16 1:14:00 PM schoi30
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''T. rex'' was discovered by Barnum Brown slightly before the start of the XX century, and described by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1905. Since then, it has been a hit with the audience and possibly ''the'' most famous dinosaur for almost a century. During this time ''T. rex'' has changed from the [[MightyGlacier heavy, fat-bellied giant]] with goose-like gait and flexible tail seen in ''Fantasia'' to the [[LightningBruiser slender, running beast]] seen in ''Franchise/JurassicPark''. We are still waiting to see it and/or its chicks depicted with downy feathers, although very recently it has been seeping in (Thank you ''DinosaurRevolution'', ''Film/DinosaurIsland'', ''{{Pokemon}}'', and ''VideoGame/{{Saurian}}'').

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''T. rex'' was discovered by Barnum Brown slightly before the start of the XX century, and described by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1905. Since then, it has been a hit with the audience and possibly ''the'' most famous dinosaur for almost a century. During this time ''T. rex'' has changed from the [[MightyGlacier heavy, fat-bellied giant]] with goose-like gait and flexible tail seen in ''Fantasia'' to the [[LightningBruiser slender, running beast]] seen in ''Franchise/JurassicPark''. We are still were waiting to see it and/or its chicks depicted with downy feathers, although very and recently it has been seeping in (Thank you ''DinosaurRevolution'', ''Documentary/DinosaurRevolution'', ''Film/DinosaurIsland'', ''{{Pokemon}}'', and ''VideoGame/{{Saurian}}'').
2nd Oct '16 1:11:42 PM schoi30
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''T. rex'' was discovered by Barnum Brown slightly before the start of the XX century, and described by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1905. Since then, it has been a hit with the audience and possibly ''the'' most famous dinosaur for almost a century. During this time ''T. rex'' has changed from the [[MightyGlacier heavy, fat-bellied giant]] with goose-like gait and flexible tail seen in ''Fantasia'' to the [[LightningBruiser slender, running beast]] seen in ''Franchise/JurassicPark''. We are still waiting to see it and/or its chicks depicted with downy covering, though (Thank you DinosaurRevolution).

to:

''T. rex'' was discovered by Barnum Brown slightly before the start of the XX century, and described by Henry Fairfield Osborn in 1905. Since then, it has been a hit with the audience and possibly ''the'' most famous dinosaur for almost a century. During this time ''T. rex'' has changed from the [[MightyGlacier heavy, fat-bellied giant]] with goose-like gait and flexible tail seen in ''Fantasia'' to the [[LightningBruiser slender, running beast]] seen in ''Franchise/JurassicPark''. We are still waiting to see it and/or its chicks depicted with downy covering, though feathers, although very recently it has been seeping in (Thank you DinosaurRevolution).
''DinosaurRevolution'', ''Film/DinosaurIsland'', ''{{Pokemon}}'', and ''VideoGame/{{Saurian}}'').
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