History UsefulNotes / StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs

15th Mar '17 12:09:45 PM 0000
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Most dinosaurs of this kind (and many early bird genera) lived in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesozoic Mesozoic Era]], nicknamed "The Age of Dinosaurs," 250-66 million years ago (mya). The era is divided by geologists and palaeontologists into three periods: from the most ancient to the most recent one, they are the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triassic Triassic]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jurassic Jurassic]], and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cretaceous Cretaceous]]. You'll note that most stock dinosaurs come from North America during either the Late Jurassic or the Late Cretaceous.

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Most dinosaurs of this kind (and many early bird genera) lived in the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesozoic Mesozoic Era]], nicknamed "The Age of Dinosaurs," 250-66 252-66 million years ago (mya). The era is divided by geologists and palaeontologists into three periods: from the most ancient to the most recent one, they are the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triassic Triassic]], [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jurassic Jurassic]], and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cretaceous Cretaceous]]. You'll note that most stock dinosaurs come from North America during either the Late Jurassic or the Late Cretaceous.
8th Mar '17 11:21:36 AM MrMediaGuy2
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Recently, it was shown that it wasn't even ''carnivorous'' at all: its strong beak wasn't hooked like an eagle's, and its body frame was stocky, seemingly slow-moving. It only was an herbivore who used its bill to crack nuts, and cut vegetation - making erroneous the BizarroWorld portrayal in Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs where birds were shown ruling mammals. Anyway, the gastorn/diatryma was a real giant in its forestal world, 40 million years ago: while mammals were still small, some birds grew to large size.

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Recently, it was shown that it wasn't even ''carnivorous'' at all: its strong beak wasn't hooked like an eagle's, and its body frame was stocky, seemingly slow-moving. It only was an herbivore who used its bill to crack nuts, and cut vegetation - making erroneous the BizarroWorld portrayal in Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs where birds were shown ruling mammals. [[note]]However, this does ''not'' mean it was the GentleGiant news articles claimed it was. Ostriches and cassowaries are herbivores too, but they're also some of the few birds that have been known to ''kill'' people. And ''Gastornis'' not only grew to their size, but it also had a powerful beak that would've been useful for fighting off the land-dwelling crocodiles that were the true dominant predator.[[/note]] Anyway, the gastorn/diatryma was a real giant in its forestal world, 40 million years ago: while mammals were still small, some birds grew to large size.
12th Jan '17 1:39:53 PM MrMediaGuy2
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With the Phorusrhacids, on the other hand, we have no doubts this time: thanks to their light weight and slender running legs, they ''were'' active hunter of small mammals. Not only that, with their strongly hooked, very eagle-like bill, they did not swallow their prey whole. It has recently been discovered they had even ''one clawed finger'' protruding from each of their tiny wings [[note]]This is not so strange as one may think: there are also living birds with this feature, the most notable being the ''two-fingered'' young [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoatzin Hoatzin]][[/note]], for uncertain purpose. Perhaps the most amazing-looking among all prehistoric birds, they have recently nicknamed [[CarnivoreConfusion terror-birds]] in pop- documentaries (for example, [[WalkingWithDinosaurs Prehistoric Park]].)

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With the Phorusrhacids, on the other hand, we have no doubts this time: thanks to their light weight and slender running legs, they ''were'' active hunter of small mammals. Not only that, with their strongly hooked, very eagle-like bill, they did not swallow their prey whole. It has recently been discovered they had even They were once thought to have ''one clawed finger'' protruding from each of their tiny wings [[note]]This is not so strange as one may think: there are also living birds with this feature, the most notable being the ''two-fingered'' young [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoatzin Hoatzin]][[/note]], for uncertain purpose. However, it was later discovered that their living relatives, the seriemas (see below) have similarly-shaped wings and lack wing claws, making these fingers unlikely. Perhaps the most amazing-looking among all prehistoric birds, they have recently nicknamed [[CarnivoreConfusion terror-birds]] in pop- documentaries (for example, [[WalkingWithDinosaurs Prehistoric Park]].)
11th Jan '17 5:00:34 AM Morgenthaler
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''Allosaurus'' entered pop culture before ''Tyrannosaurus''. After its description, it was briefly considered the "biggest land carnivore ever" together with ''Megalosaurus''. In Conan Doyle’s ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' (1912) the two scientists encounter a giant carnivore, and argue about whether it is an ''Allosaurus'' or a ''Megalosaurus'' (maybe a reference to the recent "bone wars.") Soon later, both dinosaurs got [[OvershadowedByAwesome overshadowed]] by the more impressive (and [[RuleOfCool much cooler-named]]) ''Tyrannosaurus rex'' in pop-media, especially cinema. ''Allosaurus'' has somehow managed to survive the supremacy of the rex... automatically becoming its PoorMansSubstitute, as the two animals tend to be easily confused with each other in the public mind.

to:

''Allosaurus'' entered pop culture before ''Tyrannosaurus''. After its description, it was briefly considered the "biggest land carnivore ever" together with ''Megalosaurus''. In Conan Doyle’s ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' ''Literature/{{The Lost World|1912}}'' (1912) the two scientists encounter a giant carnivore, and argue about whether it is an ''Allosaurus'' or a ''Megalosaurus'' (maybe a reference to the recent "bone wars.") Soon later, both dinosaurs got [[OvershadowedByAwesome overshadowed]] by the more impressive (and [[RuleOfCool much cooler-named]]) ''Tyrannosaurus rex'' in pop-media, especially cinema. ''Allosaurus'' has somehow managed to survive the supremacy of the rex... automatically becoming its PoorMansSubstitute, as the two animals tend to be easily confused with each other in the public mind.



# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''

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# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''
''Literature/{{The Lost World|1912}}''



The only-valid ''Megalosaurus'' is a fairly generic theropod some 30 ft / 9 m in length, similar to an elongated allosaur but smaller and more primitive. Even though its historical relevance makes it a common sight in classic and modern dino-books, the "big lizard" didn't go a long way in popular works after the two important mentions in early literature (''BleakHouse'' and ''LostWorld''). In the 20th century it heavily suffered the competition with ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Allosaurus'' - and the resolution of the "wastebasket" issue didn't make the case against it better. Apart from some occasional documentary, you've got low chances to see any "megalosaur" both in cinema and in TV media --- just as an example, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' chose to portray the contemporary close-relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Eustreptospondylus]]'' in the Jurassic-Europe episode. There is, however, the curious case of the TV show ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}'', which has one "megalosaur" in the form of Bob Sinclair: but he doesn't look particularly like any dinosaur at all.

to:

The only-valid ''Megalosaurus'' is a fairly generic theropod some 30 ft / 9 m in length, similar to an elongated allosaur but smaller and more primitive. Even though its historical relevance makes it a common sight in classic and modern dino-books, the "big lizard" didn't go a long way in popular works after the two important mentions in early literature (''BleakHouse'' (''Literature/BleakHouse'' and ''LostWorld'').''Literature/{{The Lost World|1912}}''). In the 20th century it heavily suffered the competition with ''Tyrannosaurus'' and ''Allosaurus'' - and the resolution of the "wastebasket" issue didn't make the case against it better. Apart from some occasional documentary, you've got low chances to see any "megalosaur" both in cinema and in TV media --- just as an example, ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' chose to portray the contemporary close-relative ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Eustreptospondylus]]'' in the Jurassic-Europe episode. There is, however, the curious case of the TV show ''Series/{{Dinosaurs}}'', which has one "megalosaur" in the form of Bob Sinclair: but he doesn't look particularly like any dinosaur at all.



# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''

to:

# '''TropeMaker:''' ''Literature/TheLostWorld''
''Literature/{{The Lost World|1912}}''
8th Jan '17 8:21:31 AM SeptimusHeap
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Its first remain, the extremity of a leg-bone found in 1676 in England near Oxford, was mistaken by Robert Plot for the remain of an ancient giant man (others named this remain "Scrotum humanum" [[FreudWasRight because of its shape]]), but this fossil has been lost today. Later, a half lower jaw with a single tooth left was found in 1824 in Southern England; its discoverer, reverend and geologist William Buckland, described it as belonging to a "big lizard" (the meaning of its name, which started the tradition of "[[{{Whateversaurus}} saurus]]" in dinosaur names). Buckland didn’t realize to have named the ''very first non-avian dinosaur''. At the time, the Dinosaur category didn't even exist in scientific literature.

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Its first remain, the extremity of a leg-bone found in 1676 in England near Oxford, was mistaken by Robert Plot for the remain of an ancient giant man (others named this remain "Scrotum humanum" [[FreudWasRight because of its shape]]), shape), but this fossil has been lost today. Later, a half lower jaw with a single tooth left was found in 1824 in Southern England; its discoverer, reverend and geologist William Buckland, described it as belonging to a "big lizard" (the meaning of its name, which started the tradition of "[[{{Whateversaurus}} saurus]]" in dinosaur names). Buckland didn’t realize to have named the ''very first non-avian dinosaur''. At the time, the Dinosaur category didn't even exist in scientific literature.
25th Dec '16 4:31:58 PM MrMediaGuy2
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!!Dinosaurs continued to rule: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastornis Gastornis]]'' (once called "Diatryma"), ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorusrhacos Phorusrhacos]]'', & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanis Titanis]]'', aka the “Terror Birds” **

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!!Dinosaurs continued to rule: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastornis Gastornis]]'' (once called "Diatryma"), ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorusrhacos Phorusrhacos]]'', & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanis Titanis]]'', aka the “Terror Birds” **
*



!! Symbol of Man's Folly: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodo The Dodo]] (''Raphus cucullatus'')**

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!! Symbol of Man's Folly: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dodo The Dodo]] (''Raphus cucullatus'')**
cucullatus'')***
25th Dec '16 4:16:48 PM tigris115
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!!Dinosaurs continued to rule: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastornis Gastornis]]'' (once called "Diatryma"), ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorusrhacos Phorusrhacos]]'', & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanis Titanis]]', aka the “Terror Birds” **

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!!Dinosaurs continued to rule: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gastornis Gastornis]]'' (once called "Diatryma"), ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phorusrhacos Phorusrhacos]]'', & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanis Titanis]]', Titanis]]'', aka the “Terror Birds” **
8th Dec '16 5:49:11 AM Morgenthaler
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Its most easily recognizable trait is the two parallel crests on its skull (perhaps only in males), probably used for display. These fragile and vulnerable structures indicate that it was no BadAss dinosaur. Its head was long and narrow with weak jaws and teeth, and each upper half-jaw also show a deep pit between the frontal and back-teeth, making the whole structure even weaker. [[note]]However, popular dilophosaur portraits usually don't show this pair of "pits", which were also present in ''Coelophysis'' and other relatives (but much smaller).[[/note]] Scientists have usually said the dilophosaur was a mere scavenger or a small prey hunter, even though some had initially described it as the "the first giant killer dinosaur". It was indeed one of the biggest terrestrian carnivores of its time ([[WesternAnimation/WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica some docu-portrayals]] show it as a rather unlikely powerful super-predator); however, really-powerful meat-eating dinosaurs appeared only in the following Middle Jurassic, for example ''Megalosaurus''. [[note]]Note that Early Jurassic dinosaurs were more similar to Triassic dinosaurs than to the bigger/more evolved dinosaurs from the remaining Jurassic period. Some dino-books even [[AnachronismStew mix Triassic and early-Jurassic dinosaurs together]], for example showing ''Dilophosaurus'' living alongside the earlier ''Coelophysis'' or ''Plateosaurus''.[[/note]]

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Its most easily recognizable trait is the two parallel crests on its skull (perhaps only in males), probably used for display. These fragile and vulnerable structures indicate that it was no BadAss badass dinosaur. Its head was long and narrow with weak jaws and teeth, and each upper half-jaw also show a deep pit between the frontal and back-teeth, making the whole structure even weaker. [[note]]However, popular dilophosaur portraits usually don't show this pair of "pits", which were also present in ''Coelophysis'' and other relatives (but much smaller).[[/note]] Scientists have usually said the dilophosaur was a mere scavenger or a small prey hunter, even though some had initially described it as the "the first giant killer dinosaur". It was indeed one of the biggest terrestrian carnivores of its time ([[WesternAnimation/WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica some docu-portrayals]] show it as a rather unlikely powerful super-predator); however, really-powerful meat-eating dinosaurs appeared only in the following Middle Jurassic, for example ''Megalosaurus''. [[note]]Note that Early Jurassic dinosaurs were more similar to Triassic dinosaurs than to the bigger/more evolved dinosaurs from the remaining Jurassic period. Some dino-books even [[AnachronismStew mix Triassic and early-Jurassic dinosaurs together]], for example showing ''Dilophosaurus'' living alongside the earlier ''Coelophysis'' or ''Plateosaurus''.[[/note]]



''Ceratosaurus'' is quite rare in films these days: the only relevant example is a short cameo in ''Film/JurassicParkIII'', in which it's not even named (but at least is correct-sized). Even modern documentaries rarely represent it – the ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' series didn't show it at all. The recent ''Ceratosaurus'' decline is probably due to the occurrence of other, newly-discovered theropods since the seventies: ''Carnotaurus'' in particular, being similar yet even more BadAss looking.

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''Ceratosaurus'' is quite rare in films these days: the only relevant example is a short cameo in ''Film/JurassicParkIII'', in which it's not even named (but at least is correct-sized). Even modern documentaries rarely represent it – the ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' series didn't show it at all. The recent ''Ceratosaurus'' decline is probably due to the occurrence of other, newly-discovered theropods since the seventies: ''Carnotaurus'' in particular, being similar yet even more BadAss badass looking.



With such poweful weapons, ''Therizinosaurus'' has received in the past the same treatment as ''Deinocheirus''. Some old drawings went as far as to show our “scythe-dino” as a giant carnosaur or deinonychosaur with ''sickle-claws'' on each foot (if ''Therizinosaurus'' was really shaped that way, it would really have been the most BadAss dinosaur one can imagine…). More accurate analyses made in the beginning of the 1990s definitively debunked these fantasies: we now know with a good level of sureness that ''Therizinosaurus'' was a bulky-bodied, round-bellied, and quite slow-moving animal, that used its claws mainly to pull down branches. Furthermore, its jaws were arguably weak with a rounded horny tip and small grinding teeth similar to those seen in its relative ''Segnosaurus''.

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With such poweful weapons, ''Therizinosaurus'' has received in the past the same treatment as ''Deinocheirus''. Some old drawings went as far as to show our “scythe-dino” as a giant carnosaur or deinonychosaur with ''sickle-claws'' on each foot (if ''Therizinosaurus'' was really shaped that way, it would really have been the most BadAss badass dinosaur one can imagine…). More accurate analyses made in the beginning of the 1990s definitively debunked these fantasies: we now know with a good level of sureness that ''Therizinosaurus'' was a bulky-bodied, round-bellied, and quite slow-moving animal, that used its claws mainly to pull down branches. Furthermore, its jaws were arguably weak with a rounded horny tip and small grinding teeth similar to those seen in its relative ''Segnosaurus''.



''Apatosaurus'' is one of the few sauropod kinds already known to science when the first modern pop-cultural portraits of dinosaurs came to light in the 1900s. Marsh described the first species in 1877, in full "Bone Wars" context, but its first remains were incomplete. Just two years later Marsh described a second ''Apatosaurus'' species as a distinct animal, "Brontosaurus". It was the latter that became the iconic image of a sauropod for most the 1900. ''Apatosaurus'' and ''Tyrannosaurus'' were the ultimate stock dinosaurs in their respective roles as herbivore and carnivore, and contenders for the title of ''THE'' overall most iconic dinosaur. In classic dino-stories the "brontosaur"'s designated role is the GentleGiant (while ''T. rex'' is the BigBad and ''Triceratops'' the BadAss or TheHero)... unless EverythingTryingToKillYou, of course. In the classical version of ''[[Film/KingKong1933 King Kong]]'', brontosaurs are ''meat eaters''.

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''Apatosaurus'' is one of the few sauropod kinds already known to science when the first modern pop-cultural portraits of dinosaurs came to light in the 1900s. Marsh described the first species in 1877, in full "Bone Wars" context, but its first remains were incomplete. Just two years later Marsh described a second ''Apatosaurus'' species as a distinct animal, "Brontosaurus". It was the latter that became the iconic image of a sauropod for most the 1900. ''Apatosaurus'' and ''Tyrannosaurus'' were the ultimate stock dinosaurs in their respective roles as herbivore and carnivore, and contenders for the title of ''THE'' overall most iconic dinosaur. In classic dino-stories the "brontosaur"'s designated role is the GentleGiant (while ''T. rex'' is the BigBad and ''Triceratops'' the BadAss badass or TheHero)... unless EverythingTryingToKillYou, of course. In the classical version of ''[[Film/KingKong1933 King Kong]]'', brontosaurs are ''meat eaters''.



''Triceratops'' has traditionally been considered the largest ceratopsian; its size and abundance in the fossil record have contributed to making it the most popular one. It has always been beloved by dino-fans. Maybe because with its short tail, big head, and rhino-like body, it is the least [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent reptilian-looking]] among the Stock Dinos (even in older depictions); or maybe, because of its historical reputation as "the only plant-eater [[BadAss able]] [[TheHero to defeat]] the BigBad ''TyrannosaurusRex''" (even though ankylosaurs and maybe even the biggest hadrosaurs could also have been able to defeat the tyrannosaur in a fight).

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''Triceratops'' has traditionally been considered the largest ceratopsian; its size and abundance in the fossil record have contributed to making it the most popular one. It has always been beloved by dino-fans. Maybe because with its short tail, big head, and rhino-like body, it is the least [[ReptilesAreAbhorrent reptilian-looking]] among the Stock Dinos (even in older depictions); or maybe, because of its historical reputation as "the only plant-eater [[BadAss able]] [[TheHero able to defeat]] the BigBad ''TyrannosaurusRex''" (even though ankylosaurs and maybe even the biggest hadrosaurs could also have been able to defeat the tyrannosaur in a fight).



''Triceratops'' and ''T. rex'' have been shown fighting in modern works from the first dino-movies and through the whole paleoartistic tradition (including one especially iconic [[http://www.charlesrknight.com/Enlarge.htm?109 painting]]). In these battles, the percentages of victories between the tyrannosaur and the triceratops appears to about 50%. Though all this may even be TruthInTelevision, it's likely that the tyrannosaur preferred younger and more vulnerable prey than an adult ''Triceratops''. Often considered the BadAss guy par excellence among plant-eating dinos, writers can’t resist the urge to make ''Triceratops''es acting like rhinos or even bulls. They’ll be ill-tempered, will charge everything, and could even ''moo'' like bovines.

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''Triceratops'' and ''T. rex'' have been shown fighting in modern works from the first dino-movies and through the whole paleoartistic tradition (including one especially iconic [[http://www.charlesrknight.com/Enlarge.htm?109 painting]]). In these battles, the percentages of victories between the tyrannosaur and the triceratops appears to about 50%. Though all this may even be TruthInTelevision, it's likely that the tyrannosaur preferred younger and more vulnerable prey than an adult ''Triceratops''. Often considered the BadAss badass guy par excellence among plant-eating dinos, writers can’t resist the urge to make ''Triceratops''es acting like rhinos or even bulls. They’ll be ill-tempered, will charge everything, and could even ''moo'' like bovines.
6th Dec '16 8:32:28 AM LBHills
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''Allosaurus'' entered pop culture before ''Tyrannosaurus''. After its description, was briefly considered the "biggest land carnivore ever" together with ''Megalosaurus''. In Conan Doyle’s ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' (1912) the two scientists encounter a giant carnivore, and argue about whether it is an ''Allosaurus'' or a ''Megalosaurus'' (maybe a reference to the recent "bone wars.") Soon later, both dinosaurs got [[OvershadowedByAwesome overshadowed]] by the more impressive (and [[RuleOfCool much cooler-named]]) ''Tyrannosaurus rex'' in pop-media, especially cinema. ''Allosaurus'' has somehow managed to survive the supremacy of the rex... automatically becoming its PoorMansSubstitute, as the two animals tend to be easily confused with each other in the public mind.

to:

''Allosaurus'' entered pop culture before ''Tyrannosaurus''. After its description, it was briefly considered the "biggest land carnivore ever" together with ''Megalosaurus''. In Conan Doyle’s ''Literature/TheLostWorld'' (1912) the two scientists encounter a giant carnivore, and argue about whether it is an ''Allosaurus'' or a ''Megalosaurus'' (maybe a reference to the recent "bone wars.") Soon later, both dinosaurs got [[OvershadowedByAwesome overshadowed]] by the more impressive (and [[RuleOfCool much cooler-named]]) ''Tyrannosaurus rex'' in pop-media, especially cinema. ''Allosaurus'' has somehow managed to survive the supremacy of the rex... automatically becoming its PoorMansSubstitute, as the two animals tend to be easily confused with each other in the public mind.



If a writer relies on pre-"Renaissance" science, a featured sauropod is up to its armpits in water and living in swamps while lazily munching some swamp weed. Before TheSeventies, the dominant but wrong hypothesis said they needed to spend most of their time in water to support their massive bulk and to escape the (allegedly) non-swimming theropods. Modern science says sauropods were terrestrial (though able to swim in an elephant style if needed); [[note]]Foot-tracks demonstrate all this: they were mainly made on dry-soil and show an elephant-like gait. However, some tracks show only the ''forefeet''. The latter were produced by sauropods crossing a river and only touching the bottom with their forelimbs. Enlighted by the internal airsacs, their rear-bodies and hindlegs were suspended near the surface during the swimming.[[/note]] if they were really swamp-specialists, they would have had higher chances to slip in the mud with fatal consequences. If lucky enough to survive the fall, they'd starve to death from lack of nutritious food. [[note]]Swampweed are very poor of nutrients.[[/note]] If submerged,their ribcage wouldn't even be capable to expand due to water pressure, suffocating them. And the alleged weakness of their teeth and the high placement of their nasal openings are ''not'' real proof for an amphibious, swampweed-eating lifestyle.[[note]] Since sauropods’ skulls have high-settled nasal openings, they are classically shown with their nostrils on the top of their heads like the blowholes of a whale; it was recently hypothized they could actually be on the end of their snouts like every other dinosaur.[[/note]] Finally, footprints show carnivorous dinosaur ''were'' capable to swim using their hindlegs (as shown by the aforementioned alleged ''Dilophosaurus'' footprints), making the sauropods' fleeing in water to escape them potentially useless.

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If a writer relies on pre-"Renaissance" science, a featured sauropod is up to its armpits in water and living in swamps while lazily munching some swamp weed. Before TheSeventies, the dominant but wrong hypothesis said they needed to spend most of their time in water to support their massive bulk and to escape the (allegedly) non-swimming theropods. Modern science says sauropods were terrestrial (though able to swim in an elephant style if needed); [[note]]Foot-tracks demonstrate all this: they were mainly made on dry-soil and show an elephant-like gait. However, some tracks show only the ''forefeet''. The latter were produced by sauropods crossing a river and only touching the bottom with their forelimbs. Enlighted Buoyed by the internal airsacs, their rear-bodies and hindlegs were suspended near the surface during the swimming.[[/note]] if they were really swamp-specialists, they would have had higher chances to slip in the mud with fatal consequences. If lucky enough to survive the fall, they'd starve to death from lack of nutritious food. [[note]]Swampweed [[note]]Swamp weeds are very poor of in nutrients.[[/note]] If submerged,their ribcage wouldn't even be capable to expand due to water pressure, suffocating them. And the alleged weakness of their teeth and the high placement of their nasal openings are ''not'' real proof for an amphibious, swampweed-eating lifestyle.[[note]] Since sauropods’ skulls have high-settled nasal openings, they are classically shown with their nostrils on the top of their heads like the blowholes of a whale; it was recently hypothized they could actually be on the end of their snouts like every other dinosaur.[[/note]] Finally, footprints show carnivorous dinosaur ''were'' capable to swim using their hindlegs (as shown by the aforementioned alleged ''Dilophosaurus'' footprints), making the sauropods' fleeing in water to escape them potentially useless.
4th Dec '16 4:24:23 AM Morgenthaler
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''Giganotosaurus'' remains one of the most powerful meat-eaters that ever lived; and it's ''just'' starting to gain popularity. The fact that it could have possibly hunted some of the largest sauropods -- related with the utterly vast ''Argentinosaurus'' -- means that it may become ''very'' popular in the future. If that doesn't sound cool enough, then consider that to do so, it would have had to be a ''pack hunter''. ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' did a special on just how BadAss such a hunt would be (even though in the show the Argentinosaurus that became prey was a juvenile). Though there isn't any evidence for pack behavior in ''Giganotosaurus'', there ''might'' be for its relative, the recently-discovered ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Mapusaurus]]'', which was the same length but had a more slender frame.

to:

''Giganotosaurus'' remains one of the most powerful meat-eaters that ever lived; and it's ''just'' starting to gain popularity. The fact that it could have possibly hunted some of the largest sauropods -- related with the utterly vast ''Argentinosaurus'' -- means that it may become ''very'' popular in the future. If that doesn't sound cool enough, then consider that to do so, it would have had to be a ''pack hunter''. ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'' did a special on just how BadAss badass such a hunt would be (even though in the show the Argentinosaurus that became prey was a juvenile). Though there isn't any evidence for pack behavior in ''Giganotosaurus'', there ''might'' be for its relative, the recently-discovered ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLife Mapusaurus]]'', which was the same length but had a more slender frame.
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