History UsefulNotes / SpanishLanguage

15th Feb '17 3:57:51 PM DaNuke
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* R: Flapped, as in the d's in ''pudding''. Except when beginning a word or a syllable; then it reads as...

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* R: Flapped, as in the d's in ''pudding''. Except Being otaku helps here: it's the same Japanese phoneme that is romanized as an "r". However, when beginning it follows a word consonant or it's the first letter of a syllable; word, then it reads as...
15th Feb '17 3:53:26 PM DaNuke
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* CH: In most dialects, always like in ''match'', unless the word is foreign. In New Mexico and some parts of southern Spain, however, it's generally a ''sh'' sound.

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* CH: In most dialects, always like in ''match'', unless the word is foreign. In New Mexico Mexico, the Mexican state of Chihuahua and some parts of southern Spain, however, it's generally a ''sh'' sound.
15th Feb '17 3:51:33 PM DaNuke
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Added DiffLines:

* SH: According to the RAE, this digraph is pronounced like an "s", because the H is mute. In Latin America, due to influence from the superpowerful USA, this digraph is pronounced like an English "sh". You will also hear the "sh" phoneme in places like Argentina, where LL and Y are pronounced this way, or Chihuahua, Mexico, where the CH is slurred into a "sh".
12th Feb '17 2:41:40 AM DaNuke
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Besides the acute accent, Spanish is also famous for the ''eñe'' letter, "ñ." This is pronounced approximately[[labelnote:*]]You make the ñ by pronouncing a n and a y simultaneously. It's easier than it sounds, really.[[/labelnote]] like "ny," so "ñaña" above would be pronounced "nyanya." (This happens to be a sort of cutesy word for "crap" in a few dialects.) For another example, the English word "canyon" is derived from the Spanish "cañón."

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Besides the acute accent, Spanish is also famous for the ''eñe'' letter, "ñ." This is pronounced approximately[[labelnote:*]]You make the ñ by pronouncing a n and a y simultaneously. It's easier than it sounds, really.[[/labelnote]] like "ny," so "ñaña" "ñoño" above would be pronounced "nyanya." (This happens to be a sort of cutesy "nyonyo" (a Mexican word for "crap" in a few dialects.) that more or less means "nerd") For another example, the English word "canyon" is derived from the Spanish "cañón."
12th Feb '17 2:40:31 AM DaNuke
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Also used is the letter "ü", with the diaeresis. It is used to distinguish between "gue"/"gui" and "güe"/"güi", where in the latter, the "u" is not silent. Compare ''guitarra'' (guitar) and ''pingüino'' (penguin), and ''guerra'' (war) and ''nicaragüense'' (of or from Nicaragua).

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Also used is the letter "ü", with the diaeresis. It is used to distinguish between "gue"/"gui" and "güe"/"güi", where in the latter, the "u" is not silent. Compare ''guitarra'' (guitar) and ''pingüino'' (penguin), and ''guerra'' (war) and ''nicaragüense'' (of or from Nicaragua).
(Nicaraguan).
30th Dec '16 2:47:29 PM livestockgeorge
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** In Catalan dialects (Català, Aragonés, Valenciana, Menorquinés, etc.) there is the ligature ĿL, which signifies two 'L's next to each other that should be pronounced like two British 'l's: one ending its syllable and the second starting the next. As it's only used in the middle of words, you'll only see it as "ŀl" or "l·l". That dot in the middle is called an interpunct.

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** In Catalan dialects of Catalan (Català, Aragonés, Valenciana, Menorquinés, etc.) there is the ligature ĿL, which signifies two 'L's next to each other that should be pronounced like two British 'l's: one ending its syllable and the second starting the next.next, instead of the standard double l sound as in Spanish. As it's only used in the middle of words, you'll only see it as "ŀl" or "l·l". That dot in the middle is called an interpunct.
28th Oct '16 2:46:34 AM XanderVJ
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Gender is quite a bit more intuitive than in many languages as well; in most cases, a noun's gender is clear from its ending; ''-o/-an/-aje/-ón'' is almost always masculine, whereas ''-a/-ión/-ad/-ud'' is almost always feminine... not to say that there aren't exceptions[[note]]like ''la mano'' ("hand") or ''el idioma'' ("language").[[/note]]. Masculine nouns are more common than feminine ones, so if you're really lost, guess masculine. Plural nouns that contain both masculine and feminine elements are mostly referred to as masculine; ''los gatos'' could mean "the [male] cats" or "the [male and female] cats," while ''las gatas'' can only refer to "the [female] cats."

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Gender is quite a bit more intuitive than in many languages as well; in most cases, a noun's gender is clear from its ending; ''-o/-an/-aje/-ón'' is almost always masculine, whereas ''-a/-ión/-ad/-ud'' is almost always feminine... not to say that there aren't exceptions[[note]]like ''la mano'' ("hand") or ''el idioma'' ("language").[[/note]]. Masculine nouns are more common than feminine ones, so if you're really lost, guess masculine. Plural nouns that contain both masculine and feminine elements are mostly referred to as masculine; ''los gatos'' could mean "the [male] cats" or "the [male and female] cats," while ''las gatas'' can only refer to "the [female] cats."
"[[note]]In recent years this usage has become quite controversial in a few Spanish speaking countries, Spain included, since some people are starting to consider it sexist, and promote the use both the plural masculine AND plural feminine together to be inclusive. Which creates the problem of making sentences much longer and arguably impractical. Let us say, it's a debate that has no clear end in sight.[[/note]]
15th Oct '16 8:09:08 PM nombretomado
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* J: Same as the soft G pronunciation. If you ever see Hispanics on {{Facebook}} typing "jajajaja", this is why.

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* J: Same as the soft G pronunciation. If you ever see Hispanics on {{Facebook}} Website/{{Facebook}} typing "jajajaja", this is why.
17th Aug '16 5:42:26 PM TomSFox
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One thing that ''does'' present occasional problems (for English speakers primarily) is the gender. It's mostly an arbitrary attribute of the noun (''el palo'', "stick," masculine; ''la mesa'', "table," feminine; it depends on usage, too: a hair dryer is masculine ("secador de pelo"), while the clothes dryer is feminine ("secadora de ropa"). However, when it comes to things that have actual gender they cling to that. A male cat is "un gato", while a female cat is "una gata". Not all names of gendered creatures have gendered forms, though, but in those cases the gender is easily identified by the article and/or adjective (i.e.: "bobcat" would be "el lince" and "la lince", respectively). In any case, you don't have that ridiculous business like in [[GermanLanguage German]] where the word for "girl" is neuter. Spanish actually doesn't have a neuter gender at all; everything is either masculine or feminine.

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One thing that ''does'' present occasional problems (for English speakers primarily) is the gender. It's mostly an arbitrary attribute of the noun (''el palo'', "stick," masculine; ''la mesa'', "table," feminine; it depends on usage, too: a hair dryer is masculine ("secador de pelo"), while the clothes dryer is feminine ("secadora de ropa"). However, when it comes to things that have actual gender they cling to that. A male cat is "un gato", while a female cat is "una gata". Not all names of gendered creatures have gendered forms, though, but in those cases the gender is easily identified by the article and/or adjective (i.e.: "bobcat" would be "el lince" and "la lince", respectively). In any case, you don't have that ridiculous business like in [[GermanLanguage German]] where the word for "girl" is neuter. Spanish actually doesn't have a neuter gender at all; everything is either masculine or feminine.
respectively).
17th Aug '16 1:52:18 PM DaNuke
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* S: In Latin America this sounds just like in English, while in European pronunciation it may sound like "sh" at first, but it actually is a sound between "s" and "sh" that takes some time to learn to make. However, in most Latin American dialects (Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica being notables exceptions) as well as in southern Spain, "s" is often turned into an "h" sound, or even omitted entirely, when it comes before a consonant or at the end of the a word.[[note]]As in, "[[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Tú cre' que en otro' lado' lah alga' ma' werde' son...]]"[[/note]]

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* S: In Latin America this sounds just like in English, while in European pronunciation it may sound like "sh" at first, but it actually is a sound between "s" and "sh" that takes some time to learn to make. However, in most Latin American dialects (Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica being notables exceptions) as well as in southern Spain, "s" is often turned into an "h" sound, or even omitted entirely, when it comes before a consonant or at the end of the a word.[[note]]As in, "[[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Tú cre' que en otro' lado' lah alga' ma' werde' son...]]"[[/note]]]]", or in Andrés Manuel López Obrador's famously attributed quote, "¡Ehto é un compló!"[[/note]]
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