History UsefulNotes / SpanishLanguage

24th Jan '16 2:15:03 PM TheDiego908
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The nature of semantic drift naturally ensures that [[InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike "false]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend friends"]] will arise. Probably the most famous, as shown above, is ''molestar'', which is a perfectly innocent and mundane word in Spanish meaning "bother," but obviously means something more...extreme in English. This really isn't that difficult, but an English speaker who's sort of half-listening may still be caught off guard by a phrase such as, ''Aunque él me molestaba, yo le amaba todavía.'' ("Even though he '''bothered''' me, I still loved him." We're not talking StockholmSyndrome here.)
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The nature of semantic drift naturally ensures that [[InMyLanguageThatSoundsLike "false]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_friend friends"]] will arise. Probably the most famous, as shown above, is ''molestar'', which is a perfectly innocent and mundane word in Spanish meaning "bother," but obviously means something more...extreme in English. This really isn't that difficult, but an English speaker who's sort of half-listening may still be caught off guard by a phrase such as, ''Aunque él me molestaba, yo le amaba todavía.'' ("Even though he '''bothered''' me, I still loved him." We're not talking StockholmSyndrome here.) here). Funnily enough, this can also happen with spanish speaking natives when trying to speak english ("Teacher, teacher! He's '''molesting''' me!")
6th Jan '16 2:11:35 PM JudgeSpear
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U with diaeresis info
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Also used is the letter "ü", with the diaeresis. It is used to distinguish between "gue"/"gui" and "güe"/"güi", where in the latter, the "u" is not silent. Compare ''guitarra'' (guitar) and ''pingüino'' (penguin), and ''guerra'' (war) and ''nicaragüense'' (of or from Nicaragua).
20th Nov '15 7:50:30 AM DeisTheAlcano
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One thing that ''does'' present occasional problems (for English speakers primarily) is the gender. It's mostly an arbitrary attribute of the noun (''el palo'', "stick," masculine; ''la mesa'', "table," feminine; it depends on usage, too: a hair dryer is masculine ("secador de pelo"), while the clothes dryer is feminine ("secadora de ropa")). However, when it comes to things that have actual gender they cling to that. A male cat is "un gato", while a female cat is "una gata". Not all names of gendered creatures have gendered forms, though, but in those cases the gender is easily identified by the article and/or adjective (i.e.: "bobcat" would be "el lince" and "la lince", respectively). In any case, you don't have that ridiculous business like in [[GermanLanguage German]] where the word for "girl" is neuter. Spanish actually doesn't have a neuter gender at all; everything is either masculine or feminine.
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One thing that ''does'' present occasional problems (for English speakers primarily) is the gender. It's mostly an arbitrary attribute of the noun (''el palo'', "stick," masculine; ''la mesa'', "table," feminine; it depends on usage, too: a hair dryer is masculine ("secador de pelo"), while the clothes dryer is feminine ("secadora de ropa")).ropa"). However, when it comes to things that have actual gender they cling to that. A male cat is "un gato", while a female cat is "una gata". Not all names of gendered creatures have gendered forms, though, but in those cases the gender is easily identified by the article and/or adjective (i.e.: "bobcat" would be "el lince" and "la lince", respectively). In any case, you don't have that ridiculous business like in [[GermanLanguage German]] where the word for "girl" is neuter. Spanish actually doesn't have a neuter gender at all; everything is either masculine or feminine.

* '''Llanas (Graves)''': They have the accent on the second-to-last syllable. Are marked when they end in consonant different than ''n'' or ''s''. Examples. Guerra, Gato, Radio, Flores, Lápiz, Árbol, Cárcel, Difícil, Azúcar.
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* '''Llanas '''Llanas/Graves (Graves)''': They have the accent on the second-to-last syllable. Are marked when they end in consonant different than ''n'' or ''s''. Examples. Guerra, Gato, Radio, Flores, Lápiz, Árbol, Cárcel, Difícil, Azúcar.
20th Nov '15 5:23:12 AM system
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moderator restored to earlier version
12th Sep '15 7:16:14 AM molotov
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* X: In standard Spanish it's always pronounced as in "ax." But Spaniards used it to represent several different sounds on Aztec and Mayan languages, so in {{Mayincatec}} words that crossed over to Mexican Spanish it can be read like "s", "sh", "j" (That's how you should pronounce it "Mexico", by the way) and also "x".
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* X: In standard Spanish it's always pronounced as in "ax." But Spaniards used it to represent several different sounds on Aztec and Mayan languages, so in {{Mayincatec}} words that crossed over to Mexican Spanish it can be read like "s", "sh", "j" (That's how you should pronounce it "Mexico", "El Mexicoo or "Narcostan"", by the way) and also "x".
12th Sep '15 7:11:22 AM molotov
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Nouns ain't too complicated in Spanish. Unlike its predecessor Latin, which had a casserole of case endings depending on the noun was used in a sentence, Spanish has nothing in that regard. ''Pan'' (bread) will stay ''pan'' no matter where or how it's used.
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Nouns ain't too complicated in Spanish. Unlike its predecessor Latin, which had a casserole of case endings depending on the noun was used in a sentence, Spanish has nothing in that regard. ''Pan'' (bread) (el breado) will stay ''pan'' no matter where or how it's used.
12th Sep '15 7:10:13 AM molotov
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Spanish is an Ibero-Romance language, and the second most natively spoken language in the entire world (after Mandarin Chinese) due to the enormous expanse of the Spanish Empire in its heyday. It's the national or official language of 21 countries, as well as one of the official languages of the UN and 13 other international organizations. Even in the United States alone there are over 50 million Spanish-speakers, which is more than the entire population of most Spanish-speaking countries, Spain itself included[[note]]And if you look below, there's even a native dialect of Spanish in New Mexico and Colorado![[/note]]. In short, this is a big language. It's the most widely spoken language in the Western Hemisphere. See SpanishLiterature.
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Spanish ElSpanisho is an Ibero-Romance language, and the second most natively spoken language in the entire world (after Mandarin Chinese) due to the enormous expanse of the Spanish Empire in its heyday. It's the national or official language of 21 countries, as well as one of the official languages of the UN and 13 other international organizations. Even in the United States alone there are over 50 million Spanish-speakers, which is more than the entire population of most Spanish-speaking countries, Spain itself included[[note]]And if you look below, there's even a native dialect of Spanish in New Mexico and Colorado![[/note]]. In short, this is a big language. It's the most widely spoken language in the Western Hemisphere. See SpanishLiterature.

!!Those who write the rules: La Real Academia Española
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!!Those who write the rules: La Real Academia Españolael Realo Academiao Españolao

The institution was created in 1714 following the model from the "Académie française" in France and the "Accademia della Crusca" in Italy. Its function is to gather and approve officially all the changes in the Spanish language in all the Spanish-speaking world to preserve and maintain its proper use. Every year they take care of including in the dictionary new words and removing unused ones[[note]]Well, at least in theory. The R.A.E. is infamous for being painfully slow in acknowledging the most recent developments, specially in the colloquial language. There are plenty of words that took DECADES to be approved by the academy just because their members kept refusing to accept them as proper[[/note]].
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The institution was created in 1714 following the model from the "Académie française" in France el Franceo and the "Accademia della Crusca" in Italy.el Italyo. Its function is to gather and approve officially all the changes in the Spanish language in all the Spanish-speaking world to preserve and maintain its proper use. Every year they take care of including in the dictionary new words and removing unused ones[[note]]Well, at least in theory. The R.A.E. is infamous for being painfully slow in acknowledging the most recent developments, specially in the colloquial language. There are plenty of words that took DECADES to be approved by the academy just because their members kept refusing to accept them as proper[[/note]].
14th Aug '15 5:06:29 PM ElBuenCuate
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One famous feature of Spanish orthography is its diacritics, specifically acute accents and tildes. The acute accents, unlike some other languages, such as Hungarian or Polish, where they distinguish sounds, accents in Spanish are used only to mark stress or to distinguish homonyms. You'll notice, however, that it's not marked on every word, and that's because they only mark stress if the word breaks Da Rules, which are: * If the word ends in a vowel, "-n," or "-s," the stress goes on the penultimate syllable. Examples: ''queso, chico, umbra, oscuro.'' * If it ends in any other consonant, it's on the last one. Examples: ''pared, hablar, escolar, policial, carnet.''
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One famous feature of Spanish orthography is its diacritics, specifically acute accents and tildes. The acute accents, unlike some other languages, such as Hungarian or Polish, where they distinguish sounds, accents in Spanish are used only to mark stress or to distinguish homonyms. You'll notice, however, that it's not marked on every word, and that's because they only mark stress if the word breaks Da Rules, which are: * If rules for the word ends in a vowel, "-n," or "-s," marking are very straightforward, so if you learn them, as mentioned before, the stress goes on spelling gives you all the penultimate syllable. Examples: ''queso, chico, umbra, oscuro.'' * If it ends in any other consonant, it's information for pronunciation. The words are divided as: *'''Agudas (Acute)''': They have the accent on the last one. syllable. Are marked when they end in ''n'', ''s'', or vowel. Examples: ''pared, hablar, escolar, policial, carnet.'' Calor, Beber, Sudor, Lombriz, Camión, Jamás, Rubí, Café *'''Llanas (Graves)''': They have the accent on the second-to-last syllable. Are marked when they end in consonant different than ''n'' or ''s''. Examples. Guerra, Gato, Radio, Flores, Lápiz, Árbol, Cárcel, Difícil, Azúcar. *'''Esdrújulas (Em...[[ElNinoIsSpanishForTheNino Esdrujulas?]])''': They have the accent on the third-to-last syllable. They are always marked. Examples: Brújula, Bélgica, Séptimo, Máximo, Ejército, Hígado, Pájaro.
6th Aug '15 4:20:12 PM UltHamBro
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Added DiffLines:
In Spain, however, ''ceceo'' gets a different meaning. As the ''th'' pronounciation is spread all over the country, the term ''ceceo'' is reserved for the example above in which all the ''s'' are also replaced by ''th''. Pronouncing the sounds differently, which would be considered ''ceceo'' in Latin America, is called ''distinción'' (distinction) in Spain.[[labelnote:*]]In certain parts of the Spanish region of Andalusia, one can find ''seseo'', ''ceceo'' and ''distinción'' speakers just a few kilometres away.[[/labelnote]] For instance, regarding the words ''casa'' (house) and ''caza'' (hunt): *For a ''seseo'' speaker, both are pronounced ''casa''. *For a total ''ceceo'' speaker, both are pronounced "''catha''". *For a ''distinción'' speaker, they're pronounced ''casa'' and "''catha''", respectively.
10th Jul '15 9:25:30 PM EddieA98
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Just adding some stuff about the pronounciation, nothing major.
* GU: A hard g in front of ''e'' or ''i''; ''gw'' in all other cases.
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* GU: A hard g in front of ''e'' or ''i''; ''gw'' in all other cases.cases (although the g is removed in some varieties).

* LL: Its ''canonical'' pronunciation is rather like the Italian ''gl'' as in ''figlio''. However, in most dialects the pronunciation has become like the ''y'' in ''year'' or like the J in "jail" (oddly enough, the only strong hold-out of the primitive pronunciation is Catalonia, where the same sound is an important part of the Catalan language and its standard accent). In the area around Rio de La Plata, instead, it's pronounced as the ''sh'' in ''show'' or the ''s'' in ''measure'', and in New Mexico, it's generally omitted entirely, such that ''ellos'' becomes ''éos.''
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* LL: Its ''canonical'' pronunciation is rather like the Italian ''gl'' as in ''figlio''. However, in most dialects the pronunciation has become like the ''y'' in ''year'' or like the J in "jail" (oddly enough, the only strong hold-out of the primitive pronunciation is Catalonia, where the same sound is an important part of the Catalan language and its standard accent). In the area around Rio de La Plata, instead, it's pronounced as the ''sh'' in ''show'' or the ''s'' in ''measure'', in Guatemala, it becomes a sound somewhere between i and j, and in New Mexico, it's generally omitted entirely, such that ''ellos'' becomes ''éos.''

* S: In Latin America this sounds just like in English, while in European pronunciation it may sound like "sh" at first, but it actually is a sound between "s" and "sh" that takes some time to learn to make. However, in most Latin American dialects (Mexico and Costa Rica being notables exceptions) as well as in southern Spain, "s" is often turned into an "h" sound, or even omitted entirely, when it comes before a consonant or at the end of the a word.[[note]]As in, "[[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Tú cre' que en otro' lado' lah alga' ma' werde' son...]]"[[/note]]
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* S: In Latin America this sounds just like in English, while in European pronunciation it may sound like "sh" at first, but it actually is a sound between "s" and "sh" that takes some time to learn to make. However, in most Latin American dialects (Mexico (Mexico, Guatemala and Costa Rica being notables exceptions) as well as in southern Spain, "s" is often turned into an "h" sound, or even omitted entirely, when it comes before a consonant or at the end of the a word.[[note]]As in, "[[Disney/TheLittleMermaid Tú cre' que en otro' lado' lah alga' ma' werde' son...]]"[[/note]]
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