History UsefulNotes / SouthAfrica

15th May '16 5:59:32 PM MeekGazelle
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* The British series ''Series/Wild at Heart'', involving a game park in South Africa.

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* The British series ''Series/Wild ''Series/{{Wild at Heart'', Heart}}'', involving a game park in South Africa.
8th May '16 6:40:34 AM missmoon
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* ''Series/TheDailyShowWithTrevorNoah'''s eponymous host is from Soweto and occasionally references the country in his monologues.
31st Mar '16 9:08:14 PM 8088ben
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The concept of race in post-Apartheid South Africa is complex and fluid. In addition to black South Africans, which group comprises eighty percent of the total population and contains members of multiple ethnic origins and language groups, there is a considerable minority of white South Africans, who may be of Dutch, British, French Huguenot, Israeli, Greek, Portuguese or German descent, and who remain affected by the English/Afrikaans divide. There are also coloured [[note]]the term 'coloured' is not derogatory in South Africa. [[/note]] South Africans, who may be, inclusively, of white, black, Indonesian, Malaysian, Javanese, Arabic and/or Indian descent, and who have an extremely rich and diverse cultural heritage as a result, being mostly Afrikaans-speaking and having a high percentage of Muslims. There are also substantial immigrant groups of Indians, whose ancestors arrived in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as migrant workers, and of people of Arabic descent, not to mention a Chinese population of around 100,000. There are also nearly 150,000 refugees, the majority from sub-Saharan Africa (and several million illegals); many come from UsefulNotes/{{Zimbabwe}}. Contrary to the image most media would portray, racism is still widespread. Recent controversies surrounding racism include prominent politician, [[JerkAss Julius Malema]], who sings a song called "Shoot the Boer" at rallies[[note]]"Shoot the Boers, they are rapists, shoot them, the cowards ...". Nice "reconciliation" there, buddy.[[/note]]. Recent years have also seen an upswing in xenophobic prejudice, the chief target of this being the refugees (although its debatable whether you can blame racism for the anti-refugee riots, seeing as in many cases the refugees and rioters were even from the same tribe)[[note]]There are several examples, but the one that comes to mind is the Shona, the largest ethnic group in Zimbabwe.[[/note]].

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The concept of race in post-Apartheid South Africa is complex and fluid. In addition to black South Africans, which group comprises eighty percent of the total population and contains members of multiple ethnic origins and language groups, there is a considerable minority of white South Africans, who may be of Dutch, British, French Huguenot, Israeli, Greek, Portuguese or German descent, and who remain affected by the English/Afrikaans divide. There are also coloured [[note]]the term 'coloured' is not derogatory in South Africa. [[/note]] South Africans, who may be, inclusively, of white, black, Indonesian, Malaysian, Javanese, Arabic and/or Indian descent, and who have an extremely rich and diverse cultural heritage as a result, being mostly Afrikaans-speaking and having a high percentage of Muslims. There are also substantial immigrant groups of Indians, whose ancestors arrived in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century as migrant workers, and of people of Arabic descent, not to mention a Chinese population of around 100,000. There are also nearly 150,000 refugees, the majority from sub-Saharan Africa (and several million illegals); many come from UsefulNotes/{{Zimbabwe}}. Contrary to the image most media would portray, racism is still widespread. Recent controversies surrounding racism include prominent politician, politician [[JerkAss Julius Malema]], Malema]][[note]](former leader of the ANC's youth wing until the party expelled him, he now leads the hard-left Economic Freedom Fighters party)[[/note]], who sings a song called "Shoot the Boer" at rallies[[note]]"Shoot the Boers, they are rapists, shoot them, the cowards ...". Nice "reconciliation" there, buddy.[[/note]]. Recent years have also seen an upswing in xenophobic prejudice, the chief target of this being the refugees (although its debatable whether you can blame racism for the anti-refugee riots, seeing as in many cases the refugees and rioters were even from the same tribe)[[note]]There are several examples, but the one that comes to mind is the Shona, the largest ethnic group in Zimbabwe.[[/note]].
1st Nov '15 6:58:53 PM nombretomado
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South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj India]] away from [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).

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South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj [[UsefulNotes/TheRaj India]] away from [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).
20th Sep '15 6:40:17 PM nombretomado
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South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj India]] away from [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[NapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).

to:

South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj India]] away from [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[NapoleonicWars [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).
4th Sep '15 8:47:54 PM nombretomado
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South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj India]] away from [[NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[NapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).

to:

South Africa's earliest inhabitants were most likely the ancestors of the Khoesan, while [[SettlingTheFrontier Nguni settlers moved down]] from sub-Saharan Africa around 300 AD, the most populous of these eventually forming the Xhosa and Zulu tribes.[[note]] Although South Africa contains the Cradle of Humankind, which shows that some of the very first "humans" (if not the first) lived there.[[/note]] The first instance of European contact occurred in 1487, when Bartolomeu Dias, en route to India, rounded the Cape of Storms (later dubbed the Cape of Good Hope, which name is still in use today - the University of Cape Town's motto is ''spes bona''). However, South Africa was not colonised until 1652, when Jan van Riebeeck established a rest colony at the behest of the Dutch East India Company, mainly to supply passing vessels with fresh fruit in order to avoid scurvy. These Dutch settlers would later come to blows with British settlers who arrived during the early nineteenth century, when the British Empire annexed the territory (to keep this critical bit of land en route to [[TheRaj India]] away from [[NapoleonBonaparte [[UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte Napoleon]], who [[NapoleonicWars controlled the Netherlands at the time]]).
31st Jul '15 2:13:58 PM phoenix
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Over twenty separate political parties ran in the 2009 national election, with alignments ranging from the extreme right to the extreme left. The ruling party, at just under two-thirds majority, is the big-tent but broadly economically leftist ANC; its leader, the Zulu-descended Jacob Zuma, is therefore President of the Republic (Parliament elects the President, who is both head of state and of government). The main opposition party is the Democratic Alliance-considerably more than half of its support now derives from non-whites[[note]]The DA is not a coalition of which the old National Party forms a part; it actually descends directly from the liberal-progressive ''white'' opposition of Apartheid times (whose supporters were mostly non-Afrikaners, e.g. British-descended or recent European immigrants--such as current DA leader Helen Zille, whose parents were Jews escaping NaziGermany). After apartheid, the NP became the NNP; they tried an alliance with the predecessor of the DA, hated it, and broke up soon afterward, with many of their members '''joining the ANC.''' Strange but true![[/note]]. A third party, the Congress of the People (also known as COPE, and yes, every joke that can possibly be made already has been) was formed due to an ANC split that occurred in late 2008 after the axing of Former President Thabo Mbeki, and, rather unexpectedly, won 10% of the vote. Besides these three larger parties, there are several dozen smaller parties representing minorities and special-interest groups. Therefore, as in most Parliamentary systems of government, coalitions between parties are very important; stand-offs and close calls between two large parties, as in the American system, just do not happen in South Africa. (Instead, they are liable to occur ''within'' the ANC, behind closed doors: the ANC is a rather large tent, including both near-communist leftists and people, like economic wizard Trevor Manuel, who are definitely neoliberal and might well be viewed as centre-right.)

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Over twenty separate political parties ran in the 2009 national election, with alignments ranging from the extreme right to the extreme left. The ruling party, at just under two-thirds majority, is the big-tent but broadly economically leftist ANC; its leader, the Zulu-descended Jacob Zuma, is therefore President of the Republic (Parliament elects the President, who is both head of state and of government). The main opposition party is the Democratic Alliance-considerably more than half of its support now derives from non-whites[[note]]The DA is not a coalition of which the old National Party forms a part; it actually descends directly from the liberal-progressive ''white'' opposition of Apartheid times (whose supporters were mostly non-Afrikaners, e.g. British-descended or recent European immigrants--such as current DA leader Helen Zille, whose parents were Jews escaping NaziGermany).UsefulNotes/NaziGermany). After apartheid, the NP became the NNP; they tried an alliance with the predecessor of the DA, hated it, and broke up soon afterward, with many of their members '''joining the ANC.''' Strange but true![[/note]]. A third party, the Congress of the People (also known as COPE, and yes, every joke that can possibly be made already has been) was formed due to an ANC split that occurred in late 2008 after the axing of Former President Thabo Mbeki, and, rather unexpectedly, won 10% of the vote. Besides these three larger parties, there are several dozen smaller parties representing minorities and special-interest groups. Therefore, as in most Parliamentary systems of government, coalitions between parties are very important; stand-offs and close calls between two large parties, as in the American system, just do not happen in South Africa. (Instead, they are liable to occur ''within'' the ANC, behind closed doors: the ANC is a rather large tent, including both near-communist leftists and people, like economic wizard Trevor Manuel, who are definitely neoliberal and might well be viewed as centre-right.)
13th Jul '15 4:43:46 PM Prfnoff
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Between approximately 1830 and 1860, a series of Frontier Wars were being waged by the white settlers, chiefly against the Xhosa, who were migrating south-west, and the Zulu, who had long held the northern areas. The Zulu in particular expanded greatly during the early nineteenth century under the leadership of Shaka Zulu, whose military conquests over the various smaller tribes and factions in that area led to what was retrospectively termed the Mfecane (or Difaqane in Sotho), which can be translated as 'The Hammering' - viewed positively, it can reference the forging of many small tribes into one; negatively, it aptly describes a series of brutal [[note]] as in, near-genocidal[[/note]] wars. Shaka was renowned during his time for his military genius, which included a series of revolutionary new manoeuvres, the organisation and regimentation of a formal army, and the implementation of new, more efficient weapons; this earned him the nickname of "the African Napoleon". A secession within the Zulu nation spearheaded by Mzilikazi of the Khumalo tribe led to the formation of the Ndebele people in the north; while Moshoeshoe of the Sotho fortified sections of the Drakensberg mountains to found what is today known as Lesotho.

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Between approximately 1830 and 1860, a series of Frontier Wars were being waged by the white settlers, chiefly against the Xhosa, who were migrating south-west, and the Zulu, who had long held the northern areas. The Zulu in particular expanded greatly during the early nineteenth century under the leadership of Shaka Zulu, UsefulNotes/ShakaZulu, whose military conquests over the various smaller tribes and factions in that area led to what was retrospectively termed the Mfecane (or Difaqane in Sotho), which can be translated as 'The Hammering' - viewed positively, it can reference the forging of many small tribes into one; negatively, it aptly describes a series of brutal [[note]] as in, near-genocidal[[/note]] wars. Shaka was renowned during his time for his military genius, which included a series of revolutionary new manoeuvres, the organisation and regimentation of a formal army, and the implementation of new, more efficient weapons; this earned him the nickname of "the African Napoleon". A secession within the Zulu nation spearheaded by Mzilikazi of the Khumalo tribe led to the formation of the Ndebele people in the north; while Moshoeshoe of the Sotho fortified sections of the Drakensberg mountains to found what is today known as Lesotho.
28th Apr '15 11:07:05 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''BreakerMorant'': Australian film set during the Boer War and based on actual events.

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* ''BreakerMorant'': ''Film/BreakerMorant'': Australian film set during the Boer War and based on actual events.
28th Apr '15 3:16:21 AM Backstraw
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* ''Film/AvengersAgeOfUltron'': Johannesburg is the setting where TheHulk and IronMan battle it out. [[ArtisticLicenceGeography Not as close to the coast as the movie implies.]]
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