History UsefulNotes / Skinheads

3rd Jul '17 7:24:21 PM Fireblood
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* The Creator/KimNewman short story "[[Literature/DiogenesClub The End of the Pier Show]]" revolves around a young policeman who's gone undercover in a white supremacist skinhead gang, only to get caught up in a more supernatural form of evil to whom the skinheads, constantly depicted as a bunch of over-macho and violent but ultimately inconsequential thugs, pale in comparison (along with the [[ThoseWackyNazis horrors of the people who inspired them]]. Throughout the story, he expresses discomfort with having shaved all his previously long flowing hair off, but by the end he's used to it and even after getting reassigned to other duties decides to keep the look, deciding that the skin look deserves to be reclaimed.

to:

* The Creator/KimNewman short story "[[Literature/DiogenesClub The End of the Pier Show]]" revolves around a young policeman who's gone undercover in a white supremacist skinhead gang, only to get caught up in a more supernatural form of evil to whom the skinheads, constantly depicted as a bunch of over-macho and violent but ultimately inconsequential thugs, pale in comparison (along with the [[ThoseWackyNazis horrors of the people who inspired them]].them]]). Throughout the story, he expresses discomfort with having shaved all his previously long flowing hair off, but by the end he's used to it and even after getting reassigned to other duties decides to keep the look, deciding that the skin look deserves to be reclaimed.



** In the revival series, the costume theme for each Doctor is (by admission of WordOfGod) based on a British subculture. Both the Ninth Doctor and the Twelfth Doctor were modeled after different kinds of skinhead - the Twelfth the more classic, 1960s-style kind, with close-cropped but not shaved hair, brogues with Doc Marten's-like soles and a Crombie coat; and the Ninth the 00s, LGBT-skinhead kind with a crew cut, more conventional Doc Martens and lots of beat-up leather.

to:

** In the revival series, the costume theme for each Doctor is (by admission of WordOfGod) based on a British subculture. Both the Ninth Doctor and the Twelfth Doctor were modeled after different kinds of skinhead - the Twelfth the more classic, 1960s-style kind, with close-cropped but not shaved hair, brogues with Doc Marten's-like soles and a Crombie coat; and the Ninth the 00s, LGBT-skinhead LGBT skinhead kind with a crew cut, more conventional Doc Martens and lots of beat-up leather.
29th Apr '17 5:13:24 PM RampinUp46
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These days, the skinhead subculture isn't as large as it was, but still pervades amongst working class Brits, as well as working class Americans. It's just that the stigma is hard to avoid. It's a little bit easier in Britain, where while skinheads still bear racist associations, there are also vocal and active skinhead groups that speak out against racism, which kind of blunts the stigma (hell, skinheads are something of a fetish amongst European gay men). America kind of developed the skinhead subculture "second hand," however; while skins did make their way over from the first days on, and while the [=SHARPs=] came together in New York City, skinheads aren't really well understood as a subculture outside of the punk/hardcore/street subcultures assembly. As a result, "skinhead" and "Nazi" are practically synonymous in American media. This is possibly because, in the United States, there has yet to be a single skinhead movement or subculture which has received any media attention at all for being anything ''other'' than a pack of neo-Nazi scumbags. SHARP might have got its start in New York City, but by this point it may as well not exist in the US. Nowadays, "bonehead" is the proper nomenclature for white supremacist/National Socialist skins, and it's often not hard to tell the two apart based on how long their hair is (skinheads usually buzz theirs, boneheads usually shave it completely).

to:

These days, the skinhead subculture isn't as large as it was, but it still pervades amongst among working class Brits, Brits as well as working class Americans. It's just that the stigma is hard to avoid. It's a little bit easier in Britain, where while skinheads still bear racist associations, there are also vocal and active skinhead groups that speak out against racism, which kind of blunts the stigma (hell, skinheads are something of a fetish amongst European gay men). America kind of developed the skinhead subculture "second hand," however; however while skins did make their way over from the first days on, and while the [=SHARPs=] came together in New York City, skinheads aren't really well understood as a subculture outside of the punk/hardcore/street subcultures assembly. As a result, "skinhead" and "Nazi" are practically synonymous in American media. This is possibly because, in the United States, there has yet to be a single skinhead movement or subculture which has received any media attention at all for being anything ''other'' than a pack of neo-Nazi scumbags. SHARP might have got its start in New York City, but by this point it may as well not exist in the US. Nowadays, "bonehead" "bonehead", or less commonly, "hammerskin" is the proper nomenclature for white supremacist/National Socialist skins, and it's often not hard to tell the two apart based on how long their hair is (skinheads usually buzz theirs, boneheads usually shave it completely).
off completely) or - of all things - what color their boot laces are (racist skinheads prefer white or red laces, almost always laced in a straight bar fashion).



As has been outlined extensively, skins dance all over the political spectrum, from neo-Nazi skins to anti-fascist skins, who are likely to try and club the shit out of each other if they were to meet in a dark alley. There are also traditionalist skins, who try to avoid politics all together and focus on the working class pride the subculture originally was supposed to embody. Skinhead fashion is mostly uniform amongst guys: flight jackets, Fred Perry and Ben Sherman shirts, suspenders (braces), tight "bleachers" (bleached jeans), and work or combat boots (usually Doc Martens, though many skinheads have switched over to other brands after production for Doc Martens moved out of Britain to countries known for sweatshop labour).

to:

As has been outlined extensively, skins dance all over the political spectrum, from neo-Nazi skins to anti-fascist skins, who are likely to try and club the shit out of each other if they were to meet in a dark alley. There are also traditionalist skins, who try to avoid politics all together and focus on the working class pride the subculture originally was supposed to embody. Skinhead fashion is mostly uniform amongst guys: among males: flight jackets, Fred Perry and Ben Sherman shirts, suspenders (braces), tight "bleachers" (bleached jeans), and work or combat boots (usually Doc Martens, though many skinheads have switched over to other brands after production for Doc Martens moved out of Britain to countries known for sweatshop labour).
29th Mar '17 5:17:19 AM HasturHasturHastur
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Now, as for the racism... in the early '60s, there were individual attacks launched by skins on Pakistani and other South Asian immigrant families. It wasn't until the '70s, with the rise of the National Front, that a number of skinheads organized and adopted racist dogma. At the same time, though, there were still skinheads who joined up with other movements opposed to the National Front, such as Rock Against Racism, or would found their own, such as the [=SHARPs=] (Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice). It's just that, around that time, there were neo-Nazi groups that operated openly and were made up mostly of skinheads, and the media put two and two together and got headlines.

These days, the skinhead subculture isn't as large as it was, but still pervades amongst working class Brits, as well as working class Americans. It's just that the stigma is hard to avoid. It's a little bit easier in Britain, where while skinheads still bear racist associations, there are also vocal and active skinhead groups that speak out against racism, which kind of blunts the stigma (hell, skinheads are something of a fetish amongst European gay men). America kind of developed the skinhead subculture "second hand," however; while skins did make their way over from the first days on, and while the [=SHARPs=] came together in New York City, skinheads aren't really well understood as a subculture outside of the punk/hardcore/street subcultures assembly. As a result, "skinhead" and "Nazi" are practically synonymous in American media. This is possibly because, in the United States, there has yet to be a single skinhead movement or subculture which has received any media attention at all for being anything ''other'' than a pack of neo-Nazi scumbags. SHARP might have got its start in New York City, but by this point it may as well not exist in the US. It should be noted that there is a semi-proper term for racist/neo-Nazi skins in the form of "boneheads", and it's often not hard to tell the two apart based on how long their hair is (skinheads usually buzz theirs, boneheads usually shave it completely).

to:

Now, as for the racism... in the early '60s, there were individual attacks launched by skins on Pakistani and other South Asian immigrant families. It wasn't until the '70s, with the rise of the National Front, that a number of skinheads organized and adopted racist dogma. At the same time, though, there were still skinheads who joined up with other movements opposed to the National Front, such as Rock Against Racism, or would found their own, such as the [=SHARPs=] (Skinheads Against Racial Prejudice). It's just that, around that time, there were neo-Nazi groups that operated openly and were made up mostly of skinheads, and the media put two and two together and got headlines.

headlines. Ironically, many early skinheads were heavily influenced by rudeboys and/or were actually British-Caribbean, making the association of skinhead culture with white supremacist/National Socialist sympathies all the more unfortunate.

These days, the skinhead subculture isn't as large as it was, but still pervades amongst working class Brits, as well as working class Americans. It's just that the stigma is hard to avoid. It's a little bit easier in Britain, where while skinheads still bear racist associations, there are also vocal and active skinhead groups that speak out against racism, which kind of blunts the stigma (hell, skinheads are something of a fetish amongst European gay men). America kind of developed the skinhead subculture "second hand," however; while skins did make their way over from the first days on, and while the [=SHARPs=] came together in New York City, skinheads aren't really well understood as a subculture outside of the punk/hardcore/street subcultures assembly. As a result, "skinhead" and "Nazi" are practically synonymous in American media. This is possibly because, in the United States, there has yet to be a single skinhead movement or subculture which has received any media attention at all for being anything ''other'' than a pack of neo-Nazi scumbags. SHARP might have got its start in New York City, but by this point it may as well not exist in the US. It should be noted that there Nowadays, "bonehead" is a semi-proper term the proper nomenclature for racist/neo-Nazi skins in the form of "boneheads", white supremacist/National Socialist skins, and it's often not hard to tell the two apart based on how long their hair is (skinheads usually buzz theirs, boneheads usually shave it completely).
29th Dec '16 11:02:55 PM WanderingBrowser
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to:

* In the now-forgotten British 70s comic ''ComicBook/{{Action}}!'', the titular character from the football storyline ''Lookout for Lefty!'' has a fiercely aggressive and proud skinhead girlfriend, showcasing the original non-Neo-Nazi form of the subculture.
10th Oct '16 4:51:16 AM JamesAustin
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->''Young skinhead, [[UnfortunateImplications they call you]] [[GetTheeToANunnery hooligan]]'' \\

to:

->''Young ->''"Young skinhead, [[UnfortunateImplications they call you]] [[GetTheeToANunnery hooligan]]'' you hooligan'' \\



''But they still call you racist on the evening news''
->--'''DropkickMurphys''', "Never Alone"

to:

''But they still call you racist on the evening news''
->--'''DropkickMurphys''',
news"''
-->-- '''DropkickMurphys''',
"Never Alone"
24th Sep '16 8:19:47 PM Fireblood
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** Although he does wear swastikas, as revealed in the third book. However, he has only the vaguest idea what they represent, or why wearing them when you've time travelled back to 1943 is a bad idea.

to:

** Although he does wear swastikas, as revealed in the third book. However, he has only the vaguest idea what they represent, or why wearing them when you've time travelled traveled back to 1943 is a bad idea.



* The Creator/KimNewman short story "[[Literature/DiogenesClub The End of the Pier Show]]" revolves around a young policeman who's gone undercover in a white supremacist skinhead gang, only to get caught up in a more supernatural form of evil to whom the skinheads, constantly depicted as a bunch of over-macho and violent but ultimately inconsequential thugs who pale in comparison to the [[ThoseWackyNazis horrors of the people who inspired them]]. Throughout the story, he expresses discomfort with having shaved all his previously long flowing hair off, but by the end he's used to it and even after getting reassigned to other duties decides to keep the look, deciding that the skin look deserves to be reclaimed.

to:

* The Creator/KimNewman short story "[[Literature/DiogenesClub The End of the Pier Show]]" revolves around a young policeman who's gone undercover in a white supremacist skinhead gang, only to get caught up in a more supernatural form of evil to whom the skinheads, constantly depicted as a bunch of over-macho and violent but ultimately inconsequential thugs who thugs, pale in comparison to (along with the [[ThoseWackyNazis horrors of the people who inspired them]]. Throughout the story, he expresses discomfort with having shaved all his previously long flowing hair off, but by the end he's used to it and even after getting reassigned to other duties decides to keep the look, deciding that the skin look deserves to be reclaimed.



* Barry Kent of the ''Literature/AdrianMole'' books is one in the early books. He is racist at first, but in the second book becomes an anti-racist after a politician from the Send 'Em Back Where They Came From Party comes around to the school looking for support to deport everyone not of Anglo-Saxon blood. Kent threatens him with bodily harm and joins a group called Rock Against Racism.

to:

* Barry Kent of the ''Literature/AdrianMole'' books is one in the early books. He is racist at first, but in the second book becomes an anti-racist after a politician from the Send 'Em Back Where They Came From Party comes around to the school looking for support to deport everyone not of Anglo-Saxon blood. Kent threatens him with bodily harm and joins a group called Rock Against Racism.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "Tea Peter", the government has been shut down and the town has gone to hell. In one scene, Mort has dyed his hair blond and his hiding from a group of skinheads, and proceeds to sell out his own people.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "Tea Peter", the government has been shut down and the town has gone to hell. In one scene, Mort has dyed his hair blond and his is hiding from a group of skinheads, and proceeds to sell out his own people.
24th Sep '16 8:10:29 PM Fireblood
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The original movement still exists and has spread to cities on all continents, but because of the Aryans, they don't refer to themselves as 'skinheads' anymore. They are longest-lived subculture currently existing, probably due to remaining under the mainstream radar, which they're content to continue doing. The Aryans simply co-opted a few costume elements, and care less about preserving the movement than their own high profile.

to:

The original movement still exists and has spread to cities on all continents, but because of the Aryans, they don't refer to themselves as 'skinheads' anymore. They are the longest-lived subculture currently existing, probably due to remaining under the mainstream radar, which they're content to continue doing. The Aryans simply co-opted a few costume elements, and care less about preserving the movement than their own high profile.
3rd Jul '16 10:36:23 AM CynicalBastardo
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to:

* Barry Kent of the ''Literature/AdrianMole'' books is one in the early books. He is racist at first, but in the second book becomes an anti-racist after a politician from the Send 'Em Back Where They Came From Party comes around to the school looking for support to deport everyone not of Anglo-Saxon blood. Kent threatens him with bodily harm and joins a group called Rock Against Racism.
13th Jun '16 6:33:56 AM Folamh3
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to:

* ''Film/GreenRoom'' revolves around a HardcorePunk band who unwittingly get hired to play a gig at a neo-Nazi skinhead bar. Things only go south from there.
17th Nov '15 2:34:04 PM namingway
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* In the revival series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', the costume theme for each Doctor is (by admission of WordOfGod) based on a British subculture. Both the Ninth Doctor and the Twelfth Doctor were modeled after different kinds of skinhead - the Twelfth the more classic, 1960s-style kind, with close-cropped but not shaved hair, brogues with Doc Marten's-like soles and a Crombie coat; and the Ninth the 00s, LGBT-skinhead kind with a crew cut, more conventional Doc Martens and lots of leather.

to:

* In the revival series of ''Series/DoctorWho'', the show struggled with a [[{{Badbutt}} middle class BBC approach]] to young thugs. (See [[{{Recap/DoctorWhoS25E3SilverNemesis}} "Silver Nemesis"]], a Seventh Doctor serial.)
** In the revival series,
the costume theme for each Doctor is (by admission of WordOfGod) based on a British subculture. Both the Ninth Doctor and the Twelfth Doctor were modeled after different kinds of skinhead - the Twelfth the more classic, 1960s-style kind, with close-cropped but not shaved hair, brogues with Doc Marten's-like soles and a Crombie coat; and the Ninth the 00s, LGBT-skinhead kind with a crew cut, more conventional Doc Martens and lots of beat-up leather.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Skinheads