History UsefulNotes / Saturn

15th Apr '16 1:50:47 PM RainbowPhoenix
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Like the other giant planets, Saturn radiates more energy than it receives from the Sun; three times as much in this case. For Saturn this is because its cold temperatures and lack of density causes the helium in its upper atmosphere to condense into droplets, which then rain into the lower atmosphere, converting potential energy to kinetic energy.
16th Mar '16 11:37:00 AM AnotherGuy
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It is very likely that the four terrestrial planets, and by extension humanity, have Saturn to thank for their continued existence. Current theories on solar system formation state that it is typical for large gas giants to migrate inward until they orbit extremely close to their stars, often close enough that a full revolution takes only weeks, or even days. Jupiter most likely would have done the same, destroying everything in its path via gravitational forces, if Saturn had not formed with sufficient mass and in the right position to yank Jupiter back, allowing the inner planets to continue forming.

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It is very likely that the four terrestrial planets, and by extension humanity, have Saturn to thank for their continued existence. Current theories on solar system formation state that it is typical for large gas giants to migrate inward until they orbit extremely close to their stars, often close enough that a full revolution takes only weeks, or even days. Jupiter most likely would have done the same, destroying everything in its path via gravitational forces, if Saturn had not formed with sufficient mass and in the right position to yank Jupiter back, allowing the inner planets to continue forming.
forming. This migration also not only pushed Uranus and Neptune to their current positions, but had them ''swap'' positions (Neptune had originally been closer to the Sun than Uranus.)
19th Feb '16 10:09:40 AM PaulA
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* Grant D. Callin's ''Saturnalia'' focuses on Saturn and its moons, as a sort of cosmic ''TreasureIsland'' with colonist and Earthers hunting down alien artifacts.

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* Grant D. Callin's ''Saturnalia'' focuses on Saturn and its moons, as a sort of cosmic ''TreasureIsland'' ''Literature/TreasureIsland'' with colonist and Earthers hunting down alien artifacts.
30th Jan '16 2:05:15 PM RainbowPhoenix
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It is very likely that the four terrestrial planets, and by extension humanity, have Saturn to thank for their continued existence. Current theories on solar system formation state that it is typical for large gas giants to migrate inward until they orbit extremely close to their stars, often close enough that a full revolution takes only weeks, or even days. Jupiter most likely would have done the same, destroying everything in its path via gravitation forces, if Saturn had not formed with sufficient mass and in the right position to yank Jupiter back, allowing the inner planets to continue forming.

to:

It is very likely that the four terrestrial planets, and by extension humanity, have Saturn to thank for their continued existence. Current theories on solar system formation state that it is typical for large gas giants to migrate inward until they orbit extremely close to their stars, often close enough that a full revolution takes only weeks, or even days. Jupiter most likely would have done the same, destroying everything in its path via gravitation gravitational forces, if Saturn had not formed with sufficient mass and in the right position to yank Jupiter back, allowing the inner planets to continue forming.
17th Jan '16 12:17:09 AM RainbowPhoenix
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It is very likely that the four terrestrial planets, and by extension humanity, have Saturn to thank for their continued existence. Current theories on solar system formation state that it is typical for large gas giants to migrate inward until they orbit extremely close to their stars, often close enough that a full revolution takes only weeks, or even days. Jupiter most likely would have done the same, destroying everything in its path via gravitation forces, if Saturn had not formed with sufficient mass and in the right position to yank Jupiter back, allowing the inner planets to continue forming.
24th Dec '15 3:45:13 AM pittsburghmuggle
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* Music/NoDoubt's 2000 album "Return of Saturn" wa named that because around that time the band members were around 29 years old - one orbit of Saturn.

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* Music/NoDoubt's 2000 album "Return of Saturn" wa was named that because around that time the band members were all around 29 years old - one orbit of Saturn.
22nd Dec '15 2:58:52 AM pittsburghmuggle
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!! Saturn in Music

* Music/NoDoubt's 2000 album "Return of Saturn" wa named that because around that time the band members were around 29 years old - one orbit of Saturn.
22nd Dec '15 2:36:26 AM pittsburghmuggle
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->''The scientific theory I like best is that the rings of Saturn are composed entirely of lost airline luggage.''
-->--Mark Russell
14th Sep '15 3:32:26 PM Specialist290
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The ring system actually consists of ''thousands'' of individual rings, each orbiting the planet at a slightly different distance. There are gaps where few or no rings exist, created by the gravitational interaction between the rings and the moons. The rings are extremely thin, no more than a kilometer thick from one side to the other and perhaps as thin as ''ten meters''. While a few of the fragments making up the rings are made of rock, almost all of the ring fragments are made of plain old water ice, ranging in size from 10 meters across all the way down to a centimeter across.

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The ring system actually consists of ''thousands'' of individual rings, each orbiting the planet at a slightly different distance. There are gaps where few or no rings exist, created by the gravitational interaction between the rings and the moons. The rings are extremely thin, no more than a kilometer thick from one side to the other and perhaps as thin as ''ten meters''. While a few of the fragments making up the rings are made of rock, almost all of the ring fragments are made of plain old water ice, ranging in size from 10 meters across all the way down to a centimeter across.
across. All these chunks of ice and rock are packed into a relatively tight space, as well; Saturn's rings make for a better AsteroidThicket than the actual asteroid belt does.
12th Aug '15 2:50:55 PM DDRMASTERM
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UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn are mostly crater covered ice and rock balls, but the largest, Titan, has a thick atmosphere (about 1.5x the pressure of Earth's), and has a number of hydrocarbon lakes, erosion channels, rivers, and other surface features. Titan may also have ice volcanoes, or other geologic processes. Another moon, Enceladus, has the previously mentioned water geysers, and possible an underground liquid water layer. The moons of Saturn also help maintain some of the Rings, by providing material through collisions, and gravitationally interacting with the rings to keep them stable.

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UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn are mostly crater covered ice and rock balls, but the largest, Titan, has a thick atmosphere (about 1.5x the pressure of Earth's), and has a number of hydrocarbon lakes, erosion channels, rivers, and other surface features. Titan may also have ice volcanoes, or other geologic processes. Another moon, Enceladus, has the previously mentioned water geysers, and possible possibly an underground liquid water layer. The moons of Saturn also help maintain some of the Rings, by providing material through collisions, and gravitationally interacting with the rings to keep them stable.
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