History UsefulNotes / RolePlayingGameTerms

25th Feb '16 12:46:33 PM 0219110
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* [[DrawAggro Aggro]]: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain range, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).

* Threat: Another {{MMORPG}} mechanic that seeps into single-player games. Threat is a (normally) hidden score that the enemy AI assigns to each player character attacking it, so it can prioritize its targets: the higher the score, the higher the likelihood of the AI targeting ("putting the aggro on") that character. Threat score can be raised by a variety of means, including damaging the enemy, assisting your allies who damage the enemy, as well as by special abilities; some special abilities also help lower the threat. "Threat management" refers to players [[DamagerHealerTank manipulating the threat scores]] to keep the enemy attacking the StoneWall characters, while keeping the aggro off {{Glass Cannon}}s and {{Combat Medic}}s at all times.

to:

* [[DrawAggro Aggro]]: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain range, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).

* Threat: Another {{MMORPG}}
"threat". This mechanic that mostly seeps into single-player games. Threat is a (normally) hidden score that the enemy AI assigns to each player character attacking it, so it can prioritize its targets: the higher the score, the higher the likelihood of the AI targeting ("putting the aggro on") that character. Threat score can be raised by a variety of means, including damaging the enemy, assisting your allies who damage the enemy, as well as by special abilities; some special abilities also help lower the threat. "Threat management" refers to players [[DamagerHealerTank manipulating the threat scores]] to keep the enemy attacking the StoneWall characters, while keeping the aggro off {{Glass Cannon}}s and {{Combat Medic}}s at all times.
24th Jan '16 7:01:11 AM Koveras
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* {{Stats}}: numerical ratings that describe your character's parameters in various ways. Your Strength score determines how much you can bench-press, your Intelligence score determines how well you can think, your Charisma score determines how successful you are with the ladies, et cetera. Some games have dozens of Stats for each character, while a few, such as D.U.D.E., have only one. Generally, each Stat is a numeric score on the same scale as every other Stat; if 10 Strength is how strong an average person is, then 10 Intelligence is how smart an average person is. In some game systems, gaining experience points (c.f. below) can increase your Stats. In most systems, Stats will be broken down into Attributes (innate measures of a character's aptitude) and Skills (reflecting training, learning, and study).

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* {{Stats}}: numerical ratings that describe your character's parameters in various ways. Your Strength score determines how much you can bench-press, your Intelligence score determines how well you can think, your Charisma score determines how successful you are with the ladies, et cetera. Some games have dozens of Stats for each character, while a few, such as D.U.D.E., have only one. Generally, each Stat is a numeric score on the same scale as every other Stat; if 10 Strength is how strong an average person is, then 10 Intelligence is how smart an average person is. In some game systems, gaining experience points (c.f. below) can increase your Stats. In most systems, Stats will be broken down into Attributes (innate measures of a character's aptitude) and Skills {{Skill|Score}}s (reflecting training, learning, and study).
3rd Jan '16 5:16:00 PM BillWoods
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* Aggro: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain range, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).

to:

* Aggro: [[DrawAggro Aggro]]: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain range, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).
2nd Apr '15 2:03:57 AM Koveras
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* Threat: Another {{MMORPG}} mechanic that seeps into single-player games. Threat is a (normally) hidden score that the enemy AI assigns to each player character attacking it, so it can prioritize its targets: the higher the score, the higher the likelihood of the AI targeting ("putting the aggro on") that character. Threat score can be raised by a variety of means, including damaging the enemy, assisting your allies who damage the enemy, as well as by special abilities; some special abilities also help lower the threat. "Threat management" refers to players manipulating the threat scores to keep the enemy attacking the StoneWall characters, while keeping the aggro off {{Glass Cannon}}s and {{Combat Medic}}s at all times.

to:

* Threat: Another {{MMORPG}} mechanic that seeps into single-player games. Threat is a (normally) hidden score that the enemy AI assigns to each player character attacking it, so it can prioritize its targets: the higher the score, the higher the likelihood of the AI targeting ("putting the aggro on") that character. Threat score can be raised by a variety of means, including damaging the enemy, assisting your allies who damage the enemy, as well as by special abilities; some special abilities also help lower the threat. "Threat management" refers to players [[DamagerHealerTank manipulating the threat scores scores]] to keep the enemy attacking the StoneWall characters, while keeping the aggro off {{Glass Cannon}}s and {{Combat Medic}}s at all times.
2nd Apr '15 2:03:05 AM Koveras
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* [[FantasticSapientSpeciesTropes Race]]: Refers more to species than skin color (elves versus hobbits for example). Even subraces (dark elves versus wood elves for example) are distinguished by more than just skin color or nationality. These are popular for giving you another choice, another set of flavor and, most important, another set of bonuses to work with. It also gives the player a chance to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]] (Dwarf wizards and halfling barbarians for example).



* Race: Refers more to species than skin color (elves versus hobbits for example). Even subraces (dark elves versus wood elves for example) are distinguished by more than just skin color or nationality. These are popular for giving you another choice, another set of flavor and, most important, another set of bonuses to work with. It also gives the player a chance to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]] (Dwarf wizards and halfling barbarians for example).
1st Mar '15 5:48:43 AM SeptimusHeap
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* CharacterAlignment: Law vs. Chaos. Good vs. Evil. Neutrality in the middle. Possibly a different system, though the ''[[DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]'' scale referenced here is the one most role-playing gamers will be familiar with. Used as a guide to aid in role-playing specific character types, and sometimes as a straitjacket to ''prevent'' you from playing against your character type. Accordingly, some people find it a useful tool, while others find it a pain in the ass. Not present in all {{Role Playing Game}}s -- often rendered as a KarmaMeter for simplicity, though almost all ''D&D''-based games will have straight-up alignments included.

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* CharacterAlignment: Law vs. Chaos. Good vs. Evil. Neutrality in the middle. Possibly a different system, though the ''[[DungeonsAndDragons Dungeons & Dragons]]'' ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' scale referenced here is the one most role-playing gamers will be familiar with. Used as a guide to aid in role-playing specific character types, and sometimes as a straitjacket to ''prevent'' you from playing against your character type. Accordingly, some people find it a useful tool, while others find it a pain in the ass. Not present in all {{Role Playing Game}}s -- often rendered as a KarmaMeter for simplicity, though almost all ''D&D''-based games will have straight-up alignments included.
11th Jan '15 11:55:44 AM MagBas
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* Race: Refers more to species than skin color (elves versus hobbits for example). Even subraces (dark elves versus wood elves for example) are distinguished by more than just skin color or nationality. These are popular for giving you another choice, another set of flavor and, most important, another set of bonuses to work with. Though statistical distinction between races is popular from a gaming standpoint, the UnfortunateImplications have occasionally been noted. It also gives the player a chance to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]] (Dwarf wizards and halfling barbarians for example).

to:

* Race: Refers more to species than skin color (elves versus hobbits for example). Even subraces (dark elves versus wood elves for example) are distinguished by more than just skin color or nationality. These are popular for giving you another choice, another set of flavor and, most important, another set of bonuses to work with. Though statistical distinction between races is popular from a gaming standpoint, the UnfortunateImplications have occasionally been noted. It also gives the player a chance to [[PlayingAgainstType play against type]] (Dwarf wizards and halfling barbarians for example).
21st Dec '13 10:08:53 AM Koveras
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* TotalPartyKill: When the entire PlayerParty is wiped out. In tabletop games, it usually a result of [[KillerGameMaster GM]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies malice]] or a series of bad calls on the parts of the players, the GM, or both; the end result is the players having to roll up new characters. In single-player video games, a total party kill is usually the only thing that leads to a GameOver (unless WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou is in effect), since individual party members only ever suffer a NonLethalKO. In multiplayer games, a TPK may kick the players out of an instanced dungeon but rarely has consequences more severe than that.

to:

* TotalPartyKill: When the entire PlayerParty is wiped out. In tabletop games, it is usually a result of either [[KillerGameMaster GM]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies malice]] or a series of bad calls on the parts of the players, the GM, or both; the end result is the players having to roll up new characters. In single-player video games, a total party kill is usually the only thing that leads to a GameOver (unless WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou is in effect), since individual party members only ever suffer a NonLethalKO. In multiplayer games, a TPK may kick the players out of an instanced dungeon but rarely has consequences more severe than that.
21st Dec '13 9:56:17 AM Koveras
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* Aggro: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain distance, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).

to:

* Aggro: A multifaceted term used primarily in {{MMORPG}}s but slowing seeping into the single-player RPG corner, as well. At the most basic level it refers to the act of an NPC enemy ("mob") attacking a PlayerCharacter. If the mob is not programmed to attack on sight or only do so when a PC comes within a certain distance, range, the player can prepare for battle ("before you aggro") and attack, forcing the mob to retaliate ("draw its aggro"). During the battle, a mob can usually only target one of the [=PCs=] attacking it, so "aggro" is used in relation to its current target (which can stay the same or change depending on circumstances). Confusingly, the term can also be used interchangeably with "threat" (see below).
8th Dec '13 1:28:55 PM Koveras
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* TotalPartyKill: When the entire PlayerParty is wiped out. In tabletop games, it usually a result of [[KillerGameMaster GM]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies malice]] or a series of bad calls on the parts of the players, the GM, or both; and it results in the players having to roll up new characters. In single-player video games, a total party kill is usually the only thing that leads to GameOver if you have NonLethalKO in effect but not WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou. In multiplayer games, a TPK may kick the players out of an instanced dungeon but rarely anything more severe.

to:

* TotalPartyKill: When the entire PlayerParty is wiped out. In tabletop games, it usually a result of [[KillerGameMaster GM]] [[RocksFallEveryoneDies malice]] or a series of bad calls on the parts of the players, the GM, or both; and it results in the end result is the players having to roll up new characters. In single-player video games, a total party kill is usually the only thing that leads to a GameOver if you have NonLethalKO (unless WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou is in effect but not WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou. effect), since individual party members only ever suffer a NonLethalKO. In multiplayer games, a TPK may kick the players out of an instanced dungeon but rarely anything has consequences more severe.severe than that.
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