History UsefulNotes / RegionCoding

23rd Jul '17 12:25:17 AM RAMChYLD
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* Franchise/Leapfrog's latest endeavour, Leapfrog Academy, is currently only evvectively available in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. If you live outside those 5 countries, you can't sign up for the service, their system is designed to reject credit cards that are not from the 5 mentioned countries.

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* Franchise/Leapfrog's Franchise/LeapFrog's latest endeavour, Leapfrog Academy, is currently only evvectively effectively available in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. If you live outside those 5 countries, you can't sign up for the service, their system is designed to reject credit cards that are not from the 5 mentioned countries.
23rd Jul '17 12:24:40 AM RAMChYLD
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Added DiffLines:

* Franchise/Leapfrog's latest endeavour, Leapfrog Academy, is currently only evvectively available in the US, UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. If you live outside those 5 countries, you can't sign up for the service, their system is designed to reject credit cards that are not from the 5 mentioned countries.
9th Jul '17 2:37:19 AM RAMChYLD
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* In the 4G era, we've now got at least eight bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/2.1GHz=]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.

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* In the 4G era, we've now got at least eight nine bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/2.[=850MHz/900MHz/2.1GHz=]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.
5th Jul '17 4:42:36 AM occono
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** [[Creator/AmazonStudios Amazon Prime Video]] is available in more than 200 countries, of which all but six only have access to a little over a hundred titles; the six (US, UK, Germany, Austria, Japan and India) are the first to get pretty much everything.

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** [[Creator/AmazonStudios Amazon Prime Video]] is available in more than 200 countries, of which all but six only have access to a little over a hundred titles; the six (US, UK, Germany, Austria, Japan and India) are the first to get pretty much everything. This is because they are the primary targets for the service currently; all other countries are served by a different website and are effectively a seperate (inferior) service, apparently a placeholder while Amazon is behind Netflix in global expansion.
22nd Jun '17 12:42:16 AM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Channel 5 in Singapore is not the same as Channel 5 in Japan. Heck, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan is actually two megahertz off Channel 7, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is retuned.

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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Channel 5 in Singapore is not the same as Channel 5 in Japan. Heck, Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually two four megahertz off Channel 7, 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is retuned.
22nd Jun '17 12:41:10 AM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). The transmission standard is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). The Then there's the transmission standard standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation[[note]]a modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards.
standards. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Channel 5 in Singapore is not the same as Channel 5 in Japan. Heck, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan is actually two megahertz off Channel 7, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is retuned.
4th Jun '17 6:33:29 AM RAMChYLD
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Video game consoles had a region locking scheme based on this with standards like PAL (Europe and Australia) NTSC-U/C (the Americas), NTSC-J (Japan and much of Asia), NTSC-K (Korea), and NTSC-C (China), which don't even have anything to do with the transmission standards we just described. For the most part, though, they didn't differ too much in how a game was displayed on the screen.

to:

Video game consoles had a region locking scheme based on this with standards like PAL (Europe (Europe, Australia and Australia) New Zealand as well as South Africa) NTSC-U/C (the Americas), NTSC-J (Japan and much of Asia), NTSC-K (Korea), and NTSC-C (China), which don't even have anything to do with the transmission standards we just described. For the most part, though, they didn't differ too much in how a game was displayed on the screen.
4th Jun '17 6:32:33 AM RAMChYLD
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Video game consoles had a region locking scheme based on this with standards like NTSC-U/C (the Americas), NTSC-J (Japan), NTSC-K (Korea), and NTSC-C (China), which don't even have anything to do with the transmission standards we just described. For the most part, though, they didn't differ too much in how a game was displayed on the screen.

to:

Video game consoles had a region locking scheme based on this with standards like PAL (Europe and Australia) NTSC-U/C (the Americas), NTSC-J (Japan), (Japan and much of Asia), NTSC-K (Korea), and NTSC-C (China), which don't even have anything to do with the transmission standards we just described. For the most part, though, they didn't differ too much in how a game was displayed on the screen.
4th Jun '17 6:29:05 AM RAMChYLD
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* Strangely, only two UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 games have any region locking. One is ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena'', which Atlus blamed on the game's [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe extremely delayed European release]] (although it was totally region-locked elsewhere, even between regions which already had the game, despite the [=PS3's=] ability to make all versions run on all consoles except European ones); there was such a backlash to that decision (leading to European gamers cancelling pre-orders) that Atlus didn't dare do it again. The second is ''VideoGame/JoySoundDive'', a Japanese PSN exclusive game, which not only won't run on a non-Japanese [=PS3=], it won't even run on a Japanese [=PS3=] which recognizes that it's not in Japan; this is likely because it's a [[KaraokeBox karaoke game]] and JASRAC (the Japanese RIAA counterpart) would complain otherwise about music reproduction rights. Some other games (like ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme vs. Full Boost]]'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'') are region-free but have region-locked online play, ostensibly to prevent extreme imbalances in ability between regions.

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* Strangely, only two UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 games have any region locking. One is ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena'', which Atlus blamed on the game's [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe extremely delayed European release]] (although it was totally region-locked elsewhere, even between regions which already had the game, despite the [=PS3's=] ability to make all versions run on all consoles except European ones); there was such a backlash to that decision (leading to European gamers cancelling pre-orders) that Atlus didn't dare do it again.again[[note]]It also affected their sales so badly that Atlus ended up being acquired by a revived Sega[[/note]]. The second is ''VideoGame/JoySoundDive'', a Japanese PSN exclusive game, which not only won't run on a non-Japanese [=PS3=], it won't even run on a Japanese [=PS3=] which recognizes that it's not in Japan; this is likely because it's a [[KaraokeBox karaoke game]] and JASRAC (the Japanese RIAA counterpart) would complain otherwise about music reproduction rights. Some other games (like ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme vs. Full Boost]]'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'') are region-free but have region-locked online play, ostensibly to prevent extreme imbalances in ability between regions.
4th Jun '17 6:20:16 AM RAMChYLD
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* Nintendo was the first to introduce region locking on the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem in 1984 with a lockout chip called the [=10NES=]. While its purpose was to prevent piracy and UsefulNotes/{{Shovelware}} by ensuring that only Nintendo-certified games would run on the system, it had the side effect of region locking the console; the US and European versions all had slightly different versions of the chip, so a game that ran on one version would not run on the others, while the japanese version lacks the 10NES chip completely. Also notable was the original Japanese Famicom had a cartridge slot with fewer pins than the export NES, and it also had a [=DB15=] expansion port which was removed from the US version, preventing US gamers from using Japanese peripherals and cartridges. However, an adapter can be found in many older NES cartridges, salvaging one is considered a worthy sacrifice of the cartridge as the adapter has the 10NES matching chip onboard, meaning any game plugged in will work.

to:

* Nintendo was the first to introduce region locking on the UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem in 1984 with a lockout chip called the [=10NES=]. While its purpose was to prevent piracy and UsefulNotes/{{Shovelware}} by ensuring that only Nintendo-certified games would run on the system, it had the side effect of region locking the console; the US and European versions all had slightly different versions of the chip, so a game that ran on one version would not run on the others, while the japanese version lacks the 10NES chip completely. Also notable was the original Japanese Famicom had a cartridge slot with fewer pins than the export NES, and it also had a [=DB15=] expansion port which was removed from the US version, preventing US gamers from using Japanese peripherals and cartridges. However, an adapter can be found in many older NES cartridges, salvaging one is considered a worthy sacrifice of the cartridge as the adapter has the 10NES matching chip onboard, meaning any game plugged in to the adapter will work.work on the target NES.
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