History UsefulNotes / RegionCoding

22nd Oct '16 10:58:23 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* As PAL and NTSC have different video standards, this leads to, in some cases, a (roughly) 4% speed-up or slowdown when a work is ported across from Europe to America if [[TheyJustDidntCare no-one particularly cares to do it right]]. A particularly tragic case of this concerns the ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie]]: Normally, ''Doctor Who'' is mastered in the European PAL standard used in its native UK, and the versions released in the American market are converted to NTSC in such a way to preserve the timing. However, the movie was a UK-US co-production, so it was mastered in NTSC, and converted for the PAL market with a 4% speedup. Viewers often find it jarring to listen to ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' audio dramas featuring the Eighth Doctor after watching the movie, as his real voice is noticeably deeper than the sped-up version in the movie.\\

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* As PAL and NTSC have different video standards, this leads to, in some cases, a (roughly) 4% speed-up or slowdown when a work is ported across from Europe to America if [[TheyJustDidntCare no-one particularly cares to do it right]].right. A particularly tragic case of this concerns the ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie]]: Normally, ''Doctor Who'' is mastered in the European PAL standard used in its native UK, and the versions released in the American market are converted to NTSC in such a way to preserve the timing. However, the movie was a UK-US co-production, so it was mastered in NTSC, and converted for the PAL market with a 4% speedup. Viewers often find it jarring to listen to ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' audio dramas featuring the Eighth Doctor after watching the movie, as his real voice is noticeably deeper than the sped-up version in the movie.\\
20th Oct '16 8:52:37 PM RAMChYLD
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** The US version of the NES has a lockout chip called the 10NES. While its main reason of existence is to ensure that only games certified by Nintendo will run, it has the side-effect of region-locking the console, since various European consoles have different (and incompatible) versions of the chip. It also ended up using extra pins that're used by co-processors that're found on many Japanese games. Also, the Japanese NES has a slightly different slot, offering less pins than the NES (so in actual fact, the NES could actually implement co-processors given the extra pins, but ended up not doing so anyway).

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** The US version of the NES has a lockout chip called the 10NES. While its main reason of existence is to ensure that only games certified by Nintendo will run, it has the side-effect of region-locking the console, since various European consoles have different (and incompatible) versions of the chip. It also ended up using extra pins that're used by co-processors that're found on many Japanese games. Also, the Japanese NES has a slightly different slot, offering less pins than the NES (so in actual fact, the NES could actually implement co-processors given the extra pins, but ended up not doing so anyway). And to ensure you can't even use Japanese peripherals, they removed the DB15 expansion port, replacing it with an expansion slot under the console, and instead required that peripherals plug into the second controller port.
13th Oct '16 8:18:08 AM RAMChYLD
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Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation[[note]]without which the resulting video will be stuttering since the motion will be irregular[[/note]], and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for PAL or sixth for NTSC). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.

to:

Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation[[note]]without which the resulting video will be stuttering since the motion will be irregular[[/note]], and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for PAL or sixth for NTSC). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.that, moreso in real time.
13th Oct '16 8:16:08 AM RAMChYLD
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Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation[[note]]without which the resulting video will be stuttering since the motion will be irregular[[/note]], and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.

to:

Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation[[note]]without which the resulting video will be stuttering since the motion will be irregular[[/note]], and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC PAL or sixth for PAL).NTSC). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.
9th Oct '16 9:40:34 AM RAMChYLD
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Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation, and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.

to:

Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation, compensation[[note]]without which the resulting video will be stuttering since the motion will be irregular[[/note]], and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.
9th Oct '16 9:39:34 AM RAMChYLD
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Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second, apply motion compensation, and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.

to:

Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second, second[[note]]This means expanding a 50 or 60 fps source into 300 fps[[/note]], apply motion compensation, and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.
9th Oct '16 9:37:21 AM RAMChYLD
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Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa.

to:

Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa. The other way of fixing this is resampling the source of the video (either PAL or NTSC) at the lowest common denominator for both PAL and NTSC- which is 300 frames per second, apply motion compensation, and then recapture only the needed frames (every fifth for NTSC or sixth for PAL). Needless to say, you need some really powerful (and expensive) hardware to be able to do that.
23rd Sep '16 10:36:04 AM RAMChYLD
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Added DiffLines:

* While Creator/{{Netflix}} is now available worldwide, it still has region coding- not every show is available in every region. Up until recently, only Latin and South America has access to Disney's shows (and even now, the licensing has only been expanded to North America. Europe and much of Asia are still left out in the cold). Additionally, a lot of Netflix's anime are not available in Asia due to licensing limitations (most of the anime were already exclusively pre-licensed to either Animax or per-country national TV). It also works in reverse- certain shows like Mythbusters and Doctor Who are not or no longer available in the Americas due to exclusive licensing deals with other streaming services, but are (still) available in Asia and/or Europe. This is largely averted with Netflix exclusives however, although some exclusives like the Netflix-exclusive seasons of Series/ArrestedDevelopment remains unavailable in Asia.
17th Sep '16 10:06:12 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation program, used for current Konami arcade games such as the Franchise/{{BEMANI}} franchise and ''Quiz Magical Academy''. Games under this program must be connected to the [=eAMUSEMENT=] network upon boot or they will refuse to start. [=eAMUSEMENT=] services are limited to Japan, select East and Southeast Asian countries, and the United States (which also has Japanese machines available thanks to Japanese-owned arcade chain Round 1); anyone living outside of these countries will not be able to play current Konami arcade games even if they have access to the necessary hardware. Unfortunately for Konami, this boneheaded decision not only caused a bunch of {{Shoddy Knockoff Product}}s to spawn, parallel importers also found out that Konami made versions of the games that do not need [=eAMUSEMENT=] to function for the Chinese market, and proceeded to import ''those'' instead. A private server also existed for arcade owners that provided connectivity for machines outside these regions, but was shutdown by Konami prior to [=eAMUSEMENT=]'s introduction into the US.

to:

* Creator/{{Konami}}'s [=eAMUSEMENT=] Participation program, used for current Konami arcade games such as the Franchise/{{BEMANI}} franchise and ''Quiz Magical Academy''. Games under this program must be connected to the [=eAMUSEMENT=] network upon boot or they will refuse to start. [=eAMUSEMENT=] services are limited to Japan, select East and Southeast Asian countries, and the United States (which also has Japanese machines available thanks to Japanese-owned arcade chain Round 1); 1[[note]]However, these cabs are Japan-region, which becomes a problem due to Japan-region Konami arcade games often having features that require a PASELI account and PASELI to be enabled on the cabinets, the latter of which no Round1 location in the US does. Meanwhile, non-Japan Asian regions have access to PASELI features, but in lieu of PASELI, the player simply needs to insert more credits.[[/note]]); anyone living outside of these countries will not be able to play current Konami arcade games even if they have access to the necessary hardware. Unfortunately for Konami, this boneheaded decision not only caused a bunch of {{Shoddy Knockoff Product}}s to spawn, parallel importers also found out that Konami made versions of the games that do not need [=eAMUSEMENT=] to function for the Chinese market, and proceeded to import ''those'' instead. A private server also existed for arcade owners that provided connectivity for machines outside these regions, but was shutdown by Konami prior to [=eAMUSEMENT=]'s introduction into the US.
28th Aug '16 8:01:48 PM RAMChYLD
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** Despite AndroidGames are not region locked most of the time, they are also region locked in the Play Store which uses similar methods with ''[=VTech=]''. However, due to lack of DRM, there are workarounds, but updating them to a new version through Play Store would yield the message ''this game is not available in your country''. These apply to smartphones which attempted to install incompatible apps even if the apps themselves are not region locked. On top of this, some games uses APK extension files which can be region locked.

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** Despite AndroidGames are not region locked most of the time, they are also region locked in the Play Store which uses similar methods with ''[=VTech=]''. However, due to lack of DRM, there are workarounds, but updating them to a new version through Play Store would yield the message ''this game is not available in your country''. These apply to smartphones which attempted to install incompatible apps even if the apps themselves are not region locked. On top of this, some games uses APK extension files which can be region locked.locked via geofencing using several means (detecting your location on GPS, your telco's MNC code, and the basic IP georestriction).
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