History UsefulNotes / RegionCoding

18th Feb '18 7:14:42 PM nombretomado
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** The [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable PSP]] has region coding for UMD movies, the same as for [=DVDs=], and it also has optional region coding for games; for instance, EA used it to lock copies of ''VideoGame/{{BattleZone|2006}}'' sold in Asia so that they would only play on Asian [=PSPs=] (probably because it's so much cheaper in Asia than elsewhere). Sony also uses region coding to limit certain features and applications; Asian [=PSPs=] will not detect or launch the comic book viewer app, and only Japanese and British [=PSPs=] can use the Remote TV Viewer app to remotely watch content received and recorded by the PS3 USB tuner (which was only sold in the UK and Japan).

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** The [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable PSP]] has region coding for UMD movies, the same as for [=DVDs=], and it also has optional region coding for games; for instance, EA used it to lock copies of ''VideoGame/{{BattleZone|2006}}'' sold in Asia so that they would only play on Asian [=PSPs=] (probably because it's so much cheaper in Asia than elsewhere). Sony also uses region coding to limit certain features and applications; Asian [=PSPs=] will not detect or launch the comic book viewer app, and only Japanese and British [=PSPs=] can use the Remote TV Viewer app to remotely watch content received and recorded by the PS3 [=PS3=] USB tuner (which was only sold in the UK and Japan).
31st Jan '18 5:58:29 PM RAMChYLD
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The most primitive form of region coding, where the power is divided between "old world" (220v-240v) and "new world" (100v-120v). This is further divided into 50Hz/60Hz alternations, with Japan using both 50Hz and 60Hz alternations- with 50Hz covering the West and 60Hz covering the East- even though voltage is normalized at 100v. For the rest of the world it's far more straightforward- the "old world" (most of Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania) uses power that is normalized at 230v and alternates at 50Hz, while the "new world" (read: The Americas) uses power that is normalized at 110v and alternates at 60Hz. Unless a device has been rated for all four voltages and both alternation frequency, it's bad news to plug a device not intended for the voltage into the outlet without a conversion transformer, especially with regards to "new world" devices in "old world" regions, where the outcome would be a loud explosion and maybe fire.

to:

The most primitive form of region coding, where the power is divided between "old world" (220v-240v) and "new world" (100v-120v). This is further divided into 50Hz/60Hz alternations, with Japan using both 50Hz and 60Hz alternations- with 50Hz covering the West and 60Hz covering the East- even though voltage is normalized at 100v. For the rest of the world it's far more straightforward- the "old world" (most of Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania) uses power that is normalized at 230v and alternates at 50Hz, while the "new world" (read: The Americas) Americas, as well as areas in Asia previously occupied by US forces) uses power that is normalized at 110v and alternates at 60Hz. Unless a device has been rated for all four voltages and both alternation frequency, it's bad news to plug a device not intended for the voltage into the outlet without a conversion transformer, especially with regards to "new world" devices in "old world" regions, where the outcome would be a loud explosion and maybe fire.
31st Jan '18 5:57:38 PM RAMChYLD
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Another major nitpick is the power ratings of the world, where the power is divided between "old world" (220v-240v) and "new world" (100v-120v). This is further divided into 50Hz/60Hz alternations, with Japan using both 50Hz and 60Hz alternations- with 50Hz covering the West and 60Hz covering the East- even though voltage is normalized at 100v. For the rest of the world it's far more straightforward- the "old world" (most of Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania) uses power that is normalized at 230v and alternates at 50Hz, while the "new world" (read: The Americas) uses power that is normalized at 110v and alternates at 60Hz. Unless a device has been rated for all four voltages and both alternation frequency, it's bad news to plug a device not intended for the voltage into the outlet without a conversion transformer, especially with regards to "new world" devices in "old world" regions, where the outcome would be a loud explosion and maybe fire.

to:

Another major nitpick is the power ratings The most primitive form of the world, region coding, where the power is divided between "old world" (220v-240v) and "new world" (100v-120v). This is further divided into 50Hz/60Hz alternations, with Japan using both 50Hz and 60Hz alternations- with 50Hz covering the West and 60Hz covering the East- even though voltage is normalized at 100v. For the rest of the world it's far more straightforward- the "old world" (most of Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania) uses power that is normalized at 230v and alternates at 50Hz, while the "new world" (read: The Americas) uses power that is normalized at 110v and alternates at 60Hz. Unless a device has been rated for all four voltages and both alternation frequency, it's bad news to plug a device not intended for the voltage into the outlet without a conversion transformer, especially with regards to "new world" devices in "old world" regions, where the outcome would be a loud explosion and maybe fire.
29th Jan '18 6:36:51 PM RAMChYLD
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And then there are the frequency ranges, divided into CCIR which is typically used in most of the European Union as well as countries that are part of the British Commonwealth except Australia, OIRT which typically used in countries who deployed the SECAM color system (although China uses it with PAL color, albeit with the System-D and System-K transmission standard), and NTSC which is used in the US (NTSC can mean both the color system and the frequency boundaries defining VHF and UHF in the Americas region). However Japan and Australia have their own ranges that defer from other NTSC and PAL countries. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

And then there are the frequency ranges, divided into CCIR which is typically used in most of the European Union as well as countries that are part of the British Commonwealth except Australia, OIRT which typically used in countries who deployed the SECAM color system (although China uses it with PAL color, albeit with the System-D and System-K transmission standard), and NTSC which is used in the US (NTSC can mean both the color system and the frequency boundaries defining VHF and UHF in the Americas region). However Japan and Australia have their own ranges that defer from other NTSC and PAL countries. France also previously used their own range while broadcasting in System E, but had since abandoned it for OIRT. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.
23rd Jan '18 8:56:06 PM RAMChYLD
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* In the 2G era, it was usually the American [=850MHz/1.9GHz=] against the rest of the world's [=900MHz/1.8GHz=]. Quad-band 2G phones would allow you to use both networks.

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* In the 2G era, it was usually the American [=850MHz/1.9GHz=] against the rest of the world's [=900MHz/1.8GHz=]. Quad-band 2G phones would allow you to use networks in both networks.regions.


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[[folder:Power Supply]]
Another major nitpick is the power ratings of the world, where the power is divided between "old world" (220v-240v) and "new world" (100v-120v). This is further divided into 50Hz/60Hz alternations, with Japan using both 50Hz and 60Hz alternations- with 50Hz covering the West and 60Hz covering the East- even though voltage is normalized at 100v. For the rest of the world it's far more straightforward- the "old world" (most of Asia, Europe, Africa and Oceania) uses power that is normalized at 230v and alternates at 50Hz, while the "new world" (read: The Americas) uses power that is normalized at 110v and alternates at 60Hz. Unless a device has been rated for all four voltages and both alternation frequency, it's bad news to plug a device not intended for the voltage into the outlet without a conversion transformer, especially with regards to "new world" devices in "old world" regions, where the outcome would be a loud explosion and maybe fire.

For many devices with a wall wart or power brick, the solution would be to source a wall wart meant for the region's equivalent of the device and using that with the old device. However for devices that uses AC power directly, a conversion transformer is often needed.

This is usually mitigated on charger wall warts meant for portable devices like laptops, cellphones and camcorders, as it is understood that these devices are to be used anywhere in the world and thus need to be able to charge off any wall socket available regardless of the country's power specifications.
[[/folder]]
23rd Jan '18 8:30:22 PM RAMChYLD
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In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in most of Latin and South America, Japan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Botswana in Africa; ATSC is used in North America and it's foreign territories, and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe, most of Africa, the rest of Asia, and several outlying South American countries; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore as the country started with version 1 of the DVB standard but migrated to version 2 eventually. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant,[[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] although it is later revealed that The Philippines, Japan and South America has entered an agreement which standardized the version of ISDB used in the countries- the new version of ISDB deployed by Botswana, Sri Lanka, The Philippines and South America is called ISDB-Tb and only differs from the original Japanese version by means of ''reception frequency'' (Japan's VHF/UHF frequency range traditionally differs greatly from the table used in the rest of the world). It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too (just ask Thailand, who dumped NTSC for PAL in 1989). And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.

to:

In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in most of Latin and South America, Japan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Botswana in Africa; ATSC is used in North America and it's foreign territories, and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe, most of Africa, the rest of Asia, and several outlying South American countries; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore as the country started with version 1 of the DVB standard but migrated to version 2 eventually. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant,[[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] although it is later revealed that The Philippines, Japan and South America has entered an agreement which standardized the version of ISDB used in the countries- the new version of ISDB deployed by Botswana, Sri Lanka, The Philippines and South America is called ISDB-Tb and only differs from the original Japanese version by means of ''reception frequency'' (Japan's VHF/UHF frequency range traditionally differs greatly from the table used in the rest of the world).is unique to Japan itself). It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too (just ask Thailand, who dumped NTSC for PAL in 1989). And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.
18th Jan '18 6:56:23 PM RAMChYLD
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** Creator/TheABC in Australia has its [=iView=] system similarly blocked to non-Australians, but the ABC offers its programming for free just on principle; there is no TV license in Australia like there is in the UK. The ABC claims it's due to licensing issues -- ''i.e.'' it costs too much for them to ensure that they have the rights to show something outside of Australia -- but they do this even to shows they've produced themselves, which is particularly mind-boggling. It turns out that they have changed their tone and no longer want to offer their programming to those living outside Australia for free- those living outside of Australia would need to get a ''paid channel'' called Australia Plus TV from their local pay TV provider to get ABC shows. Additionally, they've started engaging in {{International Coproduction}}s to save on cost, and part of the side effect of that is that it muddies production ownership enough that they cannot offer shows for free if the partner company chooses to sell the shows instead.

to:

** Creator/TheABC in Australia has its [=iView=] system similarly blocked to non-Australians, but the ABC offers its programming for free just on principle; there is no TV license in Australia like there is in the UK. The ABC claims it's due to licensing issues -- ''i.e.'' it costs too much for them to ensure that they have the rights to show something outside of Australia -- but they do this even to shows they've produced themselves, which is particularly mind-boggling. It turns out that they have changed their tone and no longer want to offer their programming to those living outside Australia for free- those living outside of Australia would need to get a ''paid channel'' called Australia Plus TV from their local pay TV provider to get ABC shows.shows, tough luck if their provider doesn't carry that channel. Additionally, they've started engaging in {{International Coproduction}}s to save on cost, and part of the side effect of that is that it muddies production ownership enough that they cannot offer shows for free if the partner company chooses to sell the shows instead.
18th Jan '18 6:53:08 PM RAMChYLD
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** Creator/TheABC in Australia has its [=iView=] system similarly blocked to non-Australians, but the ABC offers its programming for free just on principle; there is no TV license in Australia like there is in the UK. The ABC claims it's due to licensing issues -- ''i.e.'' it costs too much for them to ensure that they have the rights to show something outside of Australia -- but they do this even to shows they've produced themselves, which is particularly mind-boggling.

to:

** Creator/TheABC in Australia has its [=iView=] system similarly blocked to non-Australians, but the ABC offers its programming for free just on principle; there is no TV license in Australia like there is in the UK. The ABC claims it's due to licensing issues -- ''i.e.'' it costs too much for them to ensure that they have the rights to show something outside of Australia -- but they do this even to shows they've produced themselves, which is particularly mind-boggling. It turns out that they have changed their tone and no longer want to offer their programming to those living outside Australia for free- those living outside of Australia would need to get a ''paid channel'' called Australia Plus TV from their local pay TV provider to get ABC shows. Additionally, they've started engaging in {{International Coproduction}}s to save on cost, and part of the side effect of that is that it muddies production ownership enough that they cannot offer shows for free if the partner company chooses to sell the shows instead.
18th Jan '18 6:38:04 PM RAMChYLD
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And then there are the frequency ranges, divided into CCIR which is typically used in countries that are part of the British commonwealth except Australia and most of the European Union, OIRT which typically used in countries who deployed the SECAM color system (although China uses it with PAL color, albeit with the System-D and System-K transmission standard), and NTSC which is used in the US (NTSC can mean both the color system and the frequency boundaries defining VHF and UHF in the Americas region). However Japan and Australia have their own ranges that defer from other NTSC and PAL countries. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

And then there are the frequency ranges, divided into CCIR which is typically used in most of the European Union as well as countries that are part of the British commonwealth Commonwealth except Australia and most of the European Union, Australia, OIRT which typically used in countries who deployed the SECAM color system (although China uses it with PAL color, albeit with the System-D and System-K transmission standard), and NTSC which is used in the US (NTSC can mean both the color system and the frequency boundaries defining VHF and UHF in the Americas region). However Japan and Australia have their own ranges that defer from other NTSC and PAL countries. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.
18th Jan '18 6:36:43 PM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate: A TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems. Additionally it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' broadcasts, ensuring that PAL [=TVs=] from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC [=TVs=] from North America can only pick up a black and white signal.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen).

Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate: A TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems. Additionally it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' broadcasts, ensuring that PAL [=TVs=] from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC [=TVs=] from North America can only pick up a black and white signal.
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