History UsefulNotes / RegionCoding

29th Jan '16 5:07:34 PM MyFinalEdits
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*** It is possible to defeat this chip by literally removing the cover and cutting pin #4 with nail scissors. Then all you need is a Famicom to NES adaptor and your machine will play anything. *** Heck, Some early NES games are actually Famicom games with an adapter complete with [=10NES=] chip key inside. Busting one open to recover the adapter is considered by some collectors to be a worthy sacrifice of said cartridge, since using said adapter negates the need to temper with the [=10NES=] chip. ** The SNES actually had two plastic tabs that prevented Super Famicom cartridges from being inserted. A pair of pliers and devil-may-care attitude about warranty can fix that...[[note]]While the SNES does have a copy protection chip called the CIC, the same chip is used worldwide and it's only job is to ensure the game is licensed by Nintendo, region coding is handled mostly by said tabs and checking the clock speed of the 65816 CPU.[[/note]] *** Sadly, this does not apply to people trying to play a PAL SNES game on an NTSC SNES and vice-versa, due to the fact that many games actually try to detect the speed of the SNES and display a wrong region message if the speed is incorrect (PAL SNES sets runs at a slower clock rate due to being tied down to a 50Hz output, while NTSC sets run faster due to being tied down to a 60Hz output). In cases like these, a lockout bypass cartridge is usually used. Said cartridges basically has two slots on the top. In one slot, you'd plug in the wrong region game that you want to play (depending on your console), and in another slot, you'd plug in a game that is of the correct region. How the device works is a little fuzzy, but it works with most common games. However, this still won't work with cartridges that has co-processors inside. ** The Nintendo64 used tabs to region-lock as well. It's slightly more difficult to bust it's tabs, but a worthy investment. * The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting to mean Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Mainland China). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
to:
*** It is possible to defeat this chip by literally removing the cover and cutting pin #4 with nail scissors. Then all you need is a Famicom to NES adaptor and your machine will play anything. *** Heck, Some early NES games are actually Famicom games with an adapter complete with [=10NES=] chip key inside. Busting one open to recover the adapter is considered by some collectors to be a worthy sacrifice of said cartridge, since using said adapter negates the need to temper with the [=10NES=] chip. ** The SNES actually had two plastic tabs that prevented Super Famicom cartridges from being inserted. A pair of pliers and devil-may-care attitude about warranty can fix that...[[note]]While that,[[note]]While the SNES does have a copy protection chip called the CIC, the same chip is used worldwide and it's only job is to ensure the game is licensed by Nintendo, region coding is handled mostly by said tabs and checking the clock speed of the 65816 CPU.[[/note]] *** Sadly, [[/note]] but this does not apply to people trying to play a PAL SNES game on an NTSC SNES and vice-versa, due to the fact that as many games actually try to detect the speed of the SNES and display a wrong region message if the speed is incorrect (PAL SNES sets runs at a slower clock rate due to being tied down to a 50Hz output, while NTSC sets run faster due to being tied down to a 60Hz output). In cases like these, a lockout bypass cartridge is usually used. Said cartridges basically has two slots on the top. In one slot, you'd plug in the wrong region game that you want to play (depending on your console), and in another slot, you'd plug in a game that is of the correct region. How the device works is a little fuzzy, but it works with most common games. However, this still won't work with cartridges that has co-processors inside. ** The Nintendo64 UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 used tabs to region-lock as well. It's slightly more difficult to bust it's tabs, but a worthy investment. * The UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis: ** The console has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting to mean Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Mainland China). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.

* Interestingly, this does ''not'' apply to early portable consoles. They lack region protection, on the theory that someone with one of these should be able to pick up a game for his system no matter where in the world he goes (the lack of a TV may have played a part, see below). For this reason, portables are extremely common amongst import gamers from any country. However, with today's portable consoles, companies combat these solutions with mandatory updates required to play games released from there on out. *** The [[NintendoDS DSi]] has region locking, but only for specific [[NintendoDS DSi]] features, such as differing online features for each region. Future games will still be region-free, with the exception of downloadable ones. *** The Nintendo3DS has region locking for both cartridge and downloadable games, to the annoyance of import gamers. Nintendo allegedly incorporates a ''whitelist'' database on each device, which contains a list of checksum of valid games. Game not in the list? Then it wouldn't run. Allegedly this is why the 3DS regularly receives updates even if there's no bug fix or feature addition, and is why cartridges for the original DS needed to be validated online, leading to the requirement of the 3DS having an internet connection and the slow loading time of original DS games as well, but apparently they have moved DS games to using the whitelist too... *** The [[PlaystationPortable PSP]] has region coding as well, although it's optional for games. UMD movies are always region locked, and EA and Sony themselves have abused the feature when it comes to games and applications: EA used it to lock copies of ''VideoGame/{{BattleZone| 2006}}'' sold in Asia so that it would only play on Asian [=PSPs=] (probably because the game is sold at a lower price in the region), while Sony abused it so that Asian [=PSPs=] will not detect or launch the comic book viewer app, and so that only Japanese and British [=PSPs=] can use the Remote TV Viewer application for remotely watching content received and recorded by PS3 USB tuner, which was only sold in the UK and Japan.
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* Interestingly, this does ''not'' apply to early portable consoles. consoles. ** They lack region protection, on the theory that someone with one of these should be able to pick up a game for his system no matter where in the world he goes (the lack of a TV may have played a part, see below). For this reason, portables are extremely common amongst import gamers from any country. However, with today's portable consoles, companies combat these solutions with mandatory updates required to play games released from there on out. *** ** The [[NintendoDS DSi]] has region locking, but only for specific [[NintendoDS DSi]] features, such as differing online features for each region. Future games will still be region-free, with the exception of downloadable ones. *** ** The Nintendo3DS has region locking for both cartridge and downloadable games, to the annoyance of import gamers. Nintendo allegedly incorporates a ''whitelist'' database on each device, which contains a list of checksum of valid games. Game not in the list? Then it wouldn't run. Allegedly this is why the 3DS regularly receives updates even if there's no bug fix or feature addition, and is why cartridges for the original DS needed to be validated online, leading to the requirement of the 3DS having an internet connection and the slow loading time of original DS games as well, but apparently they have moved DS games to using the whitelist too... *** too. ** The [[PlaystationPortable PSP]] has region coding as well, although it's optional for games. UMD movies are always region locked, and EA and Sony themselves have abused the feature when it comes to games and applications: EA used it to lock copies of ''VideoGame/{{BattleZone| 2006}}'' sold in Asia so that it would only play on Asian [=PSPs=] (probably because the game is sold at a lower price in the region), while Sony abused it so that Asian [=PSPs=] will not detect or launch the comic book viewer app, and so that only Japanese and British [=PSPs=] can use the Remote TV Viewer application for remotely watching content received and recorded by PS3 USB tuner, which was only sold in the UK and Japan.

*** It should be noted that the PS3 is a strange case. It was originally to feature optional region coding itself, using two different possible methods- the first was by Blu-Ray regional codes and the second more precise method is to query the model number of the PS3- [=CECHx=]-yy for the original models where yy is the region code, and CECH-2xyyz for the slim models, where yy is the region code. In fact, the PS3 still have the region coding mechanism intact (which it still uses on Blu Ray and DVD movies, as well as PS2 and PS1 games, and also by some PS3 games, but only for CountrySwitch purposes). Pressure from certain government parties, organizations and savvy users made them promise to not use the feature on PS3 games and thus all discs are pressed as region free, as are PS1 and downloadable games that are bought off the PSN store. Several companies have threatened region-locking PS3 games in the past: Midway with John Woo's Stranglehold, Sega with Bayonetta, and EA with Army of Two. All of them backed down after public outcries and threats of boycott, with EA only limiting the Army of Two to multiplayer server segregation. However, very recently, North American consoles have started displaying a Netflix option, which is absent from other consoles. Could be justified that Netflix itself is region-locked, but still... *** VideoGame/Persona4Arena has become the first game to have actual region lockout on the PS3. The fanbase is already calling Atlus out on this, citing things such as the fact that the game might get delayed for a ridiculously long time in Europe by the localizer... which indeed happened to the surprise of no one. The game was set for release in Europe on August 31st, 2012, but its release date was removed and the localizer refused to issue a new release date. While the game was finally released on May 10th, 2013, fans have long developed HypeBacklash that many had cancelled their pre-order of the game while others are sworn that they won't buy the game if it's released[[note]][[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe Source]][[/note]]. The boneheaded part of the issue? The PS3's region lock type is exclusive; they could make the US version of the game run on all consoles except Japanese ones. [[note]]Unless, Atlus is just that greedy and is seeing the Euro-US currency rate as the same reason to region lock the US version of the game. Since the reason they don't want the Japanese importing games is because games released for the US is cheaper, which is actually the same situation in the Europe. It's just cheaper for Europeans to import games in from the US since the typical way retailers determine the pricing of a game to be sold in Europe is taking the US price and changing US$ to Euro, netting themselves a handsome profit in the process[[/note]] *** A PSN exclusive game, ''[=JoySound Dive=]'', which is exclusive to the Japanese PSN[[note]]http://www.psnstores.com/2011/11/the-more-you-know-psn-content-can-be-region-locked/[[/note]], has been recently found to be region-locked as well, making it the second game for the [=PS3=] to be region-locked. Download it onto a non-Japanese [=PS3=]? It won't run, period. Allegedly, Japanese [=PS3=]s operating outside of Japan ''won't run the game either'', even on the Japanese PSN profile, indicating a two-way lockout (IP georestriction + Console region code). On the other hand, this is a ''[[KaraokeBox karaoke]]'' game, so we can probably blame JASRAC (the Japanese equivalent of the RIAA) for this one. *** Even though ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme Vs. Full Boost]]'' is Region Free, the Online portion ''ISN'T.'' Namco Bandai added an Online Pass requirement only available to JP or Asia PSN users to prevent experienced users with multiple accounts from curb-stomping new players, so if you're willing to play the online part of the game, you'll need a JP or Asia PSN account for it, esp. if you're going to Plat the game in these accounts. If you just have a US/EU account, tough luck- say goodbye to fully platting the game (since the game has online trophies). *** EA's VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo has an issue similar to ''Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme Vs. Full Boost'' above. While the game itself is region-free, the multiplayer part is region-segregated into three geological regions (PAL, NTSC/UC and NTSC/J) and the region of the game disc determines which region's server you'll connect to.
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*** It should be noted that the PS3 is a strange case. It was originally to feature optional region coding itself, using two different possible methods- the first was by Blu-Ray regional codes and the second more precise method is to query the model number of the PS3- [=CECHx=]-yy for the original models where yy is the region code, and CECH-2xyyz for the slim models, where yy is the region code. In fact, the PS3 still have the region coding mechanism intact (which it still uses on Blu Ray and DVD movies, as well as PS2 and PS1 games, and also by some PS3 games, but only for CountrySwitch purposes). Pressure from certain government parties, organizations and savvy users made them promise to not use the feature on PS3 games and thus all discs are pressed as region free, as are PS1 and downloadable games that are bought off the PSN store. Several companies have threatened region-locking PS3 games in the past: Midway with John Woo's Stranglehold, Sega with Bayonetta, and EA with Army of Two. All of them backed down after public outcries and threats of boycott, with EA only limiting the Army of Two to multiplayer server segregation. However, very recently, North American consoles have started displaying a Netflix option, which is absent from other consoles. Could be justified that Netflix itself is region-locked, but still... *** ** VideoGame/Persona4Arena has become the first game to have actual region lockout on the PS3. The fanbase is already calling Atlus out on this, citing things such as the fact that the game might get delayed for a ridiculously long time in Europe by the localizer... which indeed happened to the surprise of no one. The game was set for release in Europe on August 31st, 2012, but its release date was removed and the localizer refused to issue a new release date. While the game was finally released on May 10th, 2013, fans have long developed HypeBacklash that many had cancelled their pre-order of the game while others are sworn that they won't buy the game if it's released[[note]][[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe Source]][[/note]]. The boneheaded part of the issue? The PS3's region lock type is exclusive; they could make the US version of the game run on all consoles except Japanese ones. [[note]]Unless, Atlus is just that greedy and is seeing the Euro-US currency rate as the same reason to region lock the US version of the game. Since the reason they don't want the Japanese importing games is because games released for the US is cheaper, which is actually the same situation in the Europe. It's just cheaper for Europeans to import games in from the US since the typical way retailers determine the pricing of a game to be sold in Europe is taking the US price and changing US$ to Euro, netting themselves a handsome profit in the process[[/note]] *** ** A PSN exclusive game, ''[=JoySound Dive=]'', which is exclusive to the Japanese PSN[[note]]http://www.psnstores.com/2011/11/the-more-you-know-psn-content-can-be-region-locked/[[/note]], has been recently found to be region-locked as well, making it the second game for the [=PS3=] to be region-locked. Download it onto a non-Japanese [=PS3=]? It won't run, period. Allegedly, Japanese [=PS3=]s operating outside of Japan ''won't run the game either'', even on the Japanese PSN profile, indicating a two-way lockout (IP georestriction + Console region code). On the other hand, this is a ''[[KaraokeBox karaoke]]'' game, so we can probably blame JASRAC (the Japanese equivalent of the RIAA) for this one. *** one. ** Even though ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme Vs. Full Boost]]'' is Region Free, the Online portion ''ISN'T.'' Namco Bandai added an Online Pass requirement only available to JP or Asia PSN users to prevent experienced users with multiple accounts from curb-stomping new players, so if you're willing to play the online part of the game, you'll need a JP or Asia PSN account for it, esp. if you're going to Plat the game in these accounts. If you just have a US/EU account, tough luck- say goodbye to fully platting the game (since the game has online trophies). *** ** EA's VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo has an issue similar to ''Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme Vs. Full Boost'' above. While the game itself is region-free, the multiplayer part is region-segregated into three geological regions (PAL, NTSC/UC and NTSC/J) and the region of the game disc determines which region's server you'll connect to.

** It gets even more complicated. PAL, SECAM and NTSC are only ''color'' encoding standards (though they typically have a refresh rate attached, the refresh rate is actually ''optional''. That's why there are messed up systems like 60Hz PAL and 50Hz NTSC). Ever wonder what are those letter suffixes that follows a system name when you look at the technical specifications page of a world multi TV manual? That's the ''transmission'' standard, which goes all the way from System A to System S. This is really where the TV resolution, refresh rate, and audio-visual frequency offset is defined. It's possible to mix and match transmission standard and color encoding standards, though PAL typically use B, D, E, G, H, I, K, M, N and NC[[note]]I, M, N and NC are 60Hz broadcast systems[[/note]], NTSC typically use M (though Japan's system could be arguably called NTSC-M'(M-prime) due to the slight luminance rating difference), and SECAM typically use B, D, G, H, K, K'(K-Prime) and L. And that's not counting abandoned systems like System A (which went through a brief trial period with all three color encoding standards by the BBC in the late 40s), and System S. Wait, there's more! This has nothing to do the the PAL, NTSC-J, NTSC/UC, NTSC-K and NTSC-C standards used for region locking game consoles. The latter bunch of imaginary NTSC variants were drummed up by marketroids to state what region code a game is for! You don't have to get confused tho- these don't really come into play as far as line input is concerned- only resolution and refresh rate are really important here with line input, and these systems should fall out of use as countries switch over to digital. On the other hand... ** This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. And there are also two different versions of DMB: China's DMB is technically incompatible with South Korea's implementation, although most portable [=TVs=] sold in South Korea are designed to support both versions of DMB anyway because they're also sold in China. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input. ** Some late-era VHS machines in the UK at least were able to play back NTSC tapes (at least US-format ones), though for some reason refuse to show SECAM recordings in anything but black-and-white[[note]]Remember that ''PAL'' and ''SECAM'' are only color standards. The only important thing about the tape where [=VCRs=] are concerned is the ''tape speed''. The reason PAL and SECAM tapes are cross-compatible save for color is that the tapes run at the same speed, but the color signal is stored as-is on the video portion of the tape and not converted to a universal standard before storage. NTSC [=VCRs=] actually spin their tape slightly faster to compensate for the higher frame rate of System-M. This is also true for PAL-M/N [=VCRs=] sold in South America- those run at a faster speed and are actually incompatible with other PAL and SECAM recorders.[[/note]] *** Completely subverted in many parts of Asia in the same era due to world-multi [=VCRs=] and [=TVs=] becoming the norm due to ''system confusion'' caused by Nintendo, Sega, Sony et. al insisting on launching NTSC/J consoles in countries that were using PAL due to being former British/Dutch colonies. (The exception is obviously the Philippines, South Korea, Japan and Myanmar, which chose NTSC due to historically being US offshore bases or having trade agreements with the US.) Even today, these countries receive PAL TV broadcasts (terrestrial TV signals- or in countries that have already switched to digital, DVB-T2 set-top digital receivers, as well as cable/satellite/IPTV set top boxes, output their analog signal in PAL) but consoles, DVD and Blu-Ray players are NTSC. * The Internet is becoming the new battle ground for all this nonsense; companies who are uploading shows to watch online will more likely than not make it a nightmare to watch their stuff if you're not in their region. Some of this makes sense (Creator/TheBBC will be legally murdered if they release their stuff outside the United Kingdom), some are just annoying (yeah, no one has the rights to ''FistOfTheNorthStar'' in the United Kingdom, Toei) and others fly in the face of all common sense.
to:
** It gets even more complicated. * PAL, SECAM and NTSC are only ''color'' encoding standards (though they typically have a refresh rate attached, the refresh rate is actually ''optional''. That's why there are messed up systems like 60Hz PAL and 50Hz NTSC). Ever wonder what are those letter suffixes that follows a system name when you look at the technical specifications page of a world multi TV manual? That's the ''transmission'' standard, which goes all the way from System A to System S. This is really where the TV resolution, refresh rate, and audio-visual frequency offset is defined. It's possible to mix and match transmission standard and color encoding standards, though PAL typically use B, D, E, G, H, I, K, M, N and NC[[note]]I, M, N and NC are 60Hz broadcast systems[[/note]], NTSC typically use M (though Japan's system could be arguably called NTSC-M'(M-prime) due to the slight luminance rating difference), and SECAM typically use B, D, G, H, K, K'(K-Prime) and L. And that's not counting abandoned systems like System A (which went through a brief trial period with all three color encoding standards by the BBC in the late 40s), and System S. Wait, there's more! This has nothing to do the the PAL, NTSC-J, NTSC/UC, NTSC-K and NTSC-C standards used for region locking game consoles. The latter bunch of imaginary NTSC variants were drummed up by marketroids to state what region code a game is for! You don't have to get confused tho- these don't really come into play as far as line input is concerned- only resolution and refresh rate are really important here with line input, and these systems should fall out of use as countries switch over to digital. On the other hand... ** * This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. And there are also two different versions of DMB: China's DMB is technically incompatible with South Korea's implementation, although most portable [=TVs=] sold in South Korea are designed to support both versions of DMB anyway because they're also sold in China. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input. ** * Some late-era VHS machines in the UK at least were able to play back NTSC tapes (at least US-format ones), though for some reason refuse to show SECAM recordings in anything but black-and-white[[note]]Remember black-and-white.[[note]]Remember that ''PAL'' and ''SECAM'' are only color standards. The only important thing about the tape where [=VCRs=] are concerned is the ''tape speed''. The reason PAL and SECAM tapes are cross-compatible save for color is that the tapes run at the same speed, but the color signal is stored as-is on the video portion of the tape and not converted to a universal standard before storage. NTSC [=VCRs=] actually spin their tape slightly faster to compensate for the higher frame rate of System-M. This is also true for PAL-M/N [=VCRs=] sold in South America- those run at a faster speed and are actually incompatible with other PAL and SECAM recorders.[[/note]] *** Completely [[/note]] It's subverted in many parts of Asia in the same era due to world-multi [=VCRs=] and [=TVs=] becoming the norm due to ''system confusion'' caused by Nintendo, Sega, Sony et. al insisting on launching NTSC/J consoles in countries that were using PAL due to being former British/Dutch colonies. (The exception is obviously the Philippines, South Korea, Japan and Myanmar, which chose NTSC due to historically being US offshore bases or having trade agreements with the US.) Even today, these countries receive PAL TV broadcasts (terrestrial TV signals- or in countries that have already switched to digital, DVB-T2 set-top digital receivers, as well as cable/satellite/IPTV set top boxes, output their analog signal in PAL) but consoles, DVD and Blu-Ray players are NTSC. NTSC. * The Internet is becoming the new battle ground for all this nonsense; companies this: ** Companies who are uploading shows to watch online will more likely than not make it a nightmare to watch their stuff if you're not in their region. Some of this makes sense (Creator/TheBBC will be legally murdered if they release their stuff outside the United Kingdom), some are just annoying (yeah, no one has the rights to ''FistOfTheNorthStar'' in the United Kingdom, Toei) and others fly in the face of all common sense.

*** Youtube allows videos to be region locked by uploaders if they so wished. ** Creator/TheBBC iPlayer and [=CatchUpTV=] is this to the rest of the world. In the case of the BBC it is funded by a license that every UK household has to pay in order to legally watch broadcast television. So the reason for restricting it to the UK is justified. i.e you haven't paid to see it. *** There is a bit of a loophole though. You're only required to have a TV license to watch broadcast television, or live streams from the BBC such as sporting events. Anyone in the UK can still legally access everything on iPlayer without paying for a TV license as long as they don't own a TV and avoid the live streams. And there's talk of dropping that restriction entirely because the BBC has yet to find a way actually enforce it. ** And so is the Australian equivalent, TheABC's iView. This one's a bit of a wallbanger because Australians were never required to pay for a license to watch TV, and it's the policy of the ABC to freely offer its content. The ABC pinned the blame on ''licensing'' issues on the blockage screen- fair enough, we assume that ABC has to agree to some archaic licensing contract that among other things prevents them from offering otherwise-premium programming outside Australia, given that it does have a fair amount of premium imports that it offers for free to Australian residents. The violation of common sense part? Even shows The ABC produced themselves are also blocked to non-Australians on the site.
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*** ** Youtube allows videos to be region locked by uploaders if they so wished. ** Creator/TheBBC iPlayer and [=CatchUpTV=] is this to the rest of the world. In the case of the BBC it is funded by a license that every UK household has to pay in order to legally watch broadcast television. So the reason for restricting it to the UK is justified. i.e you haven't paid to see it. *** it. There is a bit of a loophole though. You're only required to have a TV license to watch broadcast television, or live streams from the BBC such as sporting events. Anyone in the UK can still legally access everything on iPlayer without paying for a TV license as long as they don't own a TV and avoid the live streams. And there's talk of dropping that restriction entirely because the BBC has yet to find a way actually enforce it. ** And so is the Australian equivalent, TheABC's iView.iView in Australia. This one's a bit of a wallbanger because Australians were never required to pay for a license to watch TV, and it's the policy of the ABC to freely offer its content. The ABC pinned the blame on ''licensing'' issues on the blockage screen- fair enough, we assume that ABC has to agree to some archaic licensing contract that among other things prevents them from offering otherwise-premium programming outside Australia, given that it does have a fair amount of premium imports that it offers for free to Australian residents. The violation of common sense part? Even shows The ABC produced themselves are also blocked to non-Australians on the site.

* Many [=MMOs=] have a variation of this that prevent you from playing the game if it detects that you are playing on an internet connection outside of its region. ** Depends on the company and the MMO. An example of this is Nexon and MapleStory, in which the version North America plays is the "Global" version, which can be played by any country or region that doesn't have a company that localized it. However, when it said area ''does'' get their own version, they eventually receive an [[RegionCoding IP filter]] from the Global edition so that any new players play their region's version instead. '''But''' even then there is some leniency, as Nexon will allow players who registered and played Global before a certain date to continue playing it in addition to their localilzed game. *** The boneheaded part of the filter tho: those who can play global can also choose to sign up with some regional versions of the game, but those who can '''not''' sign up for global can only play the game in their own region. For example, someone in Australia (should be playing on the Global server proper) can sign up for both Global and the South-East Asian (SEA) version of the game (assuming he/she has the capability to install both clients side-by-side). On the other hand, someone in Malaysia is region-locked to playing only the SEA version of the game. This is because the SEA version does not request for identification aside from an address which can be easily faked. ** Korean websites and MMO hosts are required by law to scrutinize every user who registers to them. This is generally done by requiring the user to input his real name and Korean resident registration number, and submit a copy of his ID card or other legal document. As a "side effect", people not from Korea are unable to register to their sites.
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* Many [=MMOs=] have a variation of this that prevent you from playing the game if it detects that you are playing on an internet connection outside of its region. ** Depends on the company and the MMO. An example of this is Nexon and MapleStory, in which the version North America plays is the "Global" version, which can be played by any country or region that doesn't have a company that localized it. However, when it said area ''does'' get their own version, they eventually receive an [[RegionCoding IP filter]] from the Global edition so that any new players play their region's version instead. '''But''' even then there is some leniency, as Nexon will allow players who registered and played Global before a certain date to continue playing it in addition to their localilzed game. *** The boneheaded part of the filter tho: those who can play global can also choose to sign up with some regional versions of the game, but those who can '''not''' sign up for global can only play the game in their own region. For example, someone in Australia (should be playing on the Global server proper) can sign up for both Global and the South-East Asian (SEA) version of the game (assuming he/she has the capability to install both clients side-by-side). On the other hand, someone in Malaysia is region-locked to playing only the SEA version of the game. This is because the SEA version does not request for identification aside from an address which can be easily faked. ** Korean websites and MMO hosts are required by law to scrutinize every user who registers to them. This is generally done by requiring the user to input his real name and Korean resident registration number, and submit a copy of his ID card or other legal document. As a "side effect", people not from Korea are unable to register to their sites.

* A sad day for PC gamers out there: According to [[https://forum.lowyat.net/index.php?act=ST&f=249&t=3152824&st=0#entry67068661 Lowyat.Net]]- a prominent Malaysian forum, Creator/ValveSoftware has implemented region coding in Steam in some regions, with South-East Asian, Russian and South American countries being those on the receiving end of the blow at the moment. Some of the forumers suspect Creator/{{Konami}} is to blame for this. ** And now, All Steam games are fully region-locked. [[http://www.lowyat.net/2014/12/steam-games-are-now-region-locked-no-more-gifting-titles-outside-regions/ You can't even gift games to people from other regions]]. [[WhatTheHellHero What the hell, Valve?!?]]. Apparently, Valve is dividing the world into 7 regions: Eastern Europe (including Russia), West Europe + Africa and the Middle East, Oceania, Southeast Asia, Far East Asia (South Korea and Japan), South America and North+Central America. *** Apparently they had to implement the 'No Gifts' rule because people were buying games for their Russian friends and it was devastating the local business. However it is still a slap on the face for those who honestly and genuinely wished to gift a game to a friend in another country. * As PAL and NTSC have different video standards, this leads to, in some cases, a (roughly) 4% speed-up or slowdown when a work is ported across from Europe to America if [[TheyJustDidntCare no-one particularly cares to do it right]]. A particularly tragic case of this concerns the ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie]]: Normally, ''Doctor Who'' is mastered in the European PAL standard used in its native UK, and the versions released in the American market are converted to NTSC in such a way to preserve the timing. However, the movie was a UK-US co-production, so it was mastered in NTSC, and converted for the PAL market with a 4% speedup. Viewers often find it jarring to listen to ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' audio dramas featuring the Eighth Doctor after watching the movie, as his real voice is noticeably deeper than the sped-up version in the movie. ** Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa.
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* A sad day for PC gamers out there: According to [[https://forum.lowyat.net/index.php?act=ST&f=249&t=3152824&st=0#entry67068661 Lowyat.Net]]- a prominent Malaysian forum, Creator/ValveSoftware has implemented region coding in Steam in some regions, with South-East Asian, Russian and South American countries being those on the receiving end of the blow at the moment. Some of the forumers suspect Creator/{{Konami}} is to blame for this. ** And now, All this. Eventually, all Steam games are got fully region-locked. [[http://www.lowyat.net/2014/12/steam-games-are-now-region-locked-no-more-gifting-titles-outside-regions/ You can't even gift games to people from other regions]]. [[WhatTheHellHero What the hell, Valve?!?]]. Apparently, Valve is dividing the world into 7 regions: Eastern Europe (including Russia), West Europe + Africa and the Middle East, Oceania, Southeast Asia, Far East Asia (South Korea and Japan), South America and North+Central America. *** Apparently they had to implement the 'No Gifts' rule because people were buying games for their Russian friends and it was devastating the local business. However it is still a slap on the face for those who honestly and genuinely wished to gift a game to a friend in another country. regions]]. * As PAL and NTSC have different video standards, this leads to, in some cases, a (roughly) 4% speed-up or slowdown when a work is ported across from Europe to America if [[TheyJustDidntCare no-one particularly cares to do it right]]. A particularly tragic case of this concerns the ''Series/DoctorWho'' [[DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie TV movie]]: Normally, ''Doctor Who'' is mastered in the European PAL standard used in its native UK, and the versions released in the American market are converted to NTSC in such a way to preserve the timing. However, the movie was a UK-US co-production, so it was mastered in NTSC, and converted for the PAL market with a 4% speedup. Viewers often find it jarring to listen to ''AudioPlay/BigFinishDoctorWho'' audio dramas featuring the Eighth Doctor after watching the movie, as his real voice is noticeably deeper than the sped-up version in the movie. ** movie.\\ Most NTSC-to-PAL conversions used this process, as it would make sense to preserve the image quality than to retain the speed. The process for converting NTSC to PAL while retaining speed accuracy would cause frames to interpolate, since 30 frames would have to step down to 25, every frame in PAL would be an intermediate of two frames in NTSC (doing simple math, this means only every 300th frame would be a non-interpolated frame). Convert that back to NTSC and it would be doubly messy as now some of the frames would be duplicates of intermediate frames in PAL. There's a reason this conversion method is only used for worldwide live telecasts or in conversion boxes to convert NTSC game console output for use with older non-world-multi-capable PAL [=TVs=] and vice-versa.
28th Jan '16 9:11:51 AM RAMChYLD
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** The SNES actually had two plastic tabs that prevented Super Famicom cartridges from being inserted. A pair of pliers and devil-may-care attitude about warranty can fix that...[[note]]While the SNES does have a copy protection chip called the CIC, the same chip is used worldwide and it's only job is to ensure the game is licensed by Nintendo, copy protection is handled mostly by said tabs and checking the clock speed of the 65816 CPU.[[/note]]
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** The SNES actually had two plastic tabs that prevented Super Famicom cartridges from being inserted. A pair of pliers and devil-may-care attitude about warranty can fix that...[[note]]While the SNES does have a copy protection chip called the CIC, the same chip is used worldwide and it's only job is to ensure the game is licensed by Nintendo, copy protection region coding is handled mostly by said tabs and checking the clock speed of the 65816 CPU.[[/note]]
5th Jan '16 5:47:28 PM MarkLungo
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* It's worth noting that video game consoles have had region coding since 1984. It was introduced there by Nintendo, theoretically to reduce pirated and unlicensed games on the system. However, it also serves as a huge barrier to ImportGaming, for much the same reasons as with home movies. Devices to maneuver around the region coding are also illegal, but popular to the point that such a device for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the first with such coding, still sells for a respectable amount.
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* It's worth noting that video game consoles have had region coding since 1984. It was introduced there by Nintendo, theoretically to reduce pirated and unlicensed games on the system. However, it also serves as a huge barrier to ImportGaming, UsefulNotes/ImportGaming, for much the same reasons as with home movies. Devices to maneuver around the region coding are also illegal, but popular to the point that such a device for the Nintendo Entertainment System, the first with such coding, still sells for a respectable amount.
15th Dec '15 12:55:50 AM RAMChYLD
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** This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. And there are also two different versions of DMB: China's DMB is technically incompatible with the DMB used by portable TVs sold in South Korea, although most portable TVs sold in South Korea are designed to support both versions of DMB anyway because they're also sold in China. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input.
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** This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. And there are also two different versions of DMB: China's DMB is technically incompatible with the DMB used by portable TVs sold in South Korea, Korea's implementation, although most portable TVs [=TVs=] sold in South Korea are designed to support both versions of DMB anyway because they're also sold in China. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input.
15th Dec '15 12:54:59 AM RAMChYLD
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** This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input.
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** This continues into the digital age as well. DVB, ATSC, ISDB and DMB: These are the four digital systems deployed worldwide. DVB is used in Europe and most of Asia (except the handful of countries as said next), ISDB is used in South America, Japan and The Philippines, ATSC is used in North America and South Korea (the only Asian country using said system), and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system to deliver TV to portable receivers in South Korea). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards compatible with version 1, but not the other way around. Early adopter of DVB-type Digital TV and the government announces that it is switching to version 2 of the system, like what's happening in Malaysia and Singapore? Sucks to be you. And there are also two different versions of DMB: China's DMB is technically incompatible with the DMB used by portable TVs sold in South Korea, although most portable TVs sold in South Korea are designed to support both versions of DMB anyway because they're also sold in China. Also, some countries may decide to adopt two or more systems, i.e., South Korea adopted both DMB and ATSC systems and broadcasts in both formats[[note]]South Korea broadcasts in ATSC for regular [=TVs=], but also in DMB for in-vehicle and handheld portable [=TVs=][[/note]]. And if a country decided to change system due to changes in political ties/technological progression, woe be upon the citizens of the country in question. To top it all off, HD images can be 24, 25 or 30 frames per second. Many early [=HDTVs=], as well as cheaper monitors, will refuse to recognize 25 fps sources. Heck, even many new TV sets sold in the United States refuses to recognize 25 fps input.
29th Nov '15 8:31:22 PM nombretomado
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* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting to mean Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Mainland China). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
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* The SegaGenesis UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting to mean Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Mainland China). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
28th Oct '15 1:31:36 AM RAMChYLD
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* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
to:
* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting).setting to mean Hong Kong, Taiwan, Macau and Mainland China). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
11th Oct '15 10:47:41 AM nombretomado
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** Strangely for home consoles, all but two[[note]]See Persona4Arena and [=JoySound Dive=] entry below[[/note]] [=PS3=] games are region-free, and Xbox 360 region locking has always been at game publishers' discretion.
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** Strangely for home consoles, all but two[[note]]See Persona4Arena VideoGame/Persona4Arena and [=JoySound Dive=] entry below[[/note]] [=PS3=] games are region-free, and Xbox 360 region locking has always been at game publishers' discretion.

*** Persona4Arena has become the first game to have actual region lockout on the PS3. The fanbase is already calling Atlus out on this, citing things such as the fact that the game might get delayed for a ridiculously long time in Europe by the localizer... which indeed happened to the surprise of no one. The game was set for release in Europe on August 31st, 2012, but its release date was removed and the localizer refused to issue a new release date. While the game was finally released on May 10th, 2013, fans have long developed HypeBacklash that many had cancelled their pre-order of the game while others are sworn that they won't buy the game if it's released[[note]][[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe Source]][[/note]]. The boneheaded part of the issue? The PS3's region lock type is exclusive; they could make the US version of the game run on all consoles except Japanese ones. [[note]]Unless, Atlus is just that greedy and is seeing the Euro-US currency rate as the same reason to region lock the US version of the game. Since the reason they don't want the Japanese importing games is because games released for the US is cheaper, which is actually the same situation in the Europe. It's just cheaper for Europeans to import games in from the US since the typical way retailers determine the pricing of a game to be sold in Europe is taking the US price and changing US$ to Euro, netting themselves a handsome profit in the process[[/note]]
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*** Persona4Arena VideoGame/Persona4Arena has become the first game to have actual region lockout on the PS3. The fanbase is already calling Atlus out on this, citing things such as the fact that the game might get delayed for a ridiculously long time in Europe by the localizer... which indeed happened to the surprise of no one. The game was set for release in Europe on August 31st, 2012, but its release date was removed and the localizer refused to issue a new release date. While the game was finally released on May 10th, 2013, fans have long developed HypeBacklash that many had cancelled their pre-order of the game while others are sworn that they won't buy the game if it's released[[note]][[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe Source]][[/note]]. The boneheaded part of the issue? The PS3's region lock type is exclusive; they could make the US version of the game run on all consoles except Japanese ones. [[note]]Unless, Atlus is just that greedy and is seeing the Euro-US currency rate as the same reason to region lock the US version of the game. Since the reason they don't want the Japanese importing games is because games released for the US is cheaper, which is actually the same situation in the Europe. It's just cheaper for Europeans to import games in from the US since the typical way retailers determine the pricing of a game to be sold in Europe is taking the US price and changing US$ to Euro, netting themselves a handsome profit in the process[[/note]]

* Of the three TheEighthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames consoles, it appears that the WiiU will be the only region-locked console in the market. Microsoft originally intended to region-lock the XboxOne to only 21 countries, but backed out when critics and fans vocally protested the region coding plan and DRM. Sony in the meantime has pledged that Persona4Arena and [=JoySound Dive=] were unique cases and they intend to retain the region-free policy with the PlayStation4.
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* Of the three TheEighthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames consoles, it appears that the WiiU will be the only region-locked console in the market. Microsoft originally intended to region-lock the XboxOne to only 21 countries, but backed out when critics and fans vocally protested the region coding plan and DRM. Sony in the meantime has pledged that Persona4Arena VideoGame/Persona4Arena and [=JoySound Dive=] were unique cases and they intend to retain the region-free policy with the PlayStation4.
24th Sep '15 5:51:09 AM RAMChYLD
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* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding. Before that discovery however, many Chinese companies produced "region adapters" that allow for mod-free region-free gaming. Like the SNES example above, you just plug the game that's of the wrong region into the adapter itself, and the adapter itself is plugged into the Genesis or Mega Drive. This indicates that it's also possible to fool the game into thinking it's in the correct region by software.
to:
* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding. Before that discovery however, many Chinese companies produced "region adapters" that allow for mod-free region-free gaming. Like the SNES example above, you just plug the game that's of the wrong region into the adapter itself, and the adapter itself is plugged into the Genesis or Mega Drive. This indicates that it's also possible to fool the game into thinking it's in the correct region by software. ** After region-coded games started appearing but before the discovery of the jumpers however, many Chinese companies produced "region adapters" that allow for mod-free region-free gaming. Just plug the game that's of the wrong region into the adapter itself, flip some switches on the adapter to indicate the cartridge region and console region, and the adapter itself is plugged into the Genesis or Mega Drive. This indicates that it's also possible to fool the game into thinking it's in the correct region at a software level alone.
24th Sep '15 5:48:52 AM RAMChYLD
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* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding.
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* The SegaGenesis has an odd region-coding system. Sega, trying to cut costs, designed the console's motherboard so that changing the region is as simple as swapping a few jumpers on the motherboard around. The first jumper determined the clock speed of the console and the second jumper determines the console language. There were only three valid combinations - English 50Hz for PAL, English 60Hz for NTSC/UC, and Japanese 60Hz for NTSC/J- though some games will also honor the Japanese 50Hz setting). This is combined with the shape of the physical cartridge (NTSC/UC and PAL cartridges were designed the same way, but NTSC/J cartridges were slightly different in terms of shape). All it took to make the console region free was to mod two switches into the console to select language and speed (although if you had a Japanese console, you must also mod the top loading section of the case so American and European cartridges will fit). It didn't really mattered much during the early days of the console tho, since most games released then were region free (and some even used the settings for CountrySwitch purposes). Only when the region locked games came out later that people took to modding. Before that discovery however, many Chinese companies produced "region adapters" that allow for mod-free region-free gaming. Like the SNES example above, you just plug the game that's of the wrong region into the adapter itself, and the adapter itself is plugged into the Genesis or Mega Drive. This indicates that it's also possible to fool the game into thinking it's in the correct region by software.
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