History UsefulNotes / RegionCoding

30th Sep '17 6:22:35 PM nombretomado
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* TheEighthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames may be heralding the end of region locking in home video game consoles. Sony received such a backlash from its two region-locked [=PS3=] games that it pledged a region-free UsefulNotes/PlayStation4. Microsoft originally intended to region-lock the UsefulNotes/XboxOne to only 21 countries, but backed out when critics vocally protested. Nintendo, ever concerned about {{shovelware}}, maintained region coding on the UsefulNotes/WiiU, but it abandoned it for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, making it the company's first ever region-free home console. Although region locking remains an option for developers, few of them want to deal with that anymore.

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* TheEighthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames UsefulNotes/TheEighthGenerationOfConsoleVideoGames may be heralding the end of region locking in home video game consoles. Sony received such a backlash from its two region-locked [=PS3=] games that it pledged a region-free UsefulNotes/PlayStation4. Microsoft originally intended to region-lock the UsefulNotes/XboxOne to only 21 countries, but backed out when critics vocally protested. Nintendo, ever concerned about {{shovelware}}, maintained region coding on the UsefulNotes/WiiU, but it abandoned it for the UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, making it the company's first ever region-free home console. Although region locking remains an option for developers, few of them want to deal with that anymore.
12th Sep '17 6:43:44 PM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' broadcasts[[note]]ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal[[/note]]. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' broadcasts[[note]]ensuring that PAL TVs [=TVs=] from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs [=TVs=] can only pick up a black and white signal[[/note]]. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.



* In the 4G era, we've now got at least nine bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/900MHz/2.1GHz=][[note]]and that's just oversimplification as each of these bands also have variants in return channel frequencies as well as the actual band range, the 700 MHz range actually has ''five'' variants[[/note]]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.

to:

* In the 4G era, we've now got at least nine bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/900MHz/2.1GHz=][[note]]and that's just oversimplification as each of these bands also have variants in return channel frequencies as well as the actual band range, the 700 MHz [=700MHz=] range actually has ''five'' variants[[/note]]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.
12th Sep '17 6:42:14 PM RAMChYLD
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* In the 4G era, we've now got at least nine bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/900MHz/2.1GHz=]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.

to:

* In the 4G era, we've now got at least nine bands: the US uses [=700MHz/1.7GHz/1.9GHz=], most of the rest of the world uses [=800MHz/1.8GHz/2.6GHz=], and some third-world countries use [=850MHz/900MHz/2.1GHz=].1GHz=][[note]]and that's just oversimplification as each of these bands also have variants in return channel frequencies as well as the actual band range, the 700 MHz range actually has ''five'' variants[[/note]]. Then you have the TDD frequencies - 2.3, 2.5, and 3.5 [=GHz=]. So far, there is no world-capable phone that can support all of the bands, but several phones can support all the non-TDD ones.
12th Sep '17 6:39:01 PM RAMChYLD
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In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore as the country migrates from version 1 of the DVB standard to version 2. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.

to:

In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore as the country migrates from started with version 1 of the DVB standard but migrated to version 2.2 eventually. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.
12th Sep '17 6:37:45 PM RAMChYLD
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In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.

to:

In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore.Singapore as the country migrates from version 1 of the DVB standard to version 2. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.
12th Sep '17 6:34:52 PM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' signals [[note]]ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal[[/note]]. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' signals [[note]]ensuring broadcasts[[note]]ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal[[/note]]. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.
12th Sep '17 6:33:59 PM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M (the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' signals, ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal). And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M (the M, the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' signals, ensuring signals [[note]]ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal).signal[[/note]]. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.
12th Sep '17 6:32:09 PM RAMChYLD
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The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards. And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.

to:

The analog TV standards are PAL, SECAM, and NTSC. In general, NTSC was used in the Americas (except Brazil, Argentina, Uruguay, and Paraguay), Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Burma, and the Philippines; SECAM was used in France, the former Soviet Union, West Africa, and other French possessions (current and former), and PAL was used for most of Europe, most of Asia, the rest of Africa and South America, Australia, and New Zealand. The main difference arises in the color encoding standards and the "refresh rate" (''i.e.'' how the TV knows when and where to put the frames on the screen). Then there's the transmission standard, which is further divided into System A through System S, which determines the image and sound modulation as well as the refresh rate[[note]]a TV meant for China, which uses PAL-D, will produce static noise despite having a clear picture, when receiving PAL-B signal, which is used in Australia, due to technical differences regarding audio defined by the transmission system. In some cases images are even inverted, and may be rolling due to different refresh rates used by different transmission systems[[/note]], and it's possible to mix and match transmission and color encoding standards.standards, as seen egregiously in Brazil where the PAL color standard is used on top of System M (the basic black and white signal normally used for ''NTSC'' signals, ensuring that PAL TVs from outside the country can't be used at all while NTSC TVs can only pick up a black and white signal). And then there are the frequency ranges. Believe it or not, different parts of the world have different ideas on what frequency range constitutes as VHF and UHF. Historically, the biggest barrier from using a Japanese TV in the US is that the Channel 5 used in Japan (176MHz) is actually four megahertz off Channel 7 (180MHz) in the US, ensuring that it will never be able to get a clear picture unless the TV is readjusted by a qualified technician.
6th Sep '17 7:50:33 PM RAMChYLD
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* Strangely, only two UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 games have any region locking. One is ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena'', which caused Atlus a lot of flak due to the game's [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe extremely delayed European release]] (although it was totally region-locked elsewhere, even between regions which already had the game. Atlus claims that the region-locking was to dissuade Japanese and European players from importing the cheaper US version. This not only angered certain Europeans who already see themselves as being the victim of unfair price hikes[[note]]specifically, English speaking ones from the UK[[/note]], but things got worse when the European version was severely delayed with the existing launch date withdrawn and a new launch date not announced until early 2013); there was such a backlash to that decision (leading to European gamers cancelling pre-orders and threatening to boycott the launch) that Atlus didn't dare do it again[[note]]It also affected their sales so badly that Atlus ended up being acquired by a revived Sega[[/note]]. The second is ''VideoGame/JoySoundDive'', a Japanese PSN exclusive game, which not only won't run on a non-Japanese [=PS3=], it won't even run on a Japanese [=PS3=] which recognizes that it's not in Japan; this is likely because it's a [[KaraokeBox karaoke game]] and JASRAC (the Japanese RIAA counterpart) would complain otherwise about music reproduction rights. Some other games (like ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme vs. Full Boost]]'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'') are region-free but have region-locked online play, ostensibly to prevent extreme imbalances in ability between regions.

to:

* Strangely, only two UsefulNotes/PlayStation3 games have any region locking. One is ''VideoGame/Persona4Arena'', which caused Atlus a lot of flak due to the game's [[http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-08-22-persona-4-arena-delayed-in-europe extremely delayed European release]] (although it was totally region-locked elsewhere, even between regions which already had the game. Atlus claims that the region-locking was to dissuade Japanese and European players from importing the cheaper US version. This not only angered certain Europeans Europeans[[note]]specifically, English speaking ones from the UK[[/note]] who already see themselves as being the victim of unfair price hikes[[note]]specifically, English speaking ones from the UK[[/note]], hikes, but things got worse when the European version was severely delayed with the existing launch date withdrawn and a new launch date not announced until early 2013); there was such a backlash to that decision (leading to European gamers cancelling pre-orders and threatening to boycott the launch) that Atlus didn't dare do it again[[note]]It also affected their sales so badly that ended with Atlus ended up being acquired by a revived Sega[[/note]]. The second is ''VideoGame/JoySoundDive'', a Japanese PSN exclusive game, which not only won't run on a non-Japanese [=PS3=], it won't even run on a Japanese [=PS3=] which recognizes that it's not in Japan; this is likely because it's a [[KaraokeBox karaoke game]] and JASRAC (the Japanese RIAA counterpart) would complain otherwise about music reproduction rights. Some other games (like ''[[VideoGame/GundamVsSeries Mobile Suit Gundam Extreme vs. Full Boost]]'' and ''VideoGame/ArmyOfTwo'') are region-free but have region-locked online play, ostensibly to prevent extreme imbalances in ability between regions.
28th Aug '17 5:19:13 PM arnoldmcguire335
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In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISBD digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.

to:

In the digital age, we don't need analog standards anymore, but this just leads to different classifications. There are four digital systems now: ISDB is used in South America, Japan, and the Philippines; ATSC is used in North America and South Korea; DVB is used in Europe and the rest of Asia; and DMB is used in China (and as a secondary system for portable receivers in South Korea, which technically uses a different version incompatible with the Chinese version). To further complicate matters, there are two versions of DVB, and tuners built for version 2 are backwards-compatible with version 1, but not vice-versa, which causes headaches for early adopters in countries like Malaysia and Singapore. And yes, the multiple variants of ISDB implemented in South America and the Philippines are said to be not compatible with each other, let alone it's original Japanese variant. [[note]]Although there are reports that some JP TV tuners (Like the Portable TV tuner add-on for the PSP and Brazilian released Smartphones with [=1Seg=] tuners) imported to the Philippines for ISDB signal tests conducted during the test broadcasts of some channels with ISBD ISDB digital signals are compatible with the Philippine version of ISDB.[[/note]] It's incredibly difficult for a country to change standards, too. And to top it off, HD images can be 24, 25, or 30 frames per second, and many American [=TVs=] refuse to recognize 25fps input.
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