History UsefulNotes / RedsWithRockets

20th Nov '16 12:50:20 AM Alceister
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.

to:

* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.



** The Soviet Naval Infantry had a different mission than the U.S. Marines. They were intended as shock troops used to seize the beachheads as part of the first landing echelon and once follow-on units from the Soviet Army arrived to take over the battle they would withdraw to spearhead other additional landings. They were considered a sort of elite among the Soviet armed forces, being roughly between the USMC and its Force Recon element. They are not the equivalents of the U.S. Army Rangers. That distinction belongs to VDV below.

to:

** The Soviet Naval Infantry had a different mission than the U.S. Marines. They were intended as shock troops used to seize the beachheads as part of the first landing echelon and once follow-on units from the Soviet Army arrived to take over the battle they would withdraw to spearhead other additional landings. They were considered a sort of elite among the Soviet armed forces, being roughly between the USMC and its Force Recon element.battalions. They are not the equivalents of the U.S. Army Rangers. That distinction belongs to VDV below.
8th Nov '16 3:18:22 PM aurora369
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Order of Suvorov- again for exceptional duty. Named after famous general Alexander Suvorov, responsible for the phrase "Train hard, fight easy".

to:

* Order of Suvorov- again for exceptional duty. Named after famous general Alexander Suvorov, responsible for the phrase "Train hard, fight easy". This is one of the so-called "leaders' orders", which are both named for famous military commanders of the past and awarded to high-ranking officers only.



* Order of Kutuzov- Named after the Marshal who chased Napoleon out of Russia. Notable because it's awarded for "neutralizing enemy tactics and counterattacking effectively." Yes, they have an award ''expressly'' for being a total awesome smart guy who beat bastards at their own games.

to:

* Order of Kutuzov- Named after the Marshal who chased Napoleon out of Russia. Notable because it's awarded for "neutralizing enemy tactics and counterattacking effectively." Yes, they have an award ''expressly'' for being a total awesome smart guy who beat bastards at their own games. Naturally, it's another one of the leaders' orders.
5th Nov '16 10:43:02 AM GMantis
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "The one with the rifle shoots. The one without the rifle follows. When the one with the rifle is killed, the one that follows picks up the rifle and fires.". Yep, it's in ''Film/EnemyAtTheGates''. Zaytsev and Pavlichenko (a female Soviet sniper with a similar number of kills to Zaytsev) both used this.
*** Slightly misleading, while it was a minor problem - seriously exaggerated by 'every' relevant military organization [[note]] i.e. the Dukes of the Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery as well as the General Staff and the Ministry Of War [[/note]] to avoid the critical need to reform the military and fire numerous senior commanders - in [=WW1=] the Soviet Union in [=WW2=] generally had enough rifles. Now ammunition on the other hand...
30th Oct '16 5:36:53 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The female Soviet officer is cited in TheBaroness and we note also the example of Major Anya Amasova from ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'', although she's actually a KGB agent (and a bad FakeRussian, but let's not quibble here). When the chips were down and the Nazis were at the Gates, the women chipped in. Women flew combat (of special note are a praticularly BadAss group with the awesome name of the Night Witches) and the only two female aces in the world were both Soviet (a fact noted by an American character in ''Literature/RedStormRising'', mentally complaining that she's merely doing ferrying duty while the men were fighting, who then proceeds to become number three). 89 of them became Heroes Of The Soviet Union.

to:

The female Soviet officer is cited in TheBaroness and we note also the example of Major Anya Amasova from ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'', although she's actually a KGB agent (and a bad FakeRussian, but let's not quibble here). When the chips were down and the Nazis were at the Gates, the women chipped in. Women flew combat (of special note are a praticularly BadAss badass group with the awesome name of the Night Witches) and the only two female aces in the world were both Soviet (a fact noted by an American character in ''Literature/RedStormRising'', mentally complaining that she's merely doing ferrying duty while the men were fighting, who then proceeds to become number three). 89 of them became Heroes Of The Soviet Union.
21st Oct '16 9:01:40 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Yakovlev Yak series: These were the mainstay Soviet fighter aircraft during the Great Patriotic War. Designed by Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev, they served from the beginning to the end of the war, starting with the mediocre Yak-1 to the more advanced Yak-3 and Yak-9. The Yak-3 in particular was so dangerous that the Luftwaffe issued a directive not to engage them below 16,000 feet. After WorldWarII, Yak-9Ps were exported to allies such as NorthKorea and subsequently used in TheKoreanWar.

to:

* Yakovlev Yak series: These were the mainstay Soviet fighter aircraft during the Great Patriotic War. Designed by Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev, they served from the beginning to the end of the war, starting with the mediocre Yak-1 to the more advanced Yak-3 and Yak-9. The Yak-3 in particular was so dangerous that the Luftwaffe issued a directive not to engage them below 16,000 feet. After WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Yak-9Ps were exported to allies such as NorthKorea UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and subsequently used in TheKoreanWar.UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.
20th Oct '16 9:40:42 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov:''' truly outstanding tactician of the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar and one of the top-ten most important Soviet commanders of the entire war. Before the war he was a Lieutenant general posted to aid ChiangKaiShek in the Chinese struggle against ImperialJapan, where he oversaw some training and reform of Chinese military forces with Soviet material and technical asssistance. Recalled to the USSR after the German invasion, he was given an Army and ordered to hold the city of Stalingrad itself while Vatutin & co. ruthlessly counter-attacked the German flanks. Zhukov later criticised him for neglecting to mention that his force was less than a third of the force actually holding the Germans up at Stalingrad. Chuikov was assigned to assault various heavily-fortified positions and cities throughout the war, with his post-Stalingrad forces experiencing a more than 100% turnover in the following years. He personally accepted the surrender of the forces defending Berlin. The USA had the theoretical framework in place to understand the significance of his (tactical) service, making him the only Soviet citizen ever to have ever received the second highest decoration in the United States military: the Distinguished Service Cross.
* Colonel '''YuriGagarin''': The first man in space.

to:

* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov:''' truly outstanding tactician of the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar and one of the top-ten most important Soviet commanders of the entire war. Before the war he was a Lieutenant general posted to aid ChiangKaiShek UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek in the Chinese struggle against ImperialJapan, UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, where he oversaw some training and reform of Chinese military forces with Soviet material and technical asssistance. Recalled to the USSR after the German invasion, he was given an Army and ordered to hold the city of Stalingrad itself while Vatutin & co. ruthlessly counter-attacked the German flanks. Zhukov later criticised him for neglecting to mention that his force was less than a third of the force actually holding the Germans up at Stalingrad. Chuikov was assigned to assault various heavily-fortified positions and cities throughout the war, with his post-Stalingrad forces experiencing a more than 100% turnover in the following years. He personally accepted the surrender of the forces defending Berlin. The USA had the theoretical framework in place to understand the significance of his (tactical) service, making him the only Soviet citizen ever to have ever received the second highest decoration in the United States military: the Distinguished Service Cross.
* Colonel '''YuriGagarin''': '''UsefulNotes/YuriGagarin''': The first man in space.
11th Oct '16 6:09:37 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Tu-16 "Badger": The standard Soviet tactical bomber during much of early ColdWar, with two big jet engines and capable of carrying either conventional or nuclear bombs. Phased out of service near the end of the ColdWar in favor of more modern designs, but still in PRC service in form of Chinese-built copies.

to:

* Tu-16 "Badger": The standard Soviet tactical bomber during much of the early ColdWar, UsefulNotes/ColdWar, with two big jet engines and capable of carrying either conventional or nuclear bombs. Phased out of service near the end of the ColdWar Cold War in favor of more modern designs, but still in PRC service in form of Chinese-built copies.
17th Aug '16 3:39:44 PM Harrenwolf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The Germans only had the logistical strength for a single operation to a maximum depth of 500km before a necessary operational pause to allow forward stockpiling. It was essential that they halt for at least a month, and ideally three, to build up supply stockpiles in Latvia and Belarus and Western Ukraine. Yet the Germans only went onto the defensive in the centre, pushing their forces onward in the Ukraine and the Baltic in the second campaign (July-September). Consequently the advancing troops did not have sufficient ammunition supplies and so took such heavy losses that they were barely effective in the third campaign (Taifun, October). Logistical preparations for the third campaign (October-November) were undermined by expenditure during the second campaign and stockpiles ran out by the middle of October. Poorly-armed and trained Soviet troops were then able to fight the Germans on equal terms because of the shortages of ammunition. Ultimately, in the First Period of War German 'victory fever' and inattention to logistics caused them to take losses [[PyrhicVictory they could not afford]], even if they managed to inflict heavy losses on the Soviets in turn. Thus the first turning point of the war was early on. Convincing arguments have been made for ''Taifun'' (October-November), ''Kiev'' (September), and even ''Smolensk'' (July) being turning points, with each campaign cumulatively reducing Germany's options and capabilities until there was no longer any hope of winning a quick war. By the time of The Winter Counter-Offensive of 1941-2, let alone Stalingrad, Soviet survival was no longer at stake. This meant the Soviet advantages in military theory and weaponry would (thanks to Soviet industry) be able to counter short-term German advantages in operational skill and troop training.

to:

* The Germans only had the logistical strength for a single operation to a maximum depth of 500km before a necessary operational pause to allow forward stockpiling. It was essential that they halt for at least a month, and ideally three, to build up supply stockpiles in Latvia and Belarus and Western Ukraine. Yet the Germans only went onto the defensive in the centre, pushing their forces onward in the Ukraine and the Baltic in the second campaign (July-September). Consequently the advancing troops did not have sufficient ammunition supplies and so took such heavy losses that they were barely effective in the third campaign (Taifun, October). Logistical preparations for the third campaign (October-November) were undermined by expenditure during the second campaign and stockpiles ran out by the middle of October. Poorly-armed and trained Soviet troops were then able to fight the Germans on equal terms because of the shortages of ammunition. Ultimately, in the First Period of War German 'victory fever' and inattention to logistics caused them to take losses [[PyrhicVictory [[PyrrhicVictory they could not afford]], even if they managed to inflict heavy losses on the Soviets in turn. Thus the first turning point of the war was early on. Convincing arguments have been made for ''Taifun'' (October-November), ''Kiev'' (September), and even ''Smolensk'' (July) being turning points, with each campaign cumulatively reducing Germany's options and capabilities until there was no longer any hope of winning a quick war. By the time of The Winter Counter-Offensive of 1941-2, let alone Stalingrad, Soviet survival was no longer at stake. This meant the Soviet advantages in military theory and weaponry would (thanks to Soviet industry) be able to counter short-term German advantages in operational skill and troop training.
24th Jul '16 8:43:05 AM Synthesis
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This was supposedly the the T-55's actual replacement, even for the Russians. The ultimately lackluster export T-62 chipped in a few key features to the T-55's philosophy of not-so-high tech, mass produced, but solid armored units to create the next best-seller for Soviet Main Battle Tanks. With a constantly revised auto-loading D-81T 125mm smoothbore gun, thick frontal armor with provisions for extra protective add-ons, and decent mobility, the T-72 is still a fearsome weapon in a competent tank corp. It is also uncommon for the tank to exceed fifty tons, giving it a strategic advantage in out-manoeuvring its more advanced contemporaries like the Leopard 2, both iterations of the 120mm armed Challenger, the M1 Abrams series, the French AMX-56, and the Italian Ariete in areas with poor ground infrastructure.

to:

** This was supposedly the the T-55's actual replacement, even for the Russians.Soviets. The ultimately lackluster export T-62 chipped in a few key features to the T-55's philosophy of not-so-high tech, mass produced, but solid armored units to create the next best-seller for Soviet Main Battle Tanks. With a constantly revised auto-loading D-81T 125mm smoothbore gun, thick frontal armor with provisions for extra protective add-ons, and decent mobility, the T-72 is still a fearsome weapon in a competent tank corp. It is also uncommon for the tank to exceed fifty tons, giving it a strategic advantage in out-manoeuvring its more advanced contemporaries like the Leopard 2, both iterations of the 120mm armed Challenger, the M1 Abrams series, the French AMX-56, and the Italian Ariete in areas with poor ground infrastructure.


Added DiffLines:

** By contrast, Syria's T-72M1 tanks (note: Unlike Iraq above, Syria was the Soviet Union's closest ally in the Middle East, and was home to one of the few Soviet naval bases abroad in Tartus) performed [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T-72#Syria shocking well against Israeli tanks in the 1982 Lebanon War]]. While details vary, both sides acknowledged that Syrian armor effectively engaged and destroyed the best tanks [[IsraelisWithInfraredMissiles Israel]] had to offer, the M[=60A1=] and famed Merkava in South Lebanon, with few or no losses. Then-president of Syria Hafez Al-Assad described the export model T-72M1 tanks as "The best tanks in the world." Given the prestigious reputation of the Merkava (a very effective T-62 killer) and circumstances where Patton tanks handily outperformed T-72 tanks in other wars, the conflict probably spoke a great deal to the importance of up-to-date parts and training from the manufacturing country for an tank importer (not just Soviet tanks, but in general).
1st Jul '16 12:42:26 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Georgy Zhukov:''' Major player in the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar, he got the Hero of the Soviet Union medal four times (the only person to have done so legitimately), and [[ChestOfMedals is said to be Russian history's most decorated officer]]. He is popularly believed to have arrested Lavrentiy Beria, who was chief of the NKVD under Stalin and one of the top figures in the Soviet hierarchy after Stalin's death. Contrary to what Aussies believe, Zhukov was the first man to defeat Imperial Japan in battle (Khalkhin Gol encirclement operation, 1939), and he did it with the neglected, ill-equipped Mongolian and eastern Soviet forces (whom he had nothing but admiration for). He was responsible for the Soviet offensive operation at Smolensk in July 1941, which forced the Germans onto the defensive and ended their (hopelessly optimistic) plan to occupy Moscow by the end of the month. In his time he was a highly underrated general among the Allies, and was actually seen by Eisenhower (the man who commanded Montgomery and Patton) as the finest general the Allied forces had to offer. Tactically he was only passably competent, and some such as Anthony Beevor have actually maintained that he was ''incompetent'' in this role, but it is hard to question that his planning and conduct of operations and his grasp of strategy was anything less than inspired. His 'style' was [[OccamsRazor blunt and callous, but undeniably effective]] - like the man himself. Zhukov himself would have been very quick to point out the greater importance of his subordinates and colleagues (Vasilevsky, Rokossovsky, Vatutin, etcetc), rather than analysing his own role in isolation. Among military historians, assessment of Zhukov's true abilities is a notable BaseBreaker.

to:

* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Georgy Zhukov:''' Major player in the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar, he got the Hero of the Soviet Union medal four times (the only person to have done so legitimately), and [[ChestOfMedals is said to be Russian history's most decorated officer]]. He is popularly believed to have arrested Lavrentiy Beria, who was chief of the NKVD under Stalin and one of the top figures in the Soviet hierarchy after Stalin's death. Contrary to what Aussies believe, Zhukov was the first man to defeat Imperial Japan in battle (Khalkhin Gol encirclement operation, 1939), and he did it with the neglected, ill-equipped Mongolian and eastern Soviet forces (whom he had nothing but admiration for). He was responsible for the Soviet offensive operation at Smolensk in July 1941, which forced the Germans onto the defensive and ended their (hopelessly optimistic) plan to occupy Moscow by the end of the month. In his time he was a highly underrated general among the Allies, and was actually seen by Eisenhower (the man who commanded Montgomery and Patton) as the finest general the Allied forces had to offer. Tactically he was only passably competent, and some such as Anthony Beevor have actually maintained that he was ''incompetent'' in this role, but it is hard to question that his planning and conduct of operations and his grasp of strategy was anything less than inspired. His 'style' was [[OccamsRazor blunt and callous, but undeniably effective]] - like the man himself. Zhukov himself would have been very quick to point out the greater importance of his subordinates and colleagues (Vasilevsky, Rokossovsky, Vatutin, etcetc), rather than analysing his own role in isolation. Among military historians, assessment of Zhukov's true abilities is a notable BaseBreaker.
This list shows the last 10 events of 386. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.RedsWithRockets