History UsefulNotes / RedsWithRockets

7th Apr '17 2:41:10 AM TheAmazingBlachman
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* Lieutenant-Colonel '''Stanislav Petrov''', who in 1983 was an officer with the missile warning people; the Soviet early warning satellite system picked up a launch (in reality it wasn't actually a launch, but sunlight being reflected off of high attitude clouds) and because he was aware of this and the circumstances (the US, if it were launching a pre-emptive strike, wouldn't just launch 5 missiles from silos in North Dakota, but would probably go all out) he decided to wait a bit before to alert his superiors. He may have prevented a civilization-shattering nuclear exchange; however, he was initially never rewarded nor punished for his actions. The fact that the early-warning system had malfunctioned in such a fashion would have been a great embarrassment to several Soviet politicians and scientists, so Petrov was just quietly transferred to another, less important post, and his story wasn't publicly told until after the fall of the USSR. He has since been awarded by the UN and other humanitarian organizations for his actions, though he humbly insists that he was simply doing his job.

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* Lieutenant-Colonel '''Stanislav Petrov''', who in 1983 was an officer with the missile warning people; the Soviet early warning satellite system picked up a launch (in reality it wasn't actually a launch, but sunlight being reflected off of high attitude clouds) and because he was aware of this and the circumstances (the US, if it were launching a pre-emptive strike, wouldn't just launch 5 missiles from silos in North Dakota, but would probably go all out) he decided to wait a bit before to alert his superiors. He may have prevented a civilization-shattering nuclear exchange; however, he was initially never rewarded nor punished for his actions. The Though Petrov found himself HauledBeforeASenateSubCommittee afterwards, the committee's conclusion was that he had acted sensibly and properly in the situation, but the fact that the early-warning system had malfunctioned in such a fashion would have been a great embarrassment to several Soviet politicians and scientists, so Petrov he was ultimately just quietly transferred to another, less important post, and his story wasn't publicly told until after the fall of the USSR. He has since been awarded by the UN and other humanitarian organizations for his actions, though he humbly insists that he was simply doing his job.
26th Mar '17 3:09:53 PM nombretomado
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* The MoreDakka design philosophy continued with the Kalashnikov family. As stated above, [=AKs=] are extremely reliable and easy to obtain, but the stereotype also holds that they struggle to match TheOnion in accuracy. In reality, the AK-pattern rifles have always reached a fair standard of accuracy. The AKM has an official effective range of 350M[[note]] This is actually rather average for assault rifles[[note]], which is long enough to cover just about any distance encountered in typical infantry small arms engagements. onward had accuracy comparable to and in certain conditions better than[[note]]The AK-74, for example, has a standard effective range of 625 meters, but can have an area target capability of up to 1,000 meters with sight adjustments. The M16 has a standard effective range of around 550-600m, with an area target range of about 800-1,000 meters depending on the configuration.[[/note]] most NATO assault rifles, with the inaccuracy problem referring mostly to the early AK-47 line and its foreign derivatives. Since the early models are usually what people think of when someone mentions "Kalashnikovs," expect armchair experts to constantly state that ''all'' [=AKs=] are inaccurate. Moreover, as reliable as they may be, even AK rifles need be properly maintained and fed with decent quality ammunition to reach their full potential. Much of the AK's reputation for inaccuracy comes from the shoddy manufacturing standards observed in AKs not constructed in Russia and without licensing from Kalashnikov Concern.

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* The MoreDakka design philosophy continued with the Kalashnikov family. As stated above, [=AKs=] are extremely reliable and easy to obtain, but the stereotype also holds that they struggle to match TheOnion ''Website/TheOnion'' in accuracy. In reality, the AK-pattern rifles have always reached a fair standard of accuracy. The AKM has an official effective range of 350M[[note]] This is actually rather average for assault rifles[[note]], which is long enough to cover just about any distance encountered in typical infantry small arms engagements. onward had accuracy comparable to and in certain conditions better than[[note]]The AK-74, for example, has a standard effective range of 625 meters, but can have an area target capability of up to 1,000 meters with sight adjustments. The M16 has a standard effective range of around 550-600m, with an area target range of about 800-1,000 meters depending on the configuration.[[/note]] most NATO assault rifles, with the inaccuracy problem referring mostly to the early AK-47 line and its foreign derivatives. Since the early models are usually what people think of when someone mentions "Kalashnikovs," expect armchair experts to constantly state that ''all'' [=AKs=] are inaccurate. Moreover, as reliable as they may be, even AK rifles need be properly maintained and fed with decent quality ammunition to reach their full potential. Much of the AK's reputation for inaccuracy comes from the shoddy manufacturing standards observed in AKs not constructed in Russia and without licensing from Kalashnikov Concern.
28th Jan '17 8:34:45 PM Synthesis
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** Most Soviet AK rifles aren't Russian. Most of them were locally-produced variants with different names but no functional (and only very minor cosmetic) differences.

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** Most Soviet AK Kalashnikov rifles aren't Russian. Most of them were locally-produced variants with different names but no functional (and only very minor cosmetic) differences.
20th Nov '16 12:50:20 AM Alceister
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* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.

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* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.



** The Soviet Naval Infantry had a different mission than the U.S. Marines. They were intended as shock troops used to seize the beachheads as part of the first landing echelon and once follow-on units from the Soviet Army arrived to take over the battle they would withdraw to spearhead other additional landings. They were considered a sort of elite among the Soviet armed forces, being roughly between the USMC and its Force Recon element. They are not the equivalents of the U.S. Army Rangers. That distinction belongs to VDV below.

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** The Soviet Naval Infantry had a different mission than the U.S. Marines. They were intended as shock troops used to seize the beachheads as part of the first landing echelon and once follow-on units from the Soviet Army arrived to take over the battle they would withdraw to spearhead other additional landings. They were considered a sort of elite among the Soviet armed forces, being roughly between the USMC and its Force Recon element.battalions. They are not the equivalents of the U.S. Army Rangers. That distinction belongs to VDV below.
8th Nov '16 3:18:22 PM aurora369
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* Order of Suvorov- again for exceptional duty. Named after famous general Alexander Suvorov, responsible for the phrase "Train hard, fight easy".

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* Order of Suvorov- again for exceptional duty. Named after famous general Alexander Suvorov, responsible for the phrase "Train hard, fight easy". This is one of the so-called "leaders' orders", which are both named for famous military commanders of the past and awarded to high-ranking officers only.



* Order of Kutuzov- Named after the Marshal who chased Napoleon out of Russia. Notable because it's awarded for "neutralizing enemy tactics and counterattacking effectively." Yes, they have an award ''expressly'' for being a total awesome smart guy who beat bastards at their own games.

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* Order of Kutuzov- Named after the Marshal who chased Napoleon out of Russia. Notable because it's awarded for "neutralizing enemy tactics and counterattacking effectively." Yes, they have an award ''expressly'' for being a total awesome smart guy who beat bastards at their own games. Naturally, it's another one of the leaders' orders.
5th Nov '16 10:43:02 AM GMantis
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** "The one with the rifle shoots. The one without the rifle follows. When the one with the rifle is killed, the one that follows picks up the rifle and fires.". Yep, it's in ''Film/EnemyAtTheGates''. Zaytsev and Pavlichenko (a female Soviet sniper with a similar number of kills to Zaytsev) both used this.
*** Slightly misleading, while it was a minor problem - seriously exaggerated by 'every' relevant military organization [[note]] i.e. the Dukes of the Infantry, Cavalry, and Artillery as well as the General Staff and the Ministry Of War [[/note]] to avoid the critical need to reform the military and fire numerous senior commanders - in [=WW1=] the Soviet Union in [=WW2=] generally had enough rifles. Now ammunition on the other hand...
30th Oct '16 5:36:53 AM Morgenthaler
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The female Soviet officer is cited in TheBaroness and we note also the example of Major Anya Amasova from ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'', although she's actually a KGB agent (and a bad FakeRussian, but let's not quibble here). When the chips were down and the Nazis were at the Gates, the women chipped in. Women flew combat (of special note are a praticularly BadAss group with the awesome name of the Night Witches) and the only two female aces in the world were both Soviet (a fact noted by an American character in ''Literature/RedStormRising'', mentally complaining that she's merely doing ferrying duty while the men were fighting, who then proceeds to become number three). 89 of them became Heroes Of The Soviet Union.

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The female Soviet officer is cited in TheBaroness and we note also the example of Major Anya Amasova from ''Film/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'', although she's actually a KGB agent (and a bad FakeRussian, but let's not quibble here). When the chips were down and the Nazis were at the Gates, the women chipped in. Women flew combat (of special note are a praticularly BadAss badass group with the awesome name of the Night Witches) and the only two female aces in the world were both Soviet (a fact noted by an American character in ''Literature/RedStormRising'', mentally complaining that she's merely doing ferrying duty while the men were fighting, who then proceeds to become number three). 89 of them became Heroes Of The Soviet Union.
21st Oct '16 9:01:40 AM Morgenthaler
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* Yakovlev Yak series: These were the mainstay Soviet fighter aircraft during the Great Patriotic War. Designed by Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev, they served from the beginning to the end of the war, starting with the mediocre Yak-1 to the more advanced Yak-3 and Yak-9. The Yak-3 in particular was so dangerous that the Luftwaffe issued a directive not to engage them below 16,000 feet. After WorldWarII, Yak-9Ps were exported to allies such as NorthKorea and subsequently used in TheKoreanWar.

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* Yakovlev Yak series: These were the mainstay Soviet fighter aircraft during the Great Patriotic War. Designed by Alexander Sergeyevich Yakovlev, they served from the beginning to the end of the war, starting with the mediocre Yak-1 to the more advanced Yak-3 and Yak-9. The Yak-3 in particular was so dangerous that the Luftwaffe issued a directive not to engage them below 16,000 feet. After WorldWarII, UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Yak-9Ps were exported to allies such as NorthKorea UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and subsequently used in TheKoreanWar.UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.
20th Oct '16 9:40:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov:''' truly outstanding tactician of the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar and one of the top-ten most important Soviet commanders of the entire war. Before the war he was a Lieutenant general posted to aid ChiangKaiShek in the Chinese struggle against ImperialJapan, where he oversaw some training and reform of Chinese military forces with Soviet material and technical asssistance. Recalled to the USSR after the German invasion, he was given an Army and ordered to hold the city of Stalingrad itself while Vatutin & co. ruthlessly counter-attacked the German flanks. Zhukov later criticised him for neglecting to mention that his force was less than a third of the force actually holding the Germans up at Stalingrad. Chuikov was assigned to assault various heavily-fortified positions and cities throughout the war, with his post-Stalingrad forces experiencing a more than 100% turnover in the following years. He personally accepted the surrender of the forces defending Berlin. The USA had the theoretical framework in place to understand the significance of his (tactical) service, making him the only Soviet citizen ever to have ever received the second highest decoration in the United States military: the Distinguished Service Cross.
* Colonel '''YuriGagarin''': The first man in space.

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* Marshal of the Soviet Union '''Vasily Ivanovich Chuikov:''' truly outstanding tactician of the UsefulNotes/GreatPatrioticWar and one of the top-ten most important Soviet commanders of the entire war. Before the war he was a Lieutenant general posted to aid ChiangKaiShek UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek in the Chinese struggle against ImperialJapan, UsefulNotes/ImperialJapan, where he oversaw some training and reform of Chinese military forces with Soviet material and technical asssistance. Recalled to the USSR after the German invasion, he was given an Army and ordered to hold the city of Stalingrad itself while Vatutin & co. ruthlessly counter-attacked the German flanks. Zhukov later criticised him for neglecting to mention that his force was less than a third of the force actually holding the Germans up at Stalingrad. Chuikov was assigned to assault various heavily-fortified positions and cities throughout the war, with his post-Stalingrad forces experiencing a more than 100% turnover in the following years. He personally accepted the surrender of the forces defending Berlin. The USA had the theoretical framework in place to understand the significance of his (tactical) service, making him the only Soviet citizen ever to have ever received the second highest decoration in the United States military: the Distinguished Service Cross.
* Colonel '''YuriGagarin''': '''UsefulNotes/YuriGagarin''': The first man in space.
11th Oct '16 6:09:37 PM nombretomado
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* Tu-16 "Badger": The standard Soviet tactical bomber during much of early ColdWar, with two big jet engines and capable of carrying either conventional or nuclear bombs. Phased out of service near the end of the ColdWar in favor of more modern designs, but still in PRC service in form of Chinese-built copies.

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* Tu-16 "Badger": The standard Soviet tactical bomber during much of the early ColdWar, UsefulNotes/ColdWar, with two big jet engines and capable of carrying either conventional or nuclear bombs. Phased out of service near the end of the ColdWar Cold War in favor of more modern designs, but still in PRC service in form of Chinese-built copies.
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