History UsefulNotes / RedsWithRockets

10th Feb '18 10:17:43 AM MadCormorant
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* The only exception to this rule is the [[http://world.guns.ru/assault/chex/sa-vz5-e.html Czech VZ.58]]. It is visually very similar to the Kalashnikov. However, all the similarities other than its calibre are purely external. The VZ.58 is completely different mechanically to the point where the VZ cannot even share magazines with the AK.

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* The only exception to this rule is the [[http://world.guns.ru/assault/chex/sa-vz5-e.html Czech VZ.58]]. It is visually very similar to the Kalashnikov. However, all the similarities other than its calibre are purely external. The VZ.58 is completely different mechanically to the point where the VZ cannot even share magazines with the AK.[[note]]Indeed, it would be fair to say the Vz. 58 has more in common with the American M1/M2 carbines than it does with the AK; of course, this can be turned around to say the AK has more in common with the M1 Garand than it does with the Vz. 58.[[/note]]
8th Feb '18 8:04:32 PM Breakerchase
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By restricting what is required of a basic soldier, the Soviets ensured that any conscripts called from the reserve within five years of demobilization would be quite capable of acting efficiently. They believed that logical and original thought was difficult in face of battle shock, hence men in battle could accomplish only limited and simple tasks which they have learnt to do thoroughly. An operational commander who can count on a reliable execution of a known scheme despite the soldiers' confusion and battle stress would be able to direct and support his tactical forces faster than the command cycle of an improvising enemy.

to:

By restricting what is required of a basic soldier, the Soviets ensured that any conscripts called from the reserve within five years of demobilization would be quite capable of acting efficiently. They believed that logical and original thought was difficult in face of battle shock, hence men in battle could accomplish only limited and simple tasks which they have learnt to do thoroughly. An operational commander who can count on a reliable execution of a known scheme despite the soldiers' confusion and battle stress would be able to direct and support his tactical forces faster than the an enemy with a command cycle of an improvising enemy.
reliant on improvisation.
5th Feb '18 6:08:40 PM nombretomado
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* Lavochkin [=LaGG=]/La series: Another mainstay fighter of the Soviet Air Force, also serving from the beginning until the end of the Great Patriotic War. Like the Yak-1, the [=LaGG-3=] was also mediocre, and was pretty much a [[WalkingDisasterArea Flying Disaster Area]] to boot (it was nicknamed the "Morticians Friend," and pilots joked that its designation stood for "''Lakirovannii Garantirovannii Grob''" (Varnished, Guaranteed Coffin)). This changed when the chief designer decided to refit one with a more powerful radial engine, giving birth to the La-5. Unlike the [=LaGG-3=], this plane was capable of going toe-to-toe with German fighters at low altitude. This finally culminated in the La-7, which entered service in mid-1944, and managed to outperform the now increasingly obsolete planes the Luftwaffe was still fielding up until the end of the war. Postwar, the Lavochkin design bureau brought out the La-9 and La-11, the last piston-engined fighters to enter service with the USSR. Most of these would be exported, like the Yak-9P, to [[UsefulNotes/ChineseWithChopperSupport China]] and [[NorthKoreansWithNodongs North Korea]] during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.

to:

* Lavochkin [=LaGG=]/La series: Another mainstay fighter of the Soviet Air Force, also serving from the beginning until the end of the Great Patriotic War. Like the Yak-1, the [=LaGG-3=] was also mediocre, and was pretty much a [[WalkingDisasterArea Flying Disaster Area]] to boot (it was nicknamed the "Morticians Friend," and pilots joked that its designation stood for "''Lakirovannii Garantirovannii Grob''" (Varnished, Guaranteed Coffin)). This changed when the chief designer decided to refit one with a more powerful radial engine, giving birth to the La-5. Unlike the [=LaGG-3=], this plane was capable of going toe-to-toe with German fighters at low altitude. This finally culminated in the La-7, which entered service in mid-1944, and managed to outperform the now increasingly obsolete planes the Luftwaffe was still fielding up until the end of the war. Postwar, the Lavochkin design bureau brought out the La-9 and La-11, the last piston-engined fighters to enter service with the USSR. Most of these would be exported, like the Yak-9P, to [[UsefulNotes/ChineseWithChopperSupport China]] and [[NorthKoreansWithNodongs [[UsefulNotes/NorthKoreansWithNodongs North Korea]] during UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.
31st Jan '18 5:53:14 PM nombretomado
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Apart from the bomber aircraft mentioned [[Main/{{MnogoNukes}} here]], the Soviets also produced some very advanced fighters, helicopters, and some stand-out tanks and [=APCs=]. What often escapes notice is how small a lot of the cockpits were. Russian military leaders in WWII had the bright idea to sort the army by size, making big men infantry, and letting the little men be tank crew. This meant building the tank smaller, and therefore getting thicker armor for the same weight. This philosophy carried forward over time and into areas as disparate as rocket science. Vostok space capsules were tiny, so the first Russian cosmonauts were also small; UsefulNotes/YuriGagarin was about 5'5", whereas American astronauts Alan Shepard and Neil Armstrong were 5'11" and 5'9" respectively. This is another reason to bring in the ladies (see below), as they started to run short on men small enough to fit.

to:

Apart from the bomber aircraft mentioned [[Main/{{MnogoNukes}} [[UsefulNotes/FromRussiaWithNukes here]], the Soviets also produced some very advanced fighters, helicopters, and some stand-out tanks and [=APCs=]. What often escapes notice is how small a lot of the cockpits were. Russian military leaders in WWII had the bright idea to sort the army by size, making big men infantry, and letting the little men be tank crew. This meant building the tank smaller, and therefore getting thicker armor for the same weight. This philosophy carried forward over time and into areas as disparate as rocket science. Vostok space capsules were tiny, so the first Russian cosmonauts were also small; UsefulNotes/YuriGagarin was about 5'5", whereas American astronauts Alan Shepard and Neil Armstrong were 5'11" and 5'9" respectively. This is another reason to bring in the ladies (see below), as they started to run short on men small enough to fit.
31st Jan '18 5:52:21 PM nombretomado
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* RVSN (Raketnye voyska strategicheskogo naznacheniya - Strategic Rocket Forces) - the people with MnogoNukes, who controlled the USSR's intercontinental ballistic missiles. The name "Rocket" comes from the fact that the Russians, by and large, use the same word (''raketa'') to mean "missile" and "rocket"- which is also why this entry is called "Reds With Rockets."

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* RVSN (Raketnye voyska strategicheskogo naznacheniya - Strategic Rocket Forces) - the people with MnogoNukes, UsefulNotes/MnogoNukes, who controlled the USSR's intercontinental ballistic missiles. The name "Rocket" comes from the fact that the Russians, by and large, use the same word (''raketa'') to mean "missile" and "rocket"- which is also why this entry is called "Reds With Rockets."
28th Jan '18 1:01:30 AM jormis29
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** If you're played a UsefulNotes/WorldWarII game involving the Red Army (but '''not''' ''{{Battlefield 1942}}''), you will almost certainly have "fired" this at some point.

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** If you're played a UsefulNotes/WorldWarII game involving the Red Army (but '''not''' ''{{Battlefield 1942}}''), ''VideoGame/Battlefield1942''), you will almost certainly have "fired" this at some point.
23rd Jan '18 1:22:43 PM Breakerchase
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Soviet emphasis on operational art is also borne in the organization of their forces. Tactical units like divisions are designed to be "lean and mean", with little in the way of rear-area support. The logistical assets are concentrated at the army level and thus give the army commander operational flexibility to regroup the divisions to adapt to a developing situation. If NATO ground forces moved to fight, then the Soviet Army ''fought to move''.

to:

Soviet emphasis on operational art is also borne in the organization of their forces. Tactical units like divisions are designed to be "lean and mean", with little in the way of rear-area support. The logistical assets are concentrated at the army level and thus give the army commander operational flexibility to regroup the divisions to adapt to a developing situation. If NATO ground forces moved move to fight, then the Soviet Army ''fought ''fights to move''.
14th Jan '18 10:00:50 AM nombretomado
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* Lavochkin [=LaGG=]/La series: Another mainstay fighter of the Soviet Air Force, also serving from the beginning until the end of the Great Patriotic War. Like the Yak-1, the [=LaGG-3=] was also mediocre, and was pretty much a [[WalkingDisasterArea Flying Disaster Area]] to boot (it was nicknamed the "Morticians Friend," and pilots joked that its designation stood for "''Lakirovannii Garantirovannii Grob''" (Varnished, Guaranteed Coffin)). This changed when the chief designer decided to refit one with a more powerful radial engine, giving birth to the La-5. Unlike the [=LaGG-3=], this plane was capable of going toe-to-toe with German fighters at low altitude. This finally culminated in the La-7, which entered service in mid-1944, and managed to outperform the now increasingly obsolete planes the Luftwaffe was still fielding up until the end of the war. Postwar, the Lavochkin design bureau brought out the La-9 and La-11, the last piston-engined fighters to enter service with the USSR. Most of these would be exported, like the Yak-9P, to [[UsefulNotes/ChineseWithChopperSupport China]] and [[NorthKoreansWithNodongs North Korea]] during TheKoreanWar.

to:

* Lavochkin [=LaGG=]/La series: Another mainstay fighter of the Soviet Air Force, also serving from the beginning until the end of the Great Patriotic War. Like the Yak-1, the [=LaGG-3=] was also mediocre, and was pretty much a [[WalkingDisasterArea Flying Disaster Area]] to boot (it was nicknamed the "Morticians Friend," and pilots joked that its designation stood for "''Lakirovannii Garantirovannii Grob''" (Varnished, Guaranteed Coffin)). This changed when the chief designer decided to refit one with a more powerful radial engine, giving birth to the La-5. Unlike the [=LaGG-3=], this plane was capable of going toe-to-toe with German fighters at low altitude. This finally culminated in the La-7, which entered service in mid-1944, and managed to outperform the now increasingly obsolete planes the Luftwaffe was still fielding up until the end of the war. Postwar, the Lavochkin design bureau brought out the La-9 and La-11, the last piston-engined fighters to enter service with the USSR. Most of these would be exported, like the Yak-9P, to [[UsefulNotes/ChineseWithChopperSupport China]] and [[NorthKoreansWithNodongs North Korea]] during TheKoreanWar.UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.



* IS tank family: Designed as the successors to the increasingly-obsolete KV series of heavy tanks, and named after the Soviet leader himself, these tanks first saw service in early 1944. From the beginning, they were designed mainly for two purposes: to effectively destroy the newer generation of German tanks, and to storm cities, which it both did extremely well. After the great Patriotic War, some were exported to China and used during TheKoreanWar.

to:

* IS tank family: Designed as the successors to the increasingly-obsolete KV series of heavy tanks, and named after the Soviet leader himself, these tanks first saw service in early 1944. From the beginning, they were designed mainly for two purposes: to effectively destroy the newer generation of German tanks, and to storm cities, which it both did extremely well. After the great Patriotic War, some were exported to China and used during TheKoreanWar.UsefulNotes/TheKoreanWar.
2nd Jan '18 8:04:56 PM Breakerchase
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Soviet emphasis on operational art is also borne in the organization of their forces. Tactical units like divisions are designed to be "lean and mean", with little in the way of rear-area support. The logistical assets are concentrated at the army level and thus give the army commander operational flexibility to regroup the divisions to adapt to a developing situation.

to:

Soviet emphasis on operational art is also borne in the organization of their forces. Tactical units like divisions are designed to be "lean and mean", with little in the way of rear-area support. The logistical assets are concentrated at the army level and thus give the army commander operational flexibility to regroup the divisions to adapt to a developing situation.
situation. If NATO ground forces moved to fight, then the Soviet Army ''fought to move''.
2nd Jan '18 11:45:59 AM Breakerchase
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** The VVS was divided into the Long Range Aviation which was the actual organization responsible for the air-delivered nuclear weaponry, and the Frontal Aviation organized to serve as the tactical air arm of fronts. Long Range Aviation was disbanded in 1980 and its assets were divided between five strategic air armies.
* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.

to:

** The VVS was divided into the Long Range Aviation which was the actual organization responsible for the air-delivered nuclear weaponry, and the Frontal Aviation organized to serve as the tactical air arm of fronts.the army. Long Range Aviation was disbanded in 1980 and its assets were divided between five strategic air armies.
* Soviet Navy (name in Russian, Voyenno-morskoy flot SSSR - Naval-Military Forces of the USSR) AKA The Red Fleet - The people with the many submarines and ships and many nuclear weapons that went with them, including four VTOL aircraft carriers with Yak-38 "Forger". Acquired a full-size carrier before the end of the USSR. A second ended up unfinished and sold to China (who appear to be using it to prepare for a carrier of their own), (now named ''Liaoning''), while another was scrapped at 40% complete. Also had the Naval Infantry, roughly the Soviet equivalent of the Marine Corps.
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