History UsefulNotes / Quebec

20th Sep '16 8:33:32 AM Morgenthaler
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In 1837, the provinces in Lower and Upper Canada exploded in rebellion. The Patriotes movement, largely led by Francophones like Louis-Joseph Papineau and Anglophone Robert Nelson, almost swept Canada. While it failed, it did make a deep imprint in Quebec history. The result is that Quebec, now called Canada East as it was merged in 1840 into the Province of Canada, was to be given self-government. Quebec then became one of the founding provinces of Canada in 1867, and tried to accommodate to the English-speaking provinces while maintaining its French identity. Montreal became Canada's largest city (it has since been overtaken by Toronto) and its center of industry. However, many French-speakers resented the economic power of the English. Furthermore, the decision by Ottawa to send troops for the BoerWar had further angered Quebecers. Resistance to the draft was common in Quebec during the [[WorldWarI two world]] [[WorldWarII wars]]. Despite this, many Quebec people distinguished themselves in combat.

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In 1837, the provinces in Lower and Upper Canada exploded in rebellion. The Patriotes movement, largely led by Francophones like Louis-Joseph Papineau and Anglophone Robert Nelson, almost swept Canada. While it failed, it did make a deep imprint in Quebec history. The result is that Quebec, now called Canada East as it was merged in 1840 into the Province of Canada, was to be given self-government. Quebec then became one of the founding provinces of Canada in 1867, and tried to accommodate to the English-speaking provinces while maintaining its French identity. Montreal became Canada's largest city (it has since been overtaken by Toronto) and its center of industry. However, many French-speakers resented the economic power of the English. Furthermore, the decision by Ottawa to send troops for the BoerWar had further angered Quebecers. Resistance to the draft was common in Quebec during the [[WorldWarI [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI two world]] [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII wars]]. Despite this, many Quebec people distinguished themselves in combat.
11th Sep '16 1:57:10 PM jamespolk
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Added DiffLines:


!!Animation Set in Quebec
* WesternAnimation/{{Crac}}
21st Jun '16 7:42:44 PM gewunomox
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* LeonardCohen, singer, songwriter, poet.

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* LeonardCohen, Music/LeonardCohen, singer, songwriter, poet.
16th Jun '15 8:37:47 AM Tully
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In 1837, the provinces in Lower and Upper Canada exploded in rebellion. The Patriotes movement, largely led by Francophones like Louis-Joseph Papineau and Anglophone Robert Nelson, almost swept Canada. While it failed, it did make a deep imprint in Quebec history. The result is that Quebec, now called Canada East as it was merged in 1840 into the Province of Canada, was to be given self-government. Quebec then became one of the founding provinces of Canada in 1867, and tried to accommodate to the English-speaking provinces while maintaining its French identity. Montreal became Canada's largest city (it has since been overtaken by Toronto) and its center of industry. However, many French-speakers resented the economic power of the English. Furthermore, the decision by Ottawa to send troops for the BoerWar had further angered Quebecers. Resistance to the draft was common in Quebec during the [[WorldWarI two world]] [[WorldWarII wars]]. Despite this, many Quebec people both distinguished themselves in combat.

to:

In 1837, the provinces in Lower and Upper Canada exploded in rebellion. The Patriotes movement, largely led by Francophones like Louis-Joseph Papineau and Anglophone Robert Nelson, almost swept Canada. While it failed, it did make a deep imprint in Quebec history. The result is that Quebec, now called Canada East as it was merged in 1840 into the Province of Canada, was to be given self-government. Quebec then became one of the founding provinces of Canada in 1867, and tried to accommodate to the English-speaking provinces while maintaining its French identity. Montreal became Canada's largest city (it has since been overtaken by Toronto) and its center of industry. However, many French-speakers resented the economic power of the English. Furthermore, the decision by Ottawa to send troops for the BoerWar had further angered Quebecers. Resistance to the draft was common in Quebec during the [[WorldWarI two world]] [[WorldWarII wars]]. Despite this, many Quebec people both distinguished themselves in combat.



There are some who thought rebellion and secession under a Communist state was the only option to preserve Quebec identity, and the Front de libération du Québec tried to do just that, targeting Anglophone institutions and what they saw as pro-Ottawa Francophones. This led to the October Crisis in 1970 where FLQ terrorists kidnapped a British trade commissioner and a Quebec government official. The latter one was later killed; the British diplomat was freed by the Canadian government in exchange for the FLQ members involved to leave for Cuba. Trudeau--by this point Prime Minister and a vehement federalist (opponent of secession) despite being a Francophone--later invoked the controversial War Measures Act and arrested suspected militant Quebec separatists. The violence of the FLQ later cost them popular support, while the arbitrary emprisonnement of activist, journalist and even poet under the War Measures Act is still remembered.

to:

There are some who thought rebellion and secession under a Communist state was the only option to preserve Quebec identity, and the Front de libération du Québec tried to do just that, targeting Anglophone institutions and what they saw as pro-Ottawa Francophones. This led to the October Crisis in 1970 where FLQ terrorists kidnapped a British trade commissioner and a Quebec government official. The latter one was later killed; the British diplomat was freed by the Canadian government in exchange for the FLQ members involved to leave for Cuba. Trudeau--by this point Prime Minister and a vehement federalist (opponent of secession) despite being a Francophone--later invoked the controversial War Measures Act and arrested suspected militant Quebec separatists. The violence of the FLQ later cost them popular support, while the arbitrary emprisonnement imprisonment of activist, journalist activists, journalists and even poet poets under the War Measures Act is still remembered.
22nd Apr '15 11:40:12 PM jormis29
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New France was a pawn in the SevenYearsWar between the French and English. The French are losing almost on the start, with a lower population base than those of the British Thirteen Colonies, but they held on until 1763, when the British defeated the French in the Plains of Abraham, thus ending New France.

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New France was a pawn in the SevenYearsWar UsefulNotes/SevenYearsWar between the French and English. The French are losing almost on the start, with a lower population base than those of the British Thirteen Colonies, but they held on until 1763, when the British defeated the French in the Plains of Abraham, thus ending New France.
19th Mar '15 2:17:10 AM RallyBot2
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* Main/HockeyNightInCanada (When the Canadiens are playing home)
19th Dec '14 9:16:05 PM TheFarnell
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In 1603, Samuel de Champlain founded Quebec City to make it the base of French power in North America. With alliance between Huron and Algonquin tribes, the French secured the territory. In exchange of furs, the French gave the First Nations their alcohol, guns, and clothing, and also tried to convert them to Catholicism with various degree of success. Later, the French kings introduced the seigneural system where French immigrants will till a part of land for their landlords, called the seigneurs. These Frenchmen, later to be known as Canadiens, will later also expand to what is today Ontario, Manitoba, and even the territories in the Mississippi River in the United States.

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In 1603, 1608, Samuel de Champlain founded Quebec City to make it the base of French power in North America. With alliance between Huron and Algonquin tribes, the French secured the territory. In exchange of furs, the French gave the First Nations their alcohol, guns, and clothing, and also tried to convert them to Catholicism with various degree of success. Later, the French kings introduced the seigneural system where French immigrants will till a part of land for their landlords, called the seigneurs. These Frenchmen, later to be known as Canadiens, will later also expand to what is today Ontario, Manitoba, and even the territories in the Mississippi River in the United States.
27th Nov '14 9:25:37 PM enteka
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There are some who thought rebellion and secession under a Communist state was the only option to preserve Quebec identity, and the Front de libération du Québec tried to do just that, targeting Anglophone institutions and what they saw as pro-Ottawa Francophones. This led to the October Crisis in 1970 where FLQ terrorists kidnapped a British trade commissioner and a Quebec government official. The latter one was later killed; the British diplomat was freed by the Canadian government in exchange for the FLQ members involved to leave for Cuba. Trudeau--by this point Prime Minister and a vehement federalist (opponent of secession) despite being a Francophone--later invoked the controversial War Measures Act and arrested suspected militant Quebec separatists. The violence of the FLQ later cost them popular support.

On the other hand, the Parti Quebecois (non-violent Quebec separatists) gained popularity under René Lévesque and won a victory in the 1976 provincial election. They passed the Charter of the French Language (also known as "Bill 101") to make French the province's only official language and impose some restrictions on the use of English in schools and workplaces. They also held a referendum on whether to make Quebec "sovereign" (read: independent) in 1980, only for it to be defeated by a landslide. Attempts by the Quebec government to gain more provincial rights and leverage resulted in the new 1982 Canadian constitution, which was not ratified in Quebec. In 1987, the Meech Lake Accord was held by Canadian premiers to try to patch up differences, but failed utterly in the early 1990s. Later, the Parti Quebecois held a second sovereignty referendum in 1995. This time, the "no" side only won by a slim margin. The premier of Quebec blamed it on "money and ethnic votes" that exacerbated the matter. Since then, actual support for sovereignty has declined. Quebec is trying to find its place in Canadian and world society, becoming a leader in information technology, energy, and aerospace.

to:

There are some who thought rebellion and secession under a Communist state was the only option to preserve Quebec identity, and the Front de libération du Québec tried to do just that, targeting Anglophone institutions and what they saw as pro-Ottawa Francophones. This led to the October Crisis in 1970 where FLQ terrorists kidnapped a British trade commissioner and a Quebec government official. The latter one was later killed; the British diplomat was freed by the Canadian government in exchange for the FLQ members involved to leave for Cuba. Trudeau--by this point Prime Minister and a vehement federalist (opponent of secession) despite being a Francophone--later invoked the controversial War Measures Act and arrested suspected militant Quebec separatists. The violence of the FLQ later cost them popular support.

support, while the arbitrary emprisonnement of activist, journalist and even poet under the War Measures Act is still remembered.

On the other hand, the Parti Quebecois (non-violent Quebec separatists) gained popularity under René Lévesque and won a victory in the 1976 provincial election. They passed the Charter of the French Language (also known as "Bill 101") to make French the province's only official language and impose some restrictions on the use of English in schools and workplaces. They also held a referendum on whether to make Quebec "sovereign" (read: independent) in 1980, only for it to be defeated by a landslide. Attempts by the Quebec government to gain more provincial rights and leverage resulted in the new 1982 Canadian constitution, which was not ratified in Quebec. In 1987, the Meech Lake Accord was held by Canadian premiers to try to patch up differences, but failed utterly in the early 1990s. Later, the Parti Quebecois held a second sovereignty referendum in 1995. This time, the "no" side only won by a slim margin. The premier of Quebec blamed it on "money and ethnic votes" that exacerbated the matter. Since then, actual support for sovereignty has declined.declined, while at the same time the vast majority of inhabitant of the province consider themselves more Quebecer than Canadian. Quebec is trying to find its place in Canadian and world society, becoming a leader in information technology, energy, and aerospace.
2nd Oct '14 3:02:55 AM Juicehead_Baby
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->''It saddens me to hear that the best and brightest of Quebec's anglophones have left. [[BackhandedCompliment But you are still here]]!''

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->''It saddens me to hear that the best and brightest ->''The people of Quebec's anglophones have left. [[BackhandedCompliment But you Quebec are still here]]!''having a lot of stress\\
Even Gilles Vigneault has changed his name to Gilles Vign-[[BalkanizeMe yes]]''
2nd Oct '14 2:58:59 AM Juicehead_Baby
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->''It saddens me to hear that the best and brightest of Quebec's anglophones have left. [[BackhandedCompliment But you are still here]]!''
-->-- BowserAndBlue, intro to ''Faute du Federal''
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