History UsefulNotes / Python

5th Apr '16 5:52:26 AM NightShade96
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Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as UsefulNotes/{{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a [[UsefulNotes/BitmapsSpritesAndTextures sprite]] is, and how to move it around.

to:

Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as UsefulNotes/{{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, [=OpenGL=], which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a [[UsefulNotes/BitmapsSpritesAndTextures sprite]] is, and how to move it around.
12th Dec '15 12:34:46 PM MarkLungo
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Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as {{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a [[UsefulNotes/BitmapsSpritesAndTextures sprite]] is, and how to move it around.

to:

Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as {{Scripting UsefulNotes/{{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a [[UsefulNotes/BitmapsSpritesAndTextures sprite]] is, and how to move it around.



Python is used as a ScriptingLanguage by:

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Python is used as a ScriptingLanguage UsefulNotes/ScriptingLanguage by:
16th Oct '15 8:45:43 AM Rosuav
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Note that currently the Python Software Foundation maintains two very different versions of Python; the 2.7.x branch is backward compatible with older code and would be better for old-school Python programmers who don't want to update their code, while the 3.x branch made several major changes to the language that are often incompatible with older code. If you're new to the language (or are new to programming in general and chose Python as a first language), looking into version 3 would be a good idea since code for it will likely be standard in the future. Fortunately, it isn't hard to find books that cover both; for example, the popular computer book publisher O'Reilly Media currently covers both branches in its books, ''Learning Python'' (which is intended for newcomers to the language) and ''Programming Python'' (which is aimed at more advanced Python programmers).

to:

Note that currently the Python Software Foundation maintains two very different versions of Python; the 2.7.x branch is backward compatible with older code and would be better for old-school Python programmers who don't want to update their code, while the 3.x branch made several major changes to the language that are often incompatible with older code. If you're new to the language (or are new to programming in general and chose Python as a first language), looking into version 3 would be a good idea since code for is recommended, as it will likely be standard has an increasing number of features not present in the future.2.7. Fortunately, it isn't hard to find books that cover both; for example, the popular computer book publisher O'Reilly Media currently covers both branches in its books, ''Learning Python'' (which is intended for newcomers to the language) and ''Programming Python'' (which is aimed at more advanced Python programmers).
14th Jul '15 11:47:55 AM Koveras
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* [=RenPy=] is for VisualNovel games.

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* [=RenPy=] UsefulNotes/RenPy is for VisualNovel games.
19th May '15 5:46:49 PM MarkLungo
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Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as {{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a {{sprite}} is, and how to move it around.

to:

Traditionally, interpreted programming languages are used as {{Scripting Language}}s, and not to develop whole applications. Partly, this is because the process of interpreting code is slower than the process of running code that's already been compiled into machine language. This is much less true than it once was, because after running a program once, Python stores it in "bytecode" that's been almost, but not quite, compiled into machine code. But for the most part, it's because interpreted programming languages have lacked access to the ''libraries'' that compiled programming languages had. Libraries like, say, OpenGL, which allows C++ programmers to render fancy graphics without first telling the computer what a {{sprite}} [[UsefulNotes/BitmapsSpritesAndTextures sprite]] is, and how to move it around.



* BridgeCommander
* Battlefield2
* VideoGame/{{Civilization}} IV

to:

* BridgeCommander
''VideoGame/BridgeCommander''
* Battlefield2
''VideoGame/{{Battlefield}} 2''
* VideoGame/{{Civilization}} IV''VideoGame/{{Civilization}} IV''



* EveOnline
* FreedomForce

to:

* EveOnline
''VideoGame/EveOnline''
* FreedomForce''VideoGame/FreedomForce''



* JewelQuest5
* VideoGame/SeveranceBladeOfDarkness
* TheTempleOfElementalEvil
* VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines
* VideoGame/VegaStrike

to:

* JewelQuest5
''VideoGame/JewelQuest 5''
* VideoGame/SeveranceBladeOfDarkness
''VideoGame/SeveranceBladeOfDarkness''
* TheTempleOfElementalEvil
''VideoGame/TheTempleOfElementalEvil''
* VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines
''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines''
* VideoGame/VegaStrike''VideoGame/VegaStrike''



And a rather good, freely available instructional book: [[http://greenteapress.com/thinkpython/ Python for Software Design: How to Think like a Computer Scientist]].

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And a rather good, freely available instructional book: [[http://greenteapress.com/thinkpython/ Python for Software Design: How to Think like a Computer Scientist]].Scientist]].
----
23rd Jun '14 11:35:59 PM SpiderRider3
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Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to [[UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows Windows]] and MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', [[IThoughtItMeant not the snake]].

to:

Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to [[UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows Windows]] and MacOS UsefulNotes/MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', [[IThoughtItMeant not the snake]].
23rd Jun '14 6:34:52 PM EarlOfSandvich
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Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to {{Windows}} and MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', [[IThoughtItMeant not the snake]].

to:

Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to {{Windows}} [[UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows Windows]] and MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', [[IThoughtItMeant not the snake]].
17th May '14 9:29:57 PM maddthesane
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* VideoGame/{{Lugaru}}
9th Apr '14 11:01:38 AM mccrimmonmd
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Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to {{Windows}} and MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus''.

to:

Python is an interpreted programming language. That means its programs are text files; to execute a Python program, you run a program called an interpreter that reads a text file full of Python code, and does what it says, and as long as an interpreter is available for one's platform of choice (UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-based or Unix-like operating systems typically come with one and the developers maintain ports to {{Windows}} and MacOS X) the operating system and architecture are largely irrelevant since compilation isn't required. The name is a reference to ''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus''.
''Series/MontyPythonsFlyingCircus'', [[IThoughtItMeant not the snake]].
28th Jun '13 9:18:13 AM PancticeSquadCutterback
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* FretsOnFire

to:

* FretsOnFire''VideoGame/FretsOnFire''
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