History UsefulNotes / PrehistoricLifePrimitiveOrnithischians

24th Jan '15 7:46:18 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' and (less-frequently) ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "''Fabrosaurus''".

to:

Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' ''Lesothosaurus'', and (less-frequently) ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "''Fabrosaurus''".
24th Jan '15 7:46:03 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' & ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "''Fabrosaurus''".

to:

Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' & and (less-frequently) ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "''Fabrosaurus''".
17th Jan '14 1:44:34 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size and with no armor like the latter. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus]]'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.

to:

Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size and with no armor like the latter. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''''[[http://en.''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus]]'' org/wiki/Emausaurus Emausaurus]]'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.
17th Jan '14 1:43:41 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus]]'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.

to:

Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size.size and with no armor like the latter. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus]]'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.
17th Jan '14 1:41:58 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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'''Primitive technological guys:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutellosaurus Scutellosaurus]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus Emausaurus]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisanosaurus Pisanosaurus]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]''

to:

'''Primitive technological guys:''' '''Armor or not-armor?:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutellosaurus Scutellosaurus]]'', Scutellosaurus]]'' & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus Emausaurus]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisanosaurus Pisanosaurus]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]''
Pisanosaurus]]''



Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''Technosaurus'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.

to:

Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: ''Technosaurus'' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Technosaurus Technosaurus]]'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' ''''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emausaurus]]'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.



'''Two great little discoveries:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eocursor Eocursor]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianyulong Tianyulong]]''

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'''Two great little discoveries:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eocursor Eocursor]]'' and & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tianyulong Tianyulong]]''
17th Jan '14 1:39:59 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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With this dentition, ''Heterodontosaurus'' was probably a mostly herbivorous omnivore, eating insects other than vegetation, while the tusks could have been used for display and/or competiton. Some scientists suspect only males did have the large canines, but there is no evidence. Other close relatives, like ''Abrictosaurus'' (see below), are devoid of tusks: their skull could either pertain to females, or, more probably, to totally tusk-less species.

to:

With this dentition, ''Heterodontosaurus'' was probably a mostly herbivorous omnivore, eating insects other than vegetation, while the tusks could have been used for display and/or competiton. Some scientists suspect only males did have the large canines, but there is no evidence. Other close relatives, like ''Abrictosaurus'' (see below), ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrictosaurus Abrictosaurus]]'', are devoid of tusks: their skull could either pertain to females, or, more probably, to totally tusk-less species.
species.

''Heterodontosaurus'' is the prototype of its own ornithischian family, Heterodontosaurids. Once thought ornithopods or ancient relatives of ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs, now they are regarded as very basal ornithischians. Despite their primitiveness, heterodontosaurs not only flourished in the Early Jurassic, but also managed to survive until the Late Jurassic and even the Early Cretaceous, with species such as the poorly-known ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinodon Echinodon]]'' from England. Even smaller than ''Heterodontosaurus'' and with small tusks only in the upper jaws, ''Echinodon'' is known to science since the middle XIX century, but its classification as a heterodontosaurian has been confirmed only after the discovery of the namesake of the group.

The same thing happened to ''Geranosaurus'' and ''Lycorhinus'', both found in South Africa at the start of the XX century, and both showing prominent tusks (the latter, because of this, was initially believed a non-dinosaurian therapsid like ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Cynognathus]]''). Also South-African and Early-Jurassic, ''Abrictosaurus'' was found about in the same period of ''Heterodontosaurus''; its name, "awake lizard", is actually ironical, because it was hypothized that this animal underwent long "hibernations" to survive the harsh desertical conditions -- the same hyp was made about another contemporary basal ornithischian, ''Lesothosaurus'' (see below).

Some important dinosaur discoveries that have been made since the 2009 regard the heterodontosaurian Group. For example, ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruitadens Fruitadens]]'' lived in the Late Jurassic North America alongside the famous jurassic StockDinosaurs; in opposite to ''Echinodon'', ''Fruitadens'' has tusks only in its lower jaw. With only two feet of length (the same size of ''Microraptor''), ''Fruitadens'' and ''Echinodon'' are among the smallest bird-hipped dinosaurs ever discovered -- if the smallest. But the most extraordinary recent discovery about the "boar-birds" is another: see at the bottom of the page.



'''Tusks or not Tusks?:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrictosaurus Abrictosaurus]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinodon Echinodon]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruitadens Fruitadens]]''

''Heterodontosaurus'' is the prototype of its own ornithischian family, Heterodontosaurids. Once thought ornithopods or ancient relatives of ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs, now they are regarded as very basal ornithischians. Despite their primitiveness, heterodontosaurs not only flourished in the Early Jurassic, but also managed to survive until the Late Jurassic and even the Early Cretaceous, with species such as the poorly-known ''Echinodon'' from England. Even smaller than ''Heterodontosaurus'' and with small tusks only in the upper jaws, ''Echinodon'' is known to science since the middle XIX century, but its classification as a heterodontosaurian has been confirmed only after the discovery of the namesake of the group.

The same thing happened to ''Geranosaurus'' and ''Lycorhinus'', both found in South Africa at the start of the XX century, and both showing prominent tusks (the latter, because of this, was initially believed a non-dinosaurian therapsid like ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Cynognathus]]''). Also South-African and Early-Jurassic, ''Abrictosaurus'' was found about in the same period of ''Heterodontosaurus''; its name, "awake lizard", is actually ironical, because it was hypothized that this animal underwent long "hibernations" to survive the harsh desertical conditions -- the same hyp was made about another contemporary basal ornithischian, ''Lesothosaurus'' (see below).

Some important dinosaur discoveries that have been made since the 2009 regard the heterodontosaurian Group. For example, ''Fruitadens'' lived in the Late Jurassic North America alongside the famous jurassic StockDinosaurs; in opposite to ''Echinodon'', ''Fruitadens'' has tusks only in its lower jaw. With only two feet of length (the same size of ''Microraptor''), ''Fruitadens'' and ''Echinodon'' are among the smallest bird-hipped dinosaurs ever discovered -- if the smallest. But the most extraordinary recent discovery about the "boar-birds" is another: see at the bottom of the page.

----

'''Size doesn't matter (just for once):''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesothosaurus Lesothosaurus]]'' and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabrosaurus Fabrosaurus]]''

to:

'''Tusks or not Tusks?:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abrictosaurus Abrictosaurus]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echinodon Echinodon]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fruitadens Fruitadens]]''

''Heterodontosaurus'' is the prototype of its own ornithischian family, Heterodontosaurids. Once thought ornithopods or ancient relatives of ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs, now they are regarded as very basal ornithischians. Despite their primitiveness, heterodontosaurs not only flourished in the Early Jurassic, but also managed to survive until the Late Jurassic and even the Early Cretaceous, with species such as the poorly-known ''Echinodon'' from England. Even smaller than ''Heterodontosaurus'' and with small tusks only in the upper jaws, ''Echinodon'' is known to science since the middle XIX century, but its classification as a heterodontosaurian has been confirmed only after the discovery of the namesake of the group.

The same thing happened to ''Geranosaurus'' and ''Lycorhinus'', both found in South Africa at the start of the XX century, and both showing prominent tusks (the latter, because of this, was initially believed a non-dinosaurian therapsid like ''[[UsefulNotes/PrehistoricLifeNonDinosaurianReptiles Cynognathus]]''). Also South-African and Early-Jurassic, ''Abrictosaurus'' was found about in the same period of ''Heterodontosaurus''; its name, "awake lizard", is actually ironical, because it was hypothized that this animal underwent long "hibernations" to survive the harsh desertical conditions -- the same hyp was made about another contemporary basal ornithischian, ''Lesothosaurus'' (see below).

Some important dinosaur discoveries that have been made since the 2009 regard the heterodontosaurian Group. For example, ''Fruitadens'' lived in the Late Jurassic North America alongside the famous jurassic StockDinosaurs; in opposite to ''Echinodon'', ''Fruitadens'' has tusks only in its lower jaw. With only two feet of length (the same size of ''Microraptor''), ''Fruitadens'' and ''Echinodon'' are among the smallest bird-hipped dinosaurs ever discovered -- if the smallest. But the most extraordinary recent discovery about the "boar-birds" is another: see at the bottom of the page.

----

'''Size doesn't matter (just for once):''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lesothosaurus Lesothosaurus]]'' and & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fabrosaurus Fabrosaurus]]''
9th Jan '14 10:30:25 AM Splonkadumpocus
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Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: "Technosaurus" from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.

to:

Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: "Technosaurus" ''Technosaurus'' from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.
29th Dec '13 3:45:14 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' & ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "Fabrosaurus".

to:

Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' & ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "Fabrosaurus"."''Fabrosaurus''".
29th Dec '13 3:44:54 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians like ''Lesothosaurus'' and ''Scutellosaurus'' which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs.

to:

Here we've listed the Heterodontosaurians and other basal ornithischians like ''Lesothosaurus'' and ''Scutellosaurus'' which do not belong to any of the main groups of bird-hipped dinosaurs.dinosaurs. ''Heterodontosaurus'', ''Lesothosaurus'' & ''Scutellosaurus'' are the most common in dino-books; in older works, however, you'll more frequently read the name "Fabrosaurus".
28th Dec '13 4:43:12 PM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: "Technosaurus" from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' (believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'') also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU.

to:

Also found in the last decades of the XX century, the Argentinian ''Pisanosaurus'' lived with the alleged “first theropods" ''Eoraptor'' and ''Herrerasaurus'', and still remains the most ancient ornithischian known to science. Sadly, is known only from one incomplete fossil, but was arguably similar to ''Lesothosaurus'' in shape and size. One curious thing is that some Triassic non-dinosaurian archosaurs were once considered basal ornithischians as well: "Technosaurus" from Texas is one example, sometimes mentioned as "the most ancient North American ornithischian". Its evocative name comes from the Texas Tech University; interestingly, another basal ornithischian, the European ''Emausaurus'' (believed (known only from a skull) also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU. It is usually believed in the middle between ''Scutellosaurus'' and ''Scelidosaurus'') also derives its name from an university, the German EMAU.
''Scelidosaurus'', but some think it's a very primitive stegosaurian.
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