History UsefulNotes / PrehistoricLifeHadrosaurPredecessors

15th Jan '16 3:05:30 PM Anddrix
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when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WesternAnimation/WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]].
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when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WesternAnimation/WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]]. interest.
10th Aug '15 1:16:10 PM Michal
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The part about Leaellynasaura's tail is based on an SVP presentation from 2010, and needs updating. Herne's dissertation does indicate Leaellynasaura might be an ornithopod after all.
Similar but smaller than ''Iguanodon'' (about the same size of ''Camptosaurus'', ''Ouranosaurus'' or ''Tenontosaurus''), ''Muttaburrasaurus'' is easy to tell apart from its relatives thanks to its prominent nose, similar to other ornithopods but more bulbous. We don't know if it had thumbspikes: being more basal than the almost-spikeless ''Camptosaurus'', this is unlikely, but it is traditionally shown with them in drawings. Found in 1989, ''Leaellynasaura'' was a tiny (less than 1 m long) bipedal animal similar to ''Hypsilophodon'', but with the possibility of having a tail 3 times longer that its own body. Once considered an “hypsilophodontian”, even its ornithopod status is disputed today, and is now generally regarded as a more basal ornithischian.
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Similar but smaller than ''Iguanodon'' (about the same size of ''Camptosaurus'', ''Ouranosaurus'' or ''Tenontosaurus''), ''Muttaburrasaurus'' is easy to tell apart from its relatives thanks to its prominent nose, similar to other ornithopods but more bulbous. We don't know if it had thumbspikes: being more basal than the almost-spikeless ''Camptosaurus'', this is unlikely, but it is traditionally shown with them in drawings. Found in 1989, ''Leaellynasaura'' was a tiny (less than 1 m long) bipedal animal similar to ''Hypsilophodon'', but with the possibility of having a tail 3 times longer that its own body.''Hypsilophodon''. Once considered an “hypsilophodontian”, even its ornithopod status is disputed today, and is now generally regarded as a more basal ornithischian. The fossil material attributed to ''Leaellynasaura'' [[http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:320937 is currently being revised]], and until that revision is finished and published there is not much that can be said with certainty about this particular dinosaur. Fossils discovered in Australia incidate presence of a small Early Cretaceous ornithischian with tail 3 times longer that its own body; whether this is the same taxon as ''Leaellynasaura'' or not remains to be seen.
29th Jul '15 2:12:54 PM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]].
to:
when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Series/WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''.''WesternAnimation/WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]].
4th Jul '15 7:55:25 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
to:
Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); Group); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories. stories. ''[[StockDinosaursTrueDinosaurs Hypsilophodon]]'', the traditional prototype of the eponymous "hypsilophodonts" (small/slender non-hadrosaurian ornithopods), is classically countered against ''Iguanodon'', which in turn is the classic prototype of the the “iguanodonts” (large/heavy non-hadrosaurian ornithopods). [[ScienceMarchesOn Now scientists have found]] “hypsilophodonts” is an artificial assemblage including the most basal ornithopods, while “iguanodonts” now indicates a natural group including not only the most ''Iguanodon''-like animals but also duckbills, pre-duckbills and also some traditional “hypsilophodontians” (see below).

'''When dinosaurs went down trees:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypsilophodon Hypsilophodon]]'' When we think about small bipedal dinosaurs, our mind authomatically comes to guys like the “raptors”, the “compies”, or the ornithomimids. But there were also several ornithopods which shared an analogue body-shape with the latter; even though they are usually ignored by film-makers. The most iconic of them has always been ''Hypsilophodon''. One of the first dinosaurs discovered (middle XIX century), lived in Europe 130-125 million years ago together with its gigantic relative ''Iguanodon'', and was originally considered the latter’s juvenile specimen. Unusually for such a small animal, dozens complete individuals have been found, and this also explains its historical role as the stock small ornithopod. Even though most remains come from England (especially the Isle of Wight), some uncertain remains come from North America. A very small dinosaur, 2 m long or less, the size of a dog, ''Hypsilophodon'' is easily distinguishable from theropods by its horny beak on the lower jaw, small mouth-opening typical of ornithischians, large grinding teeth at the bottom of the mouth hidden by cheeks in the living animal, hands with five digits (coelurosaurs never have more than three fingers), and a more round belly to contain the typical large gut of a herbivore. ''Hypsilophodon'' is nicknamed “the gazelle dinosaur”. The comparison works very well: it was a graceful, harmless, wide-eyed biped that escaped predators thanks to its agile legs well adapted for high-speed runs: it was certainly one of the fastest-running dinosaurs. If alive today, it would probably appear one of the cutest-looking dinos, maybe even suitable as a good [[TeamPet household pet]]. But before the 1970s, ''Hypsilophodon'' used to be depicted as a tree-climbing animal, vaguely similar to a large, long-legged, spike-less iguana, and long depicted in this way in books, 3D models, and perhaps even fiction. Few other dinosaurs have had such a great ScienceMarchesOn change during their story. [[note]]While ''Iguanodon'' was often reconstruted using a classical kangaroo as a model, ''Hypsilophodon'' was often compared with the "tree-kangaroo", a small kangaroo living in the canopy of the forests of New Guinea and northern Australia.[[/note]] In the [[SeldomSeenSpecies rare event]] this little critter is portrayed in the media, expect it to be portrayed as the dinosaurian RedShirt, little more than a bite-sized snacklet for the big, nasty carnivores. The traditional prototype of the eponymous "hypsilophodonts" (small/slender non-hadrosaurian ornithopods), ''Hypsilophodon'' is classically countered against ''Iguanodon'', which in turn is the classic prototype of the the “iguanodonts” (large/heavy non-hadrosaurian ornithopods). [[ScienceMarchesOn Now scientists have found]] “hypsilophodonts” is an artificial assemblage including the most basal ornithopods, while “iguanodonts” now indicates a natural group including not only the most ''Iguanodon''-like animals but also duckbills, pre-duckbills and also some traditional “hypsilophodontians” (see below). ----
3rd Jul '15 7:02:14 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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'''Fighter for Survival or just Stock Fodder?:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenontosaurus Tenontosaurus]]''
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'''Fighter for Survival or just Stock Fodder?:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenontosaurus Tenontosaurus]]''

'''Land Down Under dinosaurs:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaellynasaura Leaellynasaura]]'' & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muttaburrasaurus Muttaburrasaurus]]''
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'''Land '''Dinosaurs Down Under dinosaurs:''' Under:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaellynasaura Leaellynasaura]]'' & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muttaburrasaurus Muttaburrasaurus]]''
2nd Jul '15 7:26:02 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
to:
Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.

'''The Antelope of the Jurassic:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camptosaurus Camptosaurus]]''
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'''The Antelope Wildebeest of the Jurassic:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camptosaurus Camptosaurus]]''

On the other hand, the other well-known Late Jurassic ornithopod, ''Dryosaurus'' (see below), despite being even less-conspicuous than ''Camptosaurus'', has received a better treatment showing up in all the three documentaries above, though with very minor roles (in one case, it serves only to give a prey to ''Allosaurus'').
to:
On the other hand, the other well-known Late Jurassic ornithopod, ''Dryosaurus'' (see below), despite being even less-conspicuous than ''Camptosaurus'', has received a better treatment showing up in all the three documentaries above, though with very minor roles (in one case, it serves only to give a prey to ''Allosaurus'').
1st Jul '15 9:11:37 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both small "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
to:
Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both small "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
1st Jul '15 9:10:41 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though certainly in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the Australian "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
to:
Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though certainly in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the Australian "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' (both Australian) [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both small "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
1st Jul '15 9:08:47 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the group); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon''); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the Australian ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and ''Leaellynasaura'' [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
to:
Among non-hadrosaur/non-''Iguanodon'' ornithopods, the ones you've more chances to see in media are: ''Hypsilophodon'' (the prototype of the "hypsilophodonts" aka small-slender members of the group); Group -- it could be considered a proper [[Main/StockDinosaurs Stock Dinosaur]] though certainly in the Little-Stock section); ''Camptosaurus'' & ''Dryosaurus'' (the two iconic ornithopods from the Late Jurassic): Jurassic; the former was big and Iguanodon-like, the latter small and Hypsilophodon-like): ''Tenontosaurus'' (apparently in the middle between an ''Iguanodon'' and a ''Hypsilophodon''); ''Hypsilophodon'', but with a distinctively long tail); and ''Ouranosaurus'' (traditionally (with an evident crest on its back, it's traditionally considered an "iguanodont" but was actually closer to hadrosaurs). Among the other examples, the Australian "iguanodont" ''Muttaburrasaurus'' and the "hypsilophodont" ''Leaellynasaura'' [[note]]The latter, according to recent research, could not be a proper ornithopod however.[[/note]] were portrayed in 1999 by WalkingWithDinosaurs, while ''Orodromeus'' and ''Thescelosaurus'' (both "hypsilophodonts") have had notable ScienceMarchesOn stories.
1st Jul '15 8:12:40 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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'''The Jurassic antelopes:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camptosaurus Camptosaurus]]'' & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryosaurus Dryosaurus]]''
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'''The Jurassic antelopes:''' Antelope of the Jurassic:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camptosaurus Camptosaurus]]'' & ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryosaurus Dryosaurus]]'' Camptosaurus]]''

when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]]. On the other hand, the other well-known Late Jurassic ornithopod, ''Dryosaurus'', despite being even less-conspicuous than ''Camptosaurus'', has received a better treatment showing up in all the three documentaries above, though with very minor roles (in one case, it serves only to give a prey to ''Allosaurus''). ''Camptosaurus'' was similar to ''[[StockDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'' but smaller (5-7 m long) and with mere hints of thumbspikes. [[note]]Some portrayals show ''Camptosaurus'' totally spike-less or with fully-developed ''Iguanodon''-like spikes, both incorrect.[[/note]] This because was one of the most primitive large-sized ornithopods, and a possible ancestor of ''Iguanodon'' and, indirectly, hadrosaurs. In the Jurassic world still dominated by sauropods, camptosaurids and stegosaurs were the only big ornithischians which were successful, anticipating the great diversity bird-hipped dinosaurs reached later in the Cretaceous. ''Dryosaurus'' was much smaller than ''Camptosaurus'' and more similar to a ''Hypsilophodon'' in shape, being totally bipedal. Compared with ''Hypsilophodon'', the dryosaur was larger (3-4 m long), slightly more robust, with a shorter head, toothless beak, and lacking the forth reversed toe of ''Hypsilophodon''. Nonetheless, ''Dryosaurus'' was a basal iguanodont, closer to ''Iguanodon'' than to ''Hypsilophodon''.
to:
when was the last time you’ve you watched it in recent documentaries? The problem is, ''Camptosaurus'' lived ''just'' alongside [[StockDinosaurs dino-stars]] like these: ''Apatosaurus'', ''Diplodocus'', ''Brachiosaurus'', ''Stegosaurus''... and ''Allosaurus''. Thus, it could have shown up in ''WalkingWithDinosaurs'', ''Ballad of Big Al'' or even ''WhenDinosaursRoamedAmerica''. But, as it seems, its very generic appearance was judiced [[ViewersAreMorons too incospicuous to capture the watchers’ interest]]. interest]]. On the other hand, the other well-known Late Jurassic ornithopod, ''Dryosaurus'', ''Dryosaurus'' (see below), despite being even less-conspicuous than ''Camptosaurus'', has received a better treatment showing up in all the three documentaries above, though with very minor roles (in one case, it serves only to give a prey to ''Allosaurus''). ''Camptosaurus'' was similar to ''[[StockDinosaurs Iguanodon]]'' but smaller (5-7 m long) and with mere hints of thumbspikes. [[note]]Some portrayals show ''Camptosaurus'' totally spike-less or with fully-developed ''Iguanodon''-like spikes, both incorrect.[[/note]] This because was one of the most primitive large-sized ornithopods, and a possible ancestor of ''Iguanodon'' and, indirectly, hadrosaurs. In the Jurassic world still dominated by sauropods, camptosaurids and stegosaurs were the only big ornithischians which were successful, anticipating the great diversity bird-hipped dinosaurs reached later in the Cretaceous. ---- '''The Gazelle of the Jurassic:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dryosaurus Dryosaurus]]'' ''Dryosaurus'' was much smaller than ''Camptosaurus'' and more similar to a ''Hypsilophodon'' in shape, being totally bipedal. Compared with ''Hypsilophodon'', the dryosaur was larger (3-4 m long), slightly more robust, with a shorter head, toothless beak, and lacking the forth reversed toe of ''Hypsilophodon''. Nonetheless, ''Dryosaurus'' was a basal iguanodont, closer to ''Iguanodon'' than to ''Hypsilophodon''.
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