History UsefulNotes / PolesWithPoleaxes

16th Sep '17 5:16:44 PM nombretomado
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The loss of independence in the late XVIII Century (between 1795 and 1918 Poland was divided between Russia, Prussia/Germany and Austria/Austro-Hungarian Empire) didn't exactly turn Poles into pacifists, either. This period saw the infatuation with SinisterScythe in several uprisings, and Poles (and with them, once more, the Polish cavalry which shone on many battlefields of [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars the time]]) were amongst the most loyal allies of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte. Poles also served across the world as exiles; Casimir Pulaski and Tadeusz Kościuszko being two notable examples, serving in [[YanksWithTanks the Continental Army]] of the infant United States during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution. Pulaski is commemorated as "the father of American cavalry". Polish officers also served in the Austrian and Russian armies during the period of occupation.

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The loss of independence in the late XVIII Century (between 1795 and 1918 Poland was divided between Russia, Prussia/Germany and Austria/Austro-Hungarian Empire) didn't exactly turn Poles into pacifists, either. This period saw the infatuation with SinisterScythe in several uprisings, and Poles (and with them, once more, the Polish cavalry which shone on many battlefields of [[UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars the time]]) were amongst the most loyal allies of UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte. Poles also served across the world as exiles; Casimir Pulaski and Tadeusz Kościuszko being two notable examples, serving in [[YanksWithTanks [[UsefulNotes/YanksWithTanks the Continental Army]] of the infant United States during UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution. Pulaski is commemorated as "the father of American cavalry". Polish officers also served in the Austrian and Russian armies during the period of occupation.
9th Jul '17 8:36:38 AM nombretomado
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The Polish military were "The First to Fight" in WorldWarTwo[[note]]On the Allied side; On the Axis', it was the German battleship ''Schleswig-Holstein'' which actually fired the first shots, in Danzig (now Gdansk)[[/note]], playing a major role in the Battle of Britain and having their own version of LaResistance (counting as much as a million people, several hundred thousands at once at its peak and maintained a whole functioning government, complete with postal and tax services, in form of the Polish Underground State, functioning in secrecy right under the noses of the occupying Germans). The Polish state maintained the overall largest partisan movement in history, in fact (Tito's Balkan resistance was larger in absolute numbers past ~1943, though it didn't have the state infrastructure as developed). They also gave a great deal of Intelligence support having some of the best field agents in Europe, and cryptographers who were GoodWithNumbers (they actually broke the merchant version of the Enigma code and thus greatly contributed to the joint effort of breaking the military one). It is worth noting that a large part of the Polish LaResistance consisted of soldiers and officers (many of them veterans of the First World War) who decided not to surrender and continued to fight as partisans. Polish troops that had successfully withdrawn from occupied territory were later formed into many units fighting along the Allies, usually British. Among the best known are the 1st Independent Parachute Brigade (Market-Garden), 303 Squadron (the highest-scoring squadron in the Battle of Britain), the Polish Independent Highland Brigade (Narvik Campaign), the Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade (Siege of Tobruk), the 1st Armored Division (Falaise pocket) and the Polish II Corps (Italian Campaign), which notably included a ''[[BearsAreBadNews bear]]'' named [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wojtek_(bear) Private Wojtek]] among their enlisted men (he didn't fight, but he did carry crates of artillery shells). During WWII Poland lost nearly 17% of its pre-war population during the war and subsequent occupations (the second-highest casualty rate of WWII), and held out against the simultaneous invasions of Russia and Germany longer than France would in 1940.

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The Polish military were "The First to Fight" in WorldWarTwo[[note]]On UsefulNotes/WorldWarII[[note]]On the Allied side; On the Axis', it was the German battleship ''Schleswig-Holstein'' which actually fired the first shots, in Danzig (now Gdansk)[[/note]], playing a major role in the Battle of Britain and having their own version of LaResistance (counting as much as a million people, several hundred thousands at once at its peak and maintained a whole functioning government, complete with postal and tax services, in form of the Polish Underground State, functioning in secrecy right under the noses of the occupying Germans). The Polish state maintained the overall largest partisan movement in history, in fact (Tito's Balkan resistance was larger in absolute numbers past ~1943, though it didn't have the state infrastructure as developed). They also gave a great deal of Intelligence support having some of the best field agents in Europe, and cryptographers who were GoodWithNumbers (they actually broke the merchant version of the Enigma code and thus greatly contributed to the joint effort of breaking the military one). It is worth noting that a large part of the Polish LaResistance consisted of soldiers and officers (many of them veterans of the First World War) who decided not to surrender and continued to fight as partisans. Polish troops that had successfully withdrawn from occupied territory were later formed into many units fighting along the Allies, usually British. Among the best known are the 1st Independent Parachute Brigade (Market-Garden), 303 Squadron (the highest-scoring squadron in the Battle of Britain), the Polish Independent Highland Brigade (Narvik Campaign), the Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade (Siege of Tobruk), the 1st Armored Division (Falaise pocket) and the Polish II Corps (Italian Campaign), which notably included a ''[[BearsAreBadNews bear]]'' named [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wojtek_(bear) Private Wojtek]] among their enlisted men (he didn't fight, but he did carry crates of artillery shells). During WWII Poland lost nearly 17% of its pre-war population during the war and subsequent occupations (the second-highest casualty rate of WWII), and held out against the simultaneous invasions of Russia and Germany longer than France would in 1940.



In 2012, there were negotiations about building in Poland a part of the U.S. missile shield (Russia really did not like this idea) but it ultimately ended with a failure (Poland made quite a fuss over the [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Bush administration's]] idea of an anti-missile shield. The Polish reasoning was that American forces on Polish soil would ensure that the Americans would be [[SummonBiggerFish more likely to move]] in case anybody threatens Poland (similar to how American forces stationed in UsefulNotes/SouthKorea would be forced to respond to a North Korean attack). Seeing [[WorldWarII what]] [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar happened]] to Poland throughout the 20th century, it's at least [[ProperlyParanoid understandable]]).

to:

In 2012, there were negotiations about building in Poland a part of the U.S. missile shield (Russia really did not like this idea) but it ultimately ended with a failure (Poland made quite a fuss over the [[UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush Bush administration's]] idea of an anti-missile shield. The Polish reasoning was that American forces on Polish soil would ensure that the Americans would be [[SummonBiggerFish more likely to move]] in case anybody threatens Poland (similar to how American forces stationed in UsefulNotes/SouthKorea would be forced to respond to a North Korean attack). Seeing [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII what]] [[UsefulNotes/ColdWar happened]] to Poland throughout the 20th century, it's at least [[ProperlyParanoid understandable]]).
14th Jun '17 8:40:50 PM Sylderon
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The Polish military were "The First to Fight" in WorldWarTwo[[note]]On the Allied side; On the Axis', it was the German battleship ''Schleswig-Holstein'' which actually fired the first shots, in Danzig (now Gdansk)[[/note]], playing a major role in the Battle of Britain and having their own version of LaResistance (counting as much as a million people, several hundred thousands at once at its peak and maintained a whole functioning government, complete with postal and tax services, in form of the Polish Underground State, functioning in secrecy right under the noses of the occupying Germans). The Polish state maintained the overall largest partisan movement in history, in fact (Tito's Balkan resistance was larger in absolute numbers past ~1943, though it didn't have the state infrastructure as developed). They also gave a great deal of Intelligence support having some of the best field agents in Europe, and cryptographers who were GoodWithNumbers (they actually broke the merchant version of the Enigma code and thus greatly contributed to the joint effort of breaking the military one). It is worth noting that a large part of the Polish LaResistance consisted of soldiers and officers (many of them veterans of the First World War) who decided not to surrender and continued to fight as partisans. Polish troops that had successfully withdrawn from occupied territory were later formed into many units fighting along the Allies, usually British. Among the best known are the 1st Independent Parachute Brigade (Market-Garden), 303 Squadron (the highest-scoring squadron in the Battle of Britain), the Polish Independent Highland Brigade (Narvik Campaign), the Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade (Siege of Tobruk), the 1st Armored Division (Falaise pocket) and the Polish II Corps (Italian Campaign). During WWII Poland lost nearly 17% of its pre-war population during the war and subsequent occupations (the second-highest casualty rate of WWII), and held out against the simultaneous invasions of Russia and Germany longer than France would in 1940.

to:

The Polish military were "The First to Fight" in WorldWarTwo[[note]]On the Allied side; On the Axis', it was the German battleship ''Schleswig-Holstein'' which actually fired the first shots, in Danzig (now Gdansk)[[/note]], playing a major role in the Battle of Britain and having their own version of LaResistance (counting as much as a million people, several hundred thousands at once at its peak and maintained a whole functioning government, complete with postal and tax services, in form of the Polish Underground State, functioning in secrecy right under the noses of the occupying Germans). The Polish state maintained the overall largest partisan movement in history, in fact (Tito's Balkan resistance was larger in absolute numbers past ~1943, though it didn't have the state infrastructure as developed). They also gave a great deal of Intelligence support having some of the best field agents in Europe, and cryptographers who were GoodWithNumbers (they actually broke the merchant version of the Enigma code and thus greatly contributed to the joint effort of breaking the military one). It is worth noting that a large part of the Polish LaResistance consisted of soldiers and officers (many of them veterans of the First World War) who decided not to surrender and continued to fight as partisans. Polish troops that had successfully withdrawn from occupied territory were later formed into many units fighting along the Allies, usually British. Among the best known are the 1st Independent Parachute Brigade (Market-Garden), 303 Squadron (the highest-scoring squadron in the Battle of Britain), the Polish Independent Highland Brigade (Narvik Campaign), the Polish Independent Carpathian Brigade (Siege of Tobruk), the 1st Armored Division (Falaise pocket) and the Polish II Corps (Italian Campaign).Campaign), which notably included a ''[[BearsAreBadNews bear]]'' named [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wojtek_(bear) Private Wojtek]] among their enlisted men (he didn't fight, but he did carry crates of artillery shells). During WWII Poland lost nearly 17% of its pre-war population during the war and subsequent occupations (the second-highest casualty rate of WWII), and held out against the simultaneous invasions of Russia and Germany longer than France would in 1940.
2nd May '17 6:26:04 PM PaulA
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* The hero of ''The Polish Officer'' by Alan Furst was a Polish military cartographer turned spy.

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* The hero of ''The Polish Officer'' by Alan Furst Creator/AlanFurst was a Polish military cartographer turned spy.
1st May '17 6:47:41 PM PaulA
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* Leo Frankowski's ''Cross-Time Engineer'' saga features a Polish Air Force officer from 1990 transported back through time to the 13th Century, where he decides that it's time for backwards Poland to conquer the world.

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* Leo Frankowski's Creator/LeoFrankowski's ''Cross-Time Engineer'' saga features a Polish Air Force officer from 1990 transported back through time to the 13th Century, where he decides that it's time for backwards Poland to conquer the world.
14th Dec '16 2:12:17 AM DeepRed
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Since its entry to NATO in 1999, the Polish Army participated and participate in numerous peacekeeping, humanitarian, police, training and observational missions in Europe, Afraica and Asia (especially in Kosovo, Iraq, Chad and Afghanistan). Currently there are plans to send a small contingent of soldiers (with British and Americans) to train Ukrainian officers.


to:

Since its entry to NATO in 1999, the Polish Army participated and participate in numerous peacekeeping, humanitarian, police, training and observational missions in Europe, Afraica Africa and Asia (especially in Kosovo, Iraq, Chad and Afghanistan). Currently there are plans to send a small contingent of soldiers (with British and Americans) to train Ukrainian officers.

5th Oct '16 3:23:14 AM AgentTasmania
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** ''Winged Hussars''

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** ''Winged Hussars''Hussars'' about the releif besieged Vienna in 1683 by the largest cavaly charge in history.
23rd Aug '16 10:49:58 PM AgentTasmania
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Winged Hussars''
9th Apr '16 12:56:22 AM Canaris
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Added DiffLines:

* Second book of the ''Axis of Time'' trilogy features squadron 303 and real life badass and fighter ace Jan Zumbach, defending HMS Trident during the operation ''Sea Dragon'' a.k.a. Nazi Germany invasion of Britain.
4th Jan '16 12:38:36 AM Preussak
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Since its entry to NATO in 1999, the Polish Army participated and participate in numerous peacekeeping, humanitarian, police, training and observational missions in Europe, Afraica and Asia (especially in Kosovo, Iraq, Chad and Afghanistan). Currently they are plans to send a small contingent of soldiers (with British and Americans) to train an Ukrainian officers.


to:

Since its entry to NATO in 1999, the Polish Army participated and participate in numerous peacekeeping, humanitarian, police, training and observational missions in Europe, Afraica and Asia (especially in Kosovo, Iraq, Chad and Afghanistan). Currently they there are plans to send a small contingent of soldiers (with British and Americans) to train an Ukrainian officers.

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