History UsefulNotes / Plagiarism

23rd Jul '16 6:18:13 PM MasoTey
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Plagiarism is essentially taking the work of others and attempting to pass it off as one's own. In academia, it is generally defined as putting forth ideas cribbed[[note]]Use of the word "cribbed" comes from the fact that plagiarism literally means baby stealing.[[/note]] from other places and claiming that the writer came up with them -- in other words, discussing facts and theories without proper citation. This can get dicey if the author of a paper or essay happened to come to the same conclusion as a previous writer independently. It can also lead to 'Plagiarism Paranoia', when a student panics over whether they've cited it enough or not. However, around here, we're more concerned with literary plagiarism. For plagiarism used as a plot point, see PlagiarismInFiction.

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Plagiarism is essentially taking the work of others and attempting to pass it off as one's own. In academia, it is generally defined as putting forth ideas cribbed[[note]]Use of the word "cribbed" comes from the fact that plagiarism literally means baby stealing.[[/note]] cribbed from other places and claiming that the writer came up with them -- in other words, discussing facts and theories without proper citation. This can get dicey if the author of a paper or essay happened to come to the same conclusion as a previous writer independently. It can also lead to 'Plagiarism Paranoia', when a student panics over whether they've cited it enough or not. However, around here, we're more concerned with literary plagiarism. For plagiarism used as a plot point, see PlagiarismInFiction.
15th Jun '16 7:20:06 AM Morgenthaler
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If a book parodies another work of fiction, there is generally an introduction in which the author clearly states that this is a parody, and explains why they are making fun of the original work. This approach is used in ''BoredOfTheRings'', a parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', among others.

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If a book parodies another work of fiction, there is generally an introduction in which the author clearly states that this is a parody, and explains why they are making fun of the original work. This approach is used in ''BoredOfTheRings'', ''Literature/BoredOfTheRings'', a parody of ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings'', among others.
11th May '16 12:53:40 PM DoctorCooper
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'''Do not link to this page whenever you deem something as plagiarism. This page is meant to explain the phenomenon of plagiarism, not to be used as a way for Administrivia/ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontLike. Thanks for your attention.'''
6th Mar '16 2:11:32 AM SneaselSawashiro
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Generally in music, ShoutOut is ''welcome'' and almost never seen as plagiarism (especially if the artist ends up collaborating with or is doing an obvious tribute to the artist (and a CoverVersion is ''almost always'' treated as a ShoutOut as long as it's properly introduced/labeled as a cover ''and'' the covering artist either has the rights to it or isn't doing it to make money.

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Generally in music, ShoutOut is ''welcome'' and almost never seen as plagiarism (especially if the artist ends up collaborating with or is doing an obvious tribute to the artist (and artist; and a CoverVersion is ''almost always'' treated as a ShoutOut as long as it's properly introduced/labeled as a cover ''and'' the covering artist either has the rights to it or isn't doing it to make money.
27th May '15 5:54:37 PM ShinyTsukkomi
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A "remake" or "retelling" is doing the original work over again with some relatively minor changes, while openly admitting that it's heavily derived from the original. A famous example of a retelling is John Sturges' film ''TheMagnificentSeven'', which had the plot and even some of the same dialogue as Akira Kurosawa's earlier ''Film/SevenSamurai''. The only real difference is that while Kurosawa's film was set in feudal Japan, Sturges' was set in TheWildWest. Why is this not plagiarism? Because Sturges had two things going for him: Kurosawa knew what he was doing and gave his approval, and Sturges openly acknowledged that he was simply moving ''Film/SevenSamurai'' to the Old West. He never claimed that it was a purely original work.

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A "remake" or "retelling" is doing the original work over again with some relatively minor changes, while openly admitting that it's heavily derived from the original. A famous example of a retelling is John Sturges' film ''TheMagnificentSeven'', ''Film/TheMagnificentSeven'', which had the plot and even some of the same dialogue as Akira Kurosawa's earlier ''Film/SevenSamurai''. The only real difference is that while Kurosawa's film was set in feudal Japan, Sturges' was set in TheWildWest. Why is this not plagiarism? Because Sturges had two things going for him: Kurosawa knew what he was doing and gave his approval, and Sturges openly acknowledged that he was simply moving ''Film/SevenSamurai'' to the Old West. He never claimed that it was a purely original work.
16th May '15 4:10:17 PM Temporary14
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It is sometimes debatable if a similar plot, introduced in a different setting and written differently with most of the details changed, still counts as plagiarism. ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'' is an example of this, with the first two books having a plot line that is quite similar to ''Franchise/StarWars'' but with many different details and an entirely different setting. Whether or not Creator/ChristopherPaolini is actually guilty of plagiarism is [[SeriousBusiness hotly debated]] between [[{{Fanboy}} hardcore fans]] and FanHater.
13th May '15 12:52:10 PM ShinyTsukkomi
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A "remake" or "retelling" is doing the original work over again with some relatively minor changes, while openly admitting that it's heavily derived from the original. A famous example of a retelling is John Sturges' film ''TheMagnificentSeven'', which had the plot and even some of the same dialogue as Akira Kurosawa's earlier ''SevenSamurai''. The only real difference is that while Kurosawa's film was set in feudal Japan, Sturges' was set in TheWildWest. Why is this not plagiarism? Because Sturges had two things going for him: Kurosawa knew what he was doing and gave his approval, and Sturges openly acknowledged that he was simply moving ''SevenSamurai'' to the Old West. He never claimed that it was a purely original work.

to:

A "remake" or "retelling" is doing the original work over again with some relatively minor changes, while openly admitting that it's heavily derived from the original. A famous example of a retelling is John Sturges' film ''TheMagnificentSeven'', which had the plot and even some of the same dialogue as Akira Kurosawa's earlier ''SevenSamurai''.''Film/SevenSamurai''. The only real difference is that while Kurosawa's film was set in feudal Japan, Sturges' was set in TheWildWest. Why is this not plagiarism? Because Sturges had two things going for him: Kurosawa knew what he was doing and gave his approval, and Sturges openly acknowledged that he was simply moving ''SevenSamurai'' ''Film/SevenSamurai'' to the Old West. He never claimed that it was a purely original work.
1st Sep '14 9:28:20 PM Specialist290
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When it comes to works of fiction, the term ''plagiarism'' tends to be misused quite a bit; indeed, most of what is referred to as 'blatant plagiarism' is actually far less blatant than actual plagiarism. If two stories happen to have [[{{Trope}} similar elements]], it does not mean that one plagiarised the other. All stories are influenced by what has come before and what the author has experienced; the most likely case is that one story inspired at least part of the other.

to:

When it comes to works of fiction, the term ''plagiarism'' tends to be misused quite a bit; indeed, most of what is referred to as 'blatant plagiarism' is actually far less blatant than actual plagiarism. If two stories happen to have [[{{Trope}} similar elements]], it does not mean that one plagiarised the other. All stories are influenced by what has come before and what the author has experienced; the most likely case is that one story inspired at least part of the other.
other, or that [[OlderThanTheyThink both are inspired by an even older common source]].
26th Mar '14 11:59:13 PM wizardcrying
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Plagiarism is essentially taking the work of others and attempting to pass it off as one's own. In academia, it is generally defined as putting forth ideas cribbed[[note]]Use of the word "cribbed" comes from the fact that plagiarism literally means baby stealing.[[/note]] from other places and claiming that the writer came up with them -- in other words, discussing facts and theories without proper citation. This can get dicey if the author of a paper or essay happened to come to the same conclusion as a previous writer independently. It can also lead to 'Plagiarism Paranoia', when a student panics over whether they've cited it enough or not. However, around here, we're more concerned with literary plagiarism. For plagiarism used as a plot point, see PlagiarismInFiction

to:

Plagiarism is essentially taking the work of others and attempting to pass it off as one's own. In academia, it is generally defined as putting forth ideas cribbed[[note]]Use of the word "cribbed" comes from the fact that plagiarism literally means baby stealing.[[/note]] from other places and claiming that the writer came up with them -- in other words, discussing facts and theories without proper citation. This can get dicey if the author of a paper or essay happened to come to the same conclusion as a previous writer independently. It can also lead to 'Plagiarism Paranoia', when a student panics over whether they've cited it enough or not. However, around here, we're more concerned with literary plagiarism. For plagiarism used as a plot point, see PlagiarismInFiction
PlagiarismInFiction.
6th Mar '14 1:20:50 AM RevolutionStone
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Added DiffLines:

Plagiarism in ''music'' is a far more tricky issue, because there are plenty of similarly-sounding songs and [[FollowTheLeader acts that look like or sound like others]].

Generally in music, ShoutOut is ''welcome'' and almost never seen as plagiarism (especially if the artist ends up collaborating with or is doing an obvious tribute to the artist (and a CoverVersion is ''almost always'' treated as a ShoutOut as long as it's properly introduced/labeled as a cover ''and'' the covering artist either has the rights to it or isn't doing it to make money.

The musical version of a homage is something like an artist choosing to be an {{expy}} of another artist's appearance or style, but making no claims to have ''originated'' that appearance or style or technique. It's generally also not considered plagiarism, unless it is an ''exact'' copy to the degree of being an impersonator ''and'' with a claim of originality.

Parody in music covers impersonators and cover artists and the like, as well as some of the two categories mentioned below - remix and sampling. As satire or parody in the form of a musical act is often more obviously so on the face, it's rarely considered plagiarism ''unless'' it is impossible to tell what is being parodied.

Sampling (or replaying a riff or section but not an entire cover) directly is a gray area - generally, it's not considered plagiarism if it only makes up one portion of the song ''and'' permission has been sought and given, and/or the sample is public domain or from a public broadcast or the like.

[[RearrangeTheSong Remixing]] ''can'' be considered plagiarism, especially if it's done poorly enough (so the original song isn't changed in any appreciable way), or if it is done without permission and for financial benefit as opposed to being a ShoutOut or tribute. However, most remixes done with permission ''and'' that substantially change the song (at least by switching out one instrument, changing the rhythm or meter or time, looping the end at the middle, etc... the more changes the better, usually) are considered as derivative but not plagiarism.

''True'' actionable musical plagiarism generally consists of not crediting samples or remixes, ''entirely'' mimicking someone else without any of the defenses above (impersonation, homage, ShoutOut, parody), lifting musical passages or lyrics note for note without permission or credit and claiming them to be one's own (e.g. if you claim the guitar solo in [[Music/VanHalen ''Eruption'']] is your own creation, or that you personally wrote [[Music/JohnLennon ''Imagine'']]), or naming your band or act exactly as another is named (even unintentionally - this is what got both Music/XJapan and Music/{{Versailles}} sued and forced to change names, as there was an existing American band called X and a French artist called Versailles).
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