History UsefulNotes / Philippines

16th Jul '17 8:36:35 AM mirisu92
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The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Copperplate_Inscription Laguna Copperplate Inscription]], a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. It definitively demonstrated the existence of existing, culturally advanced and loosely organised kingdoms in the area before the colonial period. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent, royal city-states, generally established along riverbanks or coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''; the term survives today as the country's smallest political unit). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). The more notable examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo (the kingdom that issued the debt pardon inscribed on the Laguna Copperplate, above), and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.

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The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Copperplate_Inscription Laguna Copperplate Inscription]], a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. It definitively demonstrated the existence of existing, that culturally advanced and loosely organised kingdoms were thriving in the area for at least a millennium before the colonial period. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent, royal city-states, generally established along riverbanks or coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''; the term survives today as the country's smallest political unit). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). The more notable examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo (the kingdom that issued the debt pardon inscribed on the Laguna Copperplate, above), and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.
16th Jul '17 8:33:26 AM mirisu92
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The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Copperplate_Inscription Laguna Copperplate Inscription]], a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states, generally established on the banks of rivers or in coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo (the kingdom that issued the debt pardon inscribed on the Laguna Copperplate, above), and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.

to:

The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Copperplate_Inscription Laguna Copperplate Inscription]], a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. It definitively demonstrated the existence of existing, culturally advanced and loosely organised kingdoms in the area before the colonial period. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent independent, royal city-states, generally established on the banks of rivers along riverbanks or in coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay'').''balangay''; the term survives today as the country's smallest political unit). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some The more notable examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo (the kingdom that issued the debt pardon inscribed on the Laguna Copperplate, above), and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.
16th Jul '17 2:02:32 AM mirisu92
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* Jaime Cardinal Sin, 30th Roman Catholic Archbishop of Manila, famous for helping spark the "People Power Revolution" through a church-owned radio station - by calling on civilians to block EDSA against Marcos's troops - as well as a man with a curious sense of humor regarding the [[UnfortunateNames unfortunate combination of his surname and title]].

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* Jaime Cardinal Sin, 30th Roman Catholic Archbishop of Manila, famous for helping spark the "People Power Revolution" through a church-owned radio station - by calling on civilians to block EDSA against Marcos's troops - as well as a man with a curious sense of humor regarding the [[UnfortunateNames unfortunate combination of his surname and title]].[[note]]"Sin" is a Chinese surname, derived from "Xin".[[/note]]
16th Jul '17 1:13:40 AM mirisu92
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The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the Laguna Copperplate Inscription, a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states, generally established on the banks of rivers or in coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo, and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.

to:

The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Copperplate_Inscription Laguna Copperplate Inscription, Inscription]], a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states, generally established on the banks of rivers or in coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo, Tondo (the kingdom that issued the debt pardon inscribed on the Laguna Copperplate, above), and Manila (formerly named Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.
16th Jul '17 1:10:56 AM mirisu92
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The islands were settled as early as 67,000 years ago, evidenced by the metatarsal of a man found in Cagayan valley in 2007. The earliest settlement routes, however, remain contested between Borneo and Taiwan. By the first millennium CE, the various isolated communities of the islands evolved into important trade posts attracting various merchants from as far as India and China, and by the 1300s Islam made its headway, starting with the Sulu Islands to the southwest and reaching as far as Manila. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states. Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo, and Manila (formerly named Seludong). They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.

to:

The islands were settled as early as 67,000 years ago, evidenced by the metatarsal of a man found in Cagayan valley in 2007. The earliest settlement routes, however, remain contested between Borneo and Taiwan. By the first millennium CE, the various isolated communities of the islands evolved into important trade posts attracting various merchants from as far as India and China, and by the 1300s Islam made its headway, starting with the Sulu Islands to the southwest and reaching as far as Manila. Manila.

The classical period of precolonial Philippine history—technically, "pre-Philippine history", as the name is obviously of colonial origin, named for King Philip II of Spain—is known largely from third-party accounts from elsewhere in East and Southeast Asia, but the oldest concrete artifact of a proto-Philippine provenance is the Laguna Copperplate Inscription, a record of a royal debt pardon dated, luckily very specifically, to 900 CE.
Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states.city-states, generally established on the banks of rivers or in coastal areas, known as ''barangays'' (roughly, "villages", but named after the clan boats common in the region, called ''balangay''). Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo, and Manila (formerly named Seludong).Seludong), as well as the more organised Sultanates of Sulu and Maguindanao in the south. They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.
16th Jul '17 1:02:54 AM mirisu92
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The islands were settled as early as 67,000 years ago, evidenced by the metatarsal of a man found in Cagayan valley in 2007. The earliest settlement routes, however, remain contested between Borneo and Taiwan. By the first millennium CE, the various isolated communities of the islands evolved into important trade posts attracting various merchants from as far as India and China, and by the 1300s Islam made its headway, starting with the Sulu Islands to the southwest and reaching as far as Manila.

to:

The islands were settled as early as 67,000 years ago, evidenced by the metatarsal of a man found in Cagayan valley in 2007. The earliest settlement routes, however, remain contested between Borneo and Taiwan. By the first millennium CE, the various isolated communities of the islands evolved into important trade posts attracting various merchants from as far as India and China, and by the 1300s Islam made its headway, starting with the Sulu Islands to the southwest and reaching as far as Manila.
Manila. Although the islands had few, if any, traces of the great centralised kingdoms in most of the rest of Southeast Asia, they were occupied by several small, functionally independent royal city-states. Their leaders had various titles, including ''Datu'', ''Rajah'', or ''Lakan'', all of which mean some variant of "monarch". The leaders of the largest kingdoms were either styled ''Rajah'' (from the Indian influence) or ''Sultan'' (especially after the Islamic influx; this is still true for hereditary rulers in Mindanao, for example). Some examples of precolonial kingdoms include Cebu, Butuan, Tondo, and Manila (formerly named Seludong). They paid tribute to larger centres of civilisation in the region, such as Imperial China or the Majapahit Empire in modern-day {{Indonesia}}. Some pre-Philippine kingdoms earned quite a reputation for quality items and fairness in trade that the Chinese, for instance, made them preferential trading partners over the likes of {{Japan}}.
13th Jul '17 8:44:48 AM mirisu92
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13th Jul '17 8:44:18 AM mirisu92
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* Kevin Kwan's ''Literature/CrazyRichAsians'' books have some Filipino characters in minor roles such as the nannies of Teo and Cheng families and in ''China Rich Girlfriend'', the socialites Evangeline de Ayala and Diego San Antonio. The third and final book, ''Rich People Problems'', will also be set in Manila and Palawan.

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* Kevin Kwan's ''Literature/CrazyRichAsians'' books have some Filipino characters in minor roles such as the nannies of Teo and Cheng families and in ''China Rich Girlfriend'', the socialites Evangeline de Ayala and Diego San Antonio. The third and final book, ''Rich People Problems'', will also be has some scenes set in Manila and Palawan. Palawan; [[spoiler:Astrid Leong and Charlie Wu spend a romantic getaway on a Palawan beach]].


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[[folder:Theatre]]
* ''Theatre/TheSultanOfSulu'', written by American playwright George Ade in 1902, during the thick of the Philippine-American War, is about, well, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin the Sultan of Sulu]]. His sovereign rule and polygamous ways come under threat from American soldiers and schoolteachers [[WhiteMansBurden attempting to "civilise" him and his people]].
13th Jul '17 8:39:41 AM Larkmarn
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Classified as one of the third-world countries of the world, the Philippines has been experiencing political instability, poverty, and a population growing at an extremely fast rate. On the other hand, it is one of the world's most bountiful countries in terms of flora and fauna, has many urbanized cities with progressive socioeconomic growth, has deep, rich cultures of both ancient and contemporary, and both ''Time'' and ''Reader's Digest'' discussed survey results that Filipinos are happier in comparison to people of developed countries.

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Classified as one of the third-world countries developing nations of the world, the Philippines has been experiencing political instability, poverty, and a population growing at an extremely fast rate. On the other hand, it is one of the world's most bountiful countries in terms of flora and fauna, has many urbanized cities with progressive socioeconomic growth, has deep, rich cultures of both ancient and contemporary, and both ''Time'' and ''Reader's Digest'' discussed survey results that Filipinos are happier in comparison to people of developed countries.
13th Jul '17 8:38:06 AM mirisu92
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* Manuel Roxas, first president of the fully-independent Republic after America legally granted the nation independence on 4 July 1946. Independence was supposed to be granted in 1945 were it not for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the Japanese invasion of 1942-1945.

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* Manuel Roxas, first president of the fully-independent Republic after America legally granted the nation independence on 4 July 1946. Independence was supposed to be granted in 1945 were it not for UsefulNotes/WorldWarII and the Japanese invasion of 1942-1945. Possibly one of the most blatantly [[TheQuisling pro-American]] presidents in a country already overwhelmingly pro-American; it would not be a far cry to say that the country remained a U.S. colony in some ways with Roxas at the helm.



* Ramon Magsaysay, third President of the fully-independent Republic who backed America during the Cold War. [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure A popular president known for his humility and facilitating the peaceful disbandment of the Hukbalahap guerrillas of central Luzon]] during TheFifties, he met a tragic end in a plane crash in Cebu.

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* Ramon Magsaysay, third President of the fully-independent Republic who backed America during the Cold War. [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure A popular president known for his humility and facilitating the peaceful disbandment of the Hukbalahap guerrillas of central Luzon]] during TheFifties, [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth he met a tragic end in a plane crash in Cebu.Cebu]].
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