History UsefulNotes / Patronymic

29th Mar '18 6:58:06 PM karstovich2
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** However, Arabic names also tend to have patronymics as well. The structure of an Arabic name is: Kunya (Abu/Umm, Father of/Mother of), Ism (a person's given name), Laqab (a nickname or description of the person or their character; this can be heritable, rather like a Roman ''cognomen''), Nasab (the patronymic often two generations back, given with ibn/bint son of/daughter of), and Nisba (like a surname. Usually a family name, area or tribe of origin, or occupation). Ex. Abu Kareem Muhammad al-Jameel ibn Nidh'aal ibn Abdulazeez al-Filisteeni would mean "Father of Kareem, Muhammad the beautiful, son of Nidh'all, son of Abdulazeez, the Palestinian."

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** However, Arabic names also tend to have patronymics as well. The structure of an Arabic name is: Kunya (Abu/Umm, Father of/Mother of), Ism (a person's given name), Laqab (a nickname or description of the person or their character; this can be heritable, rather like a Roman ''cognomen''), Nasab (the patronymic often two generations back, given with ibn/bint son of/daughter of), and Nisba (like a surname. Usually a family name, area or tribe of origin, or occupation).occupation, and very similar to a Roman ''nomen''). Ex. Abu Kareem Muhammad al-Jameel ibn Nidh'aal ibn Abdulazeez al-Filisteeni would mean "Father of Kareem, Muhammad the beautiful, son of Nidh'all, son of Abdulazeez, the Palestinian."
31st Jan '18 10:17:55 AM BeerBaron
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* Orc lastnames in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' are "gro" (masculine) or "gra" (feminine) apparently meaning "son of" or "daughter of" respectively.
** Nords will do this sometimes as well, being heavily based on early Scandinavian culture. For example, Archmage Gauldur's three sons all had the surname "Gauldurson".

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* Orc lastnames ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'':
** [[OurOrcsAreDifferent Orc]] last names
in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' are the series start with "gro" (masculine) or "gra" (feminine) apparently (feminine), meaning "son of" or "daughter of" respectively.
respectively. For example, Balagog gro-Nolob is "Balagog, son of Nolob" while Sharn gra-Muzgob is "Sharn, daughter of Muzgob". In some cases, the name of the Orc's home stronghold may be substituted.
** Nords [[HornyVikings Nords]] will also do this sometimes as well, in some cases. Justified by being [[CultureChopSuey heavily based based]] on early Scandinavian [[NorseByNorsewest Scandinavian]] culture. For example, Archmage Gauldur's three sons all had the surname "Gauldurson".
17th Dec '17 9:58:45 AM NhazUl
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** Bulgarian patronymics are identical to surnames ("-ov"/"-ev" for men and "-ova"/"-eva" for women). This could result in people of the older generation (commonly teachers) referring to someone by their name and patronymic rather than name and surname by Russian tradition, which is regarded as weird (or can trigger a SpellMyNameWithAnS if the two are similar).

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** Bulgarian patronymics are identical to surnames ("-ov"/"-ev" for men and "-ova"/"-eva" for women). This could result in people of the older generation (commonly teachers) referring to someone by their name and patronymic rather than name and surname by Russian tradition, which is regarded as weird (or can trigger a SpellMyNameWithAnS if the two are similar). In cases of illegitimacy, matronymics (-in/-ina) can be used, although mothers mostly opt to give the child a patronymic based on the masculine version of their own name, or directly ''their'' own patronymic, so that the child doesn't get taunted at school.
2nd Nov '17 8:06:27 PM PaulA
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* Seems to be the case in Creator/EdmondHamilton's ''Star Kings'', where the Emperor is named Arn Abbas, while his sons are Jhal Arn and Zarth Arn.

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* Seems to be the case in Creator/EdmondHamilton's ''Star Kings'', ''Literature/TheStarKings'', where the Emperor is named Arn Abbas, while his sons are Jhal Arn and Zarth Arn.
17th Sep '17 11:49:54 AM nombretomado
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%% Note that in a culture where patronymics are commonly used--like Russia or Iceland--this is PeopleSitOnChairs. You don't need to list a Russian novel set in Russia where the Russians use patronymics, unless it actually figures in the plot. Instead, list the culture in "Real Life".

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%% Note that in a culture where patronymics are commonly used--like Russia or Iceland--this is PeopleSitOnChairs.Administrivia/PeopleSitOnChairs. You don't need to list a Russian novel set in Russia where the Russians use patronymics, unless it actually figures in the plot. Instead, list the culture in "Real Life".
13th Sep '17 7:16:36 PM nombretomado
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* The science fiction novel ''[[WarchildSeries Cagebird]]'' has a protagonist from an apparently rather traditional Russian family. He uses a patronymic as his middle name until he's recruited by SpacePirates, although it's only mentioned once or twice.

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* The science fiction novel ''[[WarchildSeries ''[[Literature/WarchildSeries Cagebird]]'' has a protagonist from an apparently rather traditional Russian family. He uses a patronymic as his middle name until he's recruited by SpacePirates, although it's only mentioned once or twice.
7th Sep '17 10:36:08 AM nebodija
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However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. For example, a letter to Putin might begin with "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!"Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs the Other Wiki has some gory details ]]). Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. So Mahmoud Abbas will be more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen".

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However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic Russian names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. For example, a letter to Putin might begin with "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!"Formal Vladimirovich!" Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs the Other Wiki has some gory details ]]). Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. So Mahmoud Abbas will be more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen".
5th Sep '17 7:59:24 PM florianschild
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* Used by a smattering of characters in ''Literature/DragonsWinter'', including Azil Aumson who uses the matronymic derived from the name of his mother, Aum Niallsdatter (presumably a patronymic, although we never meet Niall).
1st Sep '17 10:34:53 AM Omeganian
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* Seems to be the case in Creator/EdmondHamilton's ''Star Kings'', where the Emperor is named Arn Abbas, while his sons are Jhal Arn and Zarth Arn.
31st Jul '17 6:36:47 PM TheMasterPanda
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[[folder:Theatre]]
* Everyone in Theatre/NatashaPierreAndTheGreatCometOf1812 has at least one, as fitting for a musical where "everyone's got 9 different names."
[[/folder]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.Patronymic