History UsefulNotes / Patronymic

31st Jul '17 6:36:47 PM TheMasterPanda
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[[folder:Theatre]]
* Everyone in Theatre/NatashaPierreAndTheGreatCometOf1812 has at least one, as fitting for a musical where "everyone's got 9 different names."
[[/folder]]
30th May '17 9:55:02 PM nombretomado
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* ''WildCards''' Dr. Tachyon has a Takisian name that lists his ''entire geneology for a thousand generations''.
* Robert Jordan's ''WheelOfTime'' series has the Ogier, whose males introduce themselves with a double patronymic (Loial son of Arent son of Halan), and whose females introduce themselves with a double matronymic (Erith daughter of Ila daughter of Alar).

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* ''WildCards''' ''Literature/WildCards''' Dr. Tachyon has a Takisian name that lists his ''entire geneology for a thousand generations''.
* Robert Jordan's ''WheelOfTime'' ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime'' series has the Ogier, whose males introduce themselves with a double patronymic (Loial son of Arent son of Halan), and whose females introduce themselves with a double matronymic (Erith daughter of Ila daughter of Alar).
11th May '17 7:58:08 AM LegitimateIdiot
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One of the cultures that used matronymics in the old days without it being an obvious sign of illegitimacy was the English culture. It was traditional for posthumous children in medieval times to take their mother's name as a surname, and kids faced with a sucky patronym and a cool matronym were free to choose the latter. Custer, Beaton, Izzard, Madison, and Parnell are only a few of the many matronyms used in English as surnames.

Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. Mongolia is an another example, but because Mongol naming system allows for a much broader variation in the given names, it has somewhat less importance and is often initialed in practice. Another interesting aside is that Mongols follow the common Asian pattern of "surname first", so their patronymics go ''before'' given names, unlike the most other examples.

However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. (So for example, a letter to Putin might begin "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!") Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on. (The Other Wiki has gory details [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs]]) Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. (So Mahmoud Abbas is more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen")

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One of the cultures that used matronymics in the old days without it being an obvious sign of illegitimacy was the English culture.English. It was traditional for posthumous children in medieval times to take their mother's name as a surname, and kids faced with a sucky patronym and a cool matronym were free to choose the latter. Custer, Beaton, Izzard, Madison, and Parnell are only a few of the many matronyms used in English as surnames.

Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, exclusively because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had these family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by their first name and patronymic. Mongolia is an another example, but because the Mongol naming system allows for a much broader variation in the given names, it has somewhat less importance and is often initialed in practice. Another interesting aside is that Mongols follow the common Asian pattern of "surname first", so their patronymics go ''before'' given names, unlike the most other examples.

However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. (So for For example, a letter to Putin might begin with "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!") Formal Vladimirovich!"Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on. (The Other Wiki has gory details [[https://en.on ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs]]) org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs the Other Wiki has some gory details ]]). Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. (So So Mahmoud Abbas is will be more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen")
Mazen".


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* In ''WesternAnimation/{{Ninjago}}'', WordOfGod confirms that Lloyd Garmadon takes on his father's first name as his surname. Garmadon himself, as well as his brother Wu, don't have a surname due to being the sons of the First Spinjitzu Master.
28th Apr '17 1:26:15 AM morane
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* This has historically been the case in Western Finland, where proper surnames became commonplace only in the 18th century: people were referred either with patronyme or by the name of their farm or trade. The use of proper surnames has historically been common in Eastern Finland, and many families can trace their roots to Middle Ages. The common suffix on Eastern Finland surnames, ''-nen'', is also the diminutive suffix in Finnish language, implying "offspring of", ''Pekkanen'', "offspring of Pekka (Peter)". Western Finnish surnames often end in ''-la'', implying in Finnish language as a "place of": ''Jaakkola'' might imply "farm of Jaakko" (James or Jacob), the original founder of the farm.
15th Apr '17 1:12:05 PM nombretomado
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* A popular naming convention in SMStirling's {{Emberverse}}, with characters known as "Jake sunna Jake" (say it aloud and it makes perfect sense), Dik Tomskid, Bjarni Erickson, and Asgerd Karlsdottir.

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* A popular naming convention in SMStirling's {{Emberverse}}, Creator/SMStirling's Literature/{{Emberverse}}, with characters known as "Jake sunna Jake" (say it aloud and it makes perfect sense), Dik Tomskid, Bjarni Erickson, and Asgerd Karlsdottir.
19th Mar '17 11:00:29 PM Khathi
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Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. Mongolia is an another example, but because Mongol naming system allows for a much broader variation in the given names, it has somewhat less importance and is often initialed in practice. Another interesting aside it that Mongols follow the common Asian pattern of "surname first", so their patronymics go ''before'' given names, unlike the most other examples.

to:

Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. Mongolia is an another example, but because Mongol naming system allows for a much broader variation in the given names, it has somewhat less importance and is often initialed in practice. Another interesting aside it is that Mongols follow the common Asian pattern of "surname first", so their patronymics go ''before'' given names, unlike the most other examples.
19th Mar '17 10:58:41 PM Khathi
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Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. (So for example, a letter to Putin might begin "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!") Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on. (The Other Wiki has gory details [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs]]) Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. (So Mahmoud Abbas is more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen")

to:

Very few modern cultures use patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as populations grow; Iceland is one of the few remaining cases, where (with the exception of a few families which had family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. Mongolia is an another example, but because Mongol naming system allows for a much broader variation in the given names, it has somewhat less importance and is often initialed in practice. Another interesting aside it that Mongols follow the common Asian pattern of "surname first", so their patronymics go ''before'' given names, unlike the most other examples.

However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. (So for example, a letter to Putin might begin "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!") Formal Spanish names include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on. (The Other Wiki has gory details [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs]]) Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames in common speech. (So Mahmoud Abbas is more commonly known as abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen")
3rd Mar '17 10:31:15 PM Xtifr
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* AncientRome didn't generally use patronymics, since they used modern-style family names (the ''nomen''). But in some formal settings, like official records, a person's name would often include a filiation, which basically inserted the ''praenomina'' of his father and grandfather between the ''nomen'' and the ''cognomen''. The Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar that everyone knows and loves would have been listed as "Gaius Iulius Gaii filius[[note]]"son of Gaius"[[/note]] Gaii nepos[[note]]"grandson of Gaius"[[/note]] Caesar", or "C. Iulius C. f. C. n. Caesar" for short.
** When [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Gaius Octavius]] found he'd been posthumously adopted by Julius Caesar, he had his new father officially proclaimed a demigod--and his own name, for formal purposes, became "Gaius Julius Caesar Divi filius", "...the son of the god".
* AncientGreece did this, Homer had the Atreides, i.e. Agamemnon and Menelaus.
** Also with the Dioscuri (Scion of Zeus), Castor and Polydeuces - kind of a misnomer since only one was the son of Zeus. I guess they were just that inseparable.

to:

* AncientRome didn't generally use patronymics, since they used modern-style family names (the ''nomen''). But in some formal settings, like official records, a person's name would often include a filiation, which basically inserted the ''praenomina'' of his father and grandfather between the ''nomen'' and the ''cognomen''. The Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar that everyone knows and loves would have been listed as "Gaius Iulius Gaii filius[[note]]"son of Gaius"[[/note]] Gaii nepos[[note]]"grandson of Gaius"[[/note]] Caesar", or "C. Iulius C. f. C. n. Caesar" for short.
**
short. When [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Gaius Octavius]] found he'd been posthumously adopted by Julius Caesar, he had his new father officially proclaimed a demigod--and his own name, for formal purposes, became "Gaius Julius Caesar Divi filius", "...the son of the god".
* AncientGreece did this, Homer had the Atreides, i.e. Agamemnon and Menelaus.
**
Menelaus. Also with the Dioscuri (Scion of Zeus), Castor and Polydeuces - kind of a misnomer since only one was the son of Zeus. I guess they were just that inseparable.
28th Dec '16 6:41:25 PM zunger
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A ''patronymic'' is a surname formed from the name of the owner's father or a paternal ancestor, used by a culture in place of a family name that is handed down from generation to generation. As an interesting note, while some cultures exist that do use matronymics (names derived from one's mother), more often in a culture that uses patronymics, taking such a name is a sign of illegitimacy.

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A ''patronymic'' is a surname formed from the name of the owner's father or a paternal ancestor, used by a culture in place of or in addition to a family name that is handed down from generation to generation. As an interesting note, while some cultures exist that do use matronymics (names derived from one's mother), more often in a culture that uses patronymics, taking such a name is a sign of illegitimacy.



There are only a few modern cultures that still retain the use of a patronymic (Eastern Europe, Russia, Mongolia, Iceland, Malaysia, Tamil Nadu in India, and Arabic countries); it just gets awkward as the populations get high, so most of these cultures (with the notable exception of Iceland, which ''does not'' have surnames bar a select few families that have had them since before taking up family names was ''forbidden by law'') cheat by adopting proper surnames or other monikers as well. Not so for alien species in ScienceFiction. Most alien races have OnlyOneName, and among those who don't, it's usually a patronymic. Especially [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proud warrior races]].

Less often, but still more common than a proper surname, a character will use a locative name (Such as Xev of [=B3K=] from ''Series/{{Lexx}}''). Various Jaffa in ''Series/StargateSG1'' have used either (and the cultural bias is demonstrated by Master Bra'tac, who always referred to General Hammond as "Hammond of Texas"). The [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proudest of the warrior races]] have ''both''.

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There are only a Very few modern cultures that still retain the use of a patronymic (Eastern Europe, Russia, Mongolia, Iceland, Malaysia, Tamil Nadu in India, and Arabic countries); patronymics exclusively, because it just gets awkward as the populations get high, so most grow; Iceland is one of these cultures the few remaining cases, where (with the notable exception of Iceland, which ''does not'' have surnames bar a select few families that have which had them family names since before taking them up was forbidden by law) people are known by first name and patronymic. However, many cultures use them as part of a broader name. Slavic names include both a patronymic and a family name, and the polite form of address (analogous to "Mr. Lastname" in English or "Lastname-sama" in Japanese) is the first name and patronymic. (So for example, a letter to Putin might begin "Dear Vladimir Vladimirovich!") Formal Spanish names was ''forbidden by law'') cheat by adopting proper include a given name, the father's first surname, the mother's first surname, and may also include toponyms, married names, and so on. (The Other Wiki has gory details [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_naming_customs]]) Arabic frequently uses either patronymics or the opposite ("father-of") in addition to surnames, but these often replace surnames or other monikers in common speech. (So Mahmoud Abbas is more commonly known as well. Not so for alien species in ScienceFiction. abu-Mazen, "the father of Mazen")

Most alien races have OnlyOneName, and among those who don't, it's usually a patronymic. Especially [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proud warrior races]].

races]]. Less often, but still more common than a proper surname, a character will use a locative name (Such as Xev of [=B3K=] from ''Series/{{Lexx}}''). Various Jaffa in ''Series/StargateSG1'' have used either (and the cultural bias is demonstrated by Master Bra'tac, who always referred to General Hammond as "Hammond of Texas"). The [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proudest of the warrior races]] have ''both''.
10th Dec '16 7:08:58 AM Khathi
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* Mongols don't use proper family names, and to distinguish between the people with the same given name they use patronymics usually, father's name in a genitive case, giving it a ubiquitous "iin" ending appended ''before'' the given name, though it isn't held in much significance and is often limited to just an initial. In an official context, like in passport, the patronymic (rarely, a matronymic) is, however, written in a nominative case. Clan names, while being allowed again nowadays, have no legal significance and aren't recorded in official documents.
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