History UsefulNotes / Patronymic

20th Dec '15 8:05:44 PM DeisTheAlcano
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* In ''{{Film/Thor}}'' and ''Film/TheAvengers'', Thor addresses [[PhilCoulson Agent Coulson]] as "Son of Coul". ** Thor calls himself either Odinson or Son of Odin.
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* In ''{{Film/Thor}}'' and ''Film/TheAvengers'', ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', Thor addresses [[PhilCoulson Agent Coulson]] Coulson as "Son of Coul". ** Coul" assuming that his surname is used the same in his culture. Thor calls himself either Odinson or Son of Odin. Odin.
12th Nov '15 6:56:45 PM nombretomado
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* The protagonist of RobinHobb's ''[[Literature/RealmOfTheElderlings The Farseer Trilogy]]'' is named [=FitzChivalry=] Farseer, and thus his ''given'' name is actually a patronymic.
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* The protagonist of RobinHobb's Creator/RobinHobb's ''[[Literature/RealmOfTheElderlings The Farseer Trilogy]]'' is named [=FitzChivalry=] Farseer, and thus his ''given'' name is actually a patronymic.
25th Jul '15 7:07:27 PM Willbyr
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* [[{{Tsundere}} Anna]] [[PlayingWithFire Yurievna Cocolova]] from MahouSenseiNegima (She's usually called by her diminutive: Anya)
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* [[{{Tsundere}} Anna]] [[PlayingWithFire Yurievna Cocolova]] from MahouSenseiNegima ''Manga/MahouSenseiNegima'' (She's usually called by her diminutive: Anya)

* Chihaya Ayase from ''{{Chihayafuru}}'' and her sister Chitose take a kanji from her mother's name, Chieko.
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* Chihaya Ayase from ''{{Chihayafuru}}'' ''Manga/{{Chihayafuru}}'' and her sister Chitose take a kanji from her mother's name, Chieko.
6th Jul '15 9:14:05 AM Morgenthaler
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* Weird subversion: Thanks to a miscommunication, the Arab protagonist of ''TheThirteenthWarrior'' became known as "Eben" -- a mispronunciation of the Arabic word "ibn", which means "son of".
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* Weird subversion: Thanks to a miscommunication, the Arab protagonist of ''TheThirteenthWarrior'' ''Film/TheThirteenthWarrior'' became known as "Eben" -- a mispronunciation of the Arabic word "ibn", which means "son of".
5th Jul '15 9:17:24 PM nombretomado
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Less often, but still more common than a proper surname, a character will use a locative name (Such as Xev of [=B3K=] from ''{{Lexx}}''). Various Jaffa in ''Series/StargateSG1'' have used either (and the cultural bias is demonstrated by Master Bra'tac, who always referred to General Hammond as "Hammond of Texas"). The [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proudest of the warrior races]] have ''both''.
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Less often, but still more common than a proper surname, a character will use a locative name (Such as Xev of [=B3K=] from ''{{Lexx}}'').''Series/{{Lexx}}''). Various Jaffa in ''Series/StargateSG1'' have used either (and the cultural bias is demonstrated by Master Bra'tac, who always referred to General Hammond as "Hammond of Texas"). The [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy proudest of the warrior races]] have ''both''.
28th Jun '15 4:24:14 PM nombretomado
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* On the original ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Classic}}'', characters would occasionally use these as well.
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* On the original ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Classic}}'', Galactica|1978}}'', characters would occasionally use these as well.
19th May '15 9:51:10 AM nombretomado
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* Some Gauls in ''{{Asterix}}'', although mostly for humour value. Semiautomatix -> Fulliautomatix, Astronomix -> Asterix, Obeliscoidix -> Obelix. There's also the historical example of Caesar -> Caesarion.
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* Some Gauls in ''{{Asterix}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'', although mostly for humour value. Semiautomatix -> Fulliautomatix, Astronomix -> Asterix, Obeliscoidix -> Obelix. There's also the historical example of Caesar -> Caesarion.
3rd May '15 5:29:29 PM Narsil
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Removed most of the Rome stuff since it *isn't* actually about patronymics—just ordinary family names. But kept the filiation ("son of X") bit, and added an example
* The ancient Romans often didn't bother naming daughters, so instead of names they'd get first, second, third (as in "third daughter"). The end result of this was most women could only really be named with a patronymic name, or it'd be impossible to tell them apart. They were only slightly less lazy when naming sons, and tended to number them, too. ** It wasn't so bad as all that; daughters would have variations on their father's clan name. The confusing part is that aristocratic fathers would often name their eldest sons after themselves with no numbers, leading to generation after generation of guys named Publius Claudius Pulcher. Only slightly better than PlanetOfSteves. ** Girls mostly got the feminine version of their father's family name - Marc Antony's daughter was named Antonia and Augustus' daughter was Julia, for example. They did sometimes get nicknames - sometimes as simple as Maior and Minor and sometimes more creative - to tell them apart. A lot of the time, though, you just had to learn to keep all your Cornelias straight. *** Roman nicknames, known as "cognomen", were actually a formally recognized parts of a person's full name -- mostly because Romans really were rather unimaginative with given names (called "praenomen" in Latin, the Romans had about three dozen different praenomens in total, out of which only a dozen are regularly used), and even one clan could have a lot of the similarly named guys. What's interesting is that in the late Republic cognomens also became hereditary and turned into an ersatz-family name, to distinguish the branches in TheClan. This, in turn caused an another round of nicknaming, this time called "agnomen" -- for example Caligula's full name was Gaius[[note]]''praenomen'' or given name[[/note]] Julius[[note]]''nomen gentile'', family name proper[[/note]] Caesar[[note]]originally Caesar's ''cognomen'', but it was adopted by all subsequent Roman Emperors as a title[[/note]] Germanicus[[note]]''cognomen'', or nickname, meaning "the conqueror of Germany". Caligula actually inherited it from his father, who was called exactly the same except for the "Caligula" bit and is generally known simply as Germanicus[[/note]] Caligula[[note]]''agnomen'', or second nickname, meaning "a Little Boot", after heavy military sandals worn by legionnaires. Caligula, being a MilitaryBrat, wore a smaller version of them in his childhood, and was nicknamed thusly.[[/note]]. ** More in line with proper patronymics, the full name listed on official records would often include a filiation, which basically inserted the ''praenomina'' of his father and grandfather between the ''nomen'' and the ''cognomen''. The Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar that everyone knows and loves would have been listed as "Gaius Iulius Gaii filius[[note]]"son of Gaius"[[/note]] Gaii nepos[[note]]"grandson of Gaius"[[/note]] Caesar" (remember how we mentioned that the Romans got a bit uncreative with their names?), or "C. Iulius C. f. C. n. Caesar" for short.
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* The ancient Romans often AncientRome didn't bother naming daughters, so instead of names they'd get first, second, third (as in "third daughter"). The end result of this was most women could only really be named with a patronymic name, or it'd be impossible to tell them apart. They were only slightly less lazy when naming sons, and tended to number them, too. ** It wasn't so bad as all that; daughters would have variations on their father's clan name. The confusing part is that aristocratic fathers would often name their eldest sons after themselves with no numbers, leading to generation after generation of guys named Publius Claudius Pulcher. Only slightly better than PlanetOfSteves. ** Girls mostly got the feminine version of their father's family name - Marc Antony's daughter was named Antonia and Augustus' daughter was Julia, for example. They did sometimes get nicknames - sometimes as simple as Maior and Minor and sometimes more creative - to tell them apart. A lot of the time, though, you just had to learn to keep all your Cornelias straight. *** Roman nicknames, known as "cognomen", were actually a formally recognized parts of a person's full name -- mostly because Romans really were rather unimaginative with given names (called "praenomen" in Latin, the Romans had about three dozen different praenomens in total, out of which only a dozen are regularly used), and even one clan could have a lot of the similarly named guys. What's interesting is that in the late Republic cognomens also became hereditary and turned into an ersatz-family name, to distinguish the branches in TheClan. This, in turn caused an another round of nicknaming, this time called "agnomen" -- for example Caligula's full name was Gaius[[note]]''praenomen'' or given name[[/note]] Julius[[note]]''nomen gentile'', family name proper[[/note]] Caesar[[note]]originally Caesar's ''cognomen'', but it was adopted by all subsequent Roman Emperors as a title[[/note]] Germanicus[[note]]''cognomen'', or nickname, meaning "the conqueror of Germany". Caligula actually inherited it from his father, who was called exactly the same except for the "Caligula" bit and is generally known simply as Germanicus[[/note]] Caligula[[note]]''agnomen'', or second nickname, meaning "a Little Boot", after heavy military sandals worn by legionnaires. Caligula, being a MilitaryBrat, wore a smaller version of them in his childhood, and was nicknamed thusly.[[/note]]. ** More in line with proper use patronymics, the full name listed on since they used modern-style family names (the ''nomen''). But in some formal settings, like official records records, a person's name would often include a filiation, which basically inserted the ''praenomina'' of his father and grandfather between the ''nomen'' and the ''cognomen''. The Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar that everyone knows and loves would have been listed as "Gaius Iulius Gaii filius[[note]]"son of Gaius"[[/note]] Gaii nepos[[note]]"grandson of Gaius"[[/note]] Caesar" (remember how we mentioned that the Romans got a bit uncreative with their names?), Caesar", or "C. Iulius C. f. C. n. Caesar" for short.short. ** When [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Gaius Octavius]] found he'd been posthumously adopted by Julius Caesar, he had his new father officially proclaimed a demigod--and his own name, for formal purposes, became "Gaius Julius Caesar Divi filius", "...the son of the god".
28th Apr '15 2:14:24 AM KyleJacobs
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For crying out loud...
** "Traditional" Hebrew names are patronyms. They are still used for calling people to read from the Torah. Converts will use "Ben-Avraham", meaning "son of Abraham" (or "Bat-Avraham" meaning "daughter of Abraham), to connect them to their new people. *** It's not just patronymic, but matronymic as well. For example, "Reuven ben Yaakov v'Leah" is Reuben, son of Jacob and Leah. And the traditional styling for a convert is usually " ben/bat Avraham Aveinu v'Sarah Imeinu", or , son/daughter of Abraham our father and Sarah our mother. **** Ben or bat is not just a name for converts, though it does tend to appear mostly within the gap between Orthodox Jews (who have their own naming traditions) and the totally secular. For example, someone discussing LeftBehind pointed to the name "Tzion Ben-Yehuda" as unrealistically Jewish. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itamar_Ben-Avi Oh really?]] *** The person on the LeftBehind page was talking about the mixed spelling. The use of tz, as is used when translitterating Hebrew, and the use of J, which doesn't exist in the Hebrew language. The point was just to be consistent. **** Actually, the particular Hebrew letter can be transliterated as either J or Y. *** Also, only the mother's name is used for some one who is sick. So when praying for someone who is ill you would call them for example Yoseph ben Shifra, rather than Yoseph ben Avraham v'Shifra.
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** "Traditional" Hebrew names are patronyms.both patronymic and matronymic. They are still used for calling people to read from the Torah. Converts will use "Ben-Avraham", meaning "son of Abraham" (or "Bat-Avraham" meaning "daughter of Abraham), to connect them to their new people.\n*** It's not just patronymic, but matronymic as well. For example, "Reuven ben Yaakov v'Leah" is Reuben, son of Jacob and Leah. And the traditional styling for a convert is usually " ben/bat Avraham Aveinu v'Sarah Imeinu", or , son/daughter of Abraham our father and Sarah our mother. **** Ben or bat is not just a name for converts, though it does tend mother. Converts will use "Ben-Avraham", meaning "son of Abraham" (or "Bat-Avraham" meaning "daughter of Abraham), to appear mostly within the gap between Orthodox Jews (who have connect them to their own naming traditions) and the totally secular. For example, someone discussing LeftBehind pointed to the name "Tzion Ben-Yehuda" as unrealistically Jewish. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itamar_Ben-Avi Oh really?]] *** The person on the LeftBehind page was talking about the mixed spelling. The use of tz, as is used when translitterating Hebrew, and the use of J, which doesn't exist in the Hebrew language. The point was just to be consistent. **** Actually, the particular Hebrew letter can be transliterated as either J or Y. *** Also, only the mother's name is used for some one who is sick. So when praying for someone who is ill you would call them for example Yoseph ben Shifra, rather than Yoseph ben Avraham v'Shifra.new people.
20th Apr '15 6:25:11 AM NhazUl
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** Most Russian surnames are essentially archaic form of patronymics: "-ov" was a standard patronymic ending for commoners, while modern form "-vich" was used by nobility. Surnames ending on "-vich" are also common but less so and more in Western parts of the country.
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** Most Russian surnames are essentially archaic form of patronymics: "-ov" was a standard patronymic ending for commoners, while modern form "-vich" was used by nobility. Surnames ending on "-vich" are also common but less so and more in Western parts of the country. Russian female patronymics have "-ovna"/"-evna" as a suffix and gender declension is also present in surnames (see below).

** The same is true of the Balkan "-ić" ending, found in Croatian, Serbian, etc. names e.g.: Petrović, Jovanović ** The ending "-vich" or "-ov" (and varieties thereof), generally speaking, denotes the form of a patronymic in Slavic languages. Some (e.g. Serbian and Croatian) seem to feature names ending in "-vich" (alternatively spelled "-vic") more commonly, while others (e.g. Russian and Bulgarian) seem to feature names ending in "-ov" more commonly.
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** The same is true of the Balkan "-ić" ending, found in Croatian, Serbian, etc. names e.g.: Petrović, Jovanović Jovanović. Also, often gender declension is present ("-ova"/"-eva" for female names but the name's still patronymic). Rare cases of matronymic names do exist (with a suffix such as -in/-ina) in some cases of illegitimacy. ** The ending "-vich" or "-ov" (and varieties thereof), generally speaking, denotes the form of a patronymic in Slavic languages. [[note]]-"-ev" is used when the previous sound is a vowel or a palatalized consonant, it is derived from "-yov" which accounted for the palatalization-[[/note]] Some (e.g. Serbian and Croatian) seem to feature names ending in "-vich" (alternatively spelled "-vic") more commonly, while others (e.g. Russian and Bulgarian) Russian) seem to feature names ending in "-ov" more commonly.commonly. ** Bulgarian patronymics are identical to surnames ("-ov"/"-ev" for men and "-ova"/"-eva" for women). This could result in people of the older generation (commonly teachers) referring to someone by their name and patronymic rather than name and surname by Russian tradition, which is regarded as weird (or can trigger a SpellMyNameWithAnS if the two are similar).
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