History UsefulNotes / Paris

23rd Jan '16 3:07:16 PM Morgenthaler
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* GenreSavvy: According to UrbanLegend, The Baron Georges Eugene Haussmann created the wide boulevards to avoid barricades in case of rebellion (which happened quite often in his nineteenth century). According to UrbanLegend, they had to be large enough to fire cannon down them at the mob. Haussmann himself denied this, [[BoringButPractical the wide boulevards were intended by him to accomodate the greater urban population and carriage traffic]].
** In any case, the goal of making impossible-to-barricade streets never materialized: as demonstrated by the Paris Commune of 1871, irate Parisians can barricade ''anything''.
** The wide boulevards also had the rather unfortunate effect of leaving the city wide open to attacking armies - including tanks - who could use the wide boulevard to march right to the heart of the city. This made the infamously brutal suppression of the Commune possible. It also proved useful to the Nazis in maintaining curfew during the Occupation, something which a patriot like Haussmann would probably regret.
3rd Jan '16 11:53:17 PM JulianLapostat
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* StarvingArtist: The city used to be a haven for them and still represented as such in fictional depictions.. Creator/VincentVanGogh, the Impressionists, bad boy poets Francois Villon and Arthur Rimbaud, Creator/JamesJoyce and the Modernists, surrealists, jazz musicians and underground experimental film-makers. The reason it attracted them was that the rents were cheaper back then, the Louvre (and the Cinematheque) was open till late at night for their perusal, lots of sidewalk cafes and a good night life. Since the rise of neoliberalism in the 80s and 90s, Paris, like many world cities, has become quite expensive which many feel compromises the qualities that made it so great in the first place.

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* StarvingArtist: The city used to be a haven for them and still represented as such in fictional depictions.. Creator/VincentVanGogh, the Impressionists, bad boy poets Francois Villon and Arthur Rimbaud, Creator/JamesJoyce and the Modernists, surrealists, jazz musicians and underground musicians, experimental film-makers.film-makers across the world who, like Creator/WoodyAllen notes, "thank God the French exist" as a market for their films. The reason it attracted them was that the rents were cheaper back then, the Louvre (and the Cinematheque) was open till late at night for their perusal, lots of sidewalk cafes and a good night life. Since the rise of neoliberalism in the 80s and 90s, Paris, like many world cities, has become quite expensive which many feel compromises the qualities that made it so great in the first place.
3rd Jan '16 10:28:34 PM JulianLapostat
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Added DiffLines:

* StarvingArtist: The city used to be a haven for them and still represented as such in fictional depictions.. Creator/VincentVanGogh, the Impressionists, bad boy poets Francois Villon and Arthur Rimbaud, Creator/JamesJoyce and the Modernists, surrealists, jazz musicians and underground experimental film-makers. The reason it attracted them was that the rents were cheaper back then, the Louvre (and the Cinematheque) was open till late at night for their perusal, lots of sidewalk cafes and a good night life. Since the rise of neoliberalism in the 80s and 90s, Paris, like many world cities, has become quite expensive which many feel compromises the qualities that made it so great in the first place.
3rd Jan '16 10:21:44 PM JulianLapostat
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-> '''Creator/VictorHugo''': ''"[[ReignOfTerror Ninety-three]] was the war of Europe against France, and of France against Paris. And what was the Revolution? It was the victory of France over Europe, and of Paris over France. Hence the immensity of that terrible moment?, '93, greater than all the rest of the century"''

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-> --> '''Creator/VictorHugo''': ''"[[ReignOfTerror Ninety-three]] was the war of Europe against France, and of France against Paris. And what was the Revolution? It was the victory of France over Europe, and of Paris over France. Hence the immensity of that terrible moment?, '93, greater than all the rest of the century"''
3rd Jan '16 10:21:31 PM JulianLapostat
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** French Kings often used any chance they could to get away from the city. King Philip le Bel faced a riot from angry Parisians and had to hide in the Temple Fortress (he would later win back his popularity by killing his former Templar benefactors). Poor King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI's ship was sunk the day the women of Paris led him from Versailles to Tuilleries.
** Republican governments often tried in vain to move the capital out of Paris, when the Girondins tried to do so, they lost their heads and the Third Republic operated from Versailles during the Paris Commune and even after the suppression was afraid of stepping in, with many arguing to shift the capital. It was also a reason why Vichy was chosen for Petain's capital instead of Paris. It was only since the gentrification of the 70s (especially the destruction of Les Halles under Pompidou) and rising costs of living that forced working class and immigrants to live in the banlieues (suburbs) that people felt that Paris had finally become a capital of France, rather than a city cut-off from the rest. Parisians, like post-Gentrification New York, feel that a vital part of its independent badass spirit was traded for neoliberal reforms.
** One reason for Paris' independence was that many of its neighbourhoods were close-knit and fairly communal and this nurtured a long independent spirit of hidden self-government and vigilance. This finally burst through during the Revolution which as Creator/VictorHugo noted was the "triumph of France over Europe and Paris over France".

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** Historically, French Kings often used any chance they could to get away from the city. King Philip le Bel faced a riot from angry Parisians and had to hide in the Temple Fortress (he would later win back his popularity by killing his former Templar benefactors). Poor King UsefulNotes/LouisXVI's ship was sunk the day the women of Paris led him from Versailles to Tuilleries. \n** Even after the Revolution, there were instances of Republican governments often tried in vain trying to move the capital out of Paris, when which the Girondins tried to do so, they lost so only to lose their heads and the heads. The Third Republic operated from Versailles during the Paris Commune and even after the suppression was afraid of stepping in, with many arguing to shift the capital. It was also a reason why Vichy was chosen for Petain's capital instead of Paris. It was only since the gentrification of the 70s (especially the destruction of Les Halles under Pompidou) and rising costs of living that forced working class and immigrants to live in the banlieues (suburbs) that people felt that Paris had finally become a capital of France, rather than a city cut-off from the rest. Parisians, like post-Gentrification New York, feel that a vital part of its independent badass spirit was traded for neoliberal reforms.capital.
** One reason for Paris' independence was that many of its neighbourhoods were close-knit and fairly communal and this nurtured a long independent spirit of hidden self-government and vigilance. This finally burst through during the Revolution which Revolution, as Creator/VictorHugo noted by Victor Hugo in his novel ''Literature/NinetyThree''
-> '''Creator/VictorHugo''': ''"[[ReignOfTerror Ninety-three]]
was the "triumph war of Europe against France, and of France against Paris. And what was the Revolution? It was the victory of France over Europe Europe, and of Paris over France". France. Hence the immensity of that terrible moment?, '93, greater than all the rest of the century"''



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1st Jan '16 2:24:22 AM Benja1789
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In its administrative area (the 75 postal area, split up into twenty numbered administrative districts called "arrondissements", although these sort of things exist all over France), also known as "downtown Paris", the population is only about 2 million, but the total urban sprawl has a population of over 10 million (making it the largest urban area in UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion and the second-largest in Europe, after UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}}). The region roughly in a 50 km radius around Paris is known as Ile-de-France, and its inhabitants are called "Franciliens" - although French people tend to refer to them all as Parisians.

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In its administrative area (the 75 postal area, split up into twenty numbered administrative districts called "arrondissements", although these sort of things exist all over France), also known as "downtown Paris", the population is only about 2 million, but the total urban sprawl has a population of over 10 11 million (making it the largest urban area in UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion and the second-largest in Europe, after UsefulNotes/{{Moscow}}). The region roughly in a 50 km radius around Paris is known as Ile-de-France, and its inhabitants are called "Franciliens" - although French people tend to refer to them all as Parisians.
3rd Dec '15 7:54:00 AM eroock
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-->--'''Creator/ErnestHemingway'''

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-->--'''Creator/ErnestHemingway'''
-->-- '''Creator/ErnestHemingway'''



** Historically, Paris is the site of infamous massacres - the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre (with 30,000 dead in three days), the events of the French Revolution (especially the September Massacres and the final months of the ReignOfTerror when all executions were conducted in the capital), the Bloody Week of the Paris Commune (30,000 dead in a single week), the Protests in 1961 when the French Police led by Maurice Papon killed 400 Algerians and dumped their bodies in the Seine. These and other incidents are portrayed in works by Dumas, Dickens and in the case of the Algerian massacre, the Michael Haneke film ''Caché''

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** Historically, Paris is the site of infamous massacres - the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre (with 30,000 dead in three days), the events of the French Revolution (especially the September Massacres and the final months of the ReignOfTerror when all executions were conducted in the capital), the Bloody Week of the Paris Commune (30,000 dead in a single week), the Protests in 1961 when the French Police led by Maurice Papon killed 400 Algerians and dumped their bodies in the Seine. These and other incidents are portrayed in works by Dumas, Dickens and in the case of the Algerian massacre, the Michael Haneke Creator/MichaelHaneke film ''Caché''''Caché''.
15th Nov '15 11:47:26 AM youngbond007
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** In the 21st Century of course, there's the attack on the offices of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo by religious extremists.

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** In the 21st Century of course, there's there were the terrorists attack on the offices of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo by religious extremists.extremists in January 2015. Then there was the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_2015_Paris_attacks November terrorist attacks]] that took place '''the same year''' by Islamic terrorists.
11th Nov '15 5:48:12 AM JulianLapostat
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* DarkAndTroubledPast: In spades:
** Historically, Paris is the site of infamous massacres - the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre (with 30,000 dead in three days), the events of the French Revolution (especially the September Massacres and the final months of the ReignOfTerror when all executions were conducted in the capital), the Bloody Week of the Paris Commune (30,000 dead in a single week), the Protests in 1961 when the French Police led by Maurice Papon killed 400 Algerians and dumped their bodies in the Seine.

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* DarkAndTroubledPast: In spades:
As much as fiction portrays the happy, ShiningCity of tourist postcards, the darker history of Paris also gets featured in fiction:
** Historically, Paris is the site of infamous massacres - the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre (with 30,000 dead in three days), the events of the French Revolution (especially the September Massacres and the final months of the ReignOfTerror when all executions were conducted in the capital), the Bloody Week of the Paris Commune (30,000 dead in a single week), the Protests in 1961 when the French Police led by Maurice Papon killed 400 Algerians and dumped their bodies in the Seine. These and other incidents are portrayed in works by Dumas, Dickens and in the case of the Algerian massacre, the Michael Haneke film ''Caché''



** In the 21st Century of course, there's the attack on the Charlie Hebdo offices by religious extremists.
* EiffelTowerEffect: Take a look at the image there. Like Big Ben for London and Hagia Sophia for Istanbul, it often serves as an instant metonym for Paris/France in the mind of the audiences.

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** In the 21st Century of course, there's the attack on the offices of the satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo offices by religious extremists.
* EiffelTowerEffect: Take a look at the image there. Like Big Ben for London and Hagia Sophia for Istanbul, it often serves as an instant metonym for Paris/France in the mind of the audiences.movie audiences:



* MonumentalDamage: For all its deserved status as a cultural capital, Paris is a city that has seen severe changes to its city geography and destruction of several landmarks over the last two hundred years:

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* MonumentalDamage: Disaster movies often like to show shots of famous Parisian monuments crumbling in post-apocalyptic landscapes. Funnily enough, this is closer to the truth. For all its deserved status as a cultural capital, Paris is a city that has seen severe changes to its city geography and destruction of several landmarks over the last two hundred years:



* PowderKegCrowd: Paris has a history in France for being highly unruly.

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* PowderKegCrowd: Paris has a history in France for being highly unruly.unruly and is often represented this way in fiction where crowds of French protestors from the Revolution to "May '68" still show up in movies and books:
8th May '15 5:13:49 AM JulianLapostat
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* GenreSavvy: The [[MagnificentBastard Baron Georges Eugene Haussmann]] created the wide boulevards to avoid barricades in case of rebellion (which happened quite often in his nineteenth century). According to UrbanLegend, they had to be large enough to fire cannon down them at the mob.
** He nevertheless failed in the goal of making impossible-to-barricade streets: as demonstrated by the Paris Commune of 1871, irate Parisians can barricade ''anything''.

to:

* GenreSavvy: According to UrbanLegend, The [[MagnificentBastard Baron Georges Eugene Haussmann]] Haussmann created the wide boulevards to avoid barricades in case of rebellion (which happened quite often in his nineteenth century). According to UrbanLegend, they had to be large enough to fire cannon down them at the mob.
mob. Haussmann himself denied this, [[BoringButPractical the wide boulevards were intended by him to accomodate the greater urban population and carriage traffic]].
** He nevertheless failed in In any case, the goal of making impossible-to-barricade streets: streets never materialized: as demonstrated by the Paris Commune of 1871, irate Parisians can barricade ''anything''.
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