History UsefulNotes / NewYorkCity

17th Feb '17 6:19:43 PM bt8257
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The most populous city in the United States, the largest English-speaking city in the world, and home to a massive media industry outclassed in the U.S. only by Hollywood. It is undoubtedly one of the most cosmopolitan, ethnically diverse, and culturally influential cities in history (if not ''the'' most). Despite all of which, it's still not the capital of its state; that title would go to Albany.

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The most populous city in the United States, the largest English-speaking city in the world, and home to a massive media industry outclassed in the U.S. only by Hollywood. It is undoubtedly one of the most cosmopolitan, ethnically diverse, and culturally influential cities in history (if not ''the'' most). Despite all of which, it's still not the capital of its state; that title would go goes to Albany.
22nd Jan '17 10:22:23 PM KYCubbie
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Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]] and UsefulNotes/NewJersey -- hence the oft-mentioned Tri-State area -- and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.

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Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]] and UsefulNotes/NewJersey -- hence the oft-mentioned Tri-State area -- and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several UsefulNotes/{{Pennsylvania}}[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.



* '''Queens''' (Queens County): The home of the two NYC airports, [=LaGuardia=] (named after the city's [[TheGreatDepression Depression]]-era mayor) and [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]] (originally Idlewild), two World Fairs, underdog baseball team The Mets, the site of tennis's US Open, and lots and ''lots'' of graveyards (Manhattan hasn't had room for burials since the 1850s, so most New Yorkers who opt to be buried wind up resting in Queens). The second most populate borough, with a mix of working-class neighborhoods in the west and {{suburbia}} in the east. Fun trivia: it is the most ethnically and linguistically diverse area in the world, with native speakers of at least 140 different languages living within its 178 square miles. You can find a family-owned restaurant that represents virtually every ethnicity. It's home to nearly half the city's Asian population, and is also one of the few counties in the US where African-Americans (who make up one in five residents) make more money on average than whites.

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* '''Queens''' (Queens County): The home of the two NYC airports, [=LaGuardia=] (named after the city's [[TheGreatDepression Depression]]-era mayor) and [[UsefulNotes/JohnFKennedy JFK]] (originally Idlewild), two World World's Fairs, underdog baseball team The Mets, the site of tennis's UsefulNotes/{{tennis}}' US Open, and lots and ''lots'' of graveyards (Manhattan hasn't had room for burials since the 1850s, so most New Yorkers who opt to be buried wind up resting in Queens). The second most populate populous borough, with a mix of working-class neighborhoods in the west and {{suburbia}} in the east. Fun trivia: it is the most ethnically and linguistically diverse area in the world, with native speakers of at least 140 different languages living within its 178 square miles. You can find a family-owned restaurant that represents virtually every ethnicity. It's home to nearly half the city's Asian population, and is also one of the few counties in the US where African-Americans (who make up one in five residents) make more money on average than whites.



* Rockefeller Center, Home of a large Christmas tree and where Creator/{{NBC}} is based.

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* Rockefeller Center, Home home of a large Christmas tree and where Creator/{{NBC}} is based.



* Grants Tomb

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* Grants Grant's Tomb



* The original, flagship stores for Macy's, Bloomingdale's, Saks Fifth Ave, Barnes & Nobles, and other major chains.

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* The original, flagship stores for Macy's, Bloomingdale's, Saks Fifth Ave, Barnes & Nobles, Noble, and other major chains.



TheGreatDepression started in New York with the Stock Market Crash of 1929, and the ensuing economic collapse led to the election of Fiorello La Guardia as mayor in 1933. A progressive social reformer and supporter of [[UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt the New Deal]], La Guardia is sometimes considered to be New York's greatest mayor. He abolished the corrupt "ward" system, broke the power of Tammany Hall (the organization stuck around InNameOnly until 1968), heavily expanded the subways, brought down [[TheMafia Lucky Luciano]], and instituted massive public works projects to build bridges, parks, airports (including the one that now bears his name) and highways. Parts of his legacy, however, are rather controversial, particularly those related to his chief planner, Robert Moses (who served long after La Guardia's retirement). Moses' critics have accused him of destroying neighborhoods (particularly the [[WretchedHive South Bronx]] and Coney Island) and uprooting thousands through the construction of highways, causing the departure of the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants baseball teams for UsefulNotes/LosAngeles and UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco respectively, and facilitating the growth of the {{suburbia}} that now blankets Long Island. Supporters, meanwhile, claim that he had built valuable infrastructure that allowed New York to avoid the fate of many Rust Belt cities and thrive into the present day and beyond.

After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, with most of Europe in ruins, New York emerged to replace [[LondonTown London]] as the world's premier financial center and [[GayParee Paris]] as the capital of the art world. The UsefulNotes/UnitedNations Headquarters was built in Manhattan along the East River, turning New York into a political center as well. Midtown Manhattan went through a huge construction boom fueled by post-war prosperity. However, not all was well. Starting in 1950, New York's population began dropping, thanks to the highways (many of them built by the aforementioned Robert Moses) running out into the growing suburbs (though Moses's plans to put through freeways through the heart of Manhattan never went through due to neighborhood protests and the slow decline of his power). In TheSixties, the city, under the inept mayorship of John Lindsay, experienced a series of strikes by transit workers, teachers and sanitation workers, a riot between college students and construction workers, and a blizzard that crippled the city. The rise of container shipping killed New York's ports, as the new Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal in [[{{Joisey}} New Jersey]] could handle the massive stacks of shipping containers that New York could not. Times Square became increasingly seedy, filled with porn theaters and other disreputable businesses, and came to symbolize the city's decline.

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TheGreatDepression started in New York with the Stock Market Crash of 1929, and the ensuing economic collapse led to the election of Fiorello La Guardia as mayor in 1933. A progressive social reformer and supporter of [[UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt the New Deal]], La Guardia is sometimes considered to be New York's greatest mayor. He abolished the corrupt "ward" system, broke the power of Tammany Hall (the organization stuck around InNameOnly until 1968), heavily expanded the subways, brought down [[TheMafia Lucky Luciano]], and instituted massive public works projects to build bridges, parks, airports (including the one that now bears his name) name, though rendered as [=LaGuardia=]) and highways. Parts of his legacy, however, are rather controversial, particularly those related to his chief planner, Robert Moses (who served long after La Guardia's retirement). Moses' critics have accused him of destroying neighborhoods (particularly the [[WretchedHive South Bronx]] and Coney Island) and uprooting thousands through the construction of highways, causing the departure of the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants baseball teams for UsefulNotes/LosAngeles and UsefulNotes/SanFrancisco respectively, and facilitating the growth of the {{suburbia}} that now blankets Long Island. Supporters, meanwhile, claim that he had built valuable infrastructure that allowed New York to avoid the fate of many Rust Belt cities and thrive into the present day and beyond.

After UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, with most of Europe in ruins, New York emerged to replace [[LondonTown London]] as the world's premier financial center and [[GayParee Paris]] as the capital of the art world. The UsefulNotes/UnitedNations Headquarters was built in Manhattan along the East River, turning New York into a political center as well. Midtown Manhattan went through a huge construction boom fueled by post-war prosperity. However, not all was well. Starting in 1950, New York's population began dropping, thanks to the highways (many of them built by the aforementioned Robert Moses) running out into the growing suburbs (though Moses's Moses' plans to put through freeways through the heart of Manhattan never went through due to neighborhood protests and the slow decline of his power). In TheSixties, the city, under the inept mayorship of John Lindsay, experienced a series of strikes by transit workers, teachers and sanitation workers, a riot between college students and construction workers, and a blizzard that crippled the city. The rise of container shipping killed New York's ports, as the new Port Newark-Elizabeth Marine Terminal in [[{{Joisey}} New Jersey]] could handle the massive stacks of shipping containers that New York could not. Times Square became increasingly seedy, filled with porn theaters and other disreputable businesses, and came to symbolize the city's decline.



TheEighties marks the beginning of the city's gentrification, albeit initially, it was not by much. Wall Street was booming, and unemployment was inching down, but crime was still out of control, racial tensions were running high, and homelessness was becoming an epidemic. This all came to a climax in 1990, [[RockBottom when a record 2245 murders were recorded]]. The mayor during this time, Ed Koch, was far more conservative than many of his predecessors (he called himself a "liberal with sanity"), winning the endorsement of both the Democratic ''and'' Republican parties in 1981. He took a tough "law and order" stance in handling crime in the city, banning the playing of radios on the subways, and giving the police broader powers in dealing with homeless people, and he has since become famous for his hawkish pro-UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} views. He was also nationally famous for taking his love of New York to [[PatrioticFervor levels that many would consider extreme]]; he tried to block the creation of a second area code for the city on the grounds that he felt it would divide New Yorkers, and when the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball New York Giants]] won SuperBowl XXI in 1987 he refused to grant them a permit to hold their victory parade in the city, saying that they should parade "in front of the oil drums in Moonachie" on the grounds of their stadium being based in UsefulNotes/NewJersey. While highly popular both during and after his three terms as mayor, he was brought down by his harsh criticism of Jesse Jackson in the 1988 Democratic primaries (which alienated black voters) and a series of corruption scandals during his third term that undermined his "clean" image.

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TheEighties marks the beginning of the city's gentrification, albeit initially, it was not by much. Wall Street was booming, and unemployment was inching down, but crime was still out of control, racial tensions were running high, and homelessness was becoming an epidemic. This all came to a climax in 1990, [[RockBottom when a record 2245 murders were recorded]]. The mayor during this time, Ed Koch, was far more conservative than many of his predecessors (he called himself a "liberal with sanity"), winning the endorsement of both the Democratic ''and'' Republican parties in 1981. He took a tough "law and order" stance in handling crime in the city, banning the playing of radios on the subways, and giving the police broader powers in dealing with homeless people, and he has since become famous for his hawkish pro-UsefulNotes/{{Israel}} views. He was also nationally famous for taking his love of New York to [[PatrioticFervor levels that many would consider extreme]]; he tried to block the creation of a second area code for the city on the grounds that he felt it would divide New Yorkers, and when the [[UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball [[UsefulNotes/NationalFootballLeague New York Giants]] won SuperBowl UsefulNotes/SuperBowl XXI in 1987 he refused to grant them a permit to hold their victory parade in the city, saying that they should parade "in front of the oil drums in Moonachie" on the grounds of their stadium being based in UsefulNotes/NewJersey. While highly popular both during and after his three terms as mayor, he was brought down by his harsh criticism of Jesse Jackson in the 1988 Democratic primaries (which alienated black voters) and a series of corruption scandals during his third term that undermined his "clean" image.



In 2012, the city was hit by Hurricane Sandy, which caused severe damage in Staten Island as well as widespread power outages, flooding in the subways and gas shortages. Mayor Bill De Blasio was elected in 2013, and has thus far taken a much more conciliatory tone towards the city's various public workers unions such as teachers, transportation, and sanitation, many of which had clashed with both Bloomberg and Giuliani and been working for years without a contract, which De Blasio has begun settling. In general De Blasio has struck something of a populist note, occasionally saying things such as that in recent years laws and policy have been in favor of the richest New Yorkers rather than all New Yorkers. Perhaps the most debated pledge of De Blasio's was his promise to end the NYPD's controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy, which gave the police the ability to stop and search anyone they suspected of criminal intent. The law had frequently been criticized for disproportionately targeting black and Latino citizens, had run into numerous 4th amendment challenges, (the right against "unreasonable search and seizure") and despite the fact that the law is intended to prevent violent crime, only a minuscule percentage of the searches ever turned up weapons or any other contraband. Many residents felt that the law worked as a deterrent and prevention method, however, and feared a return to the crime rates of the 1970s and 80s with it and other other police protections/policies being relaxed. As of September 2016, that has not happened, and in fact crime statistics indicate that crime has fallen further after the city stopped using the tactic. The matter was somewhat moot by the time that De Blasio assumed office, however, [[http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/13/nyregion/stop-and-frisk-practice-violated-rights-judge-rules.html?_r=0 as a 2013 court ruling]] from the last months of the Bloomberg administration had sharply curtailed the powers police had assumed under "Stop and Frisk" and effectively defanged the practice. Even [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CtZSLQdWYAAKwCN.jpg the NYPD took a moment to point out the continued fall in crime]] after the end of "Stop and Frisk" when that policy and New York City's crime rate became a subject of contention during the first Presidential debate of 2016.

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In 2012, the city was hit by Hurricane Sandy, which caused severe damage in Staten Island as well as widespread power outages, flooding in the subways and gas shortages. Mayor Bill De Blasio was elected in 2013, and has thus far taken a much more conciliatory tone towards the city's various public workers unions such as teachers, transportation, and sanitation, many of which had clashed with both Bloomberg and Giuliani and been working for years without a contract, which De Blasio has begun settling. In general De Blasio has struck something of a populist note, occasionally saying things such as that in recent years laws and policy have been in favor of the richest New Yorkers rather than all New Yorkers. Perhaps the most debated pledge of De Blasio's was his promise to end the NYPD's controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy, which gave the police the ability to stop and search anyone they suspected of criminal intent. The law had frequently been criticized for disproportionately targeting black and Latino citizens, had run into numerous 4th amendment challenges, challenges (the right against "unreasonable search and seizure") seizure"), and despite the fact that the law is intended to prevent violent crime, only a minuscule percentage of the searches ever turned up weapons or any other contraband. Many residents felt that the law worked as a deterrent and prevention method, however, and feared a return to the crime rates of the 1970s and 80s with it and other other police protections/policies being relaxed. As of September 2016, that has not happened, and in fact crime statistics indicate that crime has fallen further after the city stopped using the tactic. The matter was somewhat moot by the time that De Blasio assumed office, however, [[http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/13/nyregion/stop-and-frisk-practice-violated-rights-judge-rules.html?_r=0 as a 2013 court ruling]] from the last months of the Bloomberg administration had sharply curtailed the powers police had assumed under "Stop and Frisk" and effectively defanged the practice. Even [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CtZSLQdWYAAKwCN.jpg the NYPD took a moment to point out the continued fall in crime]] after the end of "Stop and Frisk" when that policy and New York City's crime rate became a subject of contention during the first Presidential debate of 2016.



Four separate pages on TheOtherWiki for media listings, 6,797 results as a keyword on IMDB... it's fair to say that [[BigApplesauce the city features a lot in fiction]]. Probably every reader here has at least one NY-set TV show on their regular watch-list or has had at some time.

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Four separate pages on TheOtherWiki [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] for media listings, 6,797 results as a keyword on IMDB... it's fair to say that [[BigApplesauce the city features a lot in fiction]]. Probably every reader here has at least one NY-set TV show on their regular watch-list or has had at some time.
31st Dec '16 8:33:37 PM FF32
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* '''Staten Island''' (Richmond County): Known by other New Yorkers for the Ferry to Manhattan, high tolls, and relative suburbanity (in that order). Third-largest in geographic size but least populous by far with a population 480,000, it is the least dense borough and the only one not connected to the subway (though it has its own local train that uses the same fare system). As a result, Staten Islanders are more likely to own cars than other New Yorkers. Combined with the fact that it stands at a bit of a remove from the rest of the city geographically but is only separated by a narrow channel from New Jersey (specifically Hudson, Union, and Middlesex Counties), this different character has led to occasional grumblings from New Jerseyans that the island should really be part of NJ, and frequent jokes from other New Yorkers that it basically already is. Its four road bridges are tolled at $14-16, rising from time to time.[[note]]Though discounts exist for residents. Take that, everyone else![[/note]] If this article was written two decades ago, Fresh Kills Landfill would've replaced "high tolls" in this entry's first sentence. It's now being turned into a park 3 times the size of Central Park. Incidentally, a ''third'' of Staten Island is protected parkland, including beaches, wildlife refuges, and dense woodlands. Two large hills straddle a ridge spanning most of the island; Todt Hill is the highest natural point along the Eastern Seaboard. Numerous historical sights, some [[UsefulNotes/TheColonialPeriod pre-Revolution]], dot the island. Richmondtown in particular is preserved colonial village, a subject of many field trips for New York schoolkids. If you're into urban exploration, the island's brownfield areas have much to offer. The whole island competes with Manhattan's Washington Square for the title of "most reputably haunted place in New York State."\\

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* '''Staten Island''' (Richmond County): Known by other New Yorkers for the Ferry to Manhattan, high tolls, and relative suburbanity (in that order). Third-largest in geographic size but least populous by far with a population 480,000, it is the least dense borough and the only one not connected to the subway (though it has its own local train that uses the same fare system). As a result, Staten Islanders are more likely to own cars than other New Yorkers. Combined with the fact that it stands at a bit of a remove from the rest of the city geographically but is only separated by a narrow channel from New Jersey (specifically Hudson, Union, and Middlesex Counties), this different character has led to occasional grumblings from New Jerseyans that the island should really be part of NJ, and frequent jokes from other New Yorkers that it basically already is. Its four road bridges are tolled at $14-16, rising from time to time.[[note]]Though discounts exist for residents. Take that, everyone else![[/note]] If this article was written two decades ago, Fresh Kills Landfill would've replaced "high tolls" in this entry's first sentence. It's now being turned into a park 3 times the size of Central Park. Incidentally, a ''third'' of Staten Island is protected parkland, including beaches, wildlife refuges, and dense woodlands. Two large hills straddle a ridge spanning most of the island; Todt Hill is the highest natural point along the Eastern Seaboard. Numerous historical sights, some [[UsefulNotes/TheColonialPeriod [[TheColonialPeriod pre-Revolution]], dot the island. Richmondtown in particular is preserved colonial village, a subject of many field trips for New York schoolkids. If you're into urban exploration, the island's brownfield areas have much to offer. The whole island competes with Manhattan's Washington Square for the title of "most reputably haunted place in New York State."\\
27th Dec '16 8:12:54 AM Wkenneth334
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The economic boom of TheNineties was especially kind to New York thanks to its modern transportation and communications infrastructure, and crime dropped hard and fast. The man who is often credited for this, particularly the latter, is Mayor Rudolph "Rudy" Giuliani, a former prosecutor who became famous for his "tough on crime" attitude and for cleaning up Times Square, turning it into the tourist-friendly mecca of neon that it is today. Whether he deserves this credit... well, let's just say it's controversial. Supporters point to his implementation of the [=CompStat=] system to make the NYPD more efficient, as well as his embrace of the "broken windows" theory[[note]]Short explanation -- if you don't fix a window that is broken, then vandals will be tempted to break more windows because no one seems to care, and then they might break into the building, and then squat in it, and then light fires inside... In other words, failing to be "tough on crime" and stop small-time, petty criminals like graffiti artists and turnstile jumpers will allow crime problems to escalate.[[/note]], while detractors point to the nationwide drop in crime during TheNineties, the fact that New York's drop in crime (as well as the cleanup of Times Square) had actually begun under Giuliani's predecessor, David Dinkins (New York's first and only black mayor), allegations of PoliceBrutality, and criticism of the "broken windows" theory. In any event, New York was prospering in a way not seen since the immediate post-war period.

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The economic boom of TheNineties was especially kind to noticeable when looking at New York York's perspective thanks to its modern transportation and communications infrastructure, and as a result, the crime rates had dropped hard and fast. The man who is often credited for this, particularly the latter, is Mayor Rudolph "Rudy" Giuliani, a former prosecutor who became famous for his "tough on crime" attitude and for cleaning up Times Square, turning it into the tourist-friendly mecca of neon that it is today. Whether he deserves this credit... well, let's just say it's controversial. Supporters point to his implementation of the [=CompStat=] system to make the NYPD more efficient, as well as his embrace of the "broken windows" theory[[note]]Short explanation -- if you don't fix a window that is broken, then vandals will be tempted to break more windows because no one seems to care, and then they might break into the building, and then squat in it, and then light fires inside... In other words, failing to be "tough on crime" and stop small-time, petty criminals like graffiti artists and turnstile jumpers will allow crime problems to escalate.[[/note]], while detractors point to the nationwide drop in crime during TheNineties, the fact that New York's drop in crime (as well as the cleanup of Times Square) had actually begun under Giuliani's predecessor, David Dinkins (New York's first and only black mayor), allegations of PoliceBrutality, and criticism of the "broken windows" theory. In any event, New York was prospering in a way not seen since the immediate post-war period.
1st Dec '16 8:05:00 PM Mdumas43073
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The most populous city in the United States, the largest English-speaking city in the world, and home to a massive media industry outclassed in the US only by Hollywood. It is undoubtedly one of the most (possibly ''the'' most) cosmopolitan, ethnically diverse, and culturally influential cities in history. Despite all of these, it's still not the capital of its state. That title would go to Albany.

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The most populous city in the United States, the largest English-speaking city in the world, and home to a massive media industry outclassed in the US U.S. only by Hollywood. It is undoubtedly one of the most (possibly ''the'' most) cosmopolitan, ethnically diverse, and culturally influential cities in history. history (if not ''the'' most). Despite all of these, which, it's still not the capital of its state. That state; that title would go to Albany.
1st Dec '16 8:03:31 PM Mdumas43073
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Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]], UsefulNotes/NewJersey (the oft-mentioned Tri-State area), and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.

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Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]], Connecticut]] and UsefulNotes/NewJersey (the -- hence the oft-mentioned Tri-State area), area -- and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.
1st Dec '16 8:01:53 PM Mdumas43073
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->''"That's incredible. Imagine seven million people all wanting to live together. Yeah, New York must be the friendliest place on Earth!"''\\

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->''"That's incredible. Imagine seven million people all wanting to live together. Yeah, New York must be the friendliest place on Earth!"''\\Earth!"''
1st Dec '16 8:01:35 PM Mdumas43073
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--'''''Film/CrocodileDundee'''''

"New York, New York," the city so nice they named it twice. Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]], UsefulNotes/NewJersey (the oft-mentioned Tri-State area), and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.

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--'''''Film/CrocodileDundee'''''

"New
-->--'''''Film/CrocodileDundee'''''

New
York, New York," York: the city so nice they named it twice. twice.

Officially, the City of New York, within the State of New York (although the greater metro area spills over into [[HollywoodNewEngland Connecticut]], UsefulNotes/NewJersey (the oft-mentioned Tri-State area), and even a county in Pennsylvania[[note]]Several more in PA if you consider the New York-Newark Combined Statistical Area[[/note]]). AKA The Big Apple or The City That Never Sleeps.
24th Oct '16 7:41:56 PM dpisel01
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* '''The Bronx''' (Bronx County): The birthplace of hip-hop, it's also home to a famous zoo and the New York Yankees UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} team, until recently the most successful sports franchise on Earth[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was deposed in 2012 by Manchester United and Real Madrid, two European [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball association football]] teams.[[/note]] and still arguably the most hated. Since TheSixties, it's been the borough most associated with [[TheBigRottenApple urban deprivation]] (a longtime unofficial slogan was [[BrooklynRage "only the strong survive"]]); though it's still the least affluent of the Five Boroughs, it's not nearly as much of a WretchedHive as it once was. Fun piece of trivia: this is the only borough on the US mainland. Manhattan and Staten Island are their own islands, while Brooklyn and Queens are on the [[http://x9f.xanga.com/e031433007134280939779/b211607553.jpg western end of Long Island]].
* '''Brooklyn''' (Kings County): The home of immigrants and, recently, trendy youngsters priced out of Manhattan. Historically, most sections are better known as working-class neighborhoods, though many neighborhoods, especially those close to the East River, are growing increasingly gentrified. It's sometimes called "The Bedroom of New York" because it is the most populous borough--being home to more than 2.5 million people--and while many of its people may work in Manhattan or elsewhere, Brooklyn is where they live and sleep. Fun trivia: before it merged with the rest of New York City in 1898, Brooklyn was its own city and the 3rd largest in the US, as measured in population. In fact, if each borough was considered a city unto itself, Brooklyn would ''still'' be the 3rd largest in the country, behind only UsefulNotes/LosAngeles and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}.

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* '''The Bronx''' (Bronx County): The birthplace of hip-hop, it's also home to a famous zoo and the New York Yankees UsefulNotes/{{baseball}} team, until recently the most successful sports franchise on Earth[[note]]In case you are wondering, it was deposed in 2012 by Manchester United and Real Madrid, two European [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball association football]] teams.[[/note]] and still arguably the most hated. Since TheSixties, it's been the borough most associated with [[TheBigRottenApple urban deprivation]] deprivation]], especially in the South Bronx (a longtime unofficial slogan was [[BrooklynRage "only the strong survive"]]); though it's still the least affluent of the Five Boroughs, it's not nearly as much of a WretchedHive as it once was. Fun piece of trivia: this is the only borough on the US mainland. Manhattan and Staten Island are their own islands, while Brooklyn and Queens are on the [[http://x9f.xanga.com/e031433007134280939779/b211607553.jpg western end of Long Island]].
* '''Brooklyn''' (Kings County): The home of immigrants and, recently, trendy youngsters priced out of Manhattan. Historically, most sections are better known as working-class neighborhoods, though many neighborhoods, especially those close to the East River, are growing increasingly gentrified. It's sometimes called "The Bedroom of New York" because it is the most populous borough--being home to more than 2.5 million people--and while many of its people may work in Manhattan or elsewhere, Brooklyn is where they live and sleep. The borough is also well-known for Brooklyn accents, the most famous subset of the New York accent, its iconic brownstone buildings, and the Brooklyn Bridge, which connects Brooklyn to Lower Manhattan. One popular tourist attraction is Coney Island Amusement Park at the southern end of the borough, which contains the Cyclone, the oldest operating roller coaster in America. Fun trivia: before it merged with the rest of New York City in 1898, Brooklyn was its own city and the 3rd largest in the US, as measured in population. In fact, if each borough was considered a city unto itself, Brooklyn would ''still'' be the 3rd largest in the country, behind only UsefulNotes/LosAngeles and UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}}.
29th Sep '16 6:40:02 PM TheWanderer
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By TheSeventies, the only good thing one could say about New York was that it wasn't ''as'' [[WretchedHive wretched a hive]] as nearby Newark was. The city nearly went bankrupt in 1975 before it was bailed out by a federal loan. The "Son of Sam" SerialKiller was on the loose, terrorizing the city. The middle classes started pouring out into the suburbs, feeling that [[TheBigRottenApple the city was in an irreversible decline]]. The city's DarkestHour -- both figuratively and [[IncrediblyLamePun literally]] -- came at 8:37 PM on July 13, 1977, when a lightning strike at an electrical substation in Westchester County, combined with [[TooDumbToLive gross negligence]] on the part of the Con Edison power company, caused the entire city to lose power for 25 hours -- which meant no air conditioning in the middle of a brutal July HeatWave. The result was an outbreak of looting, vandalism and arson that made national headlines (and gave birth to HipHop -- all those [=DJs=] and [=MCs=] had to get their equipment from ''somewhere'').

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By TheSeventies, the only good thing one could say about New York was that it wasn't ''as'' [[WretchedHive wretched a hive]] as nearby Newark was. The city nearly went bankrupt in 1975 before it was bailed out by a federal loan. The "Son of Sam" SerialKiller was on the loose, terrorizing the city. The middle classes started pouring out into the suburbs, feeling that [[TheBigRottenApple the city was in an irreversible decline]]. The city's DarkestHour -- both figuratively and [[IncrediblyLamePun literally]] -- came at 8:37 PM on July 13, 1977, when a lightning strike at an electrical substation in Westchester County, combined with [[TooDumbToLive gross negligence]] on the part of the Con Edison power company, caused the entire city to lose power for 25 hours -- which meant no air conditioning in the middle of a brutal July HeatWave. The result was an outbreak of looting, vandalism and arson that made national headlines (and gave birth to HipHop -- all those [=DJs=] and [=MCs=] had to get their equipment from ''somewhere'').
headlines.



Giuliani's immediate successor, billionaire businessman and mayor Mike Bloomberg, initially ran for mayor as a member of the Republican party, but after two terms where he was often swimming against the mainstream Republican current, officially changed his designation to independent, and would run the city in ways that borrowed from and infuriated both Republicans and Democrats. Bloomberg continued to preside over an economic boom, and gentrification and real estate development quickly reached into neighborhoods that had been ghettoes just a few years before. Bloomberg wants his main legacy to be fixing New York's schools, and to accomplish this he abolished the bureaucracy of the Board of Education and took direct control over the school system. The result was something of a mixed bag; high school graduation rates skyrocketed during his mayorship, but many other indicators of student achievement remained flat or worsened slightly, and Bloomberg and the teacher's union were quite antagonistic towards each other. The city's crime rate also continued to drop, eventually dipping to levels not seen since the 1950s, although evidence from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_Schoolcraft a police whistle blower]], (later backed by an [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/08/nypd-report-confirms-adri_n_1331613.html internal]] [[http://www.villagevoice.com/2012-03-07/news/the-nypd-tapes-confirmed/ report]] the NYPD conducted) showed that at least some of that was due to manipulation of the statistics. Bloomberg also became known outside the city for policies seen as nanny-state paternalism, including, among other things, his legislation banning trans fats and large sodas and reducing salt in city restaurants, calling on a ban on styrofoam, his presenting a bill to put cigarettes out of sight in stores, and the sting operations that he carried out in other states to catch people who were [[UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics smuggling guns into the city]]. Another controversial decision was to extend New York's term limits for its mayor from two to three terms, which was roundly criticized. It came surprisingly close to backfiring against Bloomberg, as the 2009 election against Bill Thompson, (a long time city official and former president of the Board of Education) was far, far closer than expected, especially given the relative lack of name recognition for Thompson and the '''HUGE''' disparity of the operating budgets for the two campaigns.

In 2012, the city was hit by Hurricane Sandy, which caused severe damage in Staten Island as well as widespread power outages, flooding in the subways and gas shortages. Mayor Bill De Blasio was elected in 2013, and has thus far taken a much more conciliatory tone towards the city's various public workers unions such as teachers, transportation, and sanitation, many of which had clashed with both Bloomberg and Giuliani and been working for years without a contract, which De Blasio has begun settling. In general De Blasio has struck something of a populist note, occasionally saying things such as that in recent years laws and policy have been in favor of the richest New Yorkers rather than all New Yorkers. Perhaps the most debated pledge of De Blasio's thus far is his promise to end the NYPD's controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy, which gave the police the ability to stop and search anyone they suspected of criminal intent. The law has been frequently criticized for disproportionately targeting black and Latino citizens, has run into numerous 4th amendment challenges, (the right against "unreasonable search and seizure") and despite the fact that the law is intended to prevent violent crime, only a miniscule percentage of the searches ever turned up weapons or any other contraband. Many residents feel that the law is a strong deterrent and prevention method, however, and fear a return to the crime rates of the 1970s and 80s with it and other other police protections/policies being relaxed. As of September 2016, that has not happened, and in fact crime statistics indicate that crime has fallen further after a court case took the matter out of the Mayor's hands by ruling that Stop and Frisk was unconstitutional.

to:

Giuliani's immediate successor, billionaire businessman and mayor Mike Bloomberg, initially ran for mayor as a member of the Republican party, but after two terms where he was often swimming against the mainstream Republican current, officially changed his designation to independent, and would run the city in ways that borrowed from and infuriated both Republicans and Democrats. Bloomberg continued to preside over an economic boom, and gentrification and real estate development quickly reached into neighborhoods that had been ghettoes just a few years before. Bloomberg wants his main legacy to be fixing New York's schools, and to accomplish this he abolished the bureaucracy of the Board of Education and took direct control over the school system. The result was something of a mixed bag; high school graduation rates skyrocketed during his mayorship, but many other indicators of student achievement remained flat or worsened slightly, and Bloomberg and the teacher's union were quite antagonistic towards each other. The city's crime rate also continued to drop, eventually dipping to levels not seen since the 1950s, although evidence from [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adrian_Schoolcraft a police whistle blower]], (later backed by an [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/08/nypd-report-confirms-adri_n_1331613.html internal]] [[http://www.villagevoice.com/2012-03-07/news/the-nypd-tapes-confirmed/ report]] the NYPD conducted) showed that at least some of that was due to manipulation of the statistics. Bloomberg also became known outside the city for policies seen as nanny-state paternalism, including, among other things, his legislation banning trans fats and large sodas and reducing salt in city restaurants, calling on a ban on styrofoam, his presenting a bill to put cigarettes out of sight in stores, and the sting operations that he carried out in other states to catch people who were [[UsefulNotes/AmericanGunPolitics smuggling guns into the city]]. Another controversial decision was to extend New York's term limits for its mayor from two to three terms, which was roundly criticized. It came surprisingly close to backfiring against Bloomberg, as the 2009 election against Bill Thompson, (a long time city official and former president of the Board of Education) was far, far closer which Bloomberg had been expected to win easily, wound up being decided by less than expected, 5 percentage points. This was especially surprising given the relative lack of name recognition for Thompson and the '''HUGE''' disparity of in the operating budgets for the two campaigns.

In 2012, the city was hit by Hurricane Sandy, which caused severe damage in Staten Island as well as widespread power outages, flooding in the subways and gas shortages. Mayor Bill De Blasio was elected in 2013, and has thus far taken a much more conciliatory tone towards the city's various public workers unions such as teachers, transportation, and sanitation, many of which had clashed with both Bloomberg and Giuliani and been working for years without a contract, which De Blasio has begun settling. In general De Blasio has struck something of a populist note, occasionally saying things such as that in recent years laws and policy have been in favor of the richest New Yorkers rather than all New Yorkers. Perhaps the most debated pledge of De Blasio's thus far is was his promise to end the NYPD's controversial "Stop and Frisk" policy, which gave the police the ability to stop and search anyone they suspected of criminal intent. The law has been had frequently been criticized for disproportionately targeting black and Latino citizens, has had run into numerous 4th amendment challenges, (the right against "unreasonable search and seizure") and despite the fact that the law is intended to prevent violent crime, only a miniscule minuscule percentage of the searches ever turned up weapons or any other contraband. Many residents feel felt that the law is worked as a strong deterrent and prevention method, however, and fear feared a return to the crime rates of the 1970s and 80s with it and other other police protections/policies being relaxed. As of September 2016, that has not happened, and in fact crime statistics indicate that crime has fallen further after a court case took the city stopped using the tactic. The matter out was somewhat moot by the time that De Blasio assumed office, however, [[http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/13/nyregion/stop-and-frisk-practice-violated-rights-judge-rules.html?_r=0 as a 2013 court ruling]] from the last months of the Mayor's hands by ruling Bloomberg administration had sharply curtailed the powers police had assumed under "Stop and Frisk" and effectively defanged the practice. Even [[https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CtZSLQdWYAAKwCN.jpg the NYPD took a moment to point out the continued fall in crime]] after the end of "Stop and Frisk" when that Stop policy and Frisk was unconstitutional.
New York City's crime rate became a subject of contention during the first Presidential debate of 2016.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.NewYorkCity