History UsefulNotes / NeoPaganism

9th Sep '16 9:54:54 AM Morgenthaler
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->''"[[CulturalPosturing If you leave the Bible out in the wind and rain eventually all of its teachings and lessons wash away. Our Bible IS the wind and rain.]]"''

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->''"[[CulturalPosturing If ->''"If you leave the Bible out in the wind and rain eventually all of its teachings and lessons wash away. Our Bible IS the wind and rain.]]"''"''
9th Sep '16 9:54:41 AM Morgenthaler
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** Naturally, there are many ''Roman'' Polytheistic Reconstructionists as well, who actually go the whole hog and try to reconstruct the culture of TheRomanEmpire as well as reconstructing the Roman gods. They do get a bit offended if you just call their gods the Greek gods with a name change, though. Most live in Italy.

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** Naturally, there are many ''Roman'' Polytheistic Reconstructionists as well, who actually go the whole hog and try to reconstruct the culture of TheRomanEmpire UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire as well as reconstructing the Roman gods. They do get a bit offended if you just call their gods the Greek gods with a name change, though. Most live in Italy.
24th May '16 11:38:15 PM Doug86
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* The largest and most well-known Neo-Pagan group is [[{{UsefulNotes/Wicca}} Wicca]], an orthopraxic, oathbound religion believed by most historians of religion to have founded by Gerald Gardner around 1954, although he claimed to have been part of a secret movement dating to ancient times. Some (but nowhere ''near'' all) Wiccans consider themselves practitioners of witchcraft. Their God and Goddess are separate and unique deities, not aspects of a universal god and goddess as some claim - I.E., the Lady is the Lady, ''not'' Nuith, Athena, etc. Due to their conflicts with Christianity and their use of pentagram symbols, many Wiccans have been accused of Satanism. It should also be pointed out that pretty much any book that claims to teach the reader Wicca is either bunk or is actually teaching something called Eclectic Neopaganism, which is a blanket term for general Neopagan beliefs and practices, but does not actually contain the Mysteries central and vital to practice the orthopraxic religion created by Gardner.

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* The largest and most well-known Neo-Pagan group is [[{{UsefulNotes/Wicca}} Wicca]], UsefulNotes/{{Wicca}}, an orthopraxic, oathbound religion believed by most historians of religion to have founded by Gerald Gardner around 1954, although he claimed to have been part of a secret movement dating to ancient times. Some (but nowhere ''near'' all) Wiccans consider themselves practitioners of witchcraft. Their God and Goddess are separate and unique deities, not aspects of a universal god and goddess as some claim - I.E., the Lady is the Lady, ''not'' Nuith, Athena, etc. Due to their conflicts with Christianity and their use of pentagram symbols, many Wiccans have been accused of Satanism. It should also be pointed out that pretty much any book that claims to teach the reader Wicca is either bunk or is actually teaching something called Eclectic Neopaganism, which is a blanket term for general Neopagan beliefs and practices, but does not actually contain the Mysteries central and vital to practice the orthopraxic religion created by Gardner.



* Ásatrú (ancient Nordic mythology) is based on the old religion of Germanic Northern Europe and is popular in Scandinavia and Germany. They believe in two groups of gods: the Æsir (associated with kingdom, order, and craft), the Vanir (associated with nature and fertility), opposed by the land of giants. The Æsir or Asa gods are the by far most prominent group, with the Vana gods, stemming from even earlier polytheism, being absorbed into their realm. You are probably familiar with many of their deities, such as Odin (king of the gods, god of wisdom and death), Thor (god of thunder and warriors), Frey (nature) and Freya (fertility). The 12th-13th-century Icelandic historian Creator/SnorriSturluson wrote extensively about the mythology in the ''Literature/ProseEdda,'' which made it possible to preserve a wealth of information to the present day.

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* Ásatrú (ancient Nordic mythology) is based on the old religion of Germanic Northern Europe and is popular in Scandinavia and Germany. They believe in two groups of gods: the Æsir [=Æ=]sir (associated with kingdom, order, and craft), the Vanir (associated with nature and fertility), opposed by the land of giants. The Æsir [=Æ=]sir or Asa gods are the by far most prominent group, with the Vana gods, stemming from even earlier polytheism, being absorbed into their realm. You are probably familiar with many of their deities, such as Odin (king of the gods, god of wisdom and death), Thor (god of thunder and warriors), Frey (nature) and Freya (fertility). The 12th-13th-century Icelandic historian Creator/SnorriSturluson wrote extensively about the mythology in the ''Literature/ProseEdda,'' which made it possible to preserve a wealth of information to the present day.
17th May '16 1:25:07 AM Nabi
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** Kemetic Orthodoxy is an organized, officially recognized[[note]]Namely having legal recognition in the United States, including ordained priests who can perform things like marriage ceremonies.[[/note]] take on this, who have their own rituals alongside things taken from antiquity. They are led by Tamara Siuda who acts as the "Nisut" (or pharaoh) and head of the religion.[[note]]As regarded by those who are part of the Kemetic Orthodoxy. Those outside it generally don't recognize or believe her authority.[[/note]]

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** Kemetic Orthodoxy is an organized, officially recognized[[note]]Namely having legal recognition in the United States, including ordained priests who can perform things like marriage ceremonies.[[/note]] take on this, who have their own rituals alongside things taken from antiquity. They are led by Tamara Siuda who acts as the "Nisut" (or pharaoh) and head of the religion.[[note]]As regarded by those who are part of the Kemetic Orthodoxy. Those outside it generally don't recognize or believe her authority.[[/note]][[/note]] Kemetic Orthodoxy also takes some influence from Vodoun and other African traditional religions, such as the throwing of cowrie shells as a form of divination.
17th May '16 1:13:35 AM Nabi
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** Kemetic Orthodoxy is an organized, officially recognized[[note]]That this, having legal recognition in the United States, including ordained priests who can perform things like marriage ceremonies.[[/note]] take on this, who have their own rituals alongside things taken from antiquity. They are led by Tamara Siuda who acts as the "Nisut" (or pharaoh) and head of the religion.[[note]]That is, by those who are part of the Kemetic Orthodoxy. Those outside it generally don't recognize or believe her authority.[[/note]]

to:

** Kemetic Orthodoxy is an organized, officially recognized[[note]]That this, recognized[[note]]Namely having legal recognition in the United States, including ordained priests who can perform things like marriage ceremonies.[[/note]] take on this, who have their own rituals alongside things taken from antiquity. They are led by Tamara Siuda who acts as the "Nisut" (or pharaoh) and head of the religion.[[note]]That is, [[note]]As regarded by those who are part of the Kemetic Orthodoxy. Those outside it generally don't recognize or believe her authority.[[/note]]
17th May '16 1:12:09 AM Nabi
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** Kemetic Orthodoxy is an organized, officially recognized[[note]]That this, having legal recognition in the United States, including ordained priests who can perform things like marriage ceremonies.[[/note]] take on this, who have their own rituals alongside things taken from antiquity. They are led by Tamara Siuda who acts as the "Nisut" (or pharaoh) and head of the religion.[[note]]That is, by those who are part of the Kemetic Orthodoxy. Those outside it generally don't recognize or believe her authority.[[/note]]



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4th May '15 10:21:01 AM nombretomado
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* There are currently many Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionists, who benefit from the relatively vast number of records of ancient Greek religion. Many ancient Greek writings, including those by Plato and Aristotle, are considered to be their sacred texts. They do not have an official name for their religion, although Hellenismos is the most popular. Most of them worship the tradition twelve Olympian gods, along with underworld deities and the heroes of ClassicalMythology. Although they do perform traditional sacrifices, they do not use animals killed for that purpose and sometimes include fruits and vegetables. The Greeks themselves, however, are less partial with them, at best seeing them as "quirky." Though an Orthodox clergyman in Athens once commented on them as "deluded."

to:

* There are currently many Hellenic Polytheistic Reconstructionists, who benefit from the relatively vast number of records of ancient Greek religion. Many ancient Greek writings, including those by Plato and Aristotle, are considered to be their sacred texts. They do not have an official name for their religion, although Hellenismos is the most popular. Most of them worship the tradition twelve Olympian gods, along with underworld deities and the heroes of ClassicalMythology.Myth/ClassicalMythology. Although they do perform traditional sacrifices, they do not use animals killed for that purpose and sometimes include fruits and vegetables. The Greeks themselves, however, are less partial with them, at best seeing them as "quirky." Though an Orthodox clergyman in Athens once commented on them as "deluded."
30th Mar '15 9:48:24 PM nombretomado
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* Kemeticism is the worship of the [[EgyptianMythology ancient Egyptian Gods]] and comes in many forms, largely because there was no single dogma practiced in ancient Egypt. However, many practitioners believe that to truly understand the spiritualism of the ancient Egyptians requires careful study of their various beliefs. Important rules include upholding Ma'at (the divine law), belief in the Supreme Being, ancestor worship, and respect for the community. The system is split on the need of a Pharaoh, one person sent to Earth who is the embodiment of the gods, though most followers have done away with this aspect of Egyptian religion (because having a pharaoh is when it starts to get more scary and cult-like). That said, the number of Kemeticists in Egypt is sufficiently small that you could probably hold a national conference in a motel room. The religion is more popular in Europe and North America, where the most popular deity seems to be Isis.[[note]]It appears that the cult of Isis remained extant long after Egypt and the Roman Empire became predominantly Christian (Egypt was one of the first Roman territories where Christianity really took root). There's just ''something'' about that goddess...[[/note]]

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* Kemeticism is the worship of the [[EgyptianMythology [[Myth/EgyptianMythology ancient Egyptian Gods]] and comes in many forms, largely because there was no single dogma practiced in ancient Egypt. However, many practitioners believe that to truly understand the spiritualism of the ancient Egyptians requires careful study of their various beliefs. Important rules include upholding Ma'at (the divine law), belief in the Supreme Being, ancestor worship, and respect for the community. The system is split on the need of a Pharaoh, one person sent to Earth who is the embodiment of the gods, though most followers have done away with this aspect of Egyptian religion (because having a pharaoh is when it starts to get more scary and cult-like). That said, the number of Kemeticists in Egypt is sufficiently small that you could probably hold a national conference in a motel room. The religion is more popular in Europe and North America, where the most popular deity seems to be Isis.[[note]]It appears that the cult of Isis remained extant long after Egypt and the Roman Empire became predominantly Christian (Egypt was one of the first Roman territories where Christianity really took root). There's just ''something'' about that goddess...[[/note]]
31st Jul '14 9:42:31 PM Surenity
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* In {{UsefulNotes/Armenia}} a neo-pagan sect calling themselves ''hetanos'' (sharing a common root word with the English 'heathen') has been slowly growing since the Soviet Union collapsed and the ban on religion was lifted. Although most Armenians either began following Christianity more freely than before (Armenia ''was'' the earliest country to officially adopt Christianity after all) or continued being atheists, some decided to go completely back to their roots (current estimates are that there's about 200 to 300 of them, in a country of around 3 million, though some go as high as 1,000). Hetanos follow reconstructed ancient Armenian polytheistic traditions, which borrow some from ancient Greek and Zoroastrian traditions but also contain deities uniquely Armenian. Interestingly, the Armenian Apostolic Church is not outspoken against them, choosing to instead be outspoken against the Evangelical and Protestant movements growing in the country. Their base of operations is the Temple of Garni, the only pagan temple not destroyed when Armenia's King Trdat III converted to Christianity in the 300's.

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* In {{UsefulNotes/Armenia}} a neo-pagan sect calling themselves ''hetanos'' (sharing a common root word with the English 'heathen') has been slowly growing since the Soviet Union collapsed and the ban on religion was lifted. Although most Armenians either began following Christianity more freely than before (Armenia ''was'' the earliest country to officially adopt Christianity after all) or continued being atheists, some decided to go completely back to their roots (current estimates are that there's about 200 to 300 of them, in a country of around 3 million, though some go as high as 1,000). The movement was founded by revolutionary Garegin Nzhdeh. Hetanos follow reconstructed ancient Armenian polytheistic traditions, which borrow some from ancient Greek and Zoroastrian traditions but also contain deities uniquely Armenian. Interestingly, the Armenian Apostolic Church is not outspoken against them, choosing to instead be outspoken against the Evangelical and Protestant movements growing in the country. Their base of operations is the Temple of Garni, the only pagan temple not destroyed when Armenia's King Trdat III converted to Christianity in the 300's.
25th Jul '14 9:45:25 PM Surenity
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* In {{UsefulNotes/Armenia}} a neo-pagan sect calling themselves ''hetanos'' (sharing a common root word with the English 'heathen') has been slowly growing since the Soviet Union collapsed and the ban on religion was lifted. Although most Armenians either began following Christianity more freely than before (Armenia ''was'' the earliest country to officially adopt Christianity after all) or continued being atheists, some decided to go completely back to their roots (current estimates are that there's about 200 to 300 of them, in a country of around 3 million, though some go as high as 1,000). Hetanos follow reconstructed ancient Armenian polytheistic traditions, which borrow some from ancient Greek and Zoroastrian traditions but also contain deities uniquely Armenian. Interestingly, the Armenian Apostolic Church is not outspoken against them, choosing to instead be outspoken against the Evangelical and Protestant movements growing in the country. There is even a level of mutual respect between ''some'' hetanos and Apostolic Christians, since both represent integral parts of Armenian heritage and identity.

to:

* In {{UsefulNotes/Armenia}} a neo-pagan sect calling themselves ''hetanos'' (sharing a common root word with the English 'heathen') has been slowly growing since the Soviet Union collapsed and the ban on religion was lifted. Although most Armenians either began following Christianity more freely than before (Armenia ''was'' the earliest country to officially adopt Christianity after all) or continued being atheists, some decided to go completely back to their roots (current estimates are that there's about 200 to 300 of them, in a country of around 3 million, though some go as high as 1,000). Hetanos follow reconstructed ancient Armenian polytheistic traditions, which borrow some from ancient Greek and Zoroastrian traditions but also contain deities uniquely Armenian. Interestingly, the Armenian Apostolic Church is not outspoken against them, choosing to instead be outspoken against the Evangelical and Protestant movements growing in the country. There Their base of operations is even a level the Temple of mutual respect between ''some'' hetanos and Apostolic Christians, since both represent integral parts of Armenian heritage and identity.Garni, the only pagan temple not destroyed when Armenia's King Trdat III converted to Christianity in the 300's.
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